CONTAINS 1960 SESSIONS

Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, Early 1960 / Demo
Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, 1960 / Beat Records
Studio Session for Carl Simmons, Early 1960 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, 1960 / Sonic Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, 1959/1960 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Rayburn Anthony, January 6, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bill Johnson, January 14, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, January 21-25, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, Early 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Brad Suggs, February 3, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, February 22, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, February 23, 1960 / Judd Records
Studio Session for Barbara Pittman, February 24, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, 1960 (1) / Rita Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, 1960 (2) / Rita Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, March 7, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Paul Richy, March 11, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, March 14, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, March 15, 1960 / Judd Records
Studio Session for Jeb Stuart, March 16, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Don Hinton, March 16, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Chuck Foster, March 22, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Emerson, March 24, 1960 / Mad Records
Studio Session for Dickey Lee, April 20, 1960 / Dot Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, May 27, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, Probably June 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Sonny Wilson, Summer 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Lance Roberts, Probably June 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bobbie Jean Barton, June 1, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ernie Barton, June 1, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ernie Barton, Unknown Date(s) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Levester ''Lucky Big'' Carter, June 20, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jimmy Louis, Summer 1960 / Nita Records
Studio Session for Graham Forbes & The Trio, Summer 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tracy Pendarvis, Probably July 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Don Scaife, Unknown Date July 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bill Strenght, July 19, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Brad Suggs, July 20, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Wade Cagle, July 27, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, August 3, 4, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, August 4, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Marion Conrad, September 7, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Narvel Felts, September 15, 1960 / MGM Records)
Studio Session for Bobby Crafford, September 23, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, October 13, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, October 24, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, November 23, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Linda Gail Lewis  &
Frankie Jean Lewis, December 13, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Anita Wood, December 28, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tony Rossini, December 28, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, 1960 / Fernwood Records
Studio Session for Luke McDaniel, 1960 / Big Howdy Records
Studio Session for Luke McDaniel, Unknown Dates / Stomper Records
Studio Session for Doctor Ross, Probably 1960/1961 / Hi-Q Records
Studio Session for George Jackson, Unknown Date(s) 1960/1967 / Sun Records

Biography of Artists (See: The Sun Biographies)


1960-1969

It's frequently said that rock and roll disappeared in the early sixties, and, in truth, it did go through some  hard times: Jerry Lee Lewis was blackballed after he married his thirteen-year-old cousin in December 1957;  Elvis Presley was inducted into the U.S. Army in March 1958; Buddy Holly and Ritchie Valens died in a  plane crash in February 1959; Chuck Berry spent two years in prison after being guilty of taken an underage  girl across state lines in 1959; Eddie Cochran died in a London car crash in 1960; and the U.S. Congress  began holding hearings on payola, the practice of radio disk jockeys receiving illegal payments for pushing  certain songs in February 1960. But rock and roll was far from dead. There was instrumental music like  Duane Eddy, the Ventures, the Shadows. There were girl groups like the Shirelles, the Ronettes, the Shangri- La's. There was Phil Spector's Wall of Sound and Berry Gordy's Tamla-Motown empire. There was surf  music like Dick Dale, Jan and Dean, the Beach Boys, and soul music like Sam Cooke, Jackie Wilson, the  Impressions. But all these developments pale when compared to the changes that were on the horizon.  America was getting involved in a war in Southeast Asia. President John F. Kennedy was to be assassinated  in Dallas, Texas. The Civil Rights Movement was gaining momentum. And the Beatles were about to  completely after the face of rock and roll.

1960

The cold war continued to become colder as the two sides distrusted the other more and tried to influence other parts of the world. John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson won the Presidency with one of the smallest margins in history ( 113,000 votes ) out of 68.3 million. The sexual revolution of the 60's had begun with the use of birth control pills and Hugh Hefner opening the first of his Playboy clubs in Chicago. The "Flintstones" is shown on television for the first time and movies this year include "The Magnificent Seven" and "Psycho" . Notable technical achievements include the invention of the Laser and a Heart Pacemaker. France tests its first atomic bomb and joins those countries with nuclear bomb technology. Notable names that appear in the limelight that year include "Cassius Clay" and "Sir Francis Chichester" .

The United States sends the first troops to Vietnam following the French withdrawal in 1954 in the fight against communist North Vietnam. U.S.  announces that 3,500 American soldiers are going to be sent to Vietnam. The Vietnam conflict had it's history in the original French Control of the region which changed to U.S.A. support following French withdrawal, Together with distrust by both sides during the cold war and successive US Presidents starting with Dwight D. Eisenhower believing in the Domino Theory / Effect that if one country fell to communism each country with borders would be more likely to fall, combined with the financial / Military backing of the Soviet Union and China of North Vietnam. Over the next few years the war escalated on both sides eventually ending in 1973 when the US pulled out of Vietnam following a North Vietnam Victory.

Joe Jones released ''You Talk To Much'', which cracked the rhythm and blues and pop Top 100. The same year, Jessie Hill adds Mardi Gras Indians to his rhythm and blues with ''Ooh Poo Pah Doo''.

JANUARY 1960

Fan club newsletter named Rollin' Stone mentioned: ''After being home for the holidays for the first time in years, Jerry Lee Lewis is back in Hollywood and he tells fan club vice-president Kay Martin, that he's due to make two movies, one of which might be the Hank Williams story. According to Kay Martin, ''In January 1960 Jerry was in Hollywood and he in his hotel room with a girl named Lynn, who was the California rep of the fan club. It was rumoured they had a actual crush; true or not, Myra got upset and put the kibosh on it and it was never heard of anymore''.


JANUARY 1960

The new Sun studio in Memphis is belatedly launched at 639 Madison Avenue. Producers, Jim  Vienneau (MGM), Johnny Vincent (Ace), Lew Chudd (Imperial) all attend the inauguration.

Stereo had almost completely replaced mono as the recording mode. Studios re-equipped  with multi-track tape recorders, first 3-track (initially for film work) or half inch or one inch  wide tape, then 4 track on one inch wide tape (later reduced to half inch).

8-track on one  inch tape increased to 16-track on two inch tape. The maximum tape width has stayed at  two inches but the number of tracks has increased still further to 24, 36 and even to 48  tracks.

The singles, Sun 335 ''A Thousand Guitars'' b/w ''Is It To Late'' by Tracy Pendarvis and Sun 336 ''Walkin' And Talkin'' b/w ''Somebody Just Like You'' by Mack Owen issued.


THE NEW SUN STUDIO ON 639 MADISON AVENUE

Although few could have perceived it at the time, July 1958 was a watershed in the history  of Sun Records. Jerry Lee Lewis had returned from England with his career in tatters;  Johnny Cash was just completing his divorce from the label. A few weeks later, Jud Phillips  left to start his eponymous Judd label

Despite the bad news, Sam Phillips pushed forward. Foremost in his mind was his concern  over the recording conditions at 706 Union Avenue: his studio was creeping into  obsolescense. The floor, while larger than many have supposed, was too small to  accommodate the increasingly large groups Sun was recording. The control room was too  small to install the crucial new multitrack recorders. And the office area, where Sam  rambled around as always among other people's desks, was too cramped to house even his  skeleton staff. By 1958 he knew he would have to take his recording operations into new  quarters, even if his own, very good, instincts warned him against it.

Phillips also wanted to diversify into custom recording (hiring out studio time), and  developing Phillips International into an label with diverse brands of music. All of this,  requiring more space, more personnel, and updated technology, was impossible at 706 Union  Avenue.


Sam Phillips at his desk on his new studio office  at 639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee. >

639 MADISON AVENUE – In the summer of 1958 Sam Phillips bought a property on Madison  Avenue in Memphis, just a few city blocks from the old studio. At various points in its  history, 639 Madison had housed a Midas Muffler shop and Hart's Bakery. Phillips gutted the  interior and installed two modern recording studios on the ground floor. On the second floor  he laid out the new A&R and promotion offices, and set aside a vault for tape storage.


On the  third floor, adjacent to the accounting and publishing offices, Phillips finally gave himself his  own office, complete with jukebox and nearby wet bar, ensuring that he was surrounded by  a few of his favorite things.

The anal touches fire administered by Decor by Denise, who  favored early space age motifs: door handles were housed in miniature sputniks, and the  offices soon took on the look of a late 1950s Buick.

Although it had been in use, on and off, since January 1960, the new studio was launched in  a promotional whirl on September 17. The complex was everything that 706 Union was not:  spacious, state-of-the-art, and soulless.

Phillips added to his staff at the new location. By this point, Phillips had separated from his  wife, Becky, and was living with Sally Wilbourn, who had joined Sun in late 1955. She moved  with him as office manager, as did pro-motion person Barbara Barnes (who left later in 1960,  sensing the game was over, to pursue a career in academia). Scotty Moore was brought over  from Fernwood Records in June 1960 and named studio manager and chief cutting engineer;  Charles Underwood, composer of ''Ubangi Stomp'' was hired as air manager and assistant  engineer. Moore and Underwood largely filled the holes created by the departure of Bill  Justis and Jack Clement; together they joined Bill Fitzgerald and Cecil Scaife, who had been  hired shortly before the new studio was finished.

Bill Fitzgerald had been an early partner in Duke Records before it had been acquired by  Don Robey. Fitzgerald then concentrated on building the Music Sales distributorship in  Memphis. After nine years in distribution, he took on the ill-defined role of general manager  at Sun in August 1959, staying until the bitter end.

Cecil Scaife was born in Helena, Arkansas, and had originally planned to parlay hid looks into  a career in movies. He went to Hollywood as a protege of Paramount Pictures, staying a few  months before returning to the South Vreft of his illusions about the movie business. Scaife  joined Hi Records as promotion manager, becoming their first full-time employee; Sam  Phillips was Impressed with his work in getting Carl McVoy off the ground, and phoned him in  the wee hours one morning offering him the job of promotion manager that Jud Phillips had  just vacated. After dinner the following night, Scaife accepted.


Charles Underwood directs the musicians  at the new Sun studio, 1960. >

STUDIO A - The main studio on Madison Avenue was roughly twice the size of the old studio  floor on Union Avenue, and the console in the control room was arranged in a futuristic V  design.

It house a four-track recorder and two single-track machines. Scotty Moore would  later bring in a three-track recorder so that he could be compatible with the studios in  Nashville.


Moore and Phillips also installed two state-of-the-art Neumann cutting lathes so  that they could cut their own masters, although the lathes never became fully operational.

The difficulties began to mount even before the tapes started rolling. The studio architect  was drafted, leaving others to pick up the pieces. ''We had problems from day one'', says  Cecil Scaife. ''For a start, the roof leaked because of all the flat surfaces. Every time it  rained 1'd have to go over there with buckets and mops. It delayed the opening for six  month's''.

That was nothing compared to the real problem with the building, untamed acoustics. ''The  room wasn't tuned properly'', asserts Scaife. '' I took some Nashville guys over there to  record, and they walked out. The sound was too hot. Too alive''. Phillips' instincts as an  audio engineer, which had served him so well at the old studio, deserted him on Madison  Avenue. The tightly focused slapback echo at the old studio had been replaced try a  cavernous hollow sound, as the audio signals leaped around the huge floor and off the  corrugated ceiling. To combat the problem, Phillips ordered baffles that could he recessed  into the wall when not in use; but they turned out to he more decorative than functional

The problems ran even deeper than technical and design flaws. The funkiness of the old  studio had been replaced by a high-tech environment. ''It was awful hard to create there's'',  recalls Scaife. .''06 Union had a terrific atmosphere. A creative atmosphere. There was a  naturalness about it. You felt up when you walked in. The new studio had a sterile  atmosphere, it was like a doctor's office''.

Phillips himself seems to have been ambivalent about the new facility. In his first flush of  enthusiasm, he told Edwin Howard, ''Woodshed recordings have had it You've got to have  latitude today, all the electronic devices, built-in high and low frequency equalization and  attenuation, echoes, channel splitting and metered on everything''. But it's doubtful that  Phillips ever truly learned to love the new technology.

Phillips oldest son, Knox, watched his father at work in the new studio. A single-track  machine was run in tandem with the multitrack so that everything could be recorded twice.  Phillips would premix through the hoard to the single-track machineries, as he had at the old  studio, leaving no latitude for rebalancing. The four-track tapes could he used for stereo  middowns and over-dubbing, if necessary. Invariably, though, it was what he captured on the  single-track that Phillips regarded as the ''cut''. ''His concern was to get it on the floor and  capture it on the single-track'', explained Knox. ''He believed that if the feeling wasn't there  on the floor right then, there wasn't any point it in doctoring it up later''.


319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH - Shortly after opening the new studio on Madison Avenue,  Phillips decided to branch out with a studio in Nashville, Sam had bought from Billy Ray Cooner. After years of refusing to rent out  his studio to anyone, Phillips made a complete turnabout, deciding to enter the custom  recording business in a grandiose way. The success of Bradley's Barn in Nashville showed that  there was money aplenty to be made in that city by catering to the smaller labels and the  overflow business from the larger studios. ''I thought Nashville could be a good center not  only for country music but for the range of music we were recording'', recalled Sam Phillips.  ''I was also trying to bring a new kind of influence into the business there''.

Cecil Scaife, Sun's promotion manager, mixes a tall cool one  for  sales manager Bill Fitzgerald in Sun's Madison,  third floor bar. >

Phillips had leased office space in the old Cumberland Lodge building in Nashville for his  publishing companies, which were run locally by Kelso Herston. In the same building, Billy  Sherrill and Bill Cooner had built a small studio, which was on the point of going bankrupt.  Herston told Phillips that it was available, and Phillips came to look it over. Newly conscious  of the importance of room ambiance after the disappointments back in Memphis, Phillips was  impressed with the Seventh Avenue studio. Its high ceiling and wooden floors and wails gave  a warm, focused sound. After attending a session, Phillips decided to buy it and hired Billy  Sherrill as his engineer. The multitrack installation was by Ray Butts, who had earlier built  the Echoplex amplifier that had enabled Scotty Moore to re-create the studio reverb on  stage.

After the previews at the end of 1960, the studio really opened in February 1961. Jerry Lee  Lewis breezed into town for the inaugural session and cut ''What'd I Say'' , the hit that took  him back into the charts after four years in the commercial wilderness. Two days later,  Charlie Rich came to Nashville and recorded ''Who Will The Next Fool Be''; the portents were  excellent.

''Billy Sherrill had a good basic feel for what I wanted'' recalled Phillips. '' On top of that, he  was a really excellent musician''. Sherrill's evolving production philosophy was worlds away  from Phillips', though: ''He had a feeling for the way things were changing, and a tendency to  arrange things more than would have been my way''. After joining Epic Records, Sherrill  completely foreswore his roots in rhythm and blues and developed the most overwrought  production style in Nashville. His success became the benchmark by which producers were
measured. Phillips must be given credit for seeing Sherrill's talent; however, the string and  chorus-laden productions that Sherrill favored were the antith-esis of Phillips' musical  values, indeed, the antithesis of what many regard as country music.

The Cumberland Lodge building was not in the heart of what is now considered the Music  Row area of Nashville, but at that time, the old Masonic building was itself the heart of the  music business. ''Mercury Records, the Wilborn Brothers, Tree Publishing, and some other  publishers were there'', recall Cecil Scaife. ''I remember the Wilburns brought Loretta Lynn  there when she first came to Nashville. She practiced walking in high heels on the marble  floors out-side our office. We did a lot of demo work for publishers, and a lot of custom work  for other labels''. Phillips' best customer in Nashville was Bill Beasley and Allen Bubis's Hit  Records operation, which churned out imitations of current hits to sell in dime stores at  thirty-nine cents. When Scaife quit Sun in March 1963 it was to take a position as sales  manager for Hit Records.

Phillips sold the studio in February 1964 after a plague of minor problems and one galling  annoyance: the Nashville musicians were accustomed to working on the American Federation  of Musicians guidelines, which called for four songs from a three-hour session, with overtime  pay for any removers. Phillips tried to bring in his own musicians from Memphis, but  encountered some resistance. The bottom line, according to Phillips, was that he was unable  to supervise the studio to his satisfaction. ''I was never able to make myself have at the  confidence in other people. I knew they were talented people, and Billy ash Sherrill proved  that, but it just didn't come out the way it could have. We tried to bring in something of a  new concept there, but I just didn't stay with it personally long enough to usher it in fully.  And there was just so much opposition from the people in Nashville''.

Phillips offered the studio to Cecil Scaife, who had left Sun by that point, but Scaife passed.  Fred Foster of Monument Records eventually bought the facility; he had cut some of Roy  Orbison's biggest hits there. ''I don't think Sam really wanted to sell'', recalled Foster. '' He  loved to negotiate and he wanted a big negotiating scene, and that's what we had. It lasted  three days and two nights. I was a zombie by the time we closed the deal. Then, shortly  after we bought the studio, National Life, who owned the building, tore it down, so we had  to move everything''.


Scotty Moore with the Neuman lathe, used for cutting masters, 1960. >

RE-WIRING THE CONTROL ROOMS - With the talent pool at Sun and Phillips International becoming  muddied by bad luck, lawsuits, and petty bickering, Scotty Moore focused his attention on the operation of  the studios. One day, while Sam was out of town, Scotty and engineer/consultant John Carrol started  rewiring the control room of the Memphis studio at Madison Avenue. Sam was famous for being tight with  his pennies.


The best way to get something done, Scotty discovered, was just to go ahead and do it,  especially if it involved the expenditure of money. When Sam returned to the studio and saw the mess, wires  were strewn about the floor of the control room, he was moderately horrified, but when he saw the finished  product a couple of weeks later, he was so pleased he asked them to rewire the studio in Nashville the same  way.

What Carroll remembers most about those days were the long hours they put in. ''I'd work all day at the  television station and radio station and go down there and work all night at Sam's'', says Carroll. ''Scotty was  doing pretty much the same thing, except he was doing it at the studio''.

