CONTAINS
 
1950 MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE SESSIONS 2
July 1 to December 31, 1950
 

Studio Session for B.B. King, July 1950 / Modern Records
Studio Session for Slim Rhodes, Unknown Date 1948/1949
Studio Session for Slim Rhodes, July 1950 / Gilt-Edge Records
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis, July 27, 1950 / The Phillips
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis, November 27, 1950 / Modern Records
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis, December 1950 / Modern Records
Studio Session for Slim Rhodes, December 1950 / Gilt-Edge Records

For Biographies of Artists (See: The Sun Biographies)
Most Sun tracks can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < click

1950

In early July Jules Bihari let Sam Phillips know that he and his brother would be coming to Memphis in a couple of weeks to record a promising new prospect they had recently met, a young disc jockey on the colored station, WDIA, who called himself Bee Bee King, Sam had undoubtedly heard of him. Through the station he had put out a couple of records the previous year on the Bullet label in Nashville, the production manager, Don Kern, had given them copies, and while they weren't really anything to write home about, the boy seemed to have enough local popularity to warrant putting out another record. What they would do, Saul said, was work out a deal with Sam where they could use his studio, maybe for a small fee, or some kind of modest royalty. There was no hesitation on Sam's part. King's blues were not exactly what he had in mind to record, they were too conventional, too predictable, too much along the lines of what every other popular blues shouter of the day was inclined to do. But none of that meant anything. It was a door opening.

MODERN RECORDS NUMEROLOGY - a short guide on dating Modern recordings and releases.

Mike Rowe used the term numerology for his long-running feature in Blues Unlimited dealing with post war blues discographical matters, including various numbering and recording conundrums. In the same spirit, here is an attempt to explain how the Modern Records Group mastering system worked and to what extent it can be used to identify either the recording or release date of a particular performance. But first, a disclaimer is in order.

This is more of a science than a black art, although some of the latter is needed from time to time, given the disappearance of vital documents over the years and the fact that the information they contained was, at times, self-contradictory or misleading!

To begin with Modern, like many small independent labels, didn't specifically discriminate between master numbers and release numbers. They tried to make do with one series with -A and -B suffices distinguishing one side of a record from another.

If necessary, such as when a recording was released more than once, a suffix was added to the master number to distinguish it from a release number. This led to complications during the 100 series of releases and, after a few false starts, a proper master series was set up using an MM prefix that was independent of the record release number. The main master series commenced in February 1946 at MM200 and was used for both the Modern 500 series and the RPM label until the end of their runs. Other contemporary Modern group labels such as Flair and Crown used their own systems, and later labels such as Kent reverted to the -A and -B suffix system for reasons explained below.

Starting in early 1946, performances recorded on acetate by Modern artists under the Bihari brothers' (who owned Modern) supervision were allocated MM prefix master numbers generally at the time of recording. Recordings done elsewhere and then bought-in by Modern such as those from Bill Ouinn's Gold Star, Herb Rippa's Blue Bonnet or Bernie Besman's labels tended to keep the master number from their original recordings. Those that were allocated MM numbers at their time of recording can thus be dated quite accurately based on the dates written or sometimes stamped on the original acetate. Moreover, in a particular session, the take chosen as the one to be used for release of a given song was reproduced as a suffix to the master number and appeared on the released disc. Thus, for example, we know that ''Milky White Way'' by the Floyd Dixon Trio was recorded on 19 October 1949, and that take 3 was used for the master that was released as Modern 724. This system worked well until tape came along... With the advent of magnetic tape recording, the output of a session was now typically a reel or two of tape rather than acetates. The real time allocation of master and take numbers and laborious transcription of these on to the acetates was now no longer strictly necessary as the tape contained all the output of the session, in chronological order, and, in contrast to acetates, could be played over and over again. Professional studios that were available for hire and always had a resident engineer continued to document the tape boxes with the same degree of precision, as they would have marked up acetates. Thus sessions recorded, for example, at Universal Recorders, Radio Recorders and at Capitol Studios in Hollywood would have full information on the tape box label. Takes and their status (e.g. incomplete take, hold or master) together with date of recording would thus be preserved. However, when smaller independent labels did their own recordings, that discipline tended to disappear. An engineer didn't need to be closely involved in each and every take and the owners, such as the Bihari brothers, could operate the tape machine themselves. Under these circumstances the temptation to reduce the tape box information to a quick scrawl of the artist's name on the box together with a few tentative titles tended to become the usual method of operation. Allocation of master numbers and take identification was left as a later task.

These developments led to the situation where it became the practice to allocate 'master' numbers only when a couple of performances were chosen for release on a given disc. The next two free numbers in the 'master' series were taken and these were allocated to the particular release, irrespective of the session that gave rise to the recording. Thus the MM series became more of a control number series for lacquers and metalwork, rather than relating to the date of recording. However, since they were allocated more or less consecutively, they are still very valuable for dating a disc, but now they relate to the date of mastering/release rather than the recording date. Like most systems that undergo substantial change, there was a cut over period at Modern, during the 1951/52 time frame. In general, acetate was in use below about MM1700 and thus those numbers bear a general relationship to recording date. This is not a hard and fast rule and there are some anomalies, as we shall see. By contrast, those above MM1800 are control numbers and are closely related to record release dates. Because of this fact, above MM1800, with very few exceptions, the control numbers were used on released records, right through to the last one in the series - MM3188 - ''Can't Keep From Loving You'' by Van Robinson on Modern 1028 in December 1957. Thus unlike the session-by-session system, unreleased recordings in the later system were never allocated a number. As a consequence, later releases almost always used the next two numbers in the series. As the some distinction could be gained by reverting to the use of -A / -B or -1/-2 suffixes to the record release number, that is exactly what was done for the later Modern 1000 series and other labels such as Kent. In fact it became the general industry practice by the mid-60s.

So it's all quite clear then as to how to date Modern releases - provided that the recording didn't come along in the muddy changeover period from acetate to tape, the MM number gives a good guide to either the recording or the release date, doesn't it? Well not quite! The system worked well enough provided that the artist was recording at home rather than away. When recordings were done on the road or in a remote studio such as Memphis Recording And Sound Service at 706 Union in Memphis, there were basically four choices for master numbering that could be used. They were:

a) allocate a block of numbers before travel (thus making them appear slightly early in the chronological sequence)

b) allocate a block of numbers after travel (making them appear slightly later in the chronological sequence)

c) allocate the numbers at the time of remote recording (running the risk of duplicated master numbers which, in Modern's case, occurred on a number of occasions)

d) wait until a particular recording was about to be issued and then allocate a master number (this was effectively a forerunner of the control system and also meant that there was no clear method of identifying the individual takes involved)

Based on Modem archive research, it looks as if all four methods were utilized and that at least methods b) and d) above were used for B.B. King. For the first three RPM releases that were recorded at 706 Union, method d) was certainly used. The master numbers were allocated when the corresponding RPM singles were being readied for release. From the first session, cuts far ''Mistreated Woman'' (MM1404) are to be found on the same physical acetate as ones for ''The Other Night Blues'' (MM1438). Likewise, takes of ''Walkin' And Cryin" (MM1439) are on the same acetate as those of ''B.B. Boogie'' (MM1405), so all these four numbers can reasonably be traced to the same session in the middle of 1950. B.B. King researchers have put this as July 1950 although it's interesting to note that cuts of the unissued ''Gospel Travelers 'I've Been Changed'' appear at the end of the ''The Other Night Blues'' acetate and the excellent Gospel Records Discography by Cedric Hayes and Bob Laughton date their Modern recordings as June 1950. For the second session we again have cross-coupling acetate evidence that the performances used on RPM 318 were recorded at the same session as ''B.B. Blues'' (MM1489) and ''Fine Lookin' Woman'' (MM1491) and this has been estimated to be on or close to 8 January 1951. Master numbers were allocated for RPM 318's release, but, by contrast, the other recordings from this session were assigned the consecutive numbers MM1488-91

(method b).

In each case, the master numbers were subsequently handwritten on the typed Memphis Recording And Sound Service labels (see illustrations). For the third session, the sides used on RPM 330 seem to have been allocated their numbers on return from Memphis (method b) along with 'Pray For You' and the incomplete 'Darling I Love You'. This session has been traced from Memphis paperwork to be on or about 18 June 1951. By the Own 'Three O'Clock Blues' needed a master number the next available was MM1682, immediately after the numbers used for a Roy Hawkins session recorded on 14 September 1951. This fits in with the YMCA session being in September 1951. Using method d) again, the follow-up single to 'Three O'Clock Blues' needed just one'sew' master number. 'Fine Lookin' Woman' had already been allocated MM1491 from the second 706 Union session, so the next free (MM1752) appears to have been allocated to 'She Don't Move Me No More'. This is why the master number is somewhat adrift from the other YMCA session recordings.

- by Peter Gibbon, January 2002

COMPILER'S NOTE - The complete surviving recordings by B.B. King cut by The Memphis Recording Service in Memphis for Modern Records in 1950 and 1951, apart from two run-throughs of "You Know I Love You" (titled "Darlin' I Love You"). one of these is complete, but tentative to say the least, while the other is a 1 minute fragment at a different tempo. Neither could be described as finished performances, and so are not worth issuing.

Although there are occasional fluffed lines and other mistakes on some of the tracks, particularly on the previously unissued takes, the performances exude a confidence and a panache that overcomes what are relatively minor flaws. We have included the previously unissued incomplete Take 1 of "B.B. Blues". This terminates prematurely because of a technical fault, which is a shame as it was really cooking. I felt that its 2'11" span was well worth inclusion.

THE ACETATES – FACT AND SPECULATION - In column 2 in the chart below I have allocated a number to each session. Also for convenience I have allocated a number to each of the acetates within each session. As we have no way of knowing in what order the acetates were recorded on, I have allocated numbers to each acetate pretty much at random. So I have allocated 1.1 to the acetate with ''Walkin' And Cryin'' b/w ''B.B. Boogie'', but could equally have allocated 1.2 to this disc. The number after the ' - ' indicates side. Again most of these are allocated at random, however because of the overlap on discs 1.2 & 2.2 we can assume that these correctly document the recording sequence, making the assumption that multiple takes of one song were recorded in sequence.

At least two of these acetates have not survived the ravages of time and Modern Records' owner Jules Bihari. When Ray Topping and Ted Carroll were copying acetates in Los Angeles in the early 80s, the irascible Jules removed some acetates before they had been transferred. However Ray had already made some annotations and from those notes we can say that there was a third acetate from the session cut at Memphis Recording and Sound Service. I have listed it as Take 3 here and it apparently contained two takes of ''Don't You Want A Man Like Me'' and one of ''My Baby's Gone''. It seems likely that one of the takes of ''Don't You Want A Man Like Me'' is the master, though which one we do not know (hence the query as to which take was the issued one). We have sourced the track for this package from a 78 disc dub. One could speculate that there were further cuts on this acetate or that it was the last thing recorded on the session and so there was some dead land left on it. It is possible that 'Shake It Up And Go' and maybe even another take of 'My Baby's Gone' were on this acetate. We may never know as we do not have this disc from this second MR&SS session. If anyone knows differently, don't hesitate to get in touch.

Ray also noted that Jules removed a disc with two cuts of ''She's Dynamite''. However from the annotation 'more highs on second cut', it would be fair to assume that these were mastering cuts of the same take with different eqs, and not two versions of the song. The original disc for this session is missing, but given the anecdotal evidence it would be safe to assume that it was a one song session, though there is a possibility that ''Shake It Up And Go'' was cut with it, rather than on the second session. According to Joe Bihari (co-owner of Modern), B.B.'s version of ''She's Dynamite'' (cut on 27 May 1951) was in response to the Tampa Red recording which was cut on 27 April 1951. The matrix number 1563 was allocated on release shortly after it was recorded.

