CONTAINS

Sun 261-270 Series
 
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Carl Perkins
"MATCH BOX" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 231
Recorded: - December 4, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 23, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 261-A mono
MATCHBOX / YOUR TRUE LOVE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums
Jerry Lee Lewis - Piano

According to Carl's biography, it was his father Buck who suggested (at the recording studio just after ''Your True Love'' had been completed) that the band do this 1927 Blind Lemon Jefferson song of which Buck remembered only the chorus (about wondering ''would a matchbox hold my clothes''). So Carl cobbled together a few other stock blues verses and thus was one of Carl's greatest records born. What Carl recorded contains two additional verses with lyrics that appear on most Top Ten lists of blues cliches (e.g., ''Let me be your little dog...''). Indeed, wondering whether a matchbox will hold your clothes goes back at least to Ma Raney's l 924 record of ''Lost Wandering Blues''. Songs resembling Lemon Jefferson's and using something like his record's title (''Match Box Blues'') got recorded many times in the 1930s and 1940s, both by black blues and white country singers. Carl was part of a long tradition when he recorded ''Matchbox''. Its a tradition that has continued since Carl's record, including versions by the Beatles, Sleepy LaBeef and Warren Phillips & The Rockets.

In a way, it's disappointing that Perkins did not learn the song directly from the old 1927 Blind Lemon Peterson record. It's fun to picture Carl sitting alone in the wee hours, playing an old Paramount 78, transcribing lyrics on a potato sack. But it just didn't happen that way.

This songs recording date, listed as December 4, 1956, was Carl's first experience with the young session pianist Jerry Lee Lewis impressed Carl as cocky and arrogant, a point of view borne out by Jerry Lee's performance on the one alternate take present here. His piano-styling intends more to be attention -grabbing and showy than to fit into a Carl Perkins record. And so there are numerous glissandos, gratuitous high-key doodling, and ''Hey listen to me!'' moments. Sadly, one of thorn occurs when he gets lost in the harmonic complexities of a 3-chord 12-bar blues in the chorus between the two guitar solos. Somehow. Carl and company tamed Jerry between takes - to our everlasting benefit.

The Beatles recorded "Matchbox" which was no more from Perkins' pen than it was from Lennon and McCartney's. However, they attributed the song to Perkins  because they had learned it from his "Dance Album". Thus, Perkins began receiving astronomically high airplay and publishing royalties from a song that had been a thrwaway flipside to perhaps his least creditable Sun single. In view of the sums of money at stake, it is surprising that no-one was slimy enough to contact the surviving relatives of Blind Lemon Jefferson who had recorded "Matchbox Blues" back in October 1927, thereby creating a protracted and messy court battle. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Carl Perkins
"YOUR TRUE LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 235
Recorded: - December 4, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 23, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 261-B mono
YOUR TRUE LOVE / MATCHBOX
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums
Jerry Lee Lewis - Piano

The tale of "Your True Love" being speeded up for release has often been told. Whether teens were fooled by the Chipmunk-sounding 'youthful' chorus is hard to tell. The record did sell in sufficient quantities for Perkins and Sam Phillips to see crossover potential lying within their grasp. However, this was Perkins' last serious flirtation with the pop charts. To their credit, Sun did not follow the Fats Domino model and release a neverending series of speeded up singles in order to attract the teen market. If it had been more successful, though, they might have.

"You True Love" climbed to number 67 on the pop charts before running out of steam. Ironically, it was the flip side that would reap the big pay-off, albeit ten years later. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Ernie Chaffin
"FEELIN' LOW" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 227
Recorded: - December 10, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 23, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 262-A mono
FEELIN' LOW / LONESOME FOR MY BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal and Guitar
Murphy "Pee Wee" Muddux - Acoustic Guitar
Ernie Harvey - Steel Guitar
Leo Ladner - Bass

Chaffin began his Sun recording career with a standout performance. The instrumental intro establishes the 1-6 minor chord sequence, although the song actually begins on the 50chord. From there it shuttles back and forth between 1 and 5 until Ernie hits the powerful line ''Might as well...'' and the chords run from 1 to 4 behind him. The title phrase is anticipated by a descent into the 6 minor, giving the song its catchy, almost cowboy-like sound. Billboard described ''Feelin' Low'' as folky and noted that Chaffin's voice possessed an ''Elvisy'' character. Interestingly, Ernie Harvey's steel solos almost always focus conventional swelling chords. Apparently, the song garnered some unexpected pop interest in the north east states but, for whatever reason, Sun failed to capitalise on it. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Ernie Chaffin
"LONESOME FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 228
Recorded: - December 10, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 23, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 262-B mono
LONESOME FOR MY BABY / FEELIN' LOW
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal and Guitar
Murphy "Pee Wee" Muddux - Acoustic Guitar
Ernie Harvey - Steel Guitar
Leo Ladner - Bass