Each day, at one oçlock in the morning, Scotty and Carroll followed the same ritual. ''Someone would go to  the Krystals downtown and bring back a bushel basket of Krystal hamburgers'', says Carroll. ''It was nothing  out of the ordinary for me to eat a dozen at a time''.

According to John Carroll, Scotty is one of the originators of the isolation technique of recording. ''Sam's  studio was fine as far as its acoustical properties were concerned, except you couldn't keep one instrument  out of another instrument's microphone'', says Carroll. ''Scotty started using baffles. He'd partition areas for  different instruments and that worked out real well. The general philosophy was to have a big open room and  record it live like at a concert''. Scotty got the idea of using baffles from the experiment that took place at the  Hollywood soundstage when engineers constructed baffled rooms around them. That setup didn't work with  Elvis, but it did work in Sam's studio once Scotty got the baffles properly placed.


1960

Singer/songwriter Jesse Belvin dies in a car crash following a concert in February. Two  months later Eddie Cochran dies at 21 in a car crash while on tour in England with Gene  Vincent.

The attempted mainstream watering down of rock continues with the birth of dance records,  specifically the twist which has adults taking part as well as kids and becomes the most  widespread dance craze since the Charleston ruled the 1920's.

The Shirelles launch the girl group era with "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" which manages to  get sex back into songs under the veil of innocence.

Motown Records makes its first splash with "Shop Around" a number 1 rhythm and blues hit  by The Miracles.

Roy Orbison has his first major hit with "Only The Lonely" and helps to alter rock songwriting  of the 1960's to focus on more introspective issues.

The Ventures hit instrumental "Walk Don't Run" leads to the creation of surf-rock which  brings the electric guitar back into prominence.

Elvis Presley is discharged from the Army and immediately scores a series of hit singles and  albums upon his return with a slightly less menacing, more mature persona.

1960

Former Sun artist Edwin Bruce sold used cars after graduation and worked a few lounges as a solo act with his guitar. He didn't get another shot of recording until 1960. By this point, Jack Clement was gone from Sun and was working with Chet Atkins at RCA in Nashville. He brought Ed to Nashville to cut a single for RCA. One side was a sickey song, ''Flight 303'', written by Sun producer Charles Underwood; the other was one of Ed's originals, the lovely ''Spun Gold''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON

UNKNOWN RECORDING STUDIO
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
DEMO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE EARLY 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

It wasn't just in Chicago that Hayden took his chance to record. ''We were on vacation one time in California, and I had a friend out there who had the idea to make some recordings. He was always very supportive of my music and he said he would pay for a session and take the tapes around. We went into a studio somewhere there and recorded ''The Key To My Kingdom'' and some other things. ''Mighty Big Wall'' was one of them, I think. I played piano on that session''. Here included ''The Key To My Kingdom''. Little more than a vocal and piano demo by Hayden, it is nevertheless a fine song and a tour de force performance that really deserved to have been built into a master and to have been sold to a major label.

01 – ''THE KEY TO MY KINGDOM'' – B.M.I. - 1:28
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1960
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-18 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-16 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

01 – ''MIGHTY BIG WALL'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1960
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-22 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson – Vocal & Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON
FOR BEAT RECORDS 1960

HALL RECORDING STUDIO
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
BEAT SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

Although nothing came of Hayden Tompson's California session in early 1960, back in Chicago Hayden did manage to find two record deals arising out of his trips to the Hall studio. The first came in 1960 when the studio connected him with a man who was looking for artists for his label, BEAT Records. ''It was just some guy who came in and said he was going to make me a star overnight, that kind of a deal. I didn't know him before that. We were going to cut two other songs but he was also working with a band, the Roy Hodges Band, who had songs and needed a better singer. So we did their two songs instead. I just went down there and he gave me a few dollars and paid for the session. I only met him or the band that one time, and that was the end of it. It wasn't the best recording I ever made. I think it was just some old fairy tale. I don't know''.


In fact, it turned out to be a very interesting disc. ''Dream Love'' was quite a classy ballad with a catchy ''I think I love her'' hook. Hayden sings forcefully and with feeling and the female vocal chorus fits well here, the first time he is heard with a bigger production around him.

The tinkling piano adds interest throughout as the song is carried along, and this could have been a real pop contender at the turn of the 1950s when raw rock and roll was giving away to balladry and strings by Bobby this and Bobby that.

01 – ''DREAM LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Janssen-La Mar
Publisher: - Bel-Air Music
Matrix number: - S 435
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Beat Records (S) 45rpm standard single BEAT 1011-A mono
DREAM LOVE / TOM THUMB
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-28 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS


The other side of the BEAT disc, ''Tom Thumb'', complete with a hurrying rhythm and imitation steam whistle was the story of the first American-built steam locomotive to do work on rails. The song tells about Peter Cooper, an industrialist and inventor, the proprietor of the Canton Iron Works in Baltimore, who designed a small locomotive in 1830, which he called the 'Tom Thumb' because of its size, and which he aimes to prove could carry passengers and freight on the first authorized railroad route, the Baltimore and Ohio.

On August 28 that year, the Tom Thumb locomotive raced against a horse-drawn railroad car, hence the concurrent galloping rhythm and whistles heard on the BEAT disc. Actually, the rhythm is too fast, because the locomotive only got up to ten miles an hour.

Cooper was a man of many talents, and he also invented the first gelatin dessert, which eventually became known as Jell-o. In terms of the recording, Hayden sings the lyric with clarity and style, disguising any lack of enthusiasm, and whoever produced the session had a real go at generating a novelty rock-pop hit. It was probably lack of distribution knowledge as much as the unusual subject matter that held the record back.

01 – ''TOM THUMB'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Janssen-La Mar
Publisher: - Bel-Air Music
Matrix number: - S 434
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Beat Records (S) 45rpm standard single BEAT 1011-B mono
TOM THUMB / DREAM LOVE
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-29 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson – Vocal & Piano, Acoustic Guitar
Unknown – Guitar, Drums, Piano,
Vocal Chorus, Sound Effects

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1960

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATER
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE EARLY 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

Carl Simmons excellent two-sided instrumental workout "Prowlin'" and "Boodoo" was issued on Dot 16076 in 1960. "It was a minor hit", recalls Carl. "It sold about 100,000 copies. It sounded too much like all the Bill Black stuff coming out on Hi and there was some discomfort around that on Bill's part. That's why Joe Cuoghi leased it out to Dot Records. I was actually glad to see it on Dot. They were a very successful label at the time. The original label said "Carl Simmons Orchestra". That was kind of funny. I'm not sure how we became an orchestra".

01 – "PROWLIN'" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Carl Simmons
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - MB 14395
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Dot Records (S) 45rpm standard single Dot 45-16076 mono
PROWLIN'/BOO DOO
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-31 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 - "BOO DOO" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Carl Simmons
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - MB 14396
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Dot Records (S) 45rpm standard single Dot 45-16076 mono
BOO DOO/PROWLIN'
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-32 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Simmons Orchestra
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Possible Ace Cannon - Saxophones
Carl McVoy - Piano
Bobby Stewart - Bass
Jerry Satch Arnold - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF

SONIC RECORDING STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION : UNKNOWN DATE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

01 – ''BRIDGES'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960

02 – ''WHAT'LL I DO'' – B.M.I. - 1:44
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Released: - November 3, 1997
First appearance: - Stomper Time Records (CD) 500/200rpm  2701302 mono
MACK SELF - VIBRATE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self – Vocal & Guitar
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - STAN KESLER

There is pointed out to Mack Self, that the name sounds Scottish and the songs sounds Cajun. An odd match since not many Scottish people were living in the bayous. Mack Self said, ''Well, it still worked out pretty good''. ''Folsom Prison Blues'' why, you might ask, would anybody record ''Folsom Prison Blues'' and risk comparison with the iconic version by Johnny Cash? A fair question. Mack recalls the session taking place at Sam Phillips' studio on Madison Avenue in Memphis. ''C.W. Gatlin and I had a little drink or two before the session. I rarely drink but I got hopped up pretty good that night. We got in there and had a new drummer and a new bass man – we didn't know them from Adam. Roland Janes said, 'Mack, why don't you guys warm up a little bit and let me get a balance here'. So C.W. Says, 'Let's do ''Folsom'', C.W. Can pick Luther down to a 't'. Afterwards Roland played it back for us and we were really happy how it turned out. That's how it happened. We never went up there to record a Johnny Cash song''.

The result bear out Mack's version. The spontaneity is everywhere in evidence. For one thing, Mack manages to change the melody, what little there is. For another, he flipflops the 2nd and 3rd verses, something that might well happen and go uncorrected during a warm-up take.

01 – ''FOLSOM PRISON BLUES'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny R. Cash-Gordon Jenkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960

02 – ''FOLSOM PRISON BLUES'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny R. Cash-Gordon Jenkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 2 – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960

03 – ''BREAKING NEW GROUND'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self – Vocal & Guitar
C.W. Gatlin – Lead Guitar
Jimmy Evans – Bass
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


SPRING 1960

Jim Stewart was a bank teller and part-time country fiddle player when he set up Satellite  Records in Memphis in 1958 with his sister, Estelle Axton. They started with country music  and then had an rhythm and blues group record by the Vel Tones that Rufus played on WDIA  in 1959. Then on day in the spring of 1960, Rufus Thomas turned up at Stewart's new studio  on McLemore Avenue pitching a song written by his daughter, Carla. ''Cause I Love You'' was  recorded as a duet by Rufus and Carla and it became a small hit on Satellite 102 that  summer. Carla's song ''Gee Whiz'' became a top ten rhythm and blues and popular hit the  following year, by when the label had become Stax Records.


SPRING 1960

No sooner had the Sun staff they gotten settled in than they began to realize all they had lost. No loner could  they all communicate constantly, because they were physically separated. Yes, it was cramped before, but  now it felt lonely. The music staff rarely saw the business staff. At the old place, they heard Jack Clement  play almost every day. At 706 Union Avenue, they knew who was playing on every session, and immediately  head the result, but here in the new studio had only a vague idea of what was going on musically. They even  missed the songwriters and other folks hanging around trying to sell Sam Phillips something. They lost the  gossip at Taylor's Restaurant, the plate lunches down the street at the other little restaurant they frequented.  The new location, nice at it was, had they robbed of the unique Sun community. Things hadn't been the same  since Jack Clement and Bill Justis, and Jud Phillips too, and now the mood changed even more. The best  thing about Sun for the staff had always been its intimacy and the fun, plus the feeling of the work really  mattered. Now that so many of the artists had left, they didn't have so much to do, either, so overall, working  at Sun was not nearly as enjoyable or challenging.

Sun did gain a new artist and repertoire man, the friendly, easy-going guitarist Scotty Moore. He had a sort  of surprised look that went with his wide grin, along with a fondness for verbal wordplay. He had been with  Elvis through his early movie days, but he and Bill Black were let go at some point, and Scotty implied he  was through with all that Elvis stuff. Scotty Moore had brought in D.J. Fontana to play a session was having  with a guitarist named Brad Suggs. Brad must have been feeling nostalgic, too, because an instrumental he  cut during that time was dedicated to the old studio and was called ''706 Union''. Scotty also worked with  Billy Riley and his band that summer, cutting some tunes that were meant for an album. Things never came  together, and Billy didn't get his album. His band was big on the road, though, playing all over the United  States and Canada.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

If the reports accompanying the release of ''That's What I Want To Do''/''Too Much Woman For Me'' are true, the song was cut by Jack Clement for his short-lived Summer Records. Whether Rita used the Summer master or recut it is a matter for conjecture. The production certainly has the slick hallmark of Cowboy Jack. By the time the single was released, Riley had quit Rita Records, rortedly selling his share for $1000 just as ''Mountain Of Love'' was breaking. He promptly started Mojo Records and covered ''That's What I Want To Do'' for Mojo with Billy Garner handling the vocals.

Rita Records was a short-lived venture and Billy Riley's involvement in it was even shorter. The pop aspirations of ''Too Much Woman For Me'' close out this retrospective, capturing the rockabilly rebel trying to come to terms with the changing times.

Commercially, none of Riley's records had much impact. Sam Phillips has more than once lamented this fact, stating that he does not understand why Riley never broke through. To Riley though, its simple: "Jerry Lee and Sam got too thick. That's what happened to me".

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
FOR RITA RECORDS 1959/1960

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959/1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – JACK CLEMENT

01 – ''TOO MUCH WOMAN FOR ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date 1959/1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Rita Records (S) 45rpm Rita 1013-B mono
TOO MUCH WOMAN FOR ME / THAT'S WHAT I WANT TO DO
Reissued: 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-1-21 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes – Guitar
Unknown - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums
Martin Willis – Tenor Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


1960

When Elvis Presley re-entered the pop scene after his army stint, he was a tamer presence,  in keeping with the easy-listening sound of the early 1960s. Popular music was moving  forward cautiously. However, a major change was taking place: the older artists were losing  ground. Despite a few hits by mature balladeers like Andy Williams and Steve Lawrence,  music aimed at a younger audience dominated the charts like never before.

Twist is the biggest dance-craze in the year of the dance-crazes.

Larry Parnes, Britain's most famous impresario, arranges a show for the Silver Beetles in  Liverpool.

Sam Cooke signed with RCA Records in 1960, bringing his hits on Keen Records with him The  Shirelles' "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" coins a form of romantic multi-part vocal harmonies.

The British producer Joe Meek uses the recording studio like an instrument for "I Hear A New  World".

Eddie Cochran dies at the age of 22.

Ray Charles has his first number 1 hit with "Georgia On My Mind".


PHILLIPS INTERNATIONAL

During the 1960s, as Sam Phillips struggled to maintain his company's toehold in the  marketplace, his original vision of Sun Records seemed suddenly to cask its focus. It was a  period marked by attempts at diversification, and as Phillips cast his net more broadly, the  inevitable result was the loss of the classic sun Sound. Phillips' various managers and  producers made random stabs at a bewildering variety of musical styles; consequently, his  own personal stamp faded from the Sun catalog.


Feeling that the Sun label was too closely identified with rock 'n' roll to support a wider  range of music, as previously reported, Sam Phillips had launched a second label, Phillips  International, in 1957.

The label's stationery boasted offices in New York, Hollywood, and  Memphis, and the label design it-self had a more uptown image than Sun. ''Many of the  earlier releases will be rock and roller'', gushed the promo copy accompanying the launch.  ''Future plans call for a wide variety of music including standard pop and jazz''. The new  label also enabled Phillips to test a second set of distributors in major markets.

The first batch of releases included ''Raunchy'', which augured well, although, as it  happened, Phillips International would start on the highest note it ever hit. Charlie Rich and  Carl Mann ensured that the label began the new decade with a strong profile but, from that  point, hits were elusive.

After the move to the new studio, Phillips used his new label to make a tentative gesture  toward the long-play market, which he despised. There were eight LPs on Phillips  International. Predictably, three of those were by Bill Justis, Carl Mann, and Charlie Rich.  The balance was an eclectic mix: Phillips signed a one-shot deal with big band leader Chuck  Foster, whose broadcasts from the Hotel Peabody he had engineered in leaner times; there  was cocktail piano from Graham Forbes, back country blues from Frank Frost, lukewarm  country gospel from Eddie Bond, and contemporary rhythm and blues from Frank Ballard.

The venture suffered from Phillips' lack of deep commitment. Other companies, such as  Liberty Records, had carved out a sector of the marketplace for their albums. Phillips'  tentative gestures betrayed his fundamental lack of faith in long-players, and his  unwillingness to bankroll their higher production cost. He undertook neither the advertising  nor the promotion that would have signified a sustained commitment toward creating an  identity for Phillips International as an album label.

The label eventually folded in 1963 after a series of discussions with Philips BV, the Dutch  electrical giant from Holland that had bought Mercury Records. They had launched their own  imprint in North America in 1962, and saw Phillips International a potential source of  confusion.


JANUARY 1960

Not only a new year, but a new decade was launched on January 1, 1960, and it had been with high hopes  that, just the day before, they released a new Phillips International disk, ''Lonely Weekends'' by Charlie Rich.  (Recorded at 706 Union Avenue, October 14, 1959) With all the former big stars only a memory, it seemed  that Charlie was Sun's best bet for a new major artist and hope for the future of the company.

In addition to an attention-getting piano and drum intro by Charlie Rich and Jimmy M. Van Eaton, it had a  tenor sax interlude by Martin Willis that was different and amusing. The lyrics were good, and Charlie's  voice sounded great. The Gene Lowery background singers might have been a little overdone, but all in all, it  seemed pretty strong, so they designed and ordered 2,000 copies of a special flyer to be sent to radio and TV  stations, the press, and the distributors.

According to Barbara Barnes, ''Sure enough, the record showed signs of breaking almost as soon as we sent  it out. The disk jockeys and distributors I talked with liked ''Lonely Weekend'', and not only was I getting  pretty substantial initial orders, some repeats were coming in. I was very enthusiastic as I walked into Cecil  Scaife's office to ask, ''When are you going on the road''. ''Well, I don't know if I am'', Cecil said, adding that  Sam Phillips didn't have much faith in the recording. I, on the other hand, thought even the B-side was good,  another Rich composition called ''Everything I Do Is Wrong''. Maybe Sam just wanted to keep Charlie in  songwriting and session playing, or maybe he didn't want the travel expense. Maybe he just didn't like it, I  couldn't Say''.

''Cecil stayed at the studio in the evening when he was more likely to have time with Sam, so I urged Cecil to  get Sam to reconsider. ''Look what you did with ''Mona Lisa'', I told Cecil. ''That record was not even in the  same class as this Charlie Rich number. This record will hit if you will just get out and give Charlie some  exposure. He has the potential to be a big artist'', Barbara said.