As you might have gathered by now, the mystery track is ''Shake It Up And Go'', which was logged in Leslie Fancourt's B.B. King discography as part of the Tuff Green session in early 1952. However the other three cuts from the Tuff Green session have vibes heavily featured and the sound and style of these tracks is very different to ''Shake It Up And Go''. It really is not possible to come to any scientific conclusion as to the provenance of this cut, however it was almost certainly cut at Memphis Recording And Sound Services. Was it in response to Harmonica Frank's ''Step It Up And Go'', cut sometime in the first half of 1951 at the same studio? If it was connected to this it might well militate on the side of it being part of the ''She's Dynamite'' session cut in May 1951. The 20/20 ears of Ace Record's Ted Carroll are convinced however that it is part of the January session.

by Bill Dahl, 2002

JULY 1950

The Bihari brothers came to Memphis toward the end of July, and after all his long-distance communication, when Sam finally met them in person Sam was duly impressed. Jules, thirty-six years old, was the head of the operation, a tough customer, as Sam immediately recognized, a shrewd man who measured his words carefully but was, in Sam's judgment, most likely a fair man. Saul, thirty-two, was clearly the ''outside man'' the salesman, just as well-dressed as his brother but nicer-looking. According to Sam, ''Saul seemed like one of the nicest people I'd ever met. Jules looked okay, and he probably was all right, but Saul, I would have believed just about anything he said''.

As promised, they brought in Riley King, the personable twenty-four-year-old disc jockey, whose popularity on the radio, where he played music with his own combo and spun records, allowed him to find work five or six nights a week in every little cotton-patch joint and roadhouse operation within a hundred-mile radius of Memphis. He had started out as the Pep-ti-kon boy on WDIA about a year and a half ago, going out on weekends on a flatbed truck to promote its owners' new blood-building tonic. But he had quickly become more broadly identified by a less product-oriented label, first as the Singing Black Boy, then as the Singing Blues Boy, then as the Boy from Beale Street, until, finally, he was recognized simply as Bee Bee, transmitted to the world at large on his records as ''B.B. King''.

Sam liked him immediately. Motherless at nine, on his own from the age of fourteen, when his grandmother died, he was the product of a lonely, isolated childhood, mostly around Kilmichael in the hill country of Mississippi, which only served to accentuate a sensitive, insecure nature. Be kind to others, his mother had told him on her deathbed, and his kindness would never fail be repaid, if he gave love unasked, it would come back to him many times over, and that was the credo which he continued to articulate throughout his life.

His shyness, his slight stammer set him apart from many of the other bluesmen Sam had met, but it was his wounded air that drew Sam to him most. To others this might come across simply as a pleasant, deferential manner. The Tri-State Defender, which would become Memphis' second black newspaper the following year, would describe him not long after its founding as ''quiet-spoken'' and ''unassuming'', with his sincerity serving as his calling card. But clearly that sincerity masked a burning ambition, a need to have not just Memphis of Mississippi but the world know of him. For Sam, who knew nothing of his background at the time, it was that hunger, that marked insecurity, which suggested his potential, it was that sense of wanting something so badly you couldn't fully express it that truly captured Sam's interest.

As a musician, though, he was distinctly limited. It was obvious that his primary influence was T-Bone Walker's cool, jazz-inflected style, with the elegant shape of his single-string solos set off by sophisticated seventh- and ninth-chord progressions. It was a style with which Sam was thoroughly familiar and one to which he was not particularly drawn, as much as anything because of its element of careful calculation, but he still saw B.B. As retaining some of the wonderful old Mississippi feel, and, as it turned out, B.B. Couldn't really play in the more modern style anyway. For one thing, he couldn't always execute the pretty chords that he was aiming for. For another, his timing, which in T-Bone's case was the rock-solid basis for his blues, was erratic. But most surprising of all, he couldn't sing and play at the same time. Sam thought at first he was kidding, but B.B. King assured him he was not, he had tried, and he simply could not. It had to be, Sam assumed, some kind of mental block.

It was in any case his singing at this point that was the central feature of his music. You couldn't miss the church in his voice, the influence of the sanctified tradition in which he had started out singing and playing. His uncle had married a sister of the preacher in a Pentecostal church near Kilmichael, and it was that preacher, Archie Fair, who played the first electric guitar B.B. King had ever seen and who gave him his first rudimentary lessons. He strummed his own cherry-red Stella behind the gospel group he formed with his cousin Birkett Davis and then, later, after his cousin moved to the Delta with his family and he joined them there, put together another group in Indianola.

The Famous St. John Gospel Singers were modeled after the Golden gate Quartet, whose enormous success not just on record but through regular CBS-network radio exposure inspired a generation of gospel groups to dream of pop stardom. It was only after he realized that his fellow members of the Famous St. John Gospel Singers didn't share that dream, and, not entirely coincidentally, after he wrecked his boss's tractor, that twenty-year-old Riley King set out for Memphis on his own in the spring of 1946. He had started playing some blues by then, mostly on the streets in the little towns around Indianola on market day, where he discovered that if you sang a spiritual number you got a pat on the back, but if you played a blues song, even the preacher might throw a little change in your hat. So leaving his wife of little more than a year behind, he hitched a ride on a grocery transfer truck, helping the driver unload produce all the way to Memphis, where he was determined to find his cousin, the famous blues singer Booker T. Washington (aka Bukka White).

Riley King stayed in Memphis that first time something like ten months, his cousin got him a job and showed him the ropes, introducing him to older bluesmen like Frank Stokes and Jack Kelly, taking him out on weekends to the joints where Booker would play, even allowing Riley to second him occasionally. Bukka White was his mother's first cousin, and on all his visits to Kilmichael when Riley was growing up, he would show up ''looking like a million bucks. Razor sharp. Big hat, clean shirt, pressed pants, shiny shoes. He smelled of the big city and glamorous times; he looked confident and talked about things outside our little life in the hills''. It was a vision not just of another life but of another personality, outsized, uncontained, sure enough of himself that even when he went to prison briefly for killing a man he remained undiminished by the inequities of the world.
Riley B. King came into the studio with his own little trio, and Sam was more than satisfied with the quality of the musicianship, it was the music itself that betrayed the singer's lack of a style of his own. The four numbers, ''Walking' And Crin''', ''B.B. Boogie'', ''The Other Night Blues'', and ''Mistreated Woman'' with all the other takes, that they worked on were an inoffensive boogie, a slow-paced, full-voiced version of an old Leroy Carr standard, a polite Charles Brown-styled blues with a shared piano-guitar lead, and a variation on Tampa Red's recent remake of his slide guitar classic, ''It Hurts Me Too''. B.B. Was unquestionably sincere, he projected a kind of earnestness that was unusual in and of itself, and his vocals were strong enough, Sam realized, to fill in the spaces where the guitar dropped out, but, for all of the undeniable gospel feeling in his voice, he was almost too eager to please, unwilling at this point to extend himself into the realm of the unexpected, no matter what gentle cues Sam might give him.

The Bihari brothers seemed delighted in any case, so much so, as Sam recalled, that Jules jumped on an airplane that night and flew back to Los Angeles, with the acetates because, he said, he wanted to rush a single out on their new RPM label right away. Saul was supposed to bring Riley King to the studio the next day so they could all sign an agreement under which King would be contracted to the Biharis' record company but Sam would have a side agreement, a kind of royalty override with some say in the artist's future disposition. But Saul showed up alone at the studio and said he had been out to B.B.'s house the night before and signed him to a standard union contract and Jules would be in touch from California to make a formal deal with Sam Phillips.

That was not the way they had left it, Sam protested vehemently, as he understood it, they had a firm ''shakehands'' deal. But no matter how much he expostulated, Saul Bihari simply demurred in his charming way, after all, he was just the minority stockholder younger brother, and in the end Sam comforted himself with Saul's assurances that this was only the beginning of a long and profitable relationship.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

When the first ventured into Sam Phillips' fledgling studio at 706 Union Avenue, B.B. King was a raw young talent with a local radio program and a load potential. By the time he left behind Memphis as his primary recording base, King was a fast-rising star boasting a busy touring itinerary.

King's first RPM session ensued around July of 1950 at Memphis Recording Service under Phillips' supervision. The Service was still some 18 months from commencing operations, and Phillips was independently producing groundbreaking masters for Modern and Chess.

"He recorded many of the people, like Howling Wolf and many other guys for different labels, because he was the only person that had a studio," noted King. "In fact, his studio was one of the first that I ever saw that was an actual studio''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR B.B. KING
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR RPM RECORDS 1950

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: JULY UNKNOWN DATE 1950
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JULES BIHARI

01(1) - ''WALKIN' AND CRYIN''' - B.M.I. - 3:26
Composer: - Riley B. King-Sam Ling
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1439 Take 1 Master - > RPM 304-323 Series <
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Release: - 1950
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single RPM 311-A mono
WALKIN' AND CRYIN' / THE OTHER NIGHT BLUES
Reissued: - 2002 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-8 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

"Walkin' And Cryin' and "The Other Night Blues" are both after-hours odes, King's vocals clearly growing more confident.

01(2) - ''WALKIN' AND CRYIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Riley B. King-Sam Ling
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1439 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-9 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

01(3) - ''WALKIN' AND CRYIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Riley B. King-Sam Ling
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1439 - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-10 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

02(1) - ''B.B. BOOGIE'' - B.M.I. - 3:09
Composer: - Riley B. King-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1405 Take 1 Master -> RPM 304-323 Series <
Recorded: - Unknown Dates 1950
Released: - September 1950
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single RPM 304-B mono
B.B. BOOGIE / MISTREATED WOMAN
Reissued: - 2002 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-3 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

The opposite side "B.B. Boogie" that's the dazzler, distinguished by several choruses of high flying fretwork (the second take, is taken at a hotter tempo, B.B.'s waxe sailing fast and free over Nelson's furiously pounding ivories.

02(2) - ''B.B. BOOGIE'' - B.M.I. - 3:18
Composer: - Riley B. King-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1405 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-4 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

03(1) - ''THE OTHER NIGHT BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:42
Composer: - Riley B. King-Joe Josea
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1438 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-5 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

03(2) - ''THE OTHER NIGHT BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:39
Composer: - Riley B. King-Joe Josea
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1438 Take 2 Master - > RPM 304-323 Series <
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Released: - 1950
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single RPM 311-A mono
THE OTHER NIGHT BLUES / WALKIN' AND CRYIN'
Reissued: - 2002 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-6 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

03(3) - ''THE OTHER NIGHT BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Riley B. King-Joe Josea
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1438 - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-7 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

04(1) - ''MISTREATED WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Riley B. King-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1404 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-1 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

''Mistreated Woman'', B.B.'s first RPM biscuit, is a languid outing anchored by Ford Nelson's 885 (inspired by Sonny Thompson's 'Long Gone') and sporting a crisp high-neck guitar solo from the youthful-sounding King. But it's the opposite side, ''B.B. Boogie'' that's the dazzler, distinguished by several choruses of highflying fretwork (the second take, first issued on a 1969 Kent LP, is taken at a hotter tempo, B.B.'s axe sailing fast and free over Nelson's furiously pounding ivories).

There are three takes of each side of B.B.'s RPM encore: ''The Other Night Blues'' and ''Walkin' And Cryin" are both after-hours odes, King's vocals clearly growing more confident.

04(2) - ''MISTREATED WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Riley B. King-J ules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1404 Take 2 Master - > RPM 304-323 Series <
Recorded: - July 1950 Unknown Date
Released: - September 1950
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single RPM 304-A mono
MISTREATED WOMAN / B.B. BOOGIE
Reissued: - 2002 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-2 mono
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

"Mistreated Woman" is a languid outing anchored by Ford Nelson's 88s (inspired by Sonny Thompson's "Long Gone" and sporting a crisp high-neck guitar solo from the youthful-sounding King.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
B.B. King - Vocal and Guitar
Probably Phineas Newborn Jr. - Piano
Probably Phineas Newborn Sr. - Drums
Probably Tuff Green - Bass

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 1950

Sam Phillips recalls dubs of Joe Hill Louis from Modern Records and plans the launch of the Phillips record label with Memphis disc jockey Dewey Phillips.

JULY 2, 1950 SUNDAY

Western-swing musicians Tex Williams, Deuce Spriggins and Smokey Rogers launch a show on the NBC Radio Network.

JULY 3, 1950 MONDAY

Moon Mullican recorded ''Goodnight Irene'' and Mona Lisa'' in Cincinnati, Ohio.

The USS Valley Forge launches the first carrier air strike in the Korean War. Among the crewman on the ship is Scotty Moore. future guitarist for Elvis Presley.

JULY 4, 1950 TUESDAY

Hank Williams is unable to perform for 11,000 fans at the DeLeon, Texas, Watermelon Festival because he's to sick.