In this song, Chaffin first established the use of the flatted 7-chord in his material. We don't have to wait too long for it. ''Pretty girls all around'' and we've slipped from A to G. The song features a repeated 1-5, 1-5 musical riff throughout that serves a every bit as much of a hook as the title phrase. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Sonny Burgess
"RESTLESS" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Mitt C. Addington
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 238
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/57
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 24, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 263-A mono
RESTLESS / AIN'T GOT A THING
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
Joe Lewis - Guitar
Johnny Ray Hubberd - Bass
Russell Smith - Drums
Ray Kern Kennedy - Piano
Jack Nance - Trumpet
Band Chorus

"Restless" was Sonny Burgess his first stab at a balled. The lyrics were written by Mitt Addington, a consulting pyschologist in Memphis who had demo'd a number of songs at Sun over the years - and even had two cut by Big Memphis Marainey, and another by RCA artist Wade Ray. Jack Clement handed Sonny a little sheet of paper with Addington's lyrics, and Sonny Burgess set them to music, for which he thought he would receive a fifty percent share of the song, a share that never materialised. The record died on the vines, and Burgess was disappointed - but there was worse in store.

Perhaps there was even greater sales potential on the lilting flipside "Restless". Sonny Burgess' whistling, the subdued and effective male chorus, and a rolling tempo might have made for big crossover sales, but nothing materialized. Burgess would take two more shots at fame and fortune on the Sun label, but this defeat was dispiriting for everyone involved. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Sonny Burgess
"AIN'T GOT A THING" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Jack H. Clement-Sonny A. Burgess
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 239
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/57
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 24, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 263-B mono
AIN'T GOT A THING / RESTLESS
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
Joe Lewis - Guitar
Johnny Ray Hubberd - Bass
Russell Smith - Drums
Ray Kern Kennedy - Piano
Jack Nance - Trumpet
Band Chorus

Sonny Burgess still rocked on "Ain't Got A Thing", although not at the frenetic pace of his previous outing. In addition, the track featured a clever, not to mention intelligible lyric. The key modelation during the instrumental break lets Burgess soar during the final verse.

Sonny Burgess believed that his second record, "Ain't Got A Thing", would break through. The lyrics had the anarchic throwaway humor of Chuck Berry and Louis Jordan: "I got a check, but it won't cash. I hot a woman, ain't got no class". It was catchy and melodic, featuring a nicely worked up modulation during the break, but all to no avail. Sonny Burgess later thought it might have flopped because it was a little too fast for dancing(HD)(MH)
Glenn Honeycutt
"I'LL BE AROUND" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 240
Recorded: - December 28, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 24, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 264-A mono
I'LL BE AROUND / I'LL WAIT FOREVER
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Glenn Honeycutt - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

In some ways, this is one of the strangest Sun Records ever. Not strange bad like Winnie The Parakeet, but strangely unexpected. After nearly six months of demoing rockers in the Sun studio, Glenn Honeycutt marched on this day and recorded two ballads. Both bear the unmistakable stamp of the Presley ballad style. In that way, they are standard Memphis fare for the day and time. What makes the record curious is that both sides feature slow songs. A two-sided mellow record, Memphis style circa 1956. Because his style is molded so closely on Elvis Presley's, Honeycutt brings an undeniable gospel sound, or what Billboard called "a touch of sacred feeling" to the proceedings. (HD)
Glenn Honeycutt
"I'LL WAIT FOREVER" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 241
Recorded: - December 28, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 24, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 264-B mono
I'LL WAIT FOREVER / I'LL BE AROUND
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Glenn Honeycutt - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

"I'll Wait Forever" is actually a very powerful song. Honeycutt is aided by female voices that remained anonymous for many years, until a mid-1980s interview with the Millers' career, Sam Phillips used them as studio singers twice. Their impressive efforts with Cast King on country gospel material sadly remained unissued until Bear Family's Sun Country Box (BFX 15211). Their work here is the only issued sample of their backup style. Honeycutt returned to the Sun studio once more in early 1958, but this remains his only Sun release. (HD)
Roy Orbison & The Roses
"SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips-Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 423
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 24, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 265-A mono
SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE / DEVIL DOLL
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15082-3-23 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Unknown - Bass
The Roses, Vocal Chorus
Consisting of Robert Linville, Tenor;
Ray Rush, Baritone; David Bigham, Bass