The next thing, Cecil was on the road with Charlie, most significantly in New York for the Dick Clark show.  He also booked him on some TV dance parties and introduced him to some key jocks and distributors in the  major markets. The success of the record led to bookings on some top-flight rock tours with other recording  artists. All the hoopla didn't agree with Charlie, who suffered from terminal shyness and before long was  happily back at the Sharecropper club in Memphis. There people didn't stare at him, and they didn't make  him talk. ''Lonely Weekends'' did indeed hit big, earning a place as one of the top 30 records in 1960.


JANUARY 1960

The singles, PI 3550 ''Some Enchanted Evening'' b/w ''I Can't Forget'' by Carl Mann; PI 3551 ''A Kiss Goodnite'' b/w ''Sadie's Back In Town'' by Sonny Burgess; PI 3552 ''Lonely Weekends'' b/w ''Everything I Do Is Wrong'' by Charlie Rich all issued.

Johnny Cash, Warren Smith and Jack Clement have all moved to Greener Pastures, leaving  Sun to sell Cash's back catalogue. Genial Jack Clement is being well received on the local  music front as assistant to RCA Victor's Artist and Repertoire hitmaker, Chet Atkins.

Jerry Lee Lewis was involved in a dispute with the American Federation of Musicians, which  barred him from playing in the United States until he paid his union dues. Jerry sidestepped  the ban by taking up residence at the Coq d'Or club in Toronto, Canada until his attorney  engineered a settlement of the ten-thousand-dollar debt, allowing him once again to  entertain whatever fellow Americans were willing to hear him.

JANUARY 1, 1960 FRIDAY

Alan Freed's "Big Beat" Christmas revenue ends. Gene Vincent is touring American Air Force  bases. Connie Francis at the Deaville Hotel in Miami Beach, Florida.

Billy Walker joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

JANUARY 2, 1960 SATURDAY

ABC's Dick Clark Show with Jack Scott, Little Anthony and the Imperials and Larry Hall.

John F. Kennedy announces his candidacy for president. Barely two years later, he is feted by Jimmy Dean in ''P.T. 109''.

JANUARY 3, 1960 SUNDAY

Platters in Madrid Spain in the middle of European tour. Charlie Gracie opens at the Erie  Social Club in Erie, PA.

Don Gibson recorded ''Just One Time'' at an a.m. session in Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Johnny Cash has a guest role in the ABC-TV western ''The Rebel'', for which he provides the theme song.

JANUARY 4, 1960 MONDAY

Former Sons Of The Pioneers guitarist Doye O'Dell is spotted along with Lorne Green on the small screen in ABC's western series ''Cheyenne''.

JANUARY 4, 1960 MONDAY

Fireballs perform on American Bandstand. Early January Drifters are appearing at the  Michigan State Fair.

JANUARY 5, 1960 TUESDAY

Hank Locklin recorded ''Please Help Me, I'm Falling'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee. The session marks the development of Floyd Cramer's ''slip-note'' style of playing piano.

JANUARY 6, 1960 WEDNESDAY

A fraudulent dermatologist who gave Elvis Presley facial treatments for a month leaves West Germany with hush money after threatening expose Presley's relationship with the 16-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAYBURN ANTHONY
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY WEDNESDAY JANUARY 6, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 – ''THERE'S NO TOMORROW'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 1:45
Composer: - Hoffman-Carr-Corday
Publisher: - Paxton Music
Matrix number: - U 397 - Master
Recorded: Probably January 6, 1960
Released: - March 30, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 339-B mono
THERE'S NO TOMORROW / WHOSE GONNA SHOE YOUR PRETTY LIITLE FEET
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Rayburn Anthony >

Rayburn Anthony weighs in for his second Sun single in just a few months. Once again, there's a passing nod to the Carl Mann formula with a bouncy treatment of ''There's No Tomorrow''. Elvis Presley loved this song. It had been recorded in 1949 by Tony Martin, and Elvis told his music publisher that he wanted to record it at his first post Army session. The publisher astutely realized that it featured English words to a Neapolitan folk song, ''O Sole Mio'', that was in the public domain, so he hired two songwriters to put new words to it.

The result was ''It's Now Or Never'', recorded on April 3, 1960 at RCA Studio B., 30 Music Square West, Nashville, Tennessee and just weeks after this. No one in Memphis was that smart, and Sam Phillips was left to pay publishing royalties on a song he could have paid someone fifty bucks to rewrite.

Curiously, the stronger side of Anthony's release is the one we should all love to hate. Despite the predictable sea of echo and heavy glucose treatment from Gene Lowery and friends, ''Who's Gonna Shoe'' actually works! The arrangement (what we can hear of it, anyway) is gentle, and Anthony's cracking baritone is just what the song needs to float its way through an enchanting series of key changes. The song, based on a Scottish air, ''The Lass Of Loch Royal'', had been recorded steadily since the 1920s. It might have been Patti Page's version that Rayburn remembered.

02 – ''WHOSE GONNA SHOE YOUR PRETTY LITTLE FEET'' – B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 396 - Master
Recorded: Probably January 6, 1960
Released: - March 30, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 339-A mono
WHOSE GONNA SHOE YOUR PRETTY LIITLE FEET / THERE'S NO TOMORROW
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rayburn Anthony – Vocal -Guitar
Eddie Bush – Guitar
Carl Mann - Piano
Probably Brad Suggs – Guitar
Probably R.W. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson – Bass
Probably Tony Austin - Drums

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JANUARY 7, 1960 THURSDAY

Johnny Horton recorded ''Sink The Bismarck'', inspired by the movie of the same name, at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville during the wee hours. The World War II tale includes a reference to Winston Churchill.

JANUARY 8, 1960 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley's 25th birthday generates a party in West Germany with 200 guests. Among his present, a trophy proclaiming him ''Most Valuable Player, Bad Nauheim Sunday Afternoon Football Association, 1959''.

''Summertime Blues'' songwriter Eddie Cochran holds what proves to be his final recording at Liberty Custom Recorders in Los Angeles. Snuff Garrett produces with a band featuring Buddy Holly sidemen Sonny Curtis and Jerry Allison.

JANUARY 8, 1960 FRIDAY

On American Bandstand Dick Clark receives a Trans-Atlantic call from Elvis Presley on his  25th birthday.

JANUARY 8, 1960 FRIDAY

Four months before his death in a car accident in England, Eddie Cochran makes his final  recording, including the song "Three Steps To Heaven".

JANUARY 9, 1960 SATURDAY

Patsy Cline joins the Grand Ole Opry, a t the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee  in Nashville, Tennessee.

Without fanfare, Patsy Cline becomes a member of the Grand Ole Opry.

Jimmie Davis wins a runoff election, earning the Democratic party's nomination for governor of Louisiana.

JANUARY 10, 1960 SUNDAY

Ray Charles and the Raeletts appear at the Hollywood Palladium.

JANUARY 11, 1960 MONDAY

Little Joe appears on American Bandstand.

Roy Acuff performs at the Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba during a  United Service Organizations tour.

JANUARY 12, 1960 TUESDAY

Fabian appears on Dean Martin's NBC-TV show. Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran appear  together on the British TV variety show ''Boy Meets Girl''.

Charlie Walker recorded ''Who Will Buy The Wine''.

JANUARY 13, 1960 WEDNESDAY

The Platters appear in Sheffield, England.

Jimmie Davis reverses plans to guests on a February edition of ''The Ed Sullivan Show'' on CBS. Intending to run for governor of Louisiana, an appearance would have likely required his rival receive equal broadcast time.

JANUARY 14, 1960 THURSDAY

Blue Notes on American Bandstand. Bobby Darin appears at the Deauville Hotel in Miami  Beach.

JANUARY 14, 1960 THURSDAY

Studio session with Bill Johnson at Sun Records, Memphis, Tennessee.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILL JOHNSON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY JANUARY 14, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Bill Johnson and The Four Steps Of Rhythm first recorded ''You Better Dig It'' during the summer of 1959 for Talos Records, a one-shot label owned by Bob Ritter and Carl Sanders in Augusta, Georgia. Some six months later, accompanied by the future James Brown band, the rampant blues shouter, Bill Johnson, re-cut the song with producer Charles Underwood. Two more Loyd Price-styled sides from this four track session found their way into a solitary Sun 45.

01 - ''YOU BETTER DIG IT'' - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Bill Johnson
Publisher: - Hay Day Music - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 14, 1960
Released:  - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-5-2 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - BETCHA GONNA LIKE IT
Reissued: -  2002 Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-7-8 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952-2002

02 - ''BOBALOO'' – B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Johnny Lee Hamilton
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 398 -  Master
Recorded: - January 14, 1960
Released: - March 30, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 340-A mono
BOBALOO / BAD TIMES AHEAD
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4



Bill Johnson (a.k.a. Johnny Lee Hamilton) was, for a brief moment, Sun's answer to Lloyd Price. ''Bobaloo'' isn't a half bad effort, although the recorded sound is far too echoes and unfocussed to showcase Johnson as he deserved. The song picks up the Bobaloo sage which seems to have begun in 1941 with Xavier Cugat's  hit, ''Babalu''. Desi Arnaz brought the song into the fifties, and in 1959 The Eternals had a minor hit with ''Babalu's Wedding Day''. As far as we can tell, the story ends here.

Bill Johnson >

The ballad side, as they used to call it, is a fine example of early 1960s black music for white folks. There's enough sweetening here in the form of strings, echo and a soprano-driven chorus to support a Memphis industry in insulin supplements.

Johnson brought in his own band for the session, and within the year bassist Hubert Perry and Saxophonist St. Clair Pinckney would be in James Brown's Famous Flames. It's also possible that Albrister Cook who plays baritone Saxophone here could be the Al 'Brisco' Clark who later played with James Brown. Johnson himself went on to record for Shelby Singleton as Big John Hamilton soon after Singleton bought Sun.

03 – ''BAD TIMES AHEAD'' – B.M.I. -2:25
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 399 - Master
Recorded: January 14, 1960
Released: - March 30, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 340-B mono
BAD TIMES AHEAD / BOBALOO
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

04 – ''WHERE THERE'S A WILL'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Bill Johnson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: January 14, 1960
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records mp3 Collection mono
ROCK CLASSICS: SCIENCE FICTION

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Johnson - Vocal
John Winfield - Guitar
Hubert Perry – Bass
St. Clair Pinckney – Tenor Saxophone
Albrister Cook Clark – Baritone Saxophone
Sammie Jackson - Drums

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JANUARY 15, 1960 FRIDAY

Ray Charles appears at City Auditorium in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Mid-January Everly Brothers making personal appearances in Boston, Philadelphia,  Washington and Baltimore.

JANUARY 16, 1960 SATURDAY

Bobby Rydell, Paul Evans, Dale Hawkins and the Knockouts appear on the Dick Clark Show.

JANUARY 18, 1960 MONDAY

British rocker Cliff Richard arrives in New York for recording dates for ABC-Paramount.

JANUARY 18, 1960 MONDAY

The Johnny Cash show puled a S.R.O. crowd to harmony Park Ballroom, Anaheim, California,  New Years Eve. Appearing with Johnny Cash were Luther Perkins, Marshall Grant, Johnny  Western, Linda Padgett, Warren Smith and Gordon Terry.

Columbia released Johnny Horton's ''Sink The Bismarck''.

JANUARY 19, 1960 TUESDAY

Ray Smith appears an American Bandstand.

Ralph Sylvester Peer dies in Hollywood. Peer coined the phrase ''hillbilly music'' and produced the first recordings of Jimmie Rodgers and The Carter Family. He is inducted in the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1984.

JANUARY 20, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Connie Francis starts two week engagement at Cloisters Hotel in Hollywood, California.

Elvis Presley, stationed in West Germany with the Army, gets a $22.94-per-month pay raise when he's promoted to acting sergeant.

JANUARY 21, 1960 THURSDAY

Frankie Ford appears on American Bandstand.


Ray Smith's tour bus, the whorehouse on wheels. >

JANUARY 22, 1960 FRIDAY

It seems that Jud Phillips, brother of Sam Phillips, did a pretty good job of promoting Ray  Smith. By January 22, 1960, ''Rockin' Little Angel'' was at number 22 in the national popular  sales charts. On the back of the hit, Smiths's band was renamed the Rockin' Little Angles and  Jud was again able to get him some good TV exposure and prestigious show dates.


Ray Smith  appeared on American Bandstand and a number of one-nighter tours for Dick Clark. Charlie  Terrell described Jud at work: ''When he was promoting Ray Smith to TV producers or show  promotors, Jud Phillips used to say, 'If you think Jackie Wilson's talent, then you ought to  see Ray Smith'. Smith himself said, on a live recording made in 1962, ''Rockin' Little Angel''  did pretty good for me, due to payola''.

Jub Phillips recycled a big tour bus that he had bought for Jerry Lee Lewis at the height of  his initial success. Jud's son felt that ''Jud, my father, conceived and built the first  customised rock and roll tour bus which he used to promote Ray Smith. It was full equipment  with shower, stereo system throughout, TV, telephone, comfortably slept eight; this was  unheard of in 1959''. Ray Smith certainly appreciated the bus. In later years he described it  as ''Having running hot maids and water'', while his wife looked back on it as ''a whorehouse  on wheels''.

Sam Cooke begins three day appearance at Shell House in Long Island, New York.

On his 29th birthday, rhythm and blues singer Sam Cooke signs a recording contract with RCA, where he recorded ''Bring It On Home To Me'' and ''Good Times''.

JANUARY 23, 1960 SATURDAY

The Everly Brothers perform ''Let It Be Me'' and ''(Til) I Kissed You'' on ABC's weekly music series ''The Dick Clark Saturday Night Beechnut Show''. Also featured is Jack Scott performing ''What In The World's Come Over You''.

Mark Dining, Rod Lauren, Jack Scott, Robin Luke, Jimmy Jones and the Everly Brothers  appear on ABC-TVs The Dick Clark Show. Cliff Richard appears on ABC-TVs The Pat Boone  Show.

JANUARY 24, 1960 SUNDAY

Faron Young recorded ''Your Old Used To Be'' at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

JANUARY 25, 1960 MONDAY

Chuck Berry is indicted for the violation of the Mann Act in connection with an incident in  Kansas in 1958. Berry is already under December 1959 indictment for another violation of  the Mann Act. His personal appearances drop from 20+ a month to three February and zero  in March.

JANUARY 1960

In an effort to escape the notoriety, and perhaps cash in on the success Bill Black and his Combo was having,  Lewis recorded an instrumental in 1960 titled ''In The Mood'' b/w ''I Get The Blues When It Rains''. He  released the song under the name ''Hawk'' but when the record, which was issued on Phillips International,  failed to fly, he dropped the moniker and went back to being plain old Jerry Lee. After several years of near  misses on the pop charts, he left Sun Records in 1963 and signed with Smash, a subsidiary of Mercury  Records in Nashville. That move signaled more than a change of address, it represented a change in musical  direction, nudging him from pop/rock to country.


JANUARY 1960

The dawn of the sixties brought a change of scene involving a move to the new Sun studio at 639 Madison Avenue and with it the opportunity for renewed creativity. Fortunately, Jerry Lee Lewis's career as a backing singer for Charlie Rich would turn out to have been a brief diversion. It was now time to get back to the serious business of producing another top ten hit, albeit that objective would prove to be a lengthy process, with an unanticipated twist before its fulfillment.

Jud Phillips and Jerry Lee Lewis on the recycled tour bus, circa 1960, 1961 >

The last four years of Lewis' contract with Sun served up an astonishing variety of material in his inimitable style with, as matters progressed, a definite and deliberate leaning towards rhythm and blues sources before a last hurrah of recording modern, pop-country. At a superficial level, the effort expended during these years can be summed up as a vain search for something to complement the four golden discs of 1957/1968. The problem was that whereas the hard-edged rock and roll of 1957 was no longer in vogue, the more sanitised pop music that was dominated the charts in 1960 simply didn't sit comfortably with Jerry Lee's way of doing things. An initial consequence was that an undue amount of attention was devoted to what was sometimes undeserving material.

Following a procession of forgettable singles, the impact in 1961 of ''What'd I Say'' (Sun 356), then led to a fruitless campaign to repeat the exercise with other rhythm and blues-flavoured covers, including ''Save The Last Dance For Me'' (Sun 367), ''Money'' (Sun 371), ''I've Been Twistin''' (Sun 374), ''Sweet Little Sixteen'' (Sun 379), ''Good Golly Miss Molly'' (Sun 382), ''Teenage Letter'' (Sun 384); one after the other, generating varying degrees of minor chart success or none at all. During this period, the rhythm and blues ''A'' side of each single was more often that not complemented by a country-orientated number on the reverse, effectively sustaining a practice that had been applied fairly consistently from ''Great Balls Of Fire'' onwards. But the remainder of the time in the studio tended to be spent on developing the rhythm and blues/pop theme, some of the results being issued contemporaneously on Lewis's second album, a potpourri that was immodestly branded ''Jerry Lee's Greatest'' (Sun LP 1265). Arguably it failed to live up to its billing, whatever one reads into the ambiguous title; in raiding the vaults indiscriminately from 1957 onwards Sun put together a desultory collection which pales by comparison with the coherent debut LP three years earlier.

After what appears to have been a complete break from recording of some six months, a hiatus mirrored by little activity on the road, Jerry Lee Lewis returned to the studio. It's not clear exactly when he paid his earliest visits to Sun's new facilities, though most probably it was for what proved to be one of the most prolific recording sessions of his career at Sun, conducted over four or five days commencing January 21, 1960.

Once the organisation had settled in at 639 Madison Avenue, the change of location engendered a welcome new approach to the discipline of keeping track of session details. From this point forward, through to the final days of Jerry Lee's career at Sun in August 1963, there are few reasons to doubt the chronology as documented in the booklets accompanying each of the precursor box sets referred to in the introduction. This is why the contents of CD 11 et seg and the latter part of the session discography will begin to look reassuringly familiar to anyone who owns either or both of the 1989 box sets; it is reasonably certain just where and when, and by whom, everything was recorded.