Songwriter Larry Herbstritt is born in Couderport, Pennsylvania. He charts high in country music as a writer of Ronnie Milsap's ''Cowboys And Clowns'' and Anne Myrray's ''I Just Fall In Love Again''.

JULY 5, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Pop/rock singer Huey Lewis is born in New York. The frontman for Huey Lewis & The News, he secures an Academy of Country Music awards nomination after joining Phil Vassar for a 2003 remake of his own 1982 hit ''Workin' For A Livin''.

JULY 7, 1950 FRIDAY

At the works in the auto plants in Pontiac, Michigan, Johnny Cash returned home, although he made his return somewhat sooner than most - after three weeks. Still determined to get out of Dyess, Johnny Cash joined the Air Force on July 7, 1950. By his own account, Cash's 'four long, miserable years' in the Air Force were relieved only by playing music with fellow southerners.

Johnny Cash joins the Air Force and gets assigned to Lackland Air Force Base in Texas for basic training.

JULY 9, 1950 SUNDAY

Songwriter Mark D. Sanders is born in Los Angeles. Among the hits he authors are George Strait's ''Blue Clear Sky'', Lonestar's ''No News'', Jo Dee Messina's ''Heads Carolina, Tails California'' and Lee Womack's ''I Hope You Dance''.

JULY 11, 1950 TUESDAY

Pop songwriter and Capitol Records co-founder Buddy DeSylva dies in Los Angeles. The label has already enjoyed hits with Tex Ritter, Tex Williams, Jimmy Wakely, Hank Thompson and Merle Travis.

Jimmy Dean marries his first wife, Mary Sue Wittauer, at the Presbyterian Church in Takoma, Maryland.

JULY 18, 1950 TUESDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''I Overlooked An Orchid'' at the Castle Recording Studio in Nashville. It later becomes a hit for Mickey Gilley.

JULY 21, 1950 FRIDAY

Jimmy Wakely recorded ''Mona Lisa''.

JULY 23, 1950 SUNDAY

''The Gene Autry Show'' debuts on CBS-TV, taking Aytry, sidekick Pat Buttram and Champion from the big screen to the small screen. ''Back In The Saddle Again'' serves as the program's theme song.

JULY 24, 1950 MONDAY

Capitol released Kay Starr and Tennessee Ernie Ford's two-sided duet single, ''Ain't Nobody's Business But My Own'' and ''I'll Never Be Free''.

JULY 25, 1950 TUESDAY

Lefty Frizzell recorded ''If You've Got The Money I've Got The Time'', ''I Love You A Thousand Ways'' and ''Shine, Shave, Shower (It's Saturday)'' in his first recording session at Dallas' Jim Beck Studio.

Gene Aytry is a sheriff who's forced a arrest a man he believes is innocent in the debut of ''Beyond The Purple Hills''. The movie also features Pat Buttram, Jerry Scoggins and Frankie Marvis

JULY 26, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Jimmie Osborne recorded ''God Please Protect America'' in Cincinnati, Ohio.

JULY 27, 1950 THURSDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford recorded ''The Shot Gun Boogie'' at Capitol's Melrose Avenue studios in Hollywood.

JULY 1950

Sam Phillips recorded Slim Rhodes on an intermittent basis between 1950 and 1958. Ethmer Cletus ''Slim'' Rhodes fronted a band that changed with the seasons. When his first sides were sold to Gilt Edge in 1950, Rhodes was working in a strict country format, turning out songs such as ''Skunk Hollow Boogie'' and ''Memphis Bound''. By the time Rhodes appeared in Phillips' studio for the last time in 1958, though, he was sporting a pop-country style redolent of Johnny Cash. In the interim, he had covered all the bases between Hank Williams and Elvis Presley.

Rhodes had a radio show on WMC from 1944, a program that later expanded to television. Without a style of his own, Rhodes stayed abreast of every development within country music until his death from a fall at his home in 1966. He recorded most consistently for Sun Records between early 1955 and late 1956. His best shot came when he acquired a Presley sound-alike, vocalist Sandy Brooks (born Ronnie Hesselbein), with whom he recorded a creditable rockabilly record, ''Take And Give'', backed with ''Do What I Do''. The record sold predictably well in Memphis and got spotty action elsewhere, but not enough action to tempt Hesselbein away from a career with the family tire company.

''I never did see anything particular about Buck Turner or Slim Rhodes band that stood out as far as style'', says Phillips. ''They were mainstays on local radio. They were professionals that had well-balanced bands that were easy to record. They were just good, solid local combos''.

JULY 1950

Rufus Thomas' Bullet single is released.

In July of 1950, American troops and North Korean forces fought against each other for the first time in the Battle of Osan. The Korean War had only just begun in June when North Korea launched a full scale invasion of the South. Only a few U.S. troops had arrived in Korea by the time the Battle of Osan began, and they were considered largely unprepared to face the North Koreans. During the battle, the North Koreans quickly moved in on the U.S. forces and the Americans decided to withdraw from the fighting. Unfortunately, the withdrawal was uncoordinated and in the confusion the U.S. Troops suffered many casualties. The aftermath of the battle revealed that a combination of outdated equipment and a lack of organization would likely make it difficult for the Americans to win against the more well-prepared and organized North Korean forces.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR SLIM RHODES

WMC RADIO STUDIO, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1948/1949
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN

01 ''MOTHER'S BEST FLOUR SHOW' - 1:17
WMC Radio Extracts
Recorded: Unknown Date 1948/1949
Released: - February 15, 2013
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-1 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

This short excerpts from the ''Mother's Best Flour Show'' on WMC which appear at the beginning and end of this side give some sense of mid-South early morning country radio. Mother's Best was a milling company in Decatur, Alabama that sponsored several artists throughout its distribution area. Among those spreading the good word about Mother's Best flour and farm feeds were Hank Williams in Nashville and blues man Robert Jr. Lockwood in Helena, Arkansas. Slim Rhodes had been WMC since 1939, sponsored by Mother's Best for all of that time. His mixture of music, jokes and gosh-darn sincerity was standard fare for the time.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ether Cletus ''Slim'' Rhodes - Vocal & Guitar
Perry Hilburn ''Dusty'' Rhodes - Vocal and Fiddle
Gene Steele and Ray Phelps - Vocal and Guitar
Gilbert Ray ''Speck'' Rhodes - Bass

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

It was inevitable that Sam Phillips and Slim Rhodes would come together. The Rhodes family had been a potent force in the Memphis country scene since the 1940s, and Slim's radio and television shows ensured that there would be a consistent market for his product. Moreover, Slim had a chameleon-like ability to change with the seasons.

He made the transition from the primitive hillbilly boogie heard on the Gild-Edge cuts to the flat out rockabilly of ''Do What I Do''. The final cut shows that he was working towards a country-pop sound. Sam Phillips records the Slim Rhodes band in the first of two sessions for Gilt-Edge Records. The session produce four singles, issued during 1950 and 1951 for over twenty years, the Slim Rhodes Show was an institution on Memphis radio.

Starting out as a family group, the Rhodes maintained this characteristic through three generations despite a continually changing supporting cast.

STUDIO SESSION FOR SLIM RHODES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR GILT-EDGE RECORDS 1950

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JULY 1950
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Sam Phillips recorded in 1950 eight sides with the band under Slim's name for release on Gilt-Edge Records in California. Concentrating on boogie and swing based styles, the Gilt-Edge discs featured Slim and Dusty on vocals with fine fiddle and steel support spiced with energetic electric guitar solos from Pee Wee Suggs. Born Luther Bradley Suggs, he had worked with the Loden Family in Mississippi before joining Slim Rhodes, and went on to record as a solo artist, under the name Brad Suggs, for Meteor and Phillips International.

"I recorded Slim Rhodes and Lost Hunter for Bill McCall who had the 4-Star and Gilt-Edge labels", recalled Sam Phillips. "Slim Rhodes ran a local country band here that had been on radio WMC for many years. Slim had the noontime show. Buck Turner had the regular country show on the opposing station, WREC. Buck did any early morning show. He would also tour frequently throughout the South and West. Slim, in contrast, only played the local area - south east Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, west Tennessee and north west Alabama - so Slim was what we used to call a kind of mainstay on local radio programming. Both Slim and Buck were professionals, though. They both had good, well-balanced bands and were easy to record".

The first of Slim Rhodes' Gilt-Edge discs set a pattern, with this ''Save A Little Love For Me'' with this western swing vocal item backing a boogie instrumental, ''Skunk Hollow Boogie''. Slim Rhodes takes the vocal on this very pleasing swing number that owes rather more to Texas than to Tennessee. Vocal honours were shared in the Rhodes band with Dusty Rhodes, Dot Rhodes and Brad Suggs all doing their part. Surviving radio air shots from WMC dated December 1958 bear out this balance between the vocalists. They also show hos traditional fiddle solos by Dusty and the comedy sketches by Slim and Speck, where Slim is the ''Mayor of Skunk Holler'' and Speck his crazy side-kick who's always 'right back again', actually contributed as much to the group's air time as did songs like this one.

01 - ''SAVE A LITTLE LOVE FOR ME*'' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Slim Rhodes- Pee Wee Suggs
Publisher: - Music Clearance
Matrix number: - 3755 Master - > Gilt-Edge Series <
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1950
Released: - October 1950
First appearance: - Gilt-Edge (S) 78rpm standard single Gilt-Edge 5015-B mono
SAVE A LITTLE LOVE FOR ME / SKUNK HOLLOW BOOGIE
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-3 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-3 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

"The Slim Rhodes items for Gilt-Edge Records were recorded like a lot of my records on 16 inch discs, which I recorded at 78rpm. Normally you wouldn't do that. You did it on 33rpm transcription. But in order to improve the sound, I recorded straight onto 16 inch acetates and from there I would make an acetate master", recallad Sam Phillips.

"I never did see anything particular about either Buck or Slim's band that stoot out, as far as style; they were just good solid local combos. The Rhodes were a family band. Besides Slim, there was Dusty who was a real good fiddle player", recalled Sam Phillips, "and Dusty's wife was a pretty darn good singer. Speck was the comedian and bass player. He later worked for Porter Wagoner on his TV show - successful as he was with the comedy, he was still one of the better upright bass player I ever saw''.

02 - ''SKUNK HOLLOW BOOGIE'' - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Slim Rhodes-Pee Wee Suggs-Dusty Rhodes-Speck Rhodes
Publisher: - Music Clearance
Matrix number: - 3757 Master - > Gilt-Edge Series <
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1950
Released: - October 1950
First appearance: - Gilt-Edge (S) 78rpm standard single Gilt-Edge 5015-A mono
SKUNK HOLLOW BOOGIE / SAVE A LITTLE LOVE FOR ME
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-2mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-2 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Slim Rhodes' Memphis recordings commenced in 1950 with this driving and bluesy instrumental ''Skunk Hollow Boogie''. It is really a showcase for the distinguished lead guitar of Brad Suggs, but both the steel guitar of Danny Holloway and the fiddle of Dusty Rhodes take excellent solos. Slim Rhodes played rhythm guitar and Speck Rhodes was on bass. This tune had been a Rhodes band staple for over a decade and it may be heard among the many traditional and current tunes the Rhodes band recorded for the lang-Worth transcription company in 1949 for radio broadcast. It is interesting that the repeated guitar lick we hear here was adapted by Scotty Moore for Elvis Presley's ''Good Rockin' Tonight'' some for years later. Sam Phillips may have been very new to recording for records when these sides were made, but the managed nevertheless to capture a powerful sound from the five-man Rhodes band.

03 - ''RED, WHITE AND BLUE**'' - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Pee Wee Suggs-Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - 4-Star Sales
Matrix number: - 4099 Master - > Gilt-Edge Series <
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1950
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Gilt-Edge (S) 78rpm standard single Gilt-Edge 5044-A mono
RED, WHITE AND BLUE / OZARK BOOGIE
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Musicians, like politicians, were fond of extolling the virtue of military service while their asses were safe at home, and Slim Rhodes was no exception. (It was though, just a matter of months before Brad Suggs departed for the service). Departing somewhat from their usual format, here we find Dusty and the Rhodes Boys on ''Red White And Blue'' in patriotic mood. The Korean War had just started and there were many songs like this (''They Locked God Outside The Iron Curtain'', etc), most of them in the country marked. It marked the last Rhodes release on Gilt-Edge although some titles were repackaged on 4-Star Records' disc jockey albums.