Roy Orbison sought to rectify that problem when he returned to the studio to cut his third Sun single, "Sweet And Easy To Love", backed with "Devil Doll". Taking his cue from Elvis Presley and The Jordanaires, Orbison had brought a vocal group, the Roses, in from Odessa, Texas for the session. The group consisting of Robert Linville, tenor; Ray Rush, baritone; and David Bigham, bass. They performed at high school dances, community events and on local television. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Roy Orbison & The Roses
"DEVIL DOLL" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips-Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 424
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 24, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 265-B mono
DEVIL DOLL / SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-3-24 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Unknown - Bass
The Roses, Vocal Chorus
Consisting of Robert Linville, Tenor;
Ray Rush, Baritone; David Bigham, Bass

The midpaced ballad "Devil Doll" allowed Orbison's true musical soul to come up for air for the first time. By this point, Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings had parted company and Roy was working with session musicians and Sun's new engineer, Jack Clement.

During the rehearsals for "Devil Doll" and "Sweet And Easy", Roy Orbison split with the Teen Kings. "It happened right in the studio", recalled Sam Phillips. "They had some difficulty among themselves, and the band broke up then and there. Really it was nothing more than their being extremely young" "We had a commenwealth drawn up", assert James Morrow, "in which the royalties would be split equally five ways. At first the group was to be called 'The Teen Kings', but Sam Phillips and Bob Neal wanted it as 'Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings'. Bob also did not want an equal five-way split of royalties, and evidently Roy didn't want it either. We hand't actually signed anything, and that was where the disagreement arose. Jack, Billy Pat, Peanuts, and I went back to West Texas and formed another group for a few months". (MH)(HD)(CE)
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"DON'T MAKE ME GO" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 244
Recorded: - April 4, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 266-A mono
DON'T MAKE ME GO / NEXT IN LINE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal, Guitar and Percussion Effect
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
Jack Clement - Guitar
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums

There are not many tapes left intact that contained every take of a particular song but this is the case with "Don't Make Me Go", recorded in April 1957 and issued as a single later that month. It is interesting to note that none of these outtakes are like the released version, which featured some simple acoustic guitar work and a second guitar playing single note runs. Jimmy Van Eaton was also on hand and appears on some of these outtakes although they were destined to remain in the vaults. There are a number of false starts and incomplete versions witch seem to prove that this was not an easy song for them to put down on tape.

On the master here of  "Don't Make Me Go", Cash offers a beautiful acoustic guitar-led balled which, again, was a departure from his established style. The marketplace continued to be impressed with Cash's work, although the heights reached by "I Walk The Line" remained elusive. (HD)
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"NEXT IN LINE" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 245
Recorded: - April 4, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 266-B mono
NEXT IN LINE / DON'T MAKE ME GO
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-2 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal, Guitar and Percussion Effect
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
Jack Clement - Guitar
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums

Powerful as it is, this is one of Johnny Cash's least typical Sun records. Neither side features the classic oom-chicka-boom sound. "Next In Line" comes close, but the open acoustic guitar sound is quite different from the purely percussive style heard on "I Walk The Line" or "Train Of Love".

Billboard was also impressed with this outing, calling "Nest In Line" a "dirge-like theme with haunting guitar backing" and its flipside "another plaintive tune with hypnotic beat". They noted, accurately, that Cash delivered both sides with "sincerity and heart", characteristics that would remain intact for most of his Sun output. (HD)
Jerry Lee Lewis
"WHOLE LOT OF SHAKIN' GOING ON" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Dave "Curly" Williams-Sunny David (aka Roy Hall)
Publisher: - Marlyn Music - Robert Mellin Music
Matrix number: - U 247
Recorded: - February 5, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 267-A mono
WHOLE LOT OF SHAKIN' GOING ON / IT'LL BE ME
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-4 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Janes M. Van Eaton – Drums

Rockabilly pianist Roy Hall, who, under the pseudonym of Sunny David, wrote ''Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On'' with black musician Dave Williams, also recorded his own version, before Lewis inspired a generation of teens by injecting the song with his inimitable brand of boogie-woogie, country, gospel and rhythm and blues-infused hellfire. Released in May 1957, the single rose to number eight in the United Kingdom, reached number three on what was then known as the Billboard Top 100, and became an rhythm and blues and country chart-topper. In the process, it launched the career of the piano-pounding, rocket-fuelled wildman whose manic, overtly sexual live performances provoked parental nightmares. As it happens, the self-described ''Killer'' only enjoyed four Top 20 hits before the scandal of his marriage to a 13-year-old cousin brought the successes to a screeching halt. Yet, courtesy of a wide-ranging career that has now spanned seven decades and comprised an impressive body of work, Lewis’s legend has remained intact, and the tale of how he first came to prominence is, like the man himself, quite unique.