But there is a significant proviso; one thing we can assume with some confidence is that the list of titles isn't complete. As the years pass, the changes of adding to it diminish, but the search continues. Although it is generally accepted that from 1960 onwards the filing department at Sun Records began to get its act together, at times the efficiency of the administration was obviously still found wanting. For, despite the ostensibly authoritative look to the ledger presented in the 1983 vinyl box set, leaving aside all the possibilities and probabilities that characterise the Union Avenue era, it turns out that the rest of it was nowhere near as reliable as first impressions night suggest. For example, despite the fact that the track in question has been freely available in the public domain since its inclusion on an obscure US CD in 1999, the release of this set represents the first acknowledgment of the existence of a third take of the June 1962 recording of ''How's My Ex Treating You''. Either this was overlooked at the time of recording, or someone simply mislaid the tape before the log of the session was filed. Such a scenario provides encouragement for the idea that more  recordings are yet to be rediscovered and released. Elusive as echoes and shadows they may be, but perhaps ''We Three'' and other songs are still out there somewhere.

This first engagement at the new studio serves as a much more telling example; confounding the earlier accounts, it subsequently emerged that these inaugural Madison Avenue sessions, held between January 21 and January 25, 1960, had produced not just the seven cuts catalogued in 1983, but in excess of the fifty recordings, including several takes of the re-working of Hank Williams' mournful ''I Can Help It'' as Jerry Lee's braggadocio ''You Can't Help It''. Recording yet another Williams' favourite for a second time, Jerry Lee treated ''Your Cheatin' Heart'' with a little more respect albeit it too was performed at a pace that Hank Williams wouldn't have recognised. (*)


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Much of the attention at this extended session was, however, focussed on the development of two modest pop songs, ''Bonnie B'' and ''Baby Baby Bye Bye'', neither of which appear to have stimulated a huge amount of excitement on the part of Jerry Lee. To his credit, he sticks to his task and incrementally improves the calibre of the limited material he's given to work with. What isn't in doubt, judging from snippets of studio chatter, is Sam Phillips' own enthusiasm for the new facilities and the more sophisticated recording equipment with which he intended to update the Sun sound, little realising at this juncture that in moving from 706 Union he had lost the defining, preternatural quality of his product and throw the baby out with the bathwater. (*)

Ironically, the greatest impression Lewis made in terms of a hit parade placing during the early 1960s was to be archieved with ''Bonnie B'', a song which Sun studio engineer Charles Underwood had written about his wife and which, for some reason, the Swedish nation took to its heard and placed at the top of its pop charts when it was released there in 1964. The song is a strange amalgam; whereas the melody and structure provides more than a faint suggestion of ''Singing The Blues'', a dominant feature throughout is the guitar figure, itself decidedly reminiscent of Billy Burler's riff at the heart of Bill Doggett's 1956 ''Honky Tonk Part 1''. Although ''Bonnie B'' is untypical Lewis material, perhaps the labour was worthwhile; ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On'' and ''Great Balls Of Fire'' apart, it remains the record for which he is best remembered in the Nordic countries. A similar amount of energy was spent on securing a decent cut of Dorsey Burnette's ''As Long As I Live'', during the course on which Jerry Lee seems to have been unable to get ''Bonnie B'' entirely out of his mind. Once he'd overcome that distraction, however, they produced a master which eventually saw release more than eighteen months later, both on a 45 and on Lewis's second album. (*)

Sun's new promo manager, Cecil Scaife, and general manager, Bill Fitzgerald came up with the idea of releasing an instrumental record by Jerry under a pseudonym (The Hawk) on Sun's sub label, Phillips International (PI 3559). However, the results were as commercially stillborn as Lewis's other singles released in 1959 and 1960. His problem were compounded by a dispute with the Musician's Union over non-payment of dues which meant that he was unable to record officially although Phillips proceded as usual.


STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY TO MONDAY JANUARY 21-25, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Although destined to be heard publicity for the first time rather more than a decade after the event, Jerry Lee's dichotomous portrayal of Gene Aytry's ''Mexicaly Rose'' was also a part of the groundbreaking work in the Madison Avenue studio. His slightly less accomplished reading of the hymn ''The Great Speckled Bird'', similarly taking flight at a variable speed, was overlooked for even longer, only coming to light in 1987. These performances invite parallels with the recording both of ''Break Up'', which left by-products such as ''Lovesick Blues'' and ''Big Legged Woman'' and of ''Let's Talk About Us'', which begat ''Night Train To Memphis''. Not for the first time, the labouring over relatively banal tunes aimed at teenagers had provided an informal opportunity for Jerry Lee to perform some of his own favourites. Recordings such as these confound the gainsayers who argue that the tapes were never intended for release and should have remained in the vaults or even been destroyed. But Sam Phillips knew what he was doing when he kept the machines rolling, capturing everything that popped into Jerry Lee's head, and giving him free rein. The golden hits apart, Lewis's reputation is surely founded more securely on his capacity for breathing new life into material from the likes of Gene Autry, Hank Williams and Roy Acuff than on a few evanescent pop songs. (*)


1(1)(2) – ''MEXICALI ROSE'' - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Jack Tenney-Helen Stone
Publisher: - Universal MCA Music
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - False Start - Slow Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-B2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-7 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

"Mexicali Rose" is a popular song with music by Jack Tenney and lyrics by Helen Stone and published in 1923. The song is a love story of a man who must leave his love for a while. The song has become a pop standard, performed by many artists, including Bing Crosby and Jerry Lee Lewis.

1(3) - ''MEXICALI ROSE'' - B.M.I. - 1:45
Composer: - Jack Tenney-Helen Stone
Publisher: - Universal MCA Music
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Fast Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1974
First appearance: Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-A4 mono
ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-8 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

While scratching around for potential hit material at a January 1960 Sun session, Jerry thought it would be a good idea to cut a version of Gene Autry’s ''Mexicali Rose'', splitting the tempo between slow for the 1st half and rocked-up for the 2nd half. Sam Phillips (probably rightly) remained unconvinced, but this is still wonderful music. The fast part (only) was issued on ''Rockin’ And Free'' in 1974, while the complete uncut performance (slow and fast) was released on the Zu-Zazz ''Keep Your Hand Off Of It''! album of early 1960s Sun outtakes in 1987. It was also in 1987 that Jerry attempted the song in the studio again, but unfortunately this time he recorded it without a band on a cheap (Casio?) keyboard; and even more unfortunately this was then overdubbed with some truly dreadful instrumentation. This was released on the mostly unlistenable ''At Hank Cochran’s'' CD in 1995 for those that really need to hear it, but it really is only for sad completists. Far better is the 2006 ''Last Man Standing'' download-only bonus cut. Rocked-up all the way, this live-in-the-studio performance with his road band would be a strong contender for the ultimate version if it wasn’t for the trembling & croaky vocals (sadly Jerry’s voice has usually sounded very ropey during the past few years, and I personally am of the opinion that his 70th birthday in September 2005 would’ve been a good time to hang up those rock and roll shoes).

2(1) - ''IN THE MOOD'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:29
Composer: - Andy Razaf-Joe Garland
Publisher: - Louis Music - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Slow Warm-Up - Instrumental
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-A4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-9 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

2 - STUDIO CHATTER - 0:35
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-10 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Reissued: - O ctober 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS


"In the Mood" is a big band era number 1 hit recorded by American bandleader Glenn Miller. Joe Garland and Andy Razaf arranged "In The Mood" in 1937-1939 using a previously existing main theme composed by Glenn Miller before the start of the 1930s. Miller's "In The Mood" did not top the charts until 1940 and one year later was featured in the movie Sun Valley Serenade.

"In The Mood" opens with a now-famous sax section theme based on repeated arpeggios that are rhythmically displaced; trumpets and trombones add accent riffs. The arrangement has two solo sections; a "tenor fight" solo, in the most famous recording, between Tex Beneke and Al Klink, and a 16-bar trumpet solo. The arrangement is also famous for its ending: a coda that climbs triumphantly, then sounds a simple sustained unison tonic pitch with a rim shot.

"In The Mood" was arranged by Joe Garland and Andy Razaf based on a pre-existing melody. The main theme, featuring repeated arpeggios rhythmically displaced, previously appeared under the title of "Tar Paper Stomp" credited to jazz trumpeter/bandleader Wingy Manone. Manone recorded "Tar Paper Stomp" which did not become popular until the middle of 1930, just months before Horace Henderson used the same tune in "Hot and Anxious", recorded by his brother's band, The Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, on 1931 March 19.

Under copyright rules of the day, a tune that had not been written down and registered with the copyright office could be appropriated by any musician with a good ear. A story says that after "In the Mood" became a hit, Manone was paid by Miller and his record company not to contest the copyright.

The original recording of Joe Garland's version was made by Edgar Hayes and his Orchestra in 1938, with Garland participating. In this recording there was a baritone sax duet rather than a tenor sax battle. Popular thought is that the melody had already become popular with Harlem bands (e.g. at the Savoy Ballroom) before being written down by Joe Garland. Before offering it to Glenn Miller, Garland sold the tune to Artie Shaw, who could not record it because the original arrangement was too long. The Hayes recording also bears signs of being a shortened arrangement. The tune was finally sold to Glenn Miller, who played around with its arrangement for a while. Although the arrangers of most of the Miller tunes are known, things are a bit uncertain for "In The Mood". It is often thought that Eddie Durham (who contributed other arrangements on the recording date of "In The Mood", August 1, 1939 as well), John Chalmers McGregor (Miller's pianist) and Miller himself contributed most to the final version.

Glenn Miller's "In the Mood", though undisputably a hit, represents an anomaly for chart purists. "In the Mood" was released in the period immediately prior to the inception of retail sales charts in Billboard magazine. While it led the Record Buying Guide (jukebox list) for 13 weeks and stayed on the Billboard charts for 30 weeks, it never made the top 15 on the sheet music charts, which were considered by many to be the true measure of popular song success. The popular Your Hit Parade program ranked the song no higher than ninth place, for one week only (1940).

The Glenn Miller 1939 recording on RCA Bluebird, B-10416-A, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1983. The recording by Glenn Miller is one of the most recognized and most popular instrumentals of the 20th century. The song even appeared in The Beatles "All You Need is Love" number 1 single in 1967 and in the Jive Bunny and the Mastermixers rendition in 1989, "Swing The Mood", a worldwide hit. The Glenn Miller RCA Bluebird recording was released as V-Disc 123B in February 1944 and a new version was released as V-Disc 842B in May 1948 by Glenn Miller and the Overseas Band by the U.S. War Department. 1939 sheet music cover, "Introduced by Glenn Miller", Shapiro, Bernstein, and Co., New York.

Notable artists who have recorded big-band versions of "In The Mood" include the Joe Loss Orchestra, Xavier Cugat, Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Lubo D'Orio, the Brian Setzer Orchestra, The Shadows and John Williams with the Boston Pops Orchestra.

Non-big-band renditions were recorded by the Andrews Sisters, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chet Atkins, Bill Haley & His Comets, Bad Manners, the Puppini Sisters. In addition, in 1959 Ernie Fields and his Orchestra peaked at number 4 on the pop chart and number 7 on the Rhythm & Blues charts. The song charted at number 16 in 1953 in a version by Johnny Maddox. Jonathan King scored a UK Top 50 hit with his version of the song in 1976. Bette Midler recorded the song in 1973 (on the album Bette Midler). The avant-garde synthpop act Art of Noise occasionally performed a rendition of the song on their live shows, in their trademark sampled style. The rock band Chicago added their version in 1995. An unusual version of the song was released on Maynard Ferguson's 'Lost Tapes Volume 2' album. The first 30 seconds are the traditional version, but the band then re-starts with the trumpets taking the lead.

A novelty version of the song was recorded by country/novelty artist Ray Stevens in 1977. Stevens' version consisted of him performing the song in chicken clucks, bar-for-bar. The performance was credited to the "Henhouse Five Plus Two". The single was a Top-40 hit in both America and the UK.

In 1951 a Ferranti Mark 1 computer at the University of Manchester played "In the Mood", one of the first songs to be played by a computer, and the oldest known recording of digitally generated music. Jive Bunny and the Mastermixers recorded a version of the song as part of a medley entitled "Swing the Mood" which went number 1 in the United Kingdom for 5 weeks. The record reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States where it also went gold. It was the 2nd best-selling single of 1989 in the United Kingdom.

Bluesman John Lee Hooker has said that "In The Mood" was the inspiration for "I'm In The Mood" which became a number 1 hit on the Rhythm & Blues Singles chart.


In one of the worst kept secrets in music business history, Jerry Lee Lewis had these instrumental sides released under the pseudonym ''The Hawk''. Supposedly, all of Jerry's problems with the musicians union (AFM) and the marketplace would go away if his identity were masked. The name was suggested by Sun's new general manager Bill Fitzgerald in a desperate attempt to kickstart Jerry's sagging career. There was certainly nothing wrong with these side, although their effect on the marketplace was considerably short of spectacular.

Note: The Jerry Lee Lewis fan club asked its members to plug ''The Hawk'' and gave each of them a free membership card for a new fan club. Sam's ingenuity failed to do the trick; Jerry was immediately identified, and the record sold poorly. The AFN ban was eventually lifted after Jerry reached a settlement with the Union in January 1961.

2(2) - ''IN THE MOOD'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 3:00
Composer: - Andy Razaf-Joe Garland
Publisher: - Louis Music - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - P 383 - Instrumental -  Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3559-B mono
IN THE MOOD / I GET THE BLUES WHEN IN RAINS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

In an attempt to get Jerry some much-needed air-play, Sam Phillips in 1960 came up with the idea of releasing an instrumental single by Jerry under the name ‘The Hawk’, releasing it on the Phillips International label. The ruse failed miserably, but ‘I Get The Blues When It Rains’ was the B-side of the single (the A-side was the old Glen Miller hit ‘In The Mood’). A vocal version (albeit with a long instrumental passage) was finally recorded for the ''Country Music Hall Of Fame Hits Volume 2'' album in 1969.

3(1) - ''I GET THE BLUES WHEN IT RAINS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 1:11
Composer: - Marcy Klauber-Harry Stoddard
Publisher: - Foster Music
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take - Instrumental
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-A5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-11 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

''I Get The Blues When It Rain'' (a 1929 hit for Guy Lombardo and others), is done in a style not normally associated with Jerry Lee. It's got an old-timey, Del Wood feel with barely a dollop of blues or rock and roll. Nevertheless, Jerry must have liked the song because he recorded a vocal version about a decade later for Mercury.

3(2) - ''I GET THE BLUES WHEN IT RAINS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:16
Composer: - Marcy Klauber-Harry Stoddard
Publisher: - Foster Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Master - Instrumental
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-11 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-18 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

3(2) - ''I GET THE BLUES WHEN IT RAINS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:06
Composer: - Marcy Klauber-Harry Stoddard
Publisher: - Foster Music
Matrix number: - P 384 - Instrumental -  Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3559-A mono
I GET THE BLUES WHEN IT RAIN / IN THE MOOD
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

4(1) - ''DON'T DROP IT'' - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Terry Fell
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Chatter -Count-In - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released:  - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-A4 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60'S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-13 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

''Don't Drop'' was written by Terry Fell, born on May 31, 1921, Dora, Alabama. Although Terry Fell's name appears only once in the Billboard country charts, he staked his claim to fame by being not only the writer of "Truck Driving Man" but also the original recorder of the song. In 1930, he swapped his pet groundhog for a guitar, although it was to be three years before anyone showed him how to play it, or the mandolin that he also acquired. At 16, he hitch-hiked his way to California, spending some time with the Civilian Conservation Corps. He eventually returned home but he and his widowed mother finally relocated to the Los Angeles area. In 1943, while working for Tru-Flex tyres, he began to play bass with Merle Lindsey's Nightriders.

Around 1945, he joined Billy Hughes, made his first recordings for Fargo and began to write songs for the American Music Company. In 1954, after further recordings for Memo, Courtney and 4-Star, he joined RCAVictor Records, making his first recordings on their subsidiary "X" label. "Truck Driving Man" appeared as the B-side of his first "X" single, in April 1954. The A-side, "Don't Drop It", became a number 4 country chart hit (his only one) and although "Truck Driving Man" failed to chart for Fell, it went on to become a country standard. It has since been charted by both George Hamilton IV and Red Steagall (as late as 1976!) and recorded by countless other artists, including Buck Owens, who was managed by Fell early in his career.

"Don't Drop It" also spawned its share of covers, both for the country and the pop markets, including versions by Wilbert Harrison (Savoy) and some great versions for Jerry Lee Lewis (Sun). Fell made further recordings and worked as an artist for a few years, until the lack of further hits and throat problems saw him lose interest in performing. In 1962, he relocated to Nashville, where he wrote songs and worked for several publishing companies, until he eventually retired. In 1993, Bear Family Records issued a CD containing all 24 of his RCA masters, two previously unissued. Fell also co-wrote "You're The Reason", a US country and pop Top 12 hit for Bobby Edwards in 1961, also recorded by Hank Locklin and Joe South (and many others since then). Terry Fell died on April 4, 2007 in Madison, Tennessee.


4(2) - ''DON'T DROP IT'' - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Terry Fell
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Unknown Take
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-A1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT!
PREVIOUSLY UNISSUED SUN SESSIONS VOLUME 2
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-10 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(1)(2) - ''GREAT SPECKLED BIRD'' - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Reverend Guy Smith
Publisher: - Duchess Music
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - 5 False Starts - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-A3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-14 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

The Great Speckled Bird" is a Southern hymn whose lyrics were written by the Reverend Guy Smith. It is an allegory referencing Fundamentalist self-perception during the Fundamentalist-Modernist Controversy. The song is in the form of AABA and has a 12 bar count. It is based on Jeremiah 12:9, "Mine heritage is unto me as a speckled bird, the birds round about are against her; come ye, assemble all the beasts of the field, come to devour''. It was recorded in 1936 by Roy Acuff. It was also later recorded by Johnny Cash and Kitty Wells (both in 1959), Hank Locklin (1962), Lucinda Williams (1978), Bert Southwood (1990), Marion Williams, and Jerry Lee Lewis.