''I recorded country music right through the time I had my studio, but it was never with the thought that I would do that well on country music. My main interest even at the outset was in developing something of a combination of black blues and country music. Besides, Nashville was doing a damn good job on country stuff.

''They were pretty pure country too over there, which at that time didn't really excite me too much unless I could come up with something a little different. Also at, that time, I met resistance in everything I did. Nashville was very jealous of their industry over there. So it was a matter of getting your feet on the ground and finding something you had some market for. I hat to realize that recording straight country was a buffer until I could work out what I really wanted to do. I mean, without compromising. You nevertheless have to stay in business first before you can build''.

04 - ''OZARK BOOGIE'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Pee Wee Suggs-Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - 4-Star Sales
Matrix number: - 5000 Master - > Gilt-Edge Series <
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1950
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Gilt-Edge (S) 78rpm standard single Gilt-Edge 5044-B mono
OZARK BOOGIE / RED, WHITE AND BLUES
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-8mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-8 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Apparently recorded on this first Rhodes session along with Gilt-Edge 5015, this title was not issued until 1951. This is somewhat surprising since it is arguably the best jukebox material here. Brad Suggs again provides the boogie dynamics while Speck and Slim lay down a powerful rhythm foundation. Dusty gives us some gypsy fiddle in-between two strong steel guitar solos.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ether Cletus ''Slim'' Rhodes - Vocal* & Guitar
Perry Hilburn ''Dusty'' Rhodes - Vocal** and Fiddle
Luther Bradley '' Pee Wee'' Suggs - Vocal and Guitar
Gilbert Ray ''Speck'' Rhodes - Bass
Danny Holloway - Steel Guitar

''I was like a chemist in a lab, who just knows he's close to something. But I was just one person, and I couldn't concentrate on everything at one time, you know? God, a lot of hours were spent developing a sound - a sound in blues, a sound in country, and a new sound using both those kinds of music. Deep down I knew I was not doing everything that could be done for each artist. I felt I had to experiment with sounds. I loved working with people capable of something different - often that meant the turned-down, unbelieved-in musicians who had something unusual about them''.

''I knew that cutting pure Nashville-style country records was not what I wanted. I swear to God, I knew I could cut 'em, but I knew it wasn't what I hoped to get to''.

''Now, it doesn't mean I don't like country music. I love country music. I grew up on it. The way you heard pure blues - black or white - back in those days was from the people that worked with you on the farm. You certainly didn't hear it on the radio. So it was the hillbilly singers and the blues singers on the farm that I heard when I was coming up. That was my music then. The music of the bend of the river back in Florence, Alabama, that was my inspiration''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 1950

After the Phillips label disappeared back into the obscurity from which it had barely arisen, Phillips banally placed Joe Hill Louis with RPM/Modern.

Although both Louis and B. B. King were part of the staple diet on WDIA, Louis's music was a far cry from King's: it was primitive, countered, and inscrutable. He sang with the harmonica in front of his face, usually rendering his vocals muddy, and there was little room for virtuosity on any of the three instruments he routinely played at once. Louis's performances had a dense texture and a compelling drive that compensated for the lack of pure technique. His lyrics were laced with threats and a dark sense of humor: ''I sent my baby a brand new ten-dollar bill'', he sang, ''If half that don't get her back, you know my shotgun will''.

Louis was an enigmatic character, about whom little would be known if not for the research of musicologist Stephen LaVere. He was born Lester or Leslie Hill on September 23, 1921, In Whitehaven, Tennessee. At age fourteen he ran away from home, and was hired as a houseboy by the Canales, a white family who controlled much of Memphis’s soda pop and vending industry. The Canales dubbed him Joe Hill Louis, with a nod to the boxer Joe Louis, after he won a fight with a local bully.

Louis played first Jew's harp and then harmonica, before finally adding guitar, drums, and hi-hat to his act. Dubbing himself the Be Bop Boy, he played in the local part and at black ball games. After WDIA became a black-oriented station, Louis was hired as the first Pep-ti- Kon Boy. He made his first records for Columbia in Nashville under circumstances that art far from clear. Columbia had almost no penetration into the market that Louis serviced, and the records sold so poorly that Phillips had no problem in obtaining his release when he wanted to record Louis in 1950.

After falling out with the Biharis, Phillips succeeded in placing Louis with Chess, for whom he recorded an electrifying atmospheric blues, ''When I Am Gone'', that transcended form and meter in the manner of John Lee Hooker. Another record by Louis relaunched the Sun label in 1953, earning him the distinction of having his recordings issued on every label with which Phillips had been affiliated during his three years in the record business (except 4- Star). After the Sun record failed to sell, Louis and Phillips finally parted ways, and Louis recorded for a few other labels before succumbing to tetanus on August 5, 1957.

It is a testament to Phillips' love of primitive, even obscure, country blues that he persevered in recording Louis. The path toward commercial salvation had become clear as far back as March 1951: One look at the Billboard rhythm and blues charts made it obvious that country blues were already considered passe by the black record-buying audience. It was the rhythm and blues bands, with their fuller instrumentation, that were selling. And one of them had already arrived unexpectedly on Phillips doorstep.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR THE PHILLIPS 1950

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: THURSDAY JULY 27, 1950
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Sam Phillips produced nearly all of the best Joe Hill Louis recordings. After recording two raw sides for the The Phillips' label, Phillips was able to secure an arrangement that resulted in a series of records for Modern. Except for the experimental ''Eyesight To The Blind', Joe played alone on these sides and was billed as ''The-One-Man-Band". Our listening program begins with the near perfection heard on the first two Modern 78s.

''Gotta Let You Go'', the flipside of Louis first disc is wildly percussive, too, but the slower tempo allows the words to shine. It's a splenetic blues: our man has lavished money and gifts upon his woman, and is getting nothing in return. Joe Hill rants in one chord through the verses. It's a common enough theme, but he's riled up, and the harsh guitar accentuates his malice. Many extremely rare records are often found to be extremely rare for a reason; this one, almost certainly unheard by all but a few hundred people in and around Memphis at the time of release, is a jewel of high octane juke joint blues.

01 - ''GOTTA LET YOU GO'' - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: -Joe Hill Louis-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 100-2 Master - > The Phillips 9001 <
Recorded: - July 27, 1950
Released: - August 1950
First appearance: - The Phillips (S) 78rpm standard single The Phillips 9001 mono
GOTTA LET YOU GO / BOOGIE IN THE PARK
The single had different numbers on A and B sides.
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-4 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

The sole release on Sam and Dewey's eponymous Phillips label: although issued as the flip side of Louis' disc, this was the first side cut at his first Union Avenue session (he'd recorded for Columbia the previous year). It has a percussive quality similar to that of the topside, but the tempo is slowed to allow a greater prominence to the lyric, which tells the tale of an unfaithful woman upon whom our hero has lavished molar aplenty, but received precious little in return. A common enough blues theme, the chanted vocals add considerably to the air of malice generated by the harsh guitar lines.

Nominally the plug side of the Phillips' release, this "boogie" is a rough stomper, driven along by some percussive guitar work, and punctuated by squeaky harmonica. Louis returned to this theme on several occasions, but never again with quite the same force and conviction as he did on this recording. ''The song Dewey liked was ''Boogie In The Park'', Sam Phillips told Martin Hawkins. ''It was a song Joe played a lot, and it was associated with him. Though I am not sure whether he first played it in Handy Park or the other little park along there, or whether it was Russwood Park where Joe used to play when the Memphis Red Sox were in town. They were the black baseball team in those days. The white team was the Memphis Chicks''.

02 - ''BOOGIE IN THE PARK'' - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 101-2 Master - > The Phillips 9002 <
Recorded: - June/July 27, 1950
Released: - August 1950
First appearance: - The Phillips (S) 78rpm standard single The Phillips 9002 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK / GOTTA LET YOU GO
The single had different numbers on A and B sides.
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-5 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

03 - ''NAPPY HEAD WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June/July 27, 1950
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm Polydor 2383-214 mono
BLUE IN THE MORNING
Reissued: March 1, 2009 Goldenlane Records (CD) 500/200rpm mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE ESSENTIAL BLUES MASTERS

04(1) - ''I FEEL LIKE A MILLION (I FEEL SO GOOD)'' - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Jules Taub-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1459 Master - > Modern 795-828 Series <
Recorded: - July 27, 1950
Released: - Fall 1950
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm Modern 795-A mono
I FEEL LIKE A MILLION / HEARTACHE BABY
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

''I Feel Like A Million'' begins with a wonderful riffing between the harmonica and guitar with the latter taking up a boogie motif behind the vocals.

04(2) - ''I FEEL LIKE A MILLION (I FEEL SO GOOD)'' - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Jules Taub-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take
Recorded: - July 27, 1950
Released: - Unissued

05(1) – ''HEARTACHE BABY (NIGHT TIME IS THE RIGHT TIME)'' - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Jules Taub-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1460 Master - > Modern 795-828 Series
Recorded: - July 27, 1950
Released: - Fall 1950
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm Modern 795-B mono
HEARTACHE BABY / I FEEL LIKE A MILLION
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

05(2) – ''HEARTACHE BABY'' - B.M.I. - 3:35
Composer: - Jules Taub-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 27, 1950
Released: - January 5, 2009
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm Ace CDCHD 1003 mono
THE MODERN DOWNHOME BLUES SESSIONS VOLUME 3 - MEMPHIS ON DOWN

''Heartache Baby'' is a slow blues of the type that Phillips was looking for in Joe's work. The vocal and harmonica are the lead instruments with the guitar chording and the drums in perfectly synchronized support.

06 – ''BROKE AND HUNGRY (BLUE IN THE MORNING)'' - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 27, 1950
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm LP 2383-214 mono
BLUE IN THE MORNING
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

''Broke And Hungry'' is an early alternate from the song's evolution phase. It has previously been mistitled ''Blue In The Morning''. A good number of alternate takes exist and it is apparent that Louis, in common with many a country bluesman, came into the studio with only the basic idea for his new songs.

07 – ''TRAIN TICKET (KEY TO THE HIGHWAY)'' - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 27, 1950
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm LP 2383-214 mono
BLUE IN THE MORNING
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

08 – ''SHORTY THE BARBER''
Composer: - Chuck Matthews
Publisher: - Cromwell Music
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - July 27, 1950

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal, Guitar
Ford Nelson – Piano
Unknown - Drums
More details unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SAM PHILLIPS TALKING ABOUT JOE HILL LOUIS - "I had heard of Joe Hill Louis before I ever met him. I cannot remember where, but I do know that I was aware of him. I knew that he was this blues singer, this one-man-band, who would be seen and heard around town back in those days. It was well known that he played various places within a 30 or 40 mile radius of Memphis.

Matter of fact, if I am not mistaken, the first time I ever saw Joe Hill he was on his way to play a show at Moscow, Tennessee, about forty miles away. He played there a lot, it turned out. On this occasion, I was down at the studio working on getting the building right. This was before we were open for business, before we got all the walls built right to our needs. Joe just called in.

He had heard something was happening and he wanted to know what was going on. I said, 'I'm going to build a recording studio here once I get the building into shape'.

He said, 'Man, that's just what we need here in Memphis'. He explained to me that he was a recording artist - for Columbia - and that he was ready to make some more records.

So Joe was in even before the beginning. He was the first black artist, I believe, to make contact with me at that time. Then, later on, after I had recorded him, he would help me out by spreading the word around the community that here was a man who might be able to do something in music. I think he was responsible for suggesting to Jack Kelly and Charlie Burse and other musicians that they should come to see me.

Joe Hill was a very likeable person. He was the kind of person to just drop in and say 'hi' and then keep out of the way if it was not his session. He would just remind you he was around in that way. Joe Hill was always well dressed, sharp, a dapper man. He was well organised. He was a treasure, to me. He was a very entertaining man, and by that I do not mean a lot of jokes, just that he put on a good show and was very personable. He was fairly unique. He was a kind of a loner, but extremely friendly. He enjoyed being around and being involved, he liked to have an attachment to what was happening, but never in a way that was too closely involved. He was a loner, but not lonesome, if you understand me. He was his own person. I never saw him look defeated or unhappy about anything. Everyone liked Joe Hill that knew him. Joe was a sweet guy. When I had the studio finished and invited him in to record, he said, 'Well, man, this is going to be nice'. Then he sat down at his equipment and played me everything he knew, which was quite a lot.