After four recordings, disc jockey Johnny Littlefield received Roy Hall's latest Decca release in the mail in the fall of 1955. He immediately began playing the record in the air. He also began singing the song in his nightclub, the Wagon Wheel also called the Music Box in some sources). One of the members of his house band was piano player Jerry Lee Lewis. Reportedly, Lewis began begged Littlefield to allow him to sing the song in the club. Lewis has said that he first remembers hearing "Big Mama Thornton's recording of "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" sometime in 1955. Obviously, Lewis meant Big Maybelle, not Willie Mae Thornton. In any case, Jerry Lee Lewis incorporated "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" into his act. On April 15, 1957, Jerry Lee Lewis appeared "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On" on the Steve Allen show.

Jerry Lee didn't write many songs but he sure did breathe new life into virtually everything he performed. "Whole Lotta Shakin'" is a case in point. Listen to earlier versions of the song by Roy Hall or blues shouter Big Maybelle. What Jerry Lee has brought to this massive hit is truly worthy of composer credit.

Note: Later releases gave the title of the Jerry Lee Lewis hit as ''Whole Lotta Shakin''', but the label of the original release read ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On''. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Jerry Lee Lewis
"IT'LL BE ME" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 246
Recorded: - February 5, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 267-B mono
IT'LL BE ME / WHOLE LOT OF SHAKIN' GOING ON
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Janes M. Van Eaton – Drums

On the single's release, Sam Phillips had higher hopes for the other side, "It'll Be Me", a song that Jack Clement had concocted on the toilet while contemplating the possibility of reincarnation. Before recording, the line, "If you see a turd in your toilet bowl, baby, it'll be me and I'll be starin' at you" had become "If you find a lump in your sugar bowl"; sex may have been in, but scatology was definitely out. Released in mid-March, the record wasn't fully promoted until Jerry returned from the tour in May, and by that time, Sam Phillips had ascertained that "Shakin'" was the side to watch. With Dewey Phillips behind it, "Shakin'" was sitting atop the local charts in Memphis, and on June 12 it entered the national country charts. Two weeks later, it entered the Hot 100 at number 70.

Clement hit the big time by placing his composition on this flipside of Jerry Lee's second single. "It'll Be Me" is rockabilly's ode to reincarnation. A comparison with other known takes of this song reveals just how different and truly unusual the arrangement of the issued version is. All it took was a life performance during the summer of 1957 on Steve Allen's network TV show, and the Killer's career was up and running. In Billboard's words, "This platter by Lewis is taking off like wildfire". (MH)(HD)(CE)
Warren Smith
"SO LONG I'M GONE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Roy Orbison-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 248
Recorded: - Unknown Date January/February 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 268-A mono
SO LONG I'M GONE / MISS FROGGIE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-5 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Al Hopson - Guitar
Marcus Van Story - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Roland Janes - Guitar
Wil Hopson - Bass

This breezy mid-tempo rocker provided Warren Smith with his only Hot 100 entry. It was neat synthesis of the pounding rockers and restrained country ballads that had represented the two extremes of Smith's recording career to that point. This is short, deftly executed and profoundly catchy which probably accounted for its success. 

The ragged instrumental work had been tightened up and Smith's vocal is supremely confident. This song also gave Roy Orbison his first chart entry as a songwriter. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Warren Smith
"MISS FROGGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Warren Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 249
Recorded: - February 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 268-B mono
MISS FROGGIE / SO LONG I'M GONE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-6 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Al Hopson - Guitar
Marcus Van Story - Bass
Jimmy Lott - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Wil Hopson - Bass