The tune is the same apparently traditional melody used in the folk song "I Am Thinking Tonight Of My Blue Eyes'', originally recorded in the 1920s. The same melody was later used in the 1952 country hit "The Wild Side Of Life'', sung by Hank Thompson, and the even more successful "answer song" performed by Kitty Wells called "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky-Tonk Angels''. A notable instrumental version is found on the Grammy Award-Nominated album 20th Century Gospel by Nokie Edwards and The Light Crust Doughboys on Greenhaw Records.

The connection between these songs is noted in the David Allan Coe song "If That Ain't Country" that ends with the lyrics "I'm thinking tonight of my blue eyes/ And finding the great speckled bird/ I didn't know God made honky-tonk angels/ and went back to the wild side of life''. Both the song "The Great Speckled Bird" and the passage from Jeremiah may be a poetic description of mobbing behavior.

5(3) - ''GREAT SPECKLED BIRD'' - B.M.I. - 1:46
Composer: - Reverent Guy Smith
Publisher: - Duchess Music
Matrix number: - None - Fast - Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -   Not Originally Issued
Released:   - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-1-5 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-15 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963


From left: Dewey Phillips, Elvis Presley, Bonnie Beatrice Underwood, wife of Charles Underwood with guitar. Taken at the apartment of Charles Underwood, Holiday Towers, Madison Aveneue in Memphis, Tennessee, April 15, 1957.

''Bonnie B'' comes from this session, and is one of Jerry’s best teen slanted songs. Composer Charles Underwood, the husband of Bonnie  Beatrice Underwood, provides outwardly a lyrical teenage love song, full of praise for Bonnie’s turned-up nose. But the lyrics say ''We’re too young, we've got a long time to wait / But Bonnie baby that don’t mean hesitate / ’bout lovin’ me''. 

Sounds about right for Jerry, but pretty risqué for the time. The song has a lovely rolling tempo, and if there were any justice it would have been a big hit when issued in the United States in November 21, 1961, as the flip-side to ''Money'' (not issued in Britain).

According to April Underwood, daughter of Charlie Underwood, ''Dewey was destined to become a legendary disc jockey bridging black and white audiences with their music... the first to put an Elvis record on the air '' That's All Right'' and on a more intimate note; the best man and financier to my parent's wedding. Elvis was destined to become well, "Elvis the Legend", a voice no other will ever match, and ''a Godinspired man of great faith"; often this part people forget about. And my parents well, they made everyday their "play-day" to birth their dreams: From humble Tennessee beginnings with my dad at the forefront of Sun Records as artist's and repertoire director, writing hit songs like "Bonnie B" (about my mom Beatrice) for Jerry Lee Lewis, as well as many more songs for Elvis and Charlie Rich, and befriending and working with the likes of Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, and so many more, to my mom's childhood belief she could clearly see the "Hollywood Sign'' in the flat-lands of Tennessee, cut to, my parents packing all their dreams in a car with no starter and playing poker to finance their way across the U.S. to California to (unbeknownst to them at that time) build a recording studio called "Nashville West" at the site of the legendary Decca Records (where Bing Crosby formerly recorded White Christmas), right next door to the legendary Paramount Studio's entrance, all to unleash those dreams''.

6(1) - ''BONNIE B'' - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Slow Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1987 
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-16 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

6 - STUDIO CHATTER 1 - 0:24
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released:  - October 2015 - Not Originally Issued
First appearance: - B ear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-15 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6(2) - ''BONNIE B'' - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released:  - November 1987 
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: - October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-16 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6 - STUDIO CHATTER 2 - 0:30
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - October 2015  -  Not Originally Issued
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-17 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6(3) - ''BONNIE B'' - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-A2 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-18 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6(4) - ''BONNIE B'' - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 3
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released:  - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-B2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-19 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6 - STUDIO CHATTER 3 - 0:22
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - October 2015  -  Not Originally Issued
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-20 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

What better antidote for your aching ears than the sweet rolling tempo of ''Bonnie B''. This side remains one of the most enjoyable items in Jerry's Sun catalogue. Its lovely feel is established during the 6 bar intro when Jerry offers a barrelhouse right hand chord against some two string guitar work neatly lifted from Bill Doggett's ''Honky Tonk''. The mixture works well and is repeated during the piano solo. If you listen closely, you'll find a clear case for unconscious plagiarism here between sweet Miz Bonnie and Melvin Endsley's classic ''Singing The Blues''. It's hard to guess composer Charles Underwood's lyrical intent here. What is the song really telling us? After extolling the virtues of sweet young Bonnie (Underwood's future wife, by the way), Jerry makes it clear that just because she's underage doesn't mean she ought to hesitate about satisfying his lust. Was this what radio programmers needed to hear with the memory of the childbride scandal not so distant?

6(5) - ''BONNIE B'' - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 462 - Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - November 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 371-B mono
BONNIE B / MONEY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

6(6) - ''BONNIE B'' - B.M.I. - 0:47
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Fragment -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-22 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

6(7) - ''BONNIE B'' - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-23 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(1) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: -   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-24 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

The recordings of ''As Long As I Live'' fall into two distinct groups. The first seven possess that residual stamp of the ''Bonnie B'' arrangement, whereas the remainder evince a contrasting tone which indicates they may well have been cut on another day of the extended session. Within each group, there is sufficient variation bot in Lewis's singing and, more so, in the solos to tell each take apart with relative ease; Jerry Lee is in his element performing ad-lib licks on the keyboard while, on occasions, he either quite deliberately mixes things up lyrically or even loses his way altogether. For example, notice how in the first four takes the second line following the solo is delivered variously as ''I gotta set your lips on fire'', ''I want to set your lips on fire'', ''I want to feel your lips of fire'' and ''honey, I've got to feel your lips of fire'', while take 3 ends prematurely when Jerry Lee fails to repeat the last line. In take 5 we become aware of a further change in lyrical content; the song now concludes not with the boast ''I'm gonna make this whole world yours and mine'' but instead settles for the rather more passive ''I want to be your one desire''. In the second verse of take 6 Jerry Lee strays off the lyric altogether when singing ''you do something to me''; to all intents and purposes this renders the track a ''dud'' but along the way there's still much to admire. As matters progress, with Sam sounding suitably impressed, the remaining wrinkles are ironed out and take 7 faithfully repeats the efficacious formula of its immediate predecessor but with Jerry Lee now having mastered the lyric. (*)


7(2) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released:  - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-A1 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - O ctober 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-25 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(3) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - False Start Take 3
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: -   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-26 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(4) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Chatter - Take 4
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: -   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-27 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(5) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 0:23
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - False Start
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-28 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(6) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 5
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: -   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-29 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(7) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Chatter - Count-In - Take 6
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November  1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-A6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-30 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(8) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Chatter - Count-In - Take 7
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-24 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-31 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(9) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - 3 False Starts
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released:  - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-B3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-32 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

7(10) – ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 Track 8
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-B3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-33 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

There were few complaints from diehard Jerry Lee fans about this side, however. ''As Long As I Live'' was written by former Memphis rockabilly Dorsey Burnette.  It is an energetic performance on all counts in the 1-6-2-5 gospel progression. Instrumentally, the record really soars, with Jerry's piano and Jimmy Van Eaton's drumming pushing each other to greater heights. Van Eaton's crisp work on the closed hi-hat during the final verse is a moment to treasure.

7(11) - ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - False Start - Take 3 Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-26 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-34 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

The second suite of just two complete recordings of ''As Long As I Live'', prefaced both by Sam's confusion and a false start, sees a return to the more dramatic lyric hinting at megalomania, albeit Jerry Lee fluffs the first attempt. The plan all comes together with the accomplished final take that was eventually mastered for a 1961 release.


7(11) - ''AS LONG AS I LIVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: -  Dorsey Burnette
Publisher: - Corel Music
Matrix number: - U 454 - Take 3 - Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - September 1, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 367-B mono
AS LONG AS I LIVE / SAVE THE LAST DANCE FOR ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

8(1) - I CAN'T HELP IT'' - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-35 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

8(2) - I CAN'T HELP IT'' - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 Not Originally Issued
Released:  - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-B5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-36 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

8(3)(4) - ''I CAN'T HELP IT'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - 3 False Starts - Take 3
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-A6 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - September 1989  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-19 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Jerry cut several Hank Williams classics at Sun (and quite a few for other labels), including this ''I Can't Help It'' heartfelt performance from his 1956/1957 session. For several years only available on an early 1970s bootleg, it was finally made available officially on Charly’s 1977 ''Nuggets Volume Two'' compilation. At one of his final Sun sessions at 639 Madison Avenue in January 1960 Jerry cut several speeded up takes, altering the lyrics from ''I Can’t Help It (If I’m Still In Love With You)'' to ‘You Can’t Help It (If You’re Still In Love With Me)''! An interesting (and egotistical) experiment, they didn’t see the light of day until the late 1980s.

8 - STUDIO CHATTER - 0:27
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - October 2015  -  Not Originally Issued
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-39 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

8(5) - I CAN'T HELP IT'' - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 4
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released:  - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-A6 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-11-40 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

"I Can't Help It (If I'm Still in Love with You)" is a song, of course,  written and originally recorded by Hank Williams on MGM Records. It hit number two on the Billboard country singles chart in 1951. According to Colin Escott's 2004 book ''Hank Williams: The Biography'', fiddler Jerry Rivers always claimed that Hank wrote the song in the touring Sedan, and when he came up with the opening line, "Today I passed you on the street'', and then asked for suggestions, steel guitarist Don Helms replied, "And I smelled your rotten feet''. The song was recorded at Castle Studio in Nashville, Tennessee, on March 16, 1951, the same session that yielded "Hey Good Lookin'", "My Heart Would Know", and "Howlin' At The Moon". Williams was backed on the session by members of his Drifting Cowboys band, including Jerry Rivers, Don Helms, Sammy Pruett (electric guitar), Jack Shook (rhythm guitar), Ernie Newton or "Cedric Rainwater", aka Howard Watts (bass), and either Owen Bradley or producer Fred Rose on piano. It was released as the B-side of "Howlin' At The Moon" but on the strength of its simple language and passionate singing, soared to number two on the Billboard country singles chart. Hank Williams sang the song with Anita Carter on the Kate Smith Evening Hour on April 23, 1952. The rare television appearance is one of the few film clips of Williams in performance.

Other significant recordings are by Ray Price cut the song on Columbia in 1957; Ricky Nelson recorded a version for Imperial in 1958; Kitty Wells recorded it for Decca; Marty Robbins covered the song for Columbia in 1961; Tennessee Ernie Ford cut the song in 1961; George Jones included the song on his 1960 album ''George Jones Salutes Hank Williams''. In his autobiography, Jones printed the first six lines of the song and stated, "Its lyrics couldn't be more simple, or profound''; Sun Records released an recording  version by Johnny Cash for his 1960 album ''Sings Hank Williams''; Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a version for Sun Records, with characteristic bravado, he changed it to "You Can't Help It (If You're Still In Love With Me)''; Patsy Cline cut the song for Decca; Burl Ives recorded the tune for Decca, and Ferlin Husky recorded it in 1961.

In 1962, Connie Stevens recorded ''I Can't Help It'' for the 1962 album ''The Hank Williams Songbook'', and the son of Williams Sr., Hank Williams Jr. recorded it for his 1963 album LP ''Sings The Songs Ff Hank Williams''; Charlie Rich covered the song in 1963; Dean Martin cut the song for Reprise; Eddy Arnold recorded the song in 1964; Marty Robbins included it on his 1968 LP ''I Walk Alone''; Ernest Tubb covered the song in 1968; Stonewall Jackson recorded the song for Columbia in 1969; ''I Can't Help It'' appears on Roy Orbison's 1970 LP ''Hank Williams The Roy Orbison Way''; Glen Campbell recorded it for his 1973 album ''I Remember Hank Williams''; Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris covered the song in 1974, and the song is featured on the reissue of Willie Nelson's 1975 LP ''Red Headed Stranger'' album as a bonus track. Charlie McCoy recorded it as an instrumental in 1977; Charlie Pride recorded it on his 1980 tribute ''There's A Little Bit Of Hank In Me'' with Loretta in a duet. Conway Twitty recorded ''I Can't Help It'' and was released as flip-side of the 1993 single "Divine Hammer''.


9(2) - ''YOUR CHEATIN' HEART'' B.M.I. - 1:47
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Fast
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-A3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-1 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

"Your Cheatin' Heart" is a song written and recorded by country music singer and songwriter Hank Williams in 1952, regarded as one of country's most important standards. Country music historian Colin Escott writes that "the song, for all intents and purposes, defines country music''. He was inspired to write the song while driving with his fianceé from Nashville, Tennessee to Shreveport, Louisiana. After describing his first wife Audrey Sheppard as a "Cheatin' Heart", he dictated in minutes the lyrics to Billie Jean Jones. Produced by Fred Rose, Williams recorded the song on his last session at Castle Records in Nashville, Tennessee, on September 23, 1952.

"Your Cheatin' Heart" was released in January 1953. Propelled by Williams' recent death during a trip to a New Year's concert in Canton, Ohio, the song became an instant success. It topped Billboard's Country and Western chart for six weeks, while over a million units were sold. The success of the song continued. Joni James' version reached number two on Billboard's Most Played in Jukeboxes the same year, while Ray Charles' 1962 version reached number 29 on the Billboard Hot 100 and 13 on the UK Singles Chart. The song ranked at 217 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and was ranked number 5 on Country Music Television's 100 Greatest Songs in Country Music.

By 1952, Williams was enjoying a successful streak, releasing multiple hits, including "Honky Tonk Blues", "Half As Much", "Settin' The Woods On Fire", "Jambalaya (On the Bayou)" and "You Win Again". While his career was soaring, his marriage to Audrey Sheppard became turbulent. He developed serious problems with alcohol, morphine and painkillers prescribed to ease his severe back pain caused by spina bifida. The couple divorced on May 29, and Williams moved in with his mother. Soon after, Williams met Billie Jean Jones backstage at the Ryman Auditorium, a native of Shreveport, Louisiana, who was, at the time, dating Faron Young. Williams started dating Jones, upon the end of her relationship with Young and soon began to plan their marriage. While driving from Nashville, Tennessee to Shrevenport to announce the wedding to her parents, Williams talked to her about his previous marriage and described Audrey Sheppard as a "cheatin' heart", adding that one day she would "have to pay". Inspired by his line, he instructed Jones to take his notebook and write down the lyrics of the song that he quickly dictated to her. The finished composition included the line "You'll walk the floor, the way I do", which evoked Ernest Tubb's hit "Walking The Floor Over You".

Williams recorded the song on September 23 at the Castle Studios in Nashville. The session, which became Williams' last, also produced the A-side "Kaw-Liga", as well as the songs "I Could Never Be Ashamed of You" and "Take These Chains fRom My Heart". It was produced by Williams' publisher Fred Rose, who made minor arrangements of the lyrics of "Your Cheatin' Heart". Williams described the song to his friend, Braxton Schuffert, as he was about to play it, as "the best heart song (he) ever wrote". Williams is backed on the session by Tommy Jackson (fiddle), Don Helms (steel guitar), Chet Atkins (lead guitar), Jack Shook (rhythm guitar), and Floyd "Lightnin'" Chance (bass).

While traveling to a scheduled New Year's show in Canton, Ohio, the driver found Williams dead on the backseat of the car during a stop in Oak Hill, West Virginia. "Your Cheatin' Heart" was released at the end of January 1953. Propelled by Williams' death, the song and the A-side "Kaw-Liga" became a hit, selling over a million records. Billboard initially described the songs as "superlative tunes and performances", emphasizing the sales potential. Within a short time from its release, the song reached number one on Billboard's Top Country and Western Records, where it remained for six weeks. A demo version of Williams singing "Your Cheatin' Heart" with just his guitar, likely recorded in 1951, is also available.

Released in the wake of his passing, the song became synonymous with the myth of Hank Williams as a haunted, lonely figure who expressed pain with an authenticity that became the standard for country music. The name of the song was used as the title of Hank Williams' 1964 biopic. "Your Cheatin' Heart", as well as other songs by Williams were performed on the movie, with George Hamilton dubbing the soundtrack album recorded by Williams' son, Hank Williams, Jr. In the 2003 documentary series ''Lost Highway'', country music historian Ronnie Pugh comments, "It's Hank's anthem, it's his musical last will and testament. It's searing, it's powerful, it's gripping. If you want to say this is his last and best work, I wouldn't argue with that''. AllMusic described the track as the "signature song" of Hank Williams, and an "unofficial anthem" of country music. Rolling Stone magazine called it "one of the greatest country standards of all time", ranking it at number 217 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The song ranked at number 5 in Country Music Television's 100 Greatest Songs in Country Music in 2003, Two Pepsi Super Bowl commercials  featured the song, one aired during Super Bowl XXX, featured Williams' recording while a Coca-Cola deliveryman grabbed a Pepsi. The second one, aired during Super Bowl XLVI, featured the same situation, but with the song covered by Jennifer Nettles of Sugarland. The song forms the title of the 1990 TV drama 'Your Cheatin' Heart' by John Byrne.

Other significant recordings are, February, 1953 by Hank Williams (MGM 11416); February, 1953 by Joni James; September, 1958 by George Hamilton IV (ABC Paramount 9946); March, 1959 by Billy Vaughn, an instrumental (Dot 15936); November, 1962 by Ray Charles (ABC Paramount 10375); 1965 Elvis Presley for his LP ''Elvis For Everyone'' (RCA Victor LSP-3450).