Joe Hill had some very interesting approaches to things. He was a complete individual as a musician - he had his own style that he had evolved himself. I believe that he was selftaught as a musician, and he played things just however he saw them, or heard them, and I liked that. He liked to listen to Arthur Crudup and T-Bone Walker, to my memory, from the records, but he also knew many of the local musicians. He wrote many of his own songs, though of course a lot of it was taken from something or other somewhere. But again it often came out very personal to him.

Joe played guitar and harmonica and bass drum all at the same time. He had a harmonica holder around his neck. At times he would get the effect of singing through the harmonica into the mike. It was a style he had developed. He was that kind of person. He would go his own way. When I first heard him, I just thought, 'this is a guy that deserves to be heard', even though I realized that it was basically a novelty kind of thing.

When we were in the studio, usually it was just Joe and me on our own. He would play something and we would talk and then he would play another and we would decide what to record. Joe really did not like to record with anyone else. He had developed his oneman show and his instrumentation and that was what he liked to do. He would never have said to me that he would not work with other people, but I quickly found out that he really wanted to record on his own.

But I always thought I could do a little better with Joe Hill than I did do. I liked unusual things in music, and 1 was always looking for that spark of individuality. The problem was that he had gotten so used to doing his own thing. Recording Joe was a challenge to me. With Joe Hill, most everything he wanted to play was in 4/4s. He had to play those fast 4/4s at his clubs and around town. That was what drew the crowd, and Joe couldn't adapt really. Joe never could really get a hold of a ballad - I mean a low down dirty blues ballad now - because the mechanics of the instruments he was playing were against that. I did try to get him into some more 2/4 time, and we did try different people working with him. I felt I could have miked him better or arranged the instruments differently, and the fact that we didn't was really my fault.

Because I think I did get a better sound with Doctor Ross, for instance. Ross had a very special sound. He had a great command of his music and a real instinct for what was going on around him. 'Chicago Breakdown' is one of the better records I think ever heard in my life, if I am allowed to say that.

Joe Hill, though, had certain limitations, vocally, in truth, but they were never so much as to prevent us doing something with him. It did make me want to record him just with his harmonica though, without the other instruments to distract him. You can hear on ''Eyesight To The Blind'' that his vocal is so much more focused and upfront, for instance. The piano gave that recording a much more solid rhythmic foundation. Ford Nelson was an accomplished piano player. He worked at WDIA along with Joe Hill and he was an easygoing guy, the perfect accompanist. ''Eyesight'' was a song that was very popular locally and we really wanted to get a good cut on it. It was a song Joe brought in that he had learned from Sonny Boy Williamson.

The first record with Joe Hill came about because had been fooling around recording him and mentioned this to disc jockey Dewey Phillips. Now Dewey liked Joe Hill very much, and Dewey was on the air. He wanted to promote Joe, he really wanted to do something with him, so that was when we decided to go into the record business. The song Dewey liked was ''Boogie In The Park''. It was a song Joe played a lot, and it was associated with him.

Though I am not sure whether he first played it in Handy Park or the other little park along there, or whether it was Russwood Park where Joe used to play when the Memphis Red Socks were in town. They were the black baseball team in those days. The white team was the Memphis Chicks.

Another of Joe's songs was ''Gotta Go Baby.'' It had a clapping accompaniment by a friend of Joe's who used to do a tap dance routine with him sometime where he played. ''I Feel Like A Million'' is the song that really tells it all about what there is to know about Joe Hill's music. He played infectious, good time blues. That was him. ''Street Walkin' Woman'' is another one remember, because of the fine guitar solo on that one. ''Heartache Baby'' was about as good a slow blues as I think I ever recorded on Joe. But maybe ''Cold Chills'' was the best slow one, that was another song he said he had taught to him by Sonny Boy Williamson. Joe would also play that John Lee Hooker riff that was very popular at the time.

Saul and Jules Bihari had found out from Don Pierce at 4 Star that I was building a recording studio, and they wanted me to record some music for them. So I did do that for a little time. It was on a shake-hand deal. I had shake-hand deals with everyone. But it turned into being a problem with Saul and Jules. We had a misunderstanding, you could say. And there was no place in my life for that kind of thing. So went back to recording Joe Hill and the other artists for my own label, and Saul and Jules arranged with Lester Bihari to make recordings for them. Les was all right and we had no problems between us, though I am not sure how well the three of them got on together in fact.

All the time Joe was a musician, he also had a day job with the Canale family, who I knew slightly but never really in connection with Joe. They were wealthy and well thought of, and knew that they could depend on him. He was the perfect person to have around. That was why he only played his own little circuit within 30 miles or so. He would always be back in time to work the next day.

I never did see Joe Hill play his music outside of my studio. I promised him I would go out to watch him, but I was so busy with the studio and with Radio WREC and one thing and another. After a while I got where it was so busy that Joe just drifted off. Then, later on, I heard he had stepped on a rusty nail and died. That was really sad. Too many good people die for no good reason in this world. It was a real shame''.

Interview by Martin Hawkins, May 1, 2000

AUGUST 1950

The Phillips label is launched: the first release is Joe Hill Louis' "Boogie In The Park"/"Gotta Let You Go", which carries a different catalogue number on each side. A second release "Shorty The Barber" is planned, but not issued.

It's easy to overplay the extent to which Beale was buzzing, though. In August 1950, 'Ebony' magazine ran a feature about 'The New Beale Street', emphasising the rise of black owned businesses and the real or hoped for gentrification of the street. "Beale is but a ghost of the boisterous, blustering thoroughfare of yesterday'' Ebony' reported. "Its sweet men and easy riders are gone: its gambling dens and nite spots are shut down.

A new Beale Street is arising as a symbol of the new, enterprising, forward looking Southern Negro of today looking forward to the day when Negro businesses will dominate the street''. It reported, ''by midnite these days the street is virtually deserted in contrast to the old days when the rite spots operated all night long''.

The First of four singles recorded for Phillips by Slim Rhodes is issued on Gilt-Edge.

AUGUST 2, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Porter Wagoner ends a three-year job at the International Shoe Company manufacturing plant in West Plains, Missouri.

AUGUST 4, 1950 FRIDAY

Vicki Hackeman is born in Louisville. As one of the two original females in Dave & Sugar, she performs on ''Tear Time''. ''The Door Is Always Open'' and ''Golden Tears'' during her tenure, 1975-1979.

AUGUST 5, 1950 SATURDAY

Spade Cooley marks his two-year anniversary on Los Angeles' KTLA-TV. His guests for the show include jazz legend Count Basie and nightclub owner Hank Penny.

AUGUST 7, 1950 MONDAY

Rodney Crowell is born in Houston, Texas. The multi-talented performer nets five number 1 singles from his 1988 album ''Diamond & Dirt'', produced hits for Rosanne Cash and writes hits for Waylon Jennings, Crystal Gayle and Tim McGraw, among others.

Decca released Red Foley's version of ''Our Lady Of Fatima''

Decca released Ernest Tubb and Red Foley's two-sided hit, ''Goodnight Irene'' and ''Hillbilly Fever No. 2''.

AUGUST 8, 1950 TUESDAY

On this day, Sam Phillips wrote to the song's publisher, Cromwell Music, with the kind of bravado that only one who has nothing can muster: ''I would very much like to secure permission to cut this tune (''Shorty The Barber'') with Joe Hill Louis, an ex-Columbia recording artist (Negro). He has signed to make eight sides with my recording company, 'PHILLIPS', which is a new label but will be one of the most publicized regional labels to hit the market.

Jamie O'Hara is born in Toledo, Ohio. He and Kieran Kane form The O'Kanes, a 1980s duo built on strong hooks and spare arrangements. He also writes The Judds' ''Grandpa (Tell Me Bout' The Good Old Days)'', ''Gary Allan's Man To Man'' and John Conlee's ''As Long As I'm Rockin' With You''.

AUGUST 14, 1950 MONDAY

Decca released Ernest Tubb's ''You Don't Have To Be A Baby To Cry''.

AUGUST 16, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Bass player Joey Spampinato is born in New York City. Destined to play with the rock band NRBQ, he is married to Grand Ole Opry star Skeeter Davis for nine years.

AUGUST 18, 1950 FRIDAY

MGM released a double-sided Hank Williams hit ''They'll Never Take Her Love From Me'' and ''Why Should We Try Anymore''.

The Pinetoppers, including Ray and Vaughan Horton, Ray Smith, Rusty Keefer and Johnny Browers recorded ''Mockin' Bird Hill''.

AUGUST 19, 1950 SATURDAY

One day after her divorce from television executive Hubbell Robinson was finalized, ''Slipping Around'' singer Margaret Whiting marries piano player Joe ''Fingers'' Carr a second time in Guadalupe, Mexico.

Hank Snow spends the first of 21 weeks at number 1 on the Billboard country singles chart with ''I'm Moving On''.

AUGUST 20, 1950 SUNDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''The Lovebug Itch'' at Brown Brothers Studio on 4th Avenue in downtown Nashville.

AUGUST 21, 1950 MONDAY

Hank Snow recorded ''Rhumba Boogie'' and ''The Golden Rocket'' during a late-night session at Nashville's Brown Radio Productions.

AUGUST 21, 1950 MONDAY

In June 1950 Sam Phillips made his first tentative venture into the record business with WHBQ radio disc jockey Dewey Phillips. Here (above), Sam is trying to pitch the record to his brother-in-law, Jim Connolly, at WJLD. Note the emphasis that he is placing on quality. The Phillips label didn't last out the year, though.

________________________________________________

Mr. James Edward Connolly, August 21, 1950
Station WJLD
Bessemer, Alabama

Dear Madam,

Under separate cover - a couple of quilts and four blankets - I am sending you the hottest thing in country - the first official release of the newly organised PHILLIPS label. I have written Bob, telling him of our artist, and I thought you might like to know of the deal, too. Dewey Phillips and I are partners 50-50 on our new label, and we're going to do our best to make it roll in the South. Our first releases is by an ex Columbia recording artist, Joe Hill Louis, and the "Gotta Let You Go" side is already getting hot here. I know umbach can put it over down there, too.

We're going to put nothing but the best race and spiritual artists obtainable on our label, and though we may not have the number of artists that other companies have, we're going to do our durndest to have the best. I'd appreciate your singing on the station and signing it off with our records from time to time. In fact, I think it would make a good substitute for the Star Spangled Banner.

All kidding aside, do what you can to help us, and I might even buy you a couple of extra fish hooks. If our records happen to get hot down there before we get a distributor and a retail outlet in Birmingham, let me know, and we'll try to rush up the thing some. But its keeping me going night and day getting this thing set up. Therefore, if you receive any inquiries about obtaining any of our records there, please contact me, telephone collect.

Hope to get down to see y'll before too long, and give you the story on the deal. In the meantime, if you an round up the hard and pick up ol' Dobbin and head NW we'd love seeing you,

Thanks, Jimbo Best wishes, I amYours sincerely

AUGUST 1950

It was almost inconceivable, it went against all of his better instincts, against everything he ever said, whether at the time or looking back on the period: that he didn't want his own label, that he had neither the time, money, nor resources for such an enterprise, that he intended to confine himself to the creative end of the business exclusively. And to do so in such a brief space of time, with so little forethought given to the decision, contradicted virtually every impulse of his normal course of behavior. In later years he would say it was all for his friend and partner, a more freethinking and freewheeling soul (''It was to please Dewey, really. I mean I didn't... I didn't want it''), but even Sam would have been hard-pressed to deny that it was a decision fueled almost exclusively by rage.

Dewey, it was true, had no doubt that they would succeed. And, within the few days that he allowed himself to reflect on the matter, Sam may well have come to agree, convincing himself up to a point that with Dewey on the record, as well as Bob Umbach on Jimmy's station and Gene Nobles on WLAC, they really did stand a fighting chance.