This was the B-side of Warren Smith's only Hot 100 entry but the generations of rockabilly fans it was the A-side to end all A-sides. To the question what is rockabilly? this is the answer. Smith could sing uptempo numbers such as this without coarsening his voice or screaming. His deftly controlled excitement is matched note-for-note by Al Hopson's dazzling guitar and Jimmy Lott's drumming. Hopson's solos are truly lightning in a bottle. The man was possessed on the day he cut this side. The group concocted the song while driving back from Dallas one night, although Smith took sole composer credit. Both Hopson and Lott were on sparkling form. ''I always had problems playing the shuffle that Johnny Bernero used on ''Rock And Roll Ruby'', Lott told Colin Escott, ''and my drumming on ''Miss Froggie'' was almost unsyncopated. The inspiration for my playing was Al's guitar. The kick-off was unbelievable. It could have put Bo Diddley out of business''. One can trace the lyrics back to a clutch of blues standards but, in the final analysis, it doesn't matter because Smith and his group had come up with something stunningly original that is an entire dimension beyond its roots and head and shoulders above its derivatives. Classic then, classic now. (MH)(HD)(CE)
Wade and Dick – The College Kids
"BOP BOP BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 250
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 269-A mono
BOP BOP BABY / DON'T NEED YOUR LOVIN' BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-7 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wade Moore - Vocal
Dick Penner - Vocal and Guitar
Don Gilliland - Bass
Bob Izer - Guitar
Probably Roger Berkely – Drums

If Wade Moore and Dick Penner are remembered by Sun fans, it will not be for this recording. The Collage Kids primarily remembered for writing the immortal "Ooby Dooby", brought to fame on Roy Orbison's first Sun record.

As vocalists, the duo offer an appealing blend, although Dick Penner's high voice predominates and works against the sterotyped virile Sun style. In fact, both sides of this recording have a minor key sound not typically associated with Sun artists. North Texas State University in Denton was their seat of learning and part of their daily routine was to lie in the sun on the frat house roof and write songs for sun.. This  session was taped during the Yuletide vacation of 1956

"Bop Bop Baby" lives up to its name with a solid stop-rhythm and excellent instrumental work. The side is unusual in that it flirts with being in a minor key throughout. Minor key rockers were uncommon on Sun's or anyone release schedule. The guitar work on the first solo is sparkling and nicely complemented by the electric bass. The second solo forsake minor key magic and borrows liberally from the melody line of "Roll Over Beethoven". (HD)
Wade and Dick – The College Kids
"DON'T NEED YOUR LOVIN' BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 251
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 269-B mono
DON'T NEED YOUR LOVIN' BABY / BOP BOP BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-8 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wade Moore - Vocal
Dick Penner - Vocal and Guitar
Don Gilliland - Bass
Bob Izer - Guitar
Probably Roger Berkely – Drums

The flipside "Don't Need Your Lovin' Baby" is really a solo vehicle for Dick Penner. The guitar work has a distinctive oriental flavor to it, yet it rocks in a solid bluesy groove. Again, there are enough flatted thirds to keep the song;s key signature ambiguous. What is quite clear here is the marvellous interplay between the lead guitar and an unidentified drummer. Not since Jerry Lee and Jimmy Van Eaton, has such rapport been heard on a Sun record. Billboard was also impressed and touted this "wailing minor blues" in its May 27, 1957 review.

Although Dick Penner was back in the Sun studio two months later as a solo act, this is Wade and Dick's only appearance on this session. (HD)
Jimmy Williams
"PLEASE DON'T CRY OVER ME" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Jimmy Williams
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 236
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably July 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 270-A mono
PLEASE DON'T CRY OVER ME / THAT DEPENDS ON YOU
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-9 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Williams - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Bill Riley - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For some reason Jimmy Williams has never grabbed his share of mythic status given most minor Sun artists. Perhaps the vocal gimmick on "Please Don't Cry Over Me" was enough to alienate most Sun fans, who wanted a bit more bite to their music. But that doesn't explain why the flipside hasn't become more of a collectable item. (HD)(MH)
Jimmy Williams
"THAT DEPENDS ON YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Jimmy Williams
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 237
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably July 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 270-B mono
THAT DEPENDS ON YOU / PLEASE DON'T CRY OVER ME
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-10 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Williams - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Bill Riley - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

"That Depends On You" offers a lot to love. The song is bluesy and surprisingly melodic, despite its conventional 12-bar structure. A deeper look at the melody reveals that Williams has borrowed liberally from "I Almost Lost My Mind", marking the second time Ivory Joe Hunter's classic has been co-opted by a Sun artist. The first was Walter Horton's instrumental gem, "Easy". Jimmy Williams voice may be thinner than most rockabillies, but there is an undeniable tension and broodiness to this side that might have won Williams more fans, if not commercial success.

Quite apart from the vocal, the instrumental work on this quiet; understated side is to kill for. Roland Janes' guitar and J.M. Van Eaton's drumming are thoroughly engaging, even in their minimal roles. In fact, the Little Green Men turned a throwaway B-side into an undiscovered Sun treasure.  (HD)(MH)

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