10(1) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith-Daniel White
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - Appril 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-A8 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Contrary to the experience with ''As Long As I Live'', successive takes of ''Baby Baby Bye Bye'' offer little in the way of variation and they offer no real sense of progress as can be perceived in the case of, for example, ''Break Up''. At times, Jerry Lee himself sounds increasingly distracted, even bored by the process, seemingly being unable to find any scope within the format of the song to impress his own personality on the exercise. Were it not for Sam Phillips identifying most of the nine takes by their sequential numbers it might have been easy to dismiss a particular selection as a duplicate tape of another, but on close inspection there are a number of distinguishing characteristics. (*)

The first take stands out by virtue of a rather more aggressive sounding piano solo, opening with rapid fire repeat strikes of the same chords. Thereafter, even though the opening passage of each solo keeps to much the same formula, there are a number of variable fills in the second half of each; the more crotical listener might even point to some ''duff'' notes here and there. Takes 5, 6 and 10 all exhibit the one noticeable twist in the lyric, when Jerry Lee declares that he'll love the object of his affection ''till the day I die'' rather than simply the staccato ''till - I - die''. The latter part of take 5 also features a gratuitous ''goodbye honey'' casually delivered towards the fade out that isn't heard elsewhere. On sam's instruction, take 10 is performed at a much slower pace and both this and the final take, here made available for the first time without the overdubbed addition of the Gene Lowery Singers as heard on the issued master, are the easiest to tell apart from the mass of similar sounding recordings that precede them. (*)


10(2) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: -  October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10(3) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Count-In - Take 3
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960   -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-A5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-17 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

10(4) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Count-In - Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960   -  Not Originally Issued
Released: -  October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10(5) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unfinished
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960   -  Not Originally Issued
Released: -  October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10(6) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Count-In - Take 6
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960   -  Not Originally Issued
Released: -  October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10(7) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 7
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960   -  Not Originally Issued
Released: -  October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10 - STUDIO CHATTER 1 - 0:36
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960 - Not Originally Issued
Released:  - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10(8) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 8
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released:  - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued:  -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10 - STUDIO CHATTER 2 - 0:26
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: -  October 2015  -  Not Originally Issued
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-10 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10(9) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 9
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: -  October 2015
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-11 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10 - STUDIO CHATTER 3 - 0:21
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: -  October 2015  -  Not Originally Issued
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-12 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10(10) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 10 - Unfinished
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - April  1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-9-25 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-13 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10 - STUDIO CHATTER 4 - 0:23
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: -  October 2015  -  Not Originally Issued
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-14 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

10(11) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 11 - Undubbed Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1542-6-18 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-15 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

''Baby, Baby Bye Bye'', musically are from high points in Jerry's recorded career for Sun. Aside from the embalming job by the omnipresent Gene Lowery Chorus, swamp echo from the new studio again cut a swath through most everything. Even Jerry's performance seems lackluster on ''Baby, Baby Bye Bye'', a fairly catchy tune that might have caught some attention had Jerry's name not still been box office poison. Ironically, the one place in the world it charted was England, where it reached on the chart in June 1960 number 48 for one week ( London Records HLS 9131).  The song got its last shot in October 1960 when Wanda Jackson recorded it for an album.

Jerry Lee's recording was reissued in 1969 as a 7'' 45 single as Sun 42 as part of the Sun Golden Treasure Series. The song was also released as 45 single in Australia, New Zealand, France, and Japan.

10(11) - ''BABY, BABY BYE BYE*'' - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Hughie Piano Smith
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 393 - Take 11 Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - March 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 337-B mono
BABY, BABY BYE BYE / OLD BLACK JOE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

11(1) - ''OLD BLACK JOE'' - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Stephen Foster
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 1 - Chatter
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: -   October 2015
First appearance: -   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-16 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

The real highlights of these sessions involved Jerry Lee again casually dipping into the distant past, putting in the shade all the hard work in trying to make something creditable out of the two pop songs, ''Bonnie B'' and ''Baby Baby Bye Bye'' scripted for the occasion. Although ''Old Black Joe'' had no more chance of achieving a chart placing than the overtly commercial side of the 45 when paired ''Baby Baby Bye Bye'', many Lewis fans rate it as one of his finest pieces of work at Sun. It is fair to say, however, that it's not universally admired given the origins of the song and its association with the minstrel show tradition. Whatever one's perspective, the recording is a timeless demonstration both of the subtle power of Lewis's playing and his skill at reinventing material from across the musical spectrum. Irrespective of the intent of writer Stephen Foster in the 1850s, a century later Lewis surely displays a degree ob innocence in an interpretation that transcends political incorrectness; this is the rebirth of the song as an elegiac African American spiritual. Emulating the approach taken with ''Night Train To Memphis'', all Jerry Lee reproduces of Foster's ''Old Black Joe'' is a limited, in this instance inaccurate, recollection of the first verse and then the refrain, thereafter simply repeating the latter. In anyone else's hands that sort of technique, or lack of, sounds like a recipe for a potentially pointless, even calamitous, couple of minutes; in defying such logic Jerry Lee conceives a minor classic. (*)

11(2) - ''OLD BLACK JOE*'' - B.M.I. - 0:34
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Stephen Foster
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - False Start
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: -   October 2015
First appearance: -   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-17 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

11(3) - ''OLD BLACK JOE'' - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Stephen Foster
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released:  - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-B3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-18 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

11(4) - ''OLD BLACK JOE'' - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Stephen Foster
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Undubbed Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-A7 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-19 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

11(4) - ''OLD BLACK JOE*'' - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Stephen Foster
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 392 - Take 3 Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Released: - March 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 337-A mono
OLD BLACK JOE / BABY, BABY BYE BYE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

11(5) - ''OLD BLACK JOE'' - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Stephen Foster
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-20 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Old Black Joe" is a parlor song by Stephen Foster (1826-1864). It was published by Firth, Pond & Co. of New York in 1853. Ken Emerson, author of Doo-Dah!, indicates that Foster's fictional Joe was inspired by a servant in the home of his father-in-law, Dr. McDowell of Pittsburgh. The song is not written in dialect, Emerson writes, "yet the bluntness of Joe's blackness and his docility reduce Old Black Joe to the status of Old Dog Tray rather than its owner, to simply another white man's possession prized solely for its loyalty''. He believes the song "epitomizes Foster's racial condescension" but W. E. B. Dubois points to the song as a piece standing apart from the debasing minstrel and "coon" songs of the era. Emerson believes that the song's "soft melancholy" and its "elusive undertone" (rather than anything musical), brings the song closest to the traditional African American spiritual. Harold Vincent Milligan describes the song as "one of the best of the Ethiopian songs ... its mood is one of gentle melancholy, of sorrow without bitterness. There is a wistful tenderness in the music''.

Jim Kweskin covered the song on his 1971 album Jim Kweskin's America. Roy Harris made a choral adaptation of the song, Old Black Joe, A Free Paraphrase for full chorus of mixed voices a capella (1938).

The devastation to Jerry's career was far from over when he recorded this side effort in January 1960. He was reduced to playing the sort of low rent gig he would have laughed at just two years earlier. During this otherwise bleak period, he played his share of southern fraternity puke-outs and duke-outs. ''Old Black Joe'' probably went down well at those gigs. It was a Stephen Foster song, in fact Foster's only ''drakie'' song not in patois, and it was a servant in his wife-to-be's household. Jerry recorded it exactly one hundred years after Foster had written it, and it came out just as many in the South were wondering where the Old Black Joes had gone. Southern sales were probably quite respectable, but it utterly stiffed in the North. Sam Phillips' consolation lay in the fact that the song was in the public domain, allowing him to copyright Jerry Lee's arrangement.

12(2) – ''HOUND DOG'' - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Jerry Leiber Music – Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 8
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-25 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

The escapades on this session also informed Jerry Lee's re-working of ''Hound Dog'', now sounding far more true to Big Mama Thornton's original than the version dating from early 1958 when he had covered several Elvis Presley hits looking for potential album tracks.

"Hound Dog" is a twelve-bar blues song by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. It was recorded by Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton on August 13, 1952 in Los Angeles and released by Peacock Records in March 1953. "Hound Dog" was Thornton's only hit record, spending 14 weeks in the Rhythm and Blues charts, including seven weeks at number 1. Thornton's recording of "Hound Dog" is listed as one of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's "500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll", and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in February 2013.

"Hound Dog" has been recorded more than 250 times. The best-known version of "Hound Dog" is the July 2, 1956 recording by Elvis Presley, which is ranked number 19 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the ''500 Greatest Songs of All Time''; it is also one of the best-selling singles of all time. Presley's version, which sold about more than 10 million copies globally, was his best-selling song and "an emblem of the rock and roll revolution. It was simultaneously number 1 on the United States pop, country, and Rrhythm and Blues charts in 1956, and it topped the pop chart for 11 weeks - a record that stood for 36 years. Presley's 1956 (RCA 20/47-6604) recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1988.

"Hound Dog" has been at the center of many lawsuits, including disputes over authorship, royalties, and copyright infringement by the many answer songs released by such artists as Rufus Thomas and Roy Brown. From the 1970s onward, the song has been featured in numerous films, in ''Grease'', ''Forrest Gump'', ''Lilo and Stitch'', ''A Few Good Men'', ''Hounddog'', ''Indiana Jones'', ''The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull'', and ''Nowhere Boy''.

On August 12, 1952, rhythm and blues bandleader Johnny Otis asked 19-year-old songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller to his home to meet blues singer Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton. Thornton had been signed by Don Robey's Houston-based Peacock Records the year before, and after two failed singles, Robey had enlisted Otis to reverse her fortunes. After hearing Thornton rehearse several songs, Leiber and Stoller "forged a tune to suit her personality, brusque and badass". In an interview in Rolling Stone in April 1990, Stoller said: "She was a wonderful blues singer, with a great moaning style. But it was as much her appearance as her blues style that influenced the writing of  ''Hound Dog'' and the idea that we wanted her to growl it''. Leiber recalled: "We saw Big Mama and she knocked me cold. She looked like the biggest, baddest, saltiest chick you would ever see. And she was mean, a ''lady bear'', as they used to call 'em. She must have been 350 pounds, and she had all these scars all over her face" conveying words which could not be sung. "But how to do it without actually saying it? And how to do it telling a story? I couldn't just have a song full of expletives''. In 1999, Leiber said, "I was trying to get something like the Furry Lewis phrase 'Dirty Mother Furya'. I was looking for something closer to that but I couldn't find it, because everything I went for was too coarse and would not have been playable on the air''. Using a "black slang expression referring to a man who sought a woman to take care of him", the song's opening line, "You ain't nothin' but a hound dog", was a euphemism, said Leiber. The song, a Southern blues lament, is "the tale of a woman throwing a gigolo out of her house and her life".

The song was written for a woman to sing in which she berates "her selfish, exploitative man", and in it she "expresses a woman's rejection of a man, the metaphorical dog in the title". According to Iain Thomas, "'Hound Dog' embodies the Thornton persona she had crafted as a comedienne prior to entering the music business" by parading "the classic puns, extended metaphors, and sexual double entendres so popular with the bawdy genre''. Rhythm and blues expert George A. Moonoogian concurs, calling it "a biting and scathing satire in the double-entendre genre" of 1950s rhythm and blues.

Leiber and Stoller wrote the song "Hound Dog" in 12 to 15 minutes, with Leiber scribbling the lyrics in pencil on ordinary paper and without musical notation in the car on the way to Stoller's apartment. Said Leiber, "Hound Dog'' took like twelve minutes. That's not a complicated piece of work. But the rhyme scheme was difficult. Also the metric structure of the music was not easy''. According to Leiber, as soon as they reached the parking lot and Stoller's 1937 Plymouth, "I was beating out a rhythm we called the 'buck dance' on the roof of the car. We got to Johnny Otis's house and Mike went right to the piano…didn't even bother to sit down. He had a cigarette in his mouth that was burning his left eye, and he started to play the song''.

Elvis Presley's 1956 version Larry Birnbaum described "Hound Dog" as "an emblem of the rock 'n' roll revolution". George Plasketes argues that Elvis Presley's version of "Hound Dog" should not be considered a cover "since, most listeners, were innocent of Willie Mae Thornton's original 1953 release". Michael Coyle asserts that "Hound Dog", like almost all of Presley's "covers were all of material whose brief moment in the limelight was over, without the songs having become standards''. While, because of its popularity, Presley's recording "arguably usurped the original", Plasketes concludes: "anyone who's ever heard the Big Mama Thornton original would probably argue otherwise''.

Presley was aware of and appreciated Big Mama Thornton's original recording of "Hound Dog". Ron Smith, a schoolfriend of Presley's, says he remembers Elvis singing along to a version by Tommy Duncan (lead singer for the classic lineup of Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys). According to another schoolmate, Elvis' favorite rhythm and blues song was "Bear Cat (the Answer to Hound Dog)" by Rufus Thomas, a hero of Presley's. Nevertheless, it was Freddie Bell and the Bellboys' performance of the song, with Bell's amended lyrics, that influenced Presley's decision to perform, and later record and release, his own version: "Elvis's version of  ''Hound Dog'' (1956) came about, not as an attempt to cover Thornton's record, but as an imitation of a parody of her record performed by Freddie Bell and the Bellboys. ..The words, the tempo, and the arrangement of Elvis' ''Hound Dog'' come not from Thornton's version of the song, but from the Bellboys'''.

According to Rick Coleman, the Bellboys' version "featured Dave Bartholomew's three-beat Latin riff, which had been heard in Bill Haley's ''Shake, Rattle and Roll'''. Just as Haley had borrowed the riff from Bartholomew, Presley borrowed it from Bell and the Bellboys. The Latin riff form that was used in Presley's "Hound Dog" was known as "Habanera rhythm'', which is a Spanish and African-American musical beat form. After the release of "Hound Dog" by Elvis Presley, the Habanera rhythm gained much popularity in American popular music.

Presley's first appearance in Las Vegas, as an "extra added attraction", was in the Venus Room of the New Frontier Hotel and Casino from April 23 through May 6, 1956, but was reduced to one week "because of audience dissatisfaction, low attendance, and unsavory behavior by underage fans''. At that time, Freddie Bell and the Bellboys, who had been performing as a resident act in the Silver Queen Bar and Cocktail Lounge in the Sands Casino since 1952, were one of the hottest acts in town. Presley and his band decided to take in their show, and not only enjoyed the show, but also loved their reworking of "Hound Dog", which was a comedy-burlesque with show-stopping va-va-voom choreography. According to Paul W. Papa: "From the first time Elvis heard this song he was hooked. He went back over and over again until he learned the chords and lyrics''. Presley's guitarist Scotty Moore recalled: "When we heard them perform that night, we thought the song would be a good one for us to do as comic relief when we were on stage. We loved the way they did it''. When asked about "Hound Dog", Presley's drummer D. J. Fontana admitted: "We took that from a band we saw in Vegas, Freddie Bell and the Bellboys. They were doing the song kinda like that. We went out there every night to watch them. He'd say: 'Let's go watch that band. It's a good band!' That's where he heard 'Hound Dog,' and shortly thereafter he said: 'Let's try that song'''.

When asked if Bell had any objections to Presley recording his own version, Bell gave Colonel Tom Parker, Presley's manager, a copy of his 1955 Teen Records' recording, hoping that if Presley recorded it, "he might reap some benefit when his own version was released on an album''. According to Bell, "Parker promised me that if I gave him the song, the next time Elvis went on tour, I would be the opening act for him - which never happened''. In May 1956, two months before Presley's release, Bell re-recorded the song in a more frantic version for the Mercury label, however it was not released as a single until 1957. It was later included on Bell's 1957 album, ''Rock & Roll…All Flavors'' (Mercury Records MG 20289). By summer 1956, after Presley's recording of the song was a million-seller, Bell told an interviewer: "I didn't feel bad about that at all. In fact, I encouraged him to record it''. After the success of Presley's recording, "Bell sued to get some of the composer royalties because he had changed the words and indeed the song, and he would have made millions as the songwriter of Elvis’s version: but he lost because he did not ask Leiber and Stoller for permission to make the changes and thereby add his name as songwriter''.

Soon after, Elvis Presley added "Hound Dog" to his live performances, performing it as comic relief. "Hound Dog" became Elvis and Scotty and Bill's closing number for the first time on May 15, 1956 at Ellis Auditorium in Memphis, during the Memphis Cotton Festival before an audience of 7,000. Presley's performance, including the lyrics (which he sometimes changed) and "gyrations", were influenced by what  he had seen at the sands. As the song always got a big reaction, it became the standard closer until the late 1960s.

By 1964, Elvis Presley's version of "Hound Dog" had been covered over 26 times, and by 1984, there were at least 85 different cover versions of the song, making it "the best-known and most often recorded rock and roll song". In July 2013 the official Leiber and Stoller website listed 266 different versions of "Hound Dog", but acknowledged that its list is incomplete. Among the notable artists who have covered Presley's version of "Hound Dog" are: Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps; Jerry Lee Lewis in July 1974 for his Sun International LP ''Rockin' And Free'' and in November 1988 for the Zu-Zazz LP ''Jerry Lee Lewis - Doný Drop It''; Chubby Checker; Pat Boone; Sammy Davis, Jr.; Betty Everett; Little Richard; The Surfaris; The Everly Brothers; Junior Wells; The Mothers of Invention; Jimi Hendrix; Vanilla Fudge; Van Morrison; Conway Twitty; Jimi Hendrix and Little Richard; John Lennon and the Plastic Ono Elephant's Memory Band; John Entwistle; Carl Perkins; Eric Clapton; James Taylor; and (in 1993) Tiny Tim (in his full baritone voice). In 1999 David Grisman, John Hartford, and Mike Seeger included "Hound Dawg" on their 1999 album Retrograss, which was nominated for a Grammy in the Traditional Folk Album category in 2000.