Sam Phillips also had the active support, both material and spiritual, of Buster Williams, whose Plastic Products pressing plant was turning out close to six thousand records a day after less than a year of operation. The forty-one-year-old Williams, the man who had introduced Sam to the Biharis, was just one more in a proud line of Memphis wildcatters and entrepreneurs. Buster had started out at fourteen with a roasted-peanuts operation in Enterprise, Mississippi, then bought his own drugstore at sixteen and invested the profits in what would soon become one of the largest jukebox operations in the South. After serving with the 4th Ferrying Group during the war, (he trained the pilots who flew the vital lend-Lease and material resupply missions), he had returned to find his jukebox business thriving. He established a distributorship, Music Sales, primarily to service his jukebox business with the latest records, and then, primarily to service that, he designed his own pressing machines and gone into business as only the second, by a few months, independent pressing plant in the country. Like Sam and so many other ''new arrivals'' in the city, Buster Williams believed in all things Memphis, but most of all he believed in the independent spirit, and he encouraged Sam Phillips for the start, extending him credit on pressing costs and then covering his risk by placing an order for three hundred copies of the record through Music Sales.

Only Marion Keisker seemed to have reservations about the new, hastily conceived enterprise. As someone who spent all of her waking hours trying to keep Sam from being upset, she never ceased to worry about his nervous temperament. And, whether for reasons of jealousy or class, or just plain personal taste, she simply did not like Dewey. Nor did she trust him, she thought Sam was putting entirely too much faith in someone whose manic energy and violent mood swings indicated an unstable nature of his own. But she recognized the depths of her own resentment (the two of them, from her point of view, went around acting like two little boys who had sworn a blood oath, ''at least that's the way Sam felt about Dewey''), and she had no doubt that anything Dewey wanted from Sam he was going to get. So she kept her own counsel and said nothing about the new business. Sam wouldn't have listened to her anyway.

And then as quickly as it started, it was over. The whole enterprise came crashing down, and Sam's mood with it. To begin with, he seems to have been forced to the realization that Joe Hill Louis, whom he had characterized just a week or two earlier to Jimmy Connelly as ''an ex Columbia recording artist'', was in fact still on the label, a circumstance made evident by the appearance of his second Columbia single at almost the exact moment of the launching of ''The Phillips''.

AUGUST 26, 1950 SATURDAY

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans welcome a daughter, Robin Elizabeth Rogers, who is born with Down syndrome.

AUGUST 30, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Buster Williams' Plastic Products pressed three hundred copies, and first released "Gotta Let You Go"/"Boogie In The Park", recorded by Joe Hill Louis, on the Phillips label (The Phillips 9001/9002), shipped them to Music Sales for distribution in Memphis, and billed Phillips fifty-one dollars. It turned out to be the label's only release.

The extreme scarcity of the record today suggests that there never was another pressing, and, as far as anyone, the label was DOA by September.

AUGUST 31, 1950 THURSDAY

Hank Williams recorded ''Moanin' The Blues'' and ''Nobody's Lonesome For Me'' at Nashville's Castle Studio in an afternoon session.

AUGUST 1950

The Organic Act of Guam is signed into law by U.S. President Harry S. Truman during August of 1950. The act made the island an unincorporated territory of the United States and granted all Guam residents U.S. Citizenship. The act also gave a small amount of autonomy with the creation of legislative, judicial and executive branches of government and a bill of rights. Jurisdiction over the territory was also transferred to from the Untied States Navy to the United States Department of the Interior. The act marked the first time in over 300 years of colonialism that Guam would be given some form of self governance.

SEPTEMBER 1950

Atlantic Records scores its first number 1 record in the decade it would come to define musically with Ruth Brown's "Teardrops From My Eyes", the biggest rhythm and blues hit for a female artist for the next 40 years, and establishing Brown as the queen of rhythm and blues.

SEPTEMBER 1950

The second Lost John Hunter record ''YM And V Blues'' b/w ''Boogie For My Baby'' is issued by 4-Star 1511. This label takes no further blues material from Phillips after this release.

One of B.B. King's, RPM single "B.B. Boogie" b/w "Mistreated Woman" (RPM 304) is released. It may have been recorded by either Phillips or the Biharis at 706 Union Avenue. They didn't do much better than Lost John Hunter and His Blind Bats, with Billboard according one side a grade of 66, the other a 71. ''Highpitched warbler does okay on jump boogie blues'', the reviewer wrote of ''B.B. Boogie'', in a Basie-type or setting''. The single didn't sell much anywhere outside Memphis, and the second single, released in December, didn't really do any better.

Eunice Kathleen Waymon (aka blues-singer Nina Simone) is rejected from Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

SEPTEMBER 1950

Rufus Thomas signs and started at WDIA announcing two hour-long record shows, 'House Of Happiness' and 'Special Delivery'. At first, it seems that he tried to sound upmarket, smooth and articulate, like the announcers he heard on WREC broadcasting from posh venues like the Peabody Hotel. In fact, his own rasp of a voice was much more suited to selling records and sponsored goods to his home-town audience, and station manager David James Mattis counseled him about retaining the sort of hip rapport that he had with theater and night club crowds. "Once I became just Rufus, man, I started getting sharp and everything. My delivery stepped up, and there I was, a personality", he told a radio colleague, Louis Cantor. So much so that Mattis later described Rufus as ''the best black entertainer I ever saw in my life''.

SEPTEMBER 1, 1950 FRIDAY

Tex Williams signs a movie deal with Universal Pictures requiring him to do eight films for the studio

Merle Travis becomes the regular host of WRVA Radio's ''Old Dominion Barn Dance'' in Richmond, Virginia.

Drummer Steve Goetzman is born in Louisville, Kentucky. He joins Exile, whose mix of country, rock and gospel nets hook-filled 1980s hits such as ''Woke Up In Love'', ''She's A Miracle'' and ''Crazy For Your Love''.

Patti Leatherwood is born in Cleveland, Ohio. She briefly recorded for the Epic label during the late 1970s, providing background vocals the following decade on the Waylon Jenning's hit ''The Devil's On The Loose''.

SEPTEMBER 3, 1950 SUNDAY

In the early morning hours, Dewey Phillips had a terrible head-on collision on Highway 70 just outside of West Memphis that killed both the driver of the car and Dewey's companion, a nineteen-year-old girl who had moved to Memphis from Booneville, Mississippi, just six weeks earlier and was living at the Hotel Chisca with her aunt. Everyone put a brace face on it. Dewey's wife, Dot, said the girl was a friend of hers, and the station WHBQ announced that though Dewey remained on the critical list, he would soon be broadcasting from his hospital bed at Baptist Hospital. Sam Phillips' faith in Dewey never faltered, but his faith in their joint enterprise may have, even as he comforted Dot, whom Becky Phillips, too, had by now befriended. It must have hit him all at once what in reality he had known all along, just how little he knew about what it took to run a record company and how this was diverting him from his main task.

Such was the ignominious end of their ''The Phillips'' record company. There was no formal conclusion, and Music Sales, and a few other independent outlets, may have continued selling the Joe Hill Louis record (The Phillips 9001/2) for another few months. But there never was a second, from Joe or anyone else, and the whole business left such an unpleasant taste that Sam Phillips rarely referred to it in later life, and when he did, he uncharacteristically (for he was a man with an almost photographic memory) seemed unable to recall any of the details.

Nor were matters helped any by the growing tension at the radio station WREC , the increasing conflict on both Sam's and Marion's part between their dedication to the recording studio and their commitment to their salaried work. For Marion Keisker it was as much a matter of guilty conscience as anything else. At WREC ''they would say to me, 'How can you even work out there? I don't know what you're doing there'. I was beginning to shortchange the station, sliding in at the last minute and doing a show that wasn't prepared properly, but they never seemed to notice, they were so overcome with wonderment that I was able to transition from what they knew of me and my background, into this environment''.

For Sam Phillips it was harder. ''Everybody laughed at me. Of course, they'd try to make it tongue-in-cheek, talking about my recording niggers (and these were some of the greatest haven't been hanging around those niggers today'. I mean, they loved me to death. I think there was even a certain amount of admiration on, their, part that nobody really wanted to admit. Nobody can tell me that the white man wasn't little ashamed of how he was treating the black man. There was a kind of love on the part of the Southern white person for his nigger. But at the same time it would get up to a certain point, and you as a white man didn't take your nigger any further''.

It hurt. It hurt deeply. But it hurt almost as much to have had his naiveté so badly abused, to have risked his family's security and his own peace of mind for a foolish, unexamined whim, prompted mostly by the desire to vindicate himself not just in the eyes of others but in his own. Marion Keisker could see the burden of humiliation he carried around with him, at one point he broke out in a terrible case of hives, but he never wavered in his belief in the rightness of what he was doing. He never wavered in his firm conviction that the music he was seeking to record great music, the artists whom he sought out, great artists, as great as any who ever been heard. Where his belief momentarily wavered was in his own ability, whether he had the sheer stamina to carry on the crusade. Or the judgment.

SEPTEMBER 4, 1950 MONDAY

Columbia Records released Lefty Fritzell's ''If You Got The Money I've Got The Time'' backed with ''I Love You A Thousand Ways''.

Bass player Ronald LaPread is born in Tuskegee, Alabama. He provides the musical foundation for The Commondores, a 1970s rhythm and blues act whose ''Three Times A Lady'' is eventually remade as a country hit by Conway Twitty.

SEPTEMBER 9, 1950 SATURDAY

Guitarist John McFee is born in Santa Cruz, California. After a stint in The Doobie Brothers from 19791983, he helps form Southern Pacific, a breezy country-rock band that brightens country's sound from 1985 until the group's 1991 break-up.

Ernest Tubb recorded ''(Remember Me) I'm The One Who Loves You'' during the afternoon at Nashville's Castle Studio.

Four-year0old Neil Young, destined write several country hits, gets his picture in a newspaper for the first time when The Toronto Telegram features a photo of the boy with a huge fish, giving a false impression that he actually caught it.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1950 SUNDAY

Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry is born in Boston, Massachusetts. The band scores a 1988 hit from the movie ''Armageddon'' with ''I Don't Want To Miss A Thing'', which Mark Chesnutt reinvents as a country hit.

SEPTEMBER 11, 1950 MONDAY

Columbia released Gene Autry's ''Frosty The Snow Man''

SEPTEMBER 16, 1950 SATURDAY

David Bellamy is born in Darby, Florida. With Sibling Howard, he forms The Bellamy Brothers, developing a mix of hits built on worldplay or social commentary. They net 17 Country Music Association nominations for duo or group but never win.

SEPTEMBER 18, 1950 MONDAY

''Redwood Forest Trail'' opens in theaters, with singing cowboy Rex Allen as the leading good guy. His performances include ''America, The Beautiful''.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1950 WEDNESDAY

With the Korean War raging, Tex Ritter recorded ''Daddy's Last Letter'' in Los Angeles.

Gene Autry send Colonel Tom Parker an letter to thanking him for sending pictures taken at the Knickerbocker Hotel. Autry also thanked the Colonel for suggestions he made about the Checkerboard Jamboree. Autry sent his regards to "the gang". Autry explained in a handwritten note in blue ink at the bottom of the page that the letter had been misdirected when it was sent to him to be signed. He redated the letter November 1, 1950.

Gene Autry, well-known country singer, knew Colonel Tom Parker from his Nashville connections. The Colonel represented Eddy Arnold, and Autry often toured with Arnold for various shows.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1950 THURSDAY

Lefty Frizzell recorded ''Look What Thoughts Will Do'' at the Jim Beck Studio in Dallas, Texas.

Johnny Cash begins training to intercept Soviet Morse code correspondence at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1950 SATURDAY

''The Eddy Arnold Show'' debuts on NBC Radio, using ;;Cattle Call'' as the theme song.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1950 SUNDAY

Yvonne Spencely is born. She becomes the second wife of The Bee Gees' Maurice Gibb, co-writer of the Kenny Rogers & Dolly Parton hit ''Islands In The Stream''.

SEPTEMBER 25, 1950 MONDAY

An outlaw gang suffers the snuggler's blues when it runs in to Roy Rogers in ''Sunset In The West'', which debuts in movie theaters. The picture also features Foy Willing and The Riders Of The Purple Sage.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1950 THURSDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis begins taking classes at the Southwestern Bible Institute in Waxahachie, Texas. He lasts just three months before dropping out.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1950 SATURDAY

The Grand Ole Opry is televised for the first time. as WSM-TV debuts on the air, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Mandolin player Donna Stoneman, of The Stoneman Family, marries Bob Bean in Attala County, Mississippi.