13(1) – ''WHAT'D I SAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Ray Charles
Publisher: - Unichappel Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (L) 33rpm Sunbox 109-A3 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60'S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-25 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

13(2) – ''WHAT'D I SAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Ray Charles
Publisher: - Unichappel Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 2
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released:  - November 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2004-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - DON'T DROP IT!
Reissued: -  October 2015
First appearance: -   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-23 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

There's more than a touch of irony in the fact that nearly thirty years after the event this minor work should be elevated to the status of the title track on an entirely new Lewis Sun LP, following the rediscovering of these lost tapes in the later 1980s; ''Keep Your Hands Off Of It'', more deserving of the accolade, was itself celebrated as the other headliner on a twin-set of albums issued on the Zu-Zazz label (Z-2003) in 1987; here, we're treated to another example of Jerry Lee's capacity to recall some of the licentious blues material he would doubtless have heard in Haney's Big House during teenage excursions from his home in Ferriday''. (*)

''Keep Your Hands Off It'' was originally written as  "Hands Off'', later known as "Keeps Your Hands Off Her", is a 1955 song written and recorded by Jay McShann. The single, on the Vee-Jay label, was the most successful Jay McShann release on the Billboard rhythm and blues chart. "Hands Off", with vocals performed by Priscilla Bowman, was number one on the rhythm and blues best seller chart for three weeks. The single is notable because this was the last single to hit number one on the rhythm and blues chart without making the Billboard Hot 100 until 1976: For the next twenty-one years, all singles which made the top spot on the Billboard rhythm and blues chart would make the Hot 100.

In 1961, Damita Jo DeBlance recorded her version of "Keeps Your Hands Off Her"  for Mercury Records (Mercury 71760). Elvis Presley recorded and worked in a jam with "Got My Mojo Working", but not before Elvis interpolated "Keep Your Hands Off Her" during his sessions in June 1970 at RCA Studio B. in Nashville, Tennessee. ''We grew up on this mediocre shit man'', Elvis declared enthusiastically. ''It's the type of material that's not good or bad, it's just mediocre shit, you know''. But it was ''mediocre shit'' with which he was totally comfortable, for which he had great respect, and that he would always love.


14(2) – ''KEEP YOUR HANDS OFF OF IT/BIRTHDAY CAKE'' - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Jay McShann
Publisher: - Conrad Music
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Count-In - Take 1
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1987
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (LP) 33rpm Z 2003-A1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - KEEP YOU HANDS OFF OF IT!
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-28 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
W.S. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

* - Overbubbed  Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

As a footnote to this mammoth session features the masters of both ''Baby Baby Bye Bye'' and ''Old Black Joe'', as ultimately complemented by the vocal chorus and issued together on the single Sun 377, issued on The Sun Singles Collection, Volume 4 (BCD 15804-1-17-18) in 1997.

There are also to unsheathe the overdubbing process, and reveal, for the first time, the related tapes of the Gene Lowery Singers at work, issued on BCD 17254-18. These provide an intriguing opportunity to step into the sound booth with the backing singers and focus on their contribution being enacted in real time over the playback of the original recording. On hearing these tapes it is apparent that, but for a judicious edit, the issued version of ''Baby Baby Bye Bye'' might well have sounded rather more populated, with the earlier onset of the backing track. Equally, perhaps something was lost in the engineers having all but eliminated from the issued record any evidence the impressive male bass voice accompanying ''Old Black Joe'', which it is now possible to hear clearly in the deconstructed performance. (*)


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In the early days at Madison Avenue Jerry Lee Lewis also turned to a couple of traditional folk rhymes more familiar in nursery playrooms than in rock and roll dance halls; he nevertheless made sparkling recordings of both ''Billy Boy'' and ''My Bonnie'', neither of would emerge until the 1970s. The occasion is of added significance inasmuch as stereo techniques were employed for the first time on a Lewis recording. In the delivery of ''Billy Boy'', Lewis returned to an arrangement he had previously used, but ultimately discarded, in the latter stages of recording ''Break Up'' some eighteen months earlier. The same engagement also produced a polished reading of Hank Thompson's ''The Wild Side Of Life''; this song may well have been on his mind following the recording of ''The Great Speckled Bird'', from which the tune was derived, at the extended January 21-25 session. (*)

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS PROBABLY EARLY 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES EARLY 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Note: This is the first session recorded in stereo.

1 - ''THE WILD SIDE OF LIFE'' - B.M.I. - 2:49

Composer: - Arlie A. Carter-William Warrem
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - Early 1960 Not Originally Issued
Released: - August 1974
First appearance: - Power Pak (LP) 33rpm PO-247 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - FROM THE VAULTS OF SUN
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-4 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"The Wild Side Of Life" is a song made famous by country music singer Hank Thompson. Originally released in 1952, the song became one of the most popular recordings in the genre's history, spending 15 weeks at number 1 Billboard country charts, solidified Thompson's status as a country music superstar and inspired the answer song, "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" by Kitty Wells.

"The Wild Side Of Life" carries one of the most distinctive melodies of early country music, used in "I'm Thinking Tonight Of My Blue Eyes" by the Carter Family and "Great Speckled Bird" by Roy Acuff. That, along with the song's story of a woman shedding her role as domestic provider to follow the night life, combined to become one of the most famous country songs of the early 1950s.

According to country music historian Bill Malone, "Wild Side Of Life" co-writer William Warren was inspired to create the song after his experiences with a young woman he met when he was younger, a honky tonk angel, as it were, who "found the glitter of the gay night life too hard to resist''. Fellow historian Paul Kingsbury wrote that the song appealed to people who "thought the world was going to hell and that faithless women deserved a good deal of the blame''.

Jimmy Heap and His Melody Masters first recorded "Wild Side Of Life" in 1951, but never had a hit with the song. Thompson did, and his version spent three and one-half months atop the Billboard country chart in the spring and early summer of 1952. "Wild Side Of Life" was Thompson's first charting single since 1949's two-sided hit "Soft Lips"/"The Grass is Greener Over Yonder''. Thompson had hooked up with producer Ken Nelson in the interim, and one of their first songs together was "Wild Side''.

The lyric, "I didn't know God made honky tonk angels," and the tune's overall cynical attitude, Kingsbury noted the song"... just begged for an answer from a woman", inspired "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels''. Recorded by Kitty Wells and released later in 1952, that song, too, became a number 1 country hit. In "It Wasn't God ... '', Wells shifts the blame for the woman's infidelity to the man, countering that for every unfaithful woman there is a man who has led her astray.

''Wild Side Of Life'' not released at the time, this was first issued on the obscure U.S. Power Pak label’s 1974 ''From The Vaults Of Sun'' collection. Jerry re-cut the song during the 1965 sessions for ''The Return Of Rock'' album, though as it didn’t really fit on that album it was issued on his next one towards the end of the year,  ''Country Songs For City Folks''. Great though this is, the memorable saxophone on the earlier version makes that one the winner for it. 

2 - ''BILLY BOY'' - B.M.I. - 2:20

Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 7
Recorded: - Early 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Hilltop Records (LP) 33rpm Hilltop JS 6120-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - RURAL ROUTE NUMBER 1
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-5 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Billy Boy" is a traditional folk song and nursery rhyme found in the United States. It has a Round Folk Song Index number of 326. It is a variant of the traditional English folksong "My Boy Billy," collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams and published by him in 1912 as number 232 in "Novello's School Songs''.

Further variants have been recorded, that greatly extend the number of verses and tasks she can perform. An extended version of the song in which the lover performs many tasks besides the cherry pie was collected by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax: it appears in American Ballads and Folk Songs. The Lomax version names the woman being courted Betsy Jane. Jerry Lee Lewis released a version of the song on his 1972 album, Rural Rout Number 1.

The folk group, The Almanac Singers, wrote an anti-war version of this song by Millard Lampell. The final verse may be intended as a math puzzle, or it may be a humorous indication that the woman is considerably older than the protestation of her youth in the refrain seems to indicate. While the tone of the nursery rhyme is ironic and teasing, both the question and answer form and the narrative of the song have been related to Lord Randall, a murder ballad from the British Isles. In Lord Randall, the suitor is poisoned by the woman he visits.

By contrast, Robin Fox uses the song to make a point about cooking and courtship, and observes that: Feeding has always been closely linked with courtship. . . With humans this works two ways since we are the only animals who cook: the bride is usually appraised for her cooking ability. (''Can she bake a cherry pie, Billy boy, Billy boy''?). In some cultures this is far more important than her virginity.

3 – ''MY BONNIE'' - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Traditional-Charles Edward Stuart
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Slade - Take 4
Recorded: - Early 1960
Released: - January 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun NY-6-B6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - COLLECTORS EDITON
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-6 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"My Bonnie Lies Over Te Ocean" is a traditional Scottish folk song which remains popular in Western culture. The origin of the song is unknown, though it is often suggested that the subject of the song may be Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) published sheet music for "Bring Back My Bonnie To Me". Theodore Raph in his 1964 book American song treasury: 100 favorites, writes that people were requesting the song at sheet music stores in the 1870s, and Pratt was convinced to publish a version of it under the pseudonyms, and the song became a big hit, especially popular with college singing groups but also popular for all group singing situations.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Leo Ladner - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willis - Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JANUARY 26, 1960 TUESDAY

Duane Eddy, Santo and Johnny and the Diamonds begin an Australian tour.

Janice Rogers, Kenny Roger's first wife, files for divorce, accusing him of ''cruel, harsh and inhuman treatment''.

Texas resident Janis Joplin, destined to recorded ''Me And Bobby McGee'', runs off with three male friends for a weekend in New Orleans. The men are briefly threatened with statutory rape charges.

JANUARY 27, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Webb Pierce recorded a cover of Warner Mack's ''Is It Wrong (For Loving You)'' at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio, with Mel Tillis playing guitar.

JANUARY 27, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Carl Perkins and Warren Smith join Johnny Cash who is currently touring middle-America.

JANUARY 29, 1960 FRIDAY

Brook Benton headlines the Apollo Theater for a week.

Songwriter Tim Johnson is born in Noti, Oregon. He authors Kellie Pickler's ''Things That Never Cross A Man's Mind)'', Tracy Byrd's ''The Truth About Men'' and Jimmy Wayne's ''Do You Believe Me Now''.

JANUARY 30, 1960 SATURDAY

Dee Clark, Chuck, Berry, the Passions and the Fireballs appear on The Dick Clark Show.


FEBRUARY 1960

In the issued of Sun-Liners (February 1960), Barbara Barnes announced the latest Johnny Cash single  release, ''I Love You Because'' backed with ''Straight As In Love'' (Sun 334). (Both recorded December 13,  1956 at 706 Union Avenue). Recording a tune that had already been a hit for at least three other country stars  was ''scraping the bottom of the barrel'' by Sun's usual standards, but the record made it to number 20 on the  country charts. They were by this time competing with some strong Columbia releases, ans Sun's days of hit  Cash singles were coming to an end.

Also new on the market was the fifth in Sun series of EPs of Johnny Cash music, this was called ''Home Of  The Blues'' (Sun SEP 116). Barbara gave a rundown on the cover of all of these as well as the three LPs thus  far to hit the market. These ''package goods'' continued to sell well the entire time Barbara was with Sun,  even though some of the same songs appeared in more than one album. The other albums had made a great  deal of money, so Barbara convinced Sam Phillips that for the fourth one, which chiefly featured songs by  Hank Williams, they should go to full color.


FEBRUARY 1960

Like Carl Perkins before him, Carl Mann found it easy to sustain a career on the strength of  one major hit. He continued to sell records in respectable quantities through 1960, but by  the end of the year it was clear that his career was heading downhill at a steady clip. And,  like Carl Perkins, his career problems were compounded by a love affair with the bottle.  ''I was going a little too fast there'', is the way Carl characterises it today. ''In fact, it all  seems like a dream to me now''.


All I was thinking about was that I loved music, wanted to  play music and have a good time. I wasn't worried abut anything else.  We thought we were  having a good time, but looking back we should have taken care of business a little better  and not hit the bottle so much. We'd have been a lot better off we'd done that''.

Surprisingly enough, Carl had no problems getting work in bars and honky tonks despite his  tender years. He had a fake ID card, and everyone told him that he looked older than he  was. ''I remember one time we were in a bar in Chicago'', he says, ''and I was seventeen  Eddie and Robert were five years older but the waitress came and asked them for them ID.  Made Eddie mad. He said, Ain't you gonna ask him for his ID, pointing at me. She said, ''No, if  he ain't old enough, ain't none of you old enough''.

Nearly everyone needs some kind of crutch to handle the road Johnny Cash developed his  well-publicized love call with little palls, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis turned to the  bottle, and Carl Mann joined them He reckons he was an alcoholic at seventeen.


When the party started to end, Carl teamed up with Carl Perkins. They played in Las Vegas,  Carson City and the usual circuit of bars. Mann played piano behind Perkins and did a few  solo numbers. It was a bleak period for both men, unable to find another hit and ill-equipped  to do anything else in life.   Perkins and Mann wrote a few songs together, and another Carl, Carl Smith, recorded one.  Carl Mann recorded one of Perkins songs, ''Look At That Moon'', but, as he says, ''we didn't  talk about records all that much. He just couldn't seem to get anything going, and it made  him aggravated that nothing would take off. Music had changed.

He tried country, but he was  able to keep it going on the strength of ''Blue Suede Shoes'' all those years. He lived and  breathed it and kept it going''. Carl Mann didn't have quite that level of commitment to the
ever-flaky music business.

Sometime around 1963 the partnership between Carl Mann and Carl Perkins broke up. Mann  returned to Huntington, Tennessee. He played a little locally, but it was a far cry from the  summer of 1959 when the kids had stood and cheered when he played ''Mona Lisa''.  Observing that his career was more or less washed up before he was twenty years old, Carl  could reject bitterly on the fickleness of public taste.


SPRING 1960

When Scotty Moore started working at Sam Phillips' Recording Service, it had been two years since Sun  Records had placed a record in the Top 20 in the pop charts. The two major talents in Sam's stable were Jerry  Lee Lewis and a newcomer Charlie Rich, whose song ''Lonely Weekends'' had been a regional hit in 1959.  Johnny Cash had moved on to greener pastures; Carl Perkins had dropped out of sight. The reigning  Memphis hitmakers were Scotty Moore, with, ''Tragedy'', and Bill Black, with his ''Smokie (Parts 1 & 2)''.  Elvis Presley climbed back to the top of the charts in 1960 with ''Stuck On You'' and ''It's Now Or Never'', but  neither song was recorded in Memphis.

As head of production, Scotty presided over a state-of-the-art facility that the Memphis Press-Scimitar  described as ''plush'' and ''futuristic''. It boasted a sundeck on the roof and an executive bar. Sam moved from  his ''no desk'' office on Union Avenue to a penthouse office where he had a jukebox-like stereo hi-fi built into  his desk. Seven gold records hung on the wall; none bore Elvis Presley's name. Although Sam didn't come  right out and say so, the new studio represented a significant shift in his approach to the music industry.  While his efforts previously had been focused on finding new talent for Sun Records, he now was more  interested in selling studio time to other labels. Time was a less temperamental commodity in which to deal.  As soon as he had the new studio up and running, he turned his attention to opening a studio in downtown  Nashville at the Cumberland Lodge Building. It was Scotty's job to oversee production at both facilities.

FEBRUARY 1, 1960 MONDAY

Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran appear at Empire Theater in Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Capitol released Buck Owens' ''Above And Beyond'', and Hank Thompson's ''A Six Pack To Go''.

Loretta Lynn signs her first recording contract with Zero Records. The document requires just three pages.

FEBRUARY 2, 1960 TUESDAY

Cowboy Copas recorded ''Alabam''.

FEBRUARY 3, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Ray Price recorded the Mel Tillis-penned ''One More Time'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BRAD SUGGS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 3, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL

01 – "SAM'S TUNE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 393  -  Master
Recorded: - February 3, 1960
Released: - October 13, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3563-A mono
SAM'S TUNE / MY GYPSY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Brad Suggs just keeps paying homage to his employer and his place of work (''Sam never seemed to mind it'', Suggs recalls). First it was ''706 Union'' (Phillips International 3545). This time out, it's ''Sam's Tune'', dedicated to our esteemed label owner. Although it's a catchy little ditty in a singalong kind of way, this one  seems to have no more relevance to its source than ''706 Union'' did. Suggs recalls performing the lyrics with Sonny Haley and Jackie Boy Pennington, although there seems to be a pretty dominant female voice in the mix as well.


Brad Suggs >

Suggs' music continues to surprise us. What can one say about ''My Gypsy'', an utterly strange and lush record? ''I wrote that tune because I love fiddle music. I used to sit and listen to Sonny James play the violin and he used to remind me of a gypsy. That melody stayed in my head for years. I wanted to try to play a fiddle melody on the guitar. That's what this record was about. The musicians we used on there were from the Memphis Symphony. I wish we had been able to record it in Nashville. I think we could have gotten a really great record on it''.

In truth, the final results sound very much like an instrumental backing track that has mysteriously lost its vocal. Certainly, this is not a bad record, and it might even have entered the charts as a left-field item back in 1960. It's just that collectors who've come along for a digital copy of ''Sadie's Back In Town'' are going to have a tough time with this one. According to the session logs, these two titles were recorded in February, 1960. Somebody (probably Suggs, himself) wasn't satisfied and the lads were back in the studio on July 20th re-recording the same tunes. Curiously, though, it was the earlier versions that were selected for overdubbing (in August) and released in October.

02 – ''MY GYPSY'' - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 392  - Master
Recorded: - February 3, 1960
Released: - October 13, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3563-B mono
MY GYPSY / SAM'S TUNE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

03 – "CLOUDY"* - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 373  - Master
The basic track was later overdubbed by Charles Underwood
with a chorus and special effects at 639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee.
Recorded: - February 3, 1960
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3554-A mono
CLOUDY / PARTLY CLOUDY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This is what they mean by "atmospheric music". Brad Suggs third Phillips International single continues the tradition of quirky instrumental outings. Tunes like "Cloudy" were easy to promote and probably got their share of disc jockey attention, but came up short at the cash registers. It was Charles Underwood's idea to overdub the sounds effect on to Suggs' moody guitar work.