Gene Autry sings the recent Red Foley hit ''Chattanoogie Shoe Shine Boy'' in the debut of his last movie, ''Indian Territory''. The Apache tale also features Pat Buttram, Frankie Marvin and Champion The Wonder Horse.

Six months after its debut, the ABC western series ''The Marshal Of Gunsight Pass'', starring Eddie Dean, makes its last prime-time appearance.

Patti Page forgets the words to the national anthem at Rice Stadium's first football game in Houston. The Rice Owls defeat the Santa Clara Broncos, 27-7.

OCTOBER 1950

The Gilt-Edge label is re-launched with a different distribution set-up from 4-Star. Slim Rhodes is among the first releases.

Influential Memphis disc jockey and singer/musician, Eddie Hill, leaves WMPS and crosses town to WMC radio. His "High Noon Roundup" show influences many young country artists, including Johnny Cash, and includes Harmonica Frank in the regular cast.

OCTOBER 1, 1950 SUNDAY

Coral Records released The Pinetoppers' ''Mockin' Bird Hill''.

OCTOBER 2, 1950 MONDAY

Songwriter Danny Mayo is born in Gadsden, Alabama. He writes Confederate Railroad's ''Jesus And Mama'', Pirates Of The Mississippi's ''Feed Jake'', Alabama's ''If Had You'' and Tracy Byrd's ''The Keeper Of The Stars''.

OCTOBER 3, 1950 TUESDAY

Bob and Betty Wills have their third child, Diane Wills.

OCTOBER 6, 1950 FRIDAY

Guitarist Thomas McClary is born in Florida. He joins the 1970s rhythm and blues act The Commodores, whose hit ''Three Times A Lady'' is remade in 1983 as a country single by Conway Twitty.

OCTOBER 8, 1950 SUNDAY

''Holiday Rhythm'' opens the movie theaters. The film features Tex Ritter in a secondary role and the Cass County Boys.

Jackie Frantz is born in Sidney, Ohio. She becomes one of the two original females in the trio Dave and Sugar. During her tenure, from 1975-1977, she contributes to ''Queen Of The Silver Dollar'' and ''The Door Is Always Open''.

Bluegrass guitarist Russ Barenberg is born. In addition to making his own albums, he also appears on Randy Travis 1992 hit ''Better Class Of Losers''.

OCTOBER 10, 1950 TUESDAY

Elektra Records is formed by Jac Holzman as a jazz/folk label. After establishing a country division in the 1970s, the company represents such acts as Eddie Rabbitt, Eddy Raven, Crystal Gayle and Hank Williams Jr.

Songwriter Tim Krekel is born in Louisville, Kentucky. Twice a member of Jimmy Buffett's band, he authors Crystal Gayle's ''Turning Away'' and ''Patty Loveless' ''You Can Feel Bad''.

OCTOBER 11, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Pop and country singer Margaret Whiting and piano player Lou Bush (aka) Joe ''Fingers'' Care, have a daughter, Debora Louise Bush.

OCTOBER 12, 1950 THURSDAY

''The George Burns & Gracie Allen Show'' debuts on CBS-TV. Some 30 years later, Burns scores a country hit with ''I Wish I Was Eighteen Again''.

Model and actress Susan Anton is born in Oak Glen, California. Named Miss California of 1969, she earns a country hit by teaming with Fred Knoblock on the 1980 single ''Killin' Time''.

''The Morey Amsterdam Show'' airs for the final time on the DuMont TV network. Amsterdam earned a country hit three years prior as a songwriter for Dick Jurgens recording ''(Oh Why, Oh Why, Did I Ever Leave) Wyoming''.

OCTOBER 15, 1950 SUNDAY

Bill Monroe recorded the original version of ''Uncle Pen'' during an afternoon session in Nashville. The song references the fiddle classic ''Soldiers Joy'' and ''Jenny Lynn''.

OCTOBER 16, 1950 MONDAY

Decca released Ernest Tubb's ''(Remember Me) I'm The One Who Loves You''.

OCTOBER 18, 1950 WEDNESDAY

''September Affair'' appears in movie theaters with featured stars Joseph Cotton and Joan Fontaine. The film includes Walter Huston's performance of ''September Song'', a future country hit for Willie Nelson.

OCTOBER 19, 1950 THURSDAY

Brian Collins is born in Baltimore, Maryland. With the encouragement of Dolly Parton, he moves to Nashville, where he nets a hit with his 1974 remake of ''Statue Of A Fool''.

OCTOBER 20, 1950 FRIDAY

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs hold their final session for Mercury Records, at the WDAE Studio in Tampa, Florida, recording ''Roll In My Sweet Baby's Arms''.

OCTOBER 22, 1950 SUNDAY

Hank Snow recorded ''Unwanted Sign Upon Your Heart'' in the evening at Brown Radio Productions in Nashville.

OCTOBER 26, 1950 THURSDAY

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs sign with Columbia Records, where the bluegrass duo will reach its commercial peak.

OCTOBER 27, 1950 FRIDAY

MGM released Hank Williams' ''Moanin' The Blues'', with ''Nobody's Lonesome For Me'' on the flip side.

NOVEMBER 1950

As Joe Hill Louis's one-year contract with Columbia, dated October 19, 1949 expires, Phillips probably enquires if Columbia will pick up the one-year option. On being told that Columbia will not, Sam Phillips signs Joe Hill Louis to Modern Records.

NOVEMBER 1950

There is a photograph of Billy Red Love sitting at a piano on the corner of the stage of what may well be the Palace Theater on Beale Street in Memphis and behind him is an advertising poster for the Johnny Otis Show due to appear in Memphis for four nights from 9 -12 of a month and year that are not visible.

It is known that the Otis show featuring the same singers and guests as listed in the poster was in Memphis at the Palace on November 9-12, 1950, and it just may be that Billy Love played that show too as part of the local support.

The Otis revue made regular visits to Memphis over the next two or three years and so Love's promotional photograph could date from as early as 1950 or as late as 1953.

NOVEMBER 2, 1950 THURSDAY

The western ''Border Outlaws'' appears in movie theaters with Spade Cooley starring as a ranch owner in the Old West.

Former Grand Ole Opry star Asher Sizemore loses his son. Charles ''Buddy Boy'' Sizemore goes missing in action in the Korean War.

NOVEMBER 3, 1950 FRIDAY

The Stanley Brothers recorded ''I'm A Man Of Constant Sorrow'' at the Castle Studio in Nashville. Their version of the song provides a template for the version by the fictitious Soggy Bottom Boys, which appears in the film ''O Brother, Where Art Thou''?

NOVEMBER 4, 1950 SATURDAY

Singer and songwriter Diane Pfeifer is born in St. Louis, Missouri. She writes Debby Boone's 1980 hit ''Free To Be Lonely Again''.

NOVEMBER 8, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Columbia renegotiates Lefty Frizzell's recording contract. He gets a raise from a royalty of 2 percent of 90 percent per record to 3 percent for two years, with a two-year option at 4 percent.

Arthur Crudup recorded ''My Baby Left Me'' in Chicago. Elvis Presley will remake a good version of the song on January 30, 1956 at RCA Studio, in New York City.

Eddy Arnold recorded ''There's Been A Change In Me'' at the Brown Brothers Studio on 4th Avenue in downtown Nashville.

Ramblin' Jimmie Dolan recorded ''Hot Rod Race''.

NOVEMBER 10, 1950 FRIDAY

Hawkshaw Hawkins recorded the Lefty Frizzell song ;;I Love You A Thousand Ways'' in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Steel player Greg Trostal is born in Elmira, New York. He replaces Pat Severs in Pirates Of The Mississippi in 1994.

NOVEMBER 12, 1950 SUNDAY

Hank Thompson small plane crashes, though he sustains no serious injuries.

Barbara Fairchild is born in Lafe, Arkansas. After making her first record at age 15, her 1972 release ''Teddy Bear Song'' begins a three-single run of innocent hits.

NOVEMBER 13, 1950 MONDAY

Capitol released Tennessee Ernie Ford's ''The Shot Gun Boogie''.

NOVEMBER 15, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Patsy Montana begins hosting her own radio show on WQAM in Miami, Florida.

Roy Rogers comes to the rescue of Indians in the northwest with the silver-screen debut of ''North Of The Great Divide''. Foy Willing and The Riders Of The Purple Sage provide musical support.

In his final screen role, the late Lee ''Lasses'' White appears in the debuting western ''The Texan Meets Calamity Jane''.

The John Wayne-Maureen O'Hara picture ''Rio Grande'' debuts in theaters. The movie also features Chill Wills, The Sons Of The Pioneers and ''(Ghost) Riders In The Sky'' songwriter Stan Jones.

NOVEMBER 20, 1950 MONDAY

''Under Mexicali Stars'' appears in movie theaters, with Rex Allen and Buddy Edsen.

''The Blazing Sun'' debuts in movie theaters with Gene Autry chasing bank robbers in the Old West. He gets assistance from Pat Buttram, Frankie Marvin and Champion The Wonder Horse.

NOVEMBER 21, 1950 TUESDAY

Flatt and Scruggs hold their first recording session for Columbia Records.

NOVEMBER 23, 1950 THURSDAY

Hank Williams writes ''Cold Cold Heart''.

NOVEMBER 24, 1950 FRIDAY

Studio session for Joe Hill Louis at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee. Session details unknown. By then, though, Sam Phillips had finally decided to eat humble pie. It was with very mixed feelings that he got back in touch with the Bihari brothers about Joe Hill Louis at the end of October, but he had nowhere else to go. Joe's one-year contract with Columbia had finally run out, Sam had seen it in writing, and he negotiated a modest new contract with Modern, signing off on it on this day and taking Joe into the studio on Monday November 27, 1950. He mailed off the results, including a more refined version of ''Boogie In The Park'' with Joe's discommodious traps weighing down the proceedings, on December 8, and sent another four sides a little later. But nothing happened.

The Broadway musical ''Guys And Dolls'', starring Robert Alda and Vivian Blaine, opens at the 46th Street Theatre in New York. The score includes ''A Bushel And A Peck'', which is also recorded by Margaret Whiting and Jimmy Wakely.

Drummer Robert Burns is born in Jacksonville, Florida. As a founding member of Lynyrd Skynyrd, he plays on ''Sweet Home Alabama'', ranked among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.

NOVEMBER 27, 1950 MONDAY

Studio session for Joe Hill Louis at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee. Details unknown.

NOVEMBER 28, 1950 TUESDAY

Evelyn Knight and Red Foley recorded ''My Heart Cries For You''.

NOVEMBER 29, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Red Foley recorded ''Hot Rod Race''.

Wendy Steiner is born in Los Angeles. Operating professionally as Wendy Waldman, she produces hits for Suzy Bogguss and The Forester Sisters. Waldman writes The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's ''Fishin' In The Dark'', ''Crystal Gayle's ''Baby, What About You'' and Lorrie Morgan's ''Half Enough'', among others.

NOVEMBER 30, 1950 THURDAY

Vocalist Greg Gordon is born. He becomes the lead singer of the 1980s pop group The Boys Band, then moves into backup work. His credits include John Berry's 1996 single ''Change My Mind''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR MODERN RECORDS 1950

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: MONDAY NOVEMBER 27, 1950
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Sam Phillips has always had the ability and the willingness to persist with an artist that had the innate talent that he was looking for. He worked hard and long with a promising artist and the Louis takes selected for original release are routinely superior to the others. Joe was not an easy musician to work with, frequently unprepared and sometimes careless. In the sessions that followed, he tended to move toward an emphasis on the guitar as a lead instrument. The harmonica is more often used for fills, sometimes quite erratically. Joe could pick a fine guitar but could just as soon go quite out of tune, which made him unreliable as a sideman.

01 – ''BOOGIE IN THE PARK'' – B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - BMG Music Publisher Limited
Matrix number: - MM 1492 Take 1 - < Modern 795-828 Series
Recorded: - November 27, 1950 - Remake
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm Modern 813-A mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK / COLD CHILLS
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

''Boogie In The Park'' the follow-up record, stayed in what might be called the classic one-man-band styling while the reverse side, John Lee (Sonny Boy) Williamson's ''Cold Chills'', is the first and one of the best of his slow guitar dominated blues. Other similarly fine performances include Saint Louis Jimmy's ''Going Down Slow'' and an alternate take of ''Street Walkin' Woman'' (the acetate of the original 78 is irreparably damaged).

02(1) – ''COLD CHILLS'' – B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - John Lee Williamson
Publisher: - Wabash Music Corporation
Matrix number: - MM 1493 Take 3 Master - > Modern 795-828 Series
Recorded: - November 27, 1950
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm Modern 813-B mono
COLD CHILLS / BOOGIE IN THE PARK
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

02(2) -''COLD CHILLS'' – B.M.I. - 3:28
Composer: - John Lee Williamson
Publisher: - Wabash Music Corporation
Matrix number: - MM 1493 Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 27, 1950
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm LP 2383-214-2 mono
BLUE IN THE MORNING
Reissued: - 2008 JSP Records Internet iTunes MP3-13 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - KING OF THE ONE MAN BANDS

03 – ''STREET WALKIN' WOMAN'' – B.M.I. - 3:17
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - MM 1541 Master - > Modern 795-828 Series
Recorded: - November 27, 1950
Released: - 1951
First appearance:- Modern Records (S) 78rpm Modern 20-822-A mono
STREET WALKIN' WOMAN / WALKIN' TALKIN' BLUES
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

04 – ''MISTREAT ME WOMAN'' – B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - November 27, 1950
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm LP 2383-214-3 mono
BLUE IN THE MORNING
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis – Vocal, Harmonica, Guitar, Hi-Hat, Bass, Drums
Ford Nelson - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1950

Sam Phillips secures Joe Hill Louis' release from Columbia and ships four dubs to Modern Records.

DECEMBER 1950

Studio session for Joe Hill Louis at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

Sam Phillips recorded a second session in December on Slim Rhodes' Band for Gilt-Edge.

B.B. King's second RPM single "Walkin' And Cryin'' backed with ''The Other Night Blues'' (RPM 311) is released, but didn't the charts.

After the Chinese intervene in the Korean conflict on behalf of North Korea, United Nations and Republic of Korea troops are overrun and left with no land evacuation options during December of 1950. The UN and ROK forces decided to attempt a “reverse amphibious operation” to evacuate over 100,000 troops and hundreds of thousands of tons of supplies and vehicles. They did so by ferrying from the Port of Hungnam out to sea and back to Korean locations south of the 38th parallel. The plan faced complications as nearly 100,000 refugees showed up, asking for evacuation as well. The operation began on December 10th and it lasted until December 24th. They were miraculously successful in their efforts as the troops and most of the refugees were transported by ship to safety. The UN Troops also demolished the port and destroyed all of the left over supplies that could have been useful to the enemy as they left.

DECEMBER 2, 1950 SATURDAY

John Wesley Ryles is born in Bastrop, Louisiana. He nets two country hits as an artist, 1968's ''Kay'' and 1977's ''Once In A Lifetime Thing''; writes Steve Wariner's ''Starting Over Again''; and provides background vocals on hits by Alan Jackson, Blake Shelton, Brooks & Dunn and Randy Travis, among others.

DECEMBER 8, 1950 FRIDAY

Moon Mullican recorded ''Cherokee Boogie (Eh-Oh-Aleena)'' in Cincinnati.

DECEMBER 12, 1950 TUESDAY

La Costa is born in Seminole, Texas. The older sister of Tanya Tucker, she recorded a pair of Top 10 singles, ''Get On My Love Train'' and ''He Took Me For A Ride'', during the mid-1970s.

With his son, Ronnie, sick, Marty Robbins promises God that ''if he would save my son I would never drink again''.

DECEMBER 13, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Something Old, Something New'', ''Kentucky Waltz'' and ''May The Good Lord Bless And Keep You'' at the RCA Studios in New York City.

Bass player and recording artist Don Dixon is born in Lancaster, South Carolina. He plays bass on Mary Chapin Carpenter's 1994 album ''Stones In The Road'', appearing on the singles ''Shut Up And Kiss'' and ''Tender When I Want To Be''.

DECEMBER 15, 1950 FRIDAY

Singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Rex Allen share the silver screen as ''Trail Of Robin Hoods'' debuts. The picture includes one song written by Foy Willing.

DECEMBER 16, 1950 SATURDAY

Billboard magazine runs an ad that touts Lefty Frizzell's nickname as the result of an amateur boxing career. The claim is untrue, but becomes a part of the Frizzell legacy.

DECEMBER 18, 1950 MONDAY

Decca released bill Monroe's original version of ''Uncle Pen''.

FALL 1950

Modern Records release their first Joe Hill Louis single, "I Feel Like A Million" b/w "Heartache Baby" (Modern 795).

DECEMBER 20, 1950 WEDNESDAY

Drummer Don Heffington is born in Los Angeles, California. Alongside stints with Lone Justine and The Jayhawks, he plays on Emmylou Harris' 1984 hit, ''In My Dreams''.

DECEMBER 21, 1950 THURSDAY

Hank Williams recorded ''Cold Cold Heart'' and ''Dear John'' during an evening session at the Castle Studio in downtown Nashville.

After 17 months with Hank Williams' Drifting Cowboys, bass player Hillous Butrum joins Hank Snow's Rainbow Ranch Boys. During his four years with Snow, he plays on the hits ''Music Makin' Mama From Memphis'' and ''The Gold Rush Is Over''.

Film executive Jeffrey Katzenberg is born in New York City. After working as CEO for Disney, he joins David Geffen and Steven Spielberg to found DreamWorks. The film company's record division will represent Toby Keith, Randy Travis and Darryl Worley.

DECEMBER 23, 1950 SATURDAY

Lefty Frizzell hits number 1 on the Billboard country chart with his debut single, ''If You Got The Money I've Got The Time''.

DECEMBER 25, 1950 MONDAY

Reggie Young receives his first guitar for Christmas in Memphis. He goes on to become a great session musician, playing on such as Willie Nelson's ''Always On My Mind'', Elvis Presley's ''In The Ghetto'', ''Suspicious Minds'' and George Strait's ''Ace In The Hole''.

''The Steve Allen Show'' begins airing daily on CBS-TV, just months after its host had a hit as a songwriter on the Margaret Whiting/Jimmy Wakely duet ''Let's Go To Church (Next Sunday Morning)''.

DECEMBER 28, 1950 THURSDAY

American rock singer, songwriter, guitarist, and record producer Alex Chilton (Box Tops, Big Star) is born in Memphis, Tennessee. Chilton died in 2010.

Bass player Hugh McDonald is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A session player for Willie Nelson, Michael Bolton and Ricky Martin, he's generally regarded as an unofficial member of Bon Jovi, appearing on the band's 2006 country hit ''Who Says You Can't Go Home''.

Producer and engineer Marty Lewis is born in Oak Park, Michigan. He works with Dan Fogelberg and Jimmy Buffett, engineering ''Margaritaville''.

DECEMBER 29, 1950 FRIDAY

''Frontier Outpost'' appears in movie theaters, with Charles Starrett, Smiley Bernette and Hank Penny.

DECEMBER 30, 1950 SATURDAY

Lefty Frizzell makes his first appearance on the Grand Ole Opry, singing ''If You Got The Money I've Got The Time'' and ''I Love You A Thousand Ways''.

DECEMBER 31, 1950 SUNDAY

Marilyn Sellars is born in Northfield, Minnesota. Her lone claim to fame comes with here 1974 country hit, ''One Day At A Time''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR MODERN RECORDS 1950

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE DECEMBER 1950
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) – ''WALKIN' TALKIN' BLUES'' – B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1540 Take 3 Master - > Modern 795-828 Series
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm Modern 20-822-B mono
WALKIN' TALKIN' BLUES / STREET WALKIN' WOMAN
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

The 16-bar ''Walkin' Talkin' Blues'', with its fine and lilting harp intro.

01(2) – ''WALKIN' TALKIN' BLUES'' – B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - None – Alternate Take
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - 2008
First appearance: - JSP Records Internet iTunes MP3-23 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - KING OF THE ONE MAN BANDS

02 – ''GOING DOWN SLOW'' – B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - James Oden
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1565 Master - > Modern 795-828 Series
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm Modern 828 mono
GOING DOWN SLOW / EYESIGHT TO THE BLIND
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

03 – ''COME BACK BABY (GREAT BIG HOUSE)'' – B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - 1995
First appearance: - P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm PVC 22002 mono
GOTTA BOOGIE BABY
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803-6 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

04 – ''THE WAY YOU TREAT ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis-Joe Josea
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - 1970
First appearance: - Kent Records (LP) 33rpm LP 9002-3 mono
ANTHOLOGY OF THE BLUES - MEMPHIS BLUES - ARCHIVE SERIES - VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803 mono
BOOGIE IN THE PARK

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis – Vocal, Harmonica, Guitar, Hi-Hat, Bass Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SLIM RHODES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR GILT-EDGE RECORDS 1950

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE DECEMBER 1950
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "SIXTY DAYS**" – B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - 4-Star Sales
Matrix number: - 3969 Master - > Gilt-Edge Series <
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - March 1951
First appearance: - Gilt-Edge Records (S) 78rpm standard single Gilt-Edge 5026-A mono
SIXTY DAYS / MEMPHIS BOUNCE
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Sixty Days'' is a interesting western swing item with its laconic vocal from Dusty Rhodes could almost have been a follow-up to the ''Hot Rod Race'' saga which had been started by Arkie Shibley on Gilt-Edge. The straight-as-an-arrow vocal contrasts nicely with the jazz lead guitar. The composer, W.S. Stevenson, was 4-Star/Gilt-Edge owner Bill McCall, who bought songs from down-on-their-luck hillbillies. Odds are, he didn't make his money back on this one.

02 - "TIME MARCHES ON*" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Gail Daniels
Publisher: - 4-Star Sales
Matrix number: - 3970 Master - > Gilt-Edge Series >
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Gilt-Edge Records (S) 78rpm standard single Gilt-Edge 5034-A mono
TIME MARCHES ON / HOT FOOT RAG
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-6 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-7 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Maintaining the bouncy ballad style of the vocal sides of his records, Slim Rhodes here again stepped before the mike on ''Time Marches On'', and to render the philosophical statement penned by the little-known Gail Daniels, who also recorded the song for Gilt-Edge's parent label, 4-Star. Brad Suggs plays some dazzling guitar fills behind Slim's vocal.

03 - "HOTFOOT RAG" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - 4-Star Sales
Matrix number: - 3971 Master - > Gilt-Edge Series >
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - 1951
First appearance: - Gilt-Edge Records (S) 78rpm standard single Gilt-Edge 5034-B mono
HOT FOOT RAG / TIME MARCHES ON
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-6 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Again it was probably more than a coincidence that on ''Hot Foot Rag'' bears a passing similarity to ''Hot Rod Race''. This is another powerful guitar-led piece by Brad Suggs who plays some jazzy licks that came from the Belgian gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt, either direct or via the nifty descending runs of Arthur ''Guitar Boogie'' Smith.

04 - "MEMPHIS BOUNCE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - 4-Star Sales
Matrix number: - 3972 Master - > Gilt-Edge Series <
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1950
Released: - March 1951
First appearance: - Gilt-Edge Records (S) 78rpm standard single Gilt-Edge 5026-B mono
MEMPHIS BOUNCE / SIXTY DAYS
Reissued: - November 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-1-3 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-4 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Memphis Bounch'', the second Gilt-Edge release contained another grabby instrumental theme, this time played in unison by the take-off guitar of Brad Suggs and the steel guitar of Danny Holloway. Suggs's solo has a hint of jazz, and he then settles into a riff on the bass strings through the steel and fiddle solos. This is music of some urbanity and charm, certainly in a different league from the hillbilly recordings Rhodes would make later on Sun.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ether Cletus ''Slim'' Rhodes - Vocal* and Guitar
Perry Hilburn ''Dusty'' Rhodes - Vocal* and Fiddle
Luther Bradley ''Pee Wee'' Suggs - Vocal** and Guitar
Gilbert Ray ''Speck'' Rhodes - Bass
Danny Holloway - Steel Guitar

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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> Continued: 1951 MRS Sessions 1 <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©