04 - "PARTLY CLOUDY" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 374  - Master
Recorded: - February 3, 1960
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3554-B mono
PARTLY CLOUDY / CLOUDY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Some of the Sun gets through on Suggs' solo on this aptly named side. Otherwise, it was the usual crew (including Charlie Rich and Martin Willis" gliding effortlessly through a pleasant but generally undistinguished 12-bar blues whose sole function was apparently to direct attention to the A-side.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs – Guitar
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Saxophone

Memphis Symphony - Strings
Unknown F emale Voices

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


FEBRUARY 4, 1960 THURSDAY

Johnny Burnette appears on American Bandstand.

FEBRUARY 5, 1960 FRIDAY

The Biggest Show of Stars for 1960 starts touring with headliners Frankie Avalon, Bobby  Rydell and Clyde McPhatter.

Pam Gadd is born in Independence, Missouri. A member of The New Coon Creek Girls and Wild Rose, she becomes a background singer for Porter Wagoner and applies support vocals to Terri Clark's hit ''A Little Gasoline''.

FEBRUARY 6, 1960 SATURDAY

George Hamilton IV joins the Grand Ole Opry,  at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Rhythm and blues singer Jesse Belvin dies in a car crash in Fairhope, Arkansas. A co-writer of The Penguins' hit ''Earth Angel'', he earns a country hit 10 years later as a songwriter after Slim Whitman's cover ''Guess Who''.

Jessie Belvin is killed in an auto accident near Hope, Arkansas. Johnny Preston starts six  week tour in Tucson, Arizona. Billy Haley and the Comets appear at the Coliseum in Atlantic  City, New Jersey. Sandy Nelson appears on The Dick Clark Show.

Early February Fats Domino is booked around his hometown of New Orleans so he can  supervise the building of his new house. Bobby Darin and Connie Francis are chosen the King  and Queen of Hearts by the American Heart Association for its annual-fund raising drive.

FEBRUARY 7, 1960 SUNDAY

Country singer Molly Bee guests on CBS-TV's ''The Jack Benny Show''.

FEBRUARY 8, 1960 MONDAY

Congress begins hearings to investigate payola in music and radio. Future Academy of Country awards producer Dick Clark survives the scandal. Rock disc jockey Alan Freed, credited as a co-writer on ''Sincerely'', is destroyed.

Jim Reeves snags a number 1 country single in Billboard magazine with ''He'll Have To Go''.

FEBRUARY 9, 1960 TUESDAY

The Hollywood City Council holds the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Among those honored in its initial installment, Hank Williams, Sonny James, Elvis Presley, Johnny Mercer, Lefty Frizzell, Gene Autry and Jimmy Wakely.

FEBRUARY 10, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Champs perform "To Much Tequila" on ABC-TVs American Bandstand.

Singer/songwriter/musician Lionel Cartwright is born in Gallipolis, Ohio. His relaxed vocal style leads to four Top 10 singles from 1989-1991, the biggest coming with ''Leap Of Faith''.

Jimmie Skinner recorded ''Reasons To Live'' at the King Recording Studio in Cincinnati.

FEBRUARY 11, 1960 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley, serving with the Army in West Germany, receives his stripes as a full sergeant, three weeks after he was officially notified of the promotion.

FEBRUARY 12, 1960 FRIDAY

Chuck Berry headlines the Apollo Theater with Little Anthony and the Imperials, Baby  Washington and the Mello-Kings.

FEBRUARY 15, 1960 MONDAY

Paul Anka begins a week long engagement at the New Lotus Club in Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 16, 1960 TUESDAY

Annette appears on American Bandstand to sing "O Dio Mio".

Bass player Doug Phelps is born in Leachville, Arkansas. He becomes a founding member of The Kentucky HeadHunters but leaves in 1992 with his sibling, Ricky Lee, to form Brother Phelps. He rejoins The HeadHunters in 1996.

Johnny cash Recorded ''Smiling Bill McCall'' at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

FEBRUARY 17, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Johnny Cash recorded the George Jones-penned ''Seasons Of My Heart'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Everly Brothers sign a record-setting $1,000,000 contract with Warner Bros., the recording arm of the motion picture company.

The RCA compilation album, ''60 Years Of Music America Loves Best'' goes gold. Among its 30 tracks, primarily culled from pop and classical music, is Eddy Arnold's ''Bouquet Of Roses''.

Elvis Presley earns the first gold album of his career, for ''Elvis'' ( RCA Victor LPM-1382).

FEBRUARY 18, 1960 THURSDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded the pop hit ''When Will I Be Loved'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B. Linda Ronstadt succeeds with the song in country music 15 years later.

FEBRUARY 19, 1960 FRIDAY

Dr. Jive's Rhythm and Blues Revenue opens at the Apollo featuring Johnny Nash, The  Flamingos, Tiny Topsy, Nappy Brown, the Hollywood Flames and Barrett Strong.

FEBRUARY 20, 1960 SATURDAY

Bill Haley and His Comets, Frankie Ford, Ray Smith and Johnny Tillotson appear on Saturday  evening's Dick Clark Show.

A riot breaks out when teen fans storm the stage during an Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran concert at Caird Hall in Dundee, England.

FEBRUARY 22, 1960 MONDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''Big Iron'', and Stonewall Jackson's double-sided hit, ''Why I'm Walkin'''backed with ''Life Of A Poor Boy''.


FEBRUARY 1960

As little shoots of daffodils and crocus were making their first timid forays above the ground in Memphis  gardens, the big day came when the Sun staff would move to the new offices. Despite the many problems  with a leaking roof, equipment that didn't sound right, and delays in all quarters, the building seemed to be  ready in late February 1960 when they were told they could pack up all the stuff and move to 639 Madison  Avenue. (The official opening of Sam Phillips' Recording Studio was on September 17, 1960).

This was a much more comfortable space. Sam Phillips had a large, plush office on the third floor with  windows overlooking a rooftop patio, a jukebox, and, at last, a big desk of his very own. A wet bar was  nearby. Bill Fitzgerald and Sally Wilbourn also had private offices on the third floor. Cecil Scaife and  Barbara Barnes found themselves on the second floor side by side in spacious rooms with lovely carpet and  all new furnishings.

At first Regina Reese was stationed in the reception area on the first floor, but soon she moved upstairs,  relieved by a newly hired lady whose main qualification was that she was of late middle age and thus should  not prove a distraction to the young musicians or vice-versa. The new receptionist took a liking to her  contemporary, the building construction supervisor, O.T. Being, so far away upstairs they didn't know how  that played out. Sam required that Regina and Barbara start alternating Saturday morning on phone duty, an  onerous task, since they had the weekends free heretofore. One Saturday morning Sam called and asked,  ''Who is this''? When Barbara answered ''Sun Records Company'' in a clipped and frosty voice.

Except for the foyer and a couple of small spaces, the first floor was devoted to the technical space and  equipment needed for making records. The two studios and all that went with them were first-class, utterly  up to the minute, and designed to Sam's specifications, with the cooperative efforts of designer of Jack  Weiner. The interior design reflected Sam's flamboyant taste, with shiny golden chandeliers, a starburst  clock, fancy door knobs, and nothing subdued. Denise Howard, who was also the decorator for the Holiday  Inn chain, searched out these objects and all the non-technical appointments.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: POSSIBLE MONDAY FEBRUARY 22, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Eddie Bush is also a pretty fair songwriter. His ''I'm Bluer Than Anyone Can Be'' is among the prettiest song on Carl recordings for Sun and for his album. Once again, the decision was that Carl should concentrate on his singing and leave the piano playing in the capable hands of Charlie Rich. Rich's contribution to tracks like this is unmistakable. Purists might also care to note that the obvious splice immediately following the piano solo was made at the time the album was assembled for reasons now lost in the mists of time.

01 - "I'M BLUER THAN ANYONE CAN BE" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-16 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Carl Mann's country soul also came up for air during these session. He cut the Webb Pierce classic ''I Don't Care'' from 1955, and Eddy Arnold's ''Then I Turned And Walked Slowly Away'', which had just been revived by Marty Robbins, Carl and the boys also took a first stab at ''Mountain Dew'', building it around a sustained guitar figure from Eddie Bush. ''I Don't Care'' is something of a wasted opportunity; Bush actually passed up the chance to dazzle us with hot licks around Carl's vocal. There are no mistakes; just a missed opportunity. Oatsvall, as always, seems to be hanging on by his fingernails, just barely handling the rudimentary chord changes.

02 - "BABY I DON'T CARE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-15 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

03 – "AIN'T YOU GOT NO LOVIN' FOR ME" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Carl Mann-Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - 1985
First appearance:  - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-3 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-6 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

04 – "THEN I TURNED AND WALKED SLOWLY AWAY" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Eddy Arnold-Carl Red Fortner
Publisher: - Abbot Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - 1985
First appearance: -  First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-13 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-7 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

The same group of sessions also included Carl's first stab at ''Serenade Of The Bells'', originally a hit in 1947 and 1948 for Sammy Kaye and Jo Stafford. This early version suggests that Bush, whose idea it was to record it, came equipment with a clear idea of the arrangement in his head, a vision he seems to have neglected to share with his pals. Carl Mann later recorded the song more successfully for Monument.

05 – "SERENADE OF THE BELLS" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Al Goodhart-Kay Twomey-Al Urbano
Publisher: - Melrose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - 1985
First appearance:  - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-4 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-8 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

The clutter of tape boxes from the LP sessions yielded some undated bits and pieces by Carl that are gathered together here. ''Sentimental Journey'' was a 1945 hit for Doris Day when she was the girl singer with Les Brown. It had been revived by Conway Twitty at the same session he recorded ''Mona Lisa'', but Carl remembers the instigation to record it came from dee-jay Dewey Phillips. Sam and Dewey were sitting in the control nursing their bottles when Dewey shouted, ''Hey Elvis! I got one for you!''. Then he went out looking for the lyrics while the liquor continued to flow. By the end of the session everyone was drunk. Sam took Carl to his all-girl radio station, WHER, to meet some of the on-air personalities. Later, they cruised around town while Carl passed out. Not your average sentimental journey.

06 – "SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY" - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Bud Green-Les Brown-Ben Homer
Publisher: - Morley Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - 1985
First appearance:  - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-8 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-10 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann – Vocal & Piano
Eddie Bush – Guitar
Robert Oatswell – Bass
W.S. Holland – Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

*


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jud Phillips did go for an alternative deal involving Bill Lowery's National Recording Corporation out of Atlanta, Georgia. Jud issued an initial pressing of Judd 1016, ''Rockin' Little Angel'' and ''That's All Right'' at his own expense, and it was reviewed in the trade press in August 1959. When the record started to hit, all subsequent copies bore the legend – ''Subsidiary of National Recording Corp Atlanta''. Charlie Terrell remembered it this way: ''I instigated the deal where NRC became involved with Judd Records. I knew Bill Lowery pretty good, and told him about Ray Smith's abilities and the great new record he had on Judd. So Bill called Jud and wanted to get involved. Lowery and NRC paid for all Ray''s Judd sessions after the first one, and they were all made at RCA in Nashville.

After leaving Sun Records, Bill Justis formed the Play-Me label in Memphis and he worked for Jud Phillips. According to Bill Justis, ''When Jud left, he ran his own Judd label based in Florence and Memphis and operated from a mobile home type bus. I produced Ray Smith for Judd in Nashville. That was really the start of my move into the Nashville music scene''. In Nashville, Justis worked with Bill Beasley for Hit Records, a company producing soundalike versions of hit songs, while working on independent productions for other labels, soon joining Monument and Mercury as an arranger.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
FOR JUDD RECORDS 1959

RCA STUDIO B.
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
JUDD SESSION: TUESDAY FEBRUARY 23, 1960
SESSION HOURS: 19:00-23:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – JUD PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

Bill Lowery had just started in the record business having emerged from the radio and publishing business and he was on his way to building a real music empire in Atlanta. By 1970, the Lowery group of music publishing companies was the second largest measured in Billboard's chart hits. Lowery's catalog included ''Young Love'', ''Games People Play'', ''Dizzy'', ''Walk On By'', and many others by his stable of artists and writers including Joe South, Tommy Roe, Jerry Reed, Ray Stevens, The Tams, Ric Cartey, Kenny Hayes, Billy Joe Royal, and a host of others. Even Lowery's vice president was named Mary Tallent in 1970, Billboard reported: ''The Bill Lowery complex is about as complex as a complex can be'', and described Lowery as ''the unquestioned head of commercial music in Atlanta... and a man who simply doesn't know how to slow down''.

01 – ''PUT YOUR ARMS AROUND MR HONEY'' – B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - von Tilzer-McCree
Publisher: - Broadway Music Corporation
Matrix number: - NRJ 1070
Recorded: - February 23, 1960
Release: - April 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1017-A mono
PUT YOUR ARMS AROUND ME HONEY / MARIA ELENA
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-9 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS


How appropriate, then that the next release on Judd Records was Ray Smith's version of ''Put Your Arms Around Me Honey'', Judd 1017, issued in the spring of 1960 and reviewed in Billboard that April. It was recorded on February 23, 1960 at the first of three sessions funded by NRC for Judd. Charlie Terrell remembered them well: ''I attended all Ray's recording sessions in those early years. Never missed a one. I was a bit older than Ray, but we were very friendly from the start and I treated him like he was my son. Our families were real close, and for years, everything he did, I was there. They called us the Missouri Mafia''.


Ray Smith with his band the Rockin' Little Angels ^

''Put Your Arms Around Me Honey'' was backed by a ballad, ''Maria Elena'' and it made its way slowly to just number 71 on the popular charts by May 1960. According to the recording logs of bass player Bob Moore, demo sessions had been held on February 1, for three hours, for which Moore was paid $30, and on February 9 for one hour. The master sessions were on Tuesday February 23 at 7:00pm followed by another at 11:30, both of which ran over the allotted three hour timeslots.

02 – ''MARIA ELENA'' – B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Lorence Barcelata-S.K. Russell
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - NRJ 1069
Recorded: - February 23, 1960
Release: - April 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1017-B mono
MARIA ELENA / PUT YOUR ARMS AROUND ME HEY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-10 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 – ''ONE WONDERFUL LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Adams Cage-Everette-Murphy-Shelton-Yaney
Publisher: - Tuneville Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - NRJ 1073-A
Recorded: - February 23, 1960
Release: - July 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1019-A mono
ONE WONDERFUL LOVE / IT MAKES ME FEEL GOOD
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-11 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The session included a number of other songs including the ones chosen for Ray Smith's third Judd single, Judd 1019 issued in June 1960, which coupled ''One Wonderful Love'' with ''It Makes Me Feel Good''. This one was a good pop-rock record but it failed to make the charts at all.

Ray Smith was still in demand for live performances though, based on his own talent and the promotional work of Jud Phillips. Charlie Terrell confirmed: ''In the days when he was with Jud and Sun, Ray was on some rock and roll package shows, but he was a showman in his own right. He could carry a show himself. He was playing some very big and very night clubs, and we took him out to Vegas. He played the Golden Nugget and so on''.

04 – ''IT MAKES ME FEEL GOOD'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Wilkin-Walker
Publisher: - Cedarwood Music
Matrix number: - NRJ 1074-B
Recorded: - February 23, 1960
Release: - July 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1019-B mono
IT MAKES ME FEEL GOOD / ONE WONDERFUL LOVE
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-12 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Chet Atkins – Guitar
Grady Martin – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Floyd Cramer – Piano

The Jordanaires consisting of
Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews,
Hugh Jarrett, Hoyt Hawkins – Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In the months after ''Lonely weekends'' was recorded, Charlie Rich continued to seek a behind the scenes role in order to make money in the music business. Barbara Pittman, whose first sides appeared on Sun in 1956, recalls how Charlie wrote and produced one side of her latest single, released immediately after ''Lonely Weekends''.

''Charlie always told me he thought I could sing jazz. That meant a lot to me because I was just a kid back then. He had heard my sing Peggy Lee's ''Fever'' at the Cotton Club. That's why he wrote ''Handsome Man'' for me. The night we recorded it the session went on quite late. At one point we missed Charlie's voice and piano. He had been singing with the vocal group and we missed his ''oooh-ah's''. We looked and there he was, under the piano. We woke him up and went on with the session. That was my last session for Sun Records and I remember the date quite well - February 3, 1960 (??). That was the night my sister murdered her husband. J.M. Van Eaton was driving me home - it was about 3:00 in the morning - and we heard it on the radio. She and her husband had taken me to the studio. It happened about 30 minutes after they left me off''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR BARBARA PITTMAN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 24, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLIE RICH 
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

A marathon session to cut "Handsome Man". Things went well and Barbara's precocious smoky voice is showcased by Charlie Rich's minor key composition. Its a long way from this track to "I Need A Man" (SUN 253) and the Janis Martin bag into which some journalists have tried to force Barbara Pittman.

A different Charlie was in charge here, as Mr. Underwood force-fed his contorted ballad to Barbara, and spent too much of Sam's saving in the process. The results were hardly worth it. There is some irony to "The Eleventh Commandment". Call it a credibility issue, as producer/composer Charles Underwood, who was later arrested for shoplifting drugs, takes it upon himself to pass editorial comment on the Ten Commandment. Sam Phillips nearly choked when he saw the bill for this epic session.

Needless to say, record sales never came close to offsetting session costs. Nearly 40 years later, Barbara Pittman still winces when she remembers trying to sing the erratic line lengths and basically tuneless opus.

01 - "HANDSOME MAN" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Version
Recorded: - February 24, 1960  -  Not Originally Issued
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-8 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

"Handsome Man" was Barbara's final release, gets a split vote. The uptempo side was written and produced by Charlie Rich, for whom Barbara has enormous respect. ''Charlie was the best thing that ever came out of Sun, period. I've been a big fan of Charlie's since I first met him when I was about 13 years old. He was always a good friend and I've always been crazy about him. His singing, his playing, his looks. He was a very handsome guy, very shy, very unassuming. Charlie was also a great writer and a fantastic pianist. Charlie and I used to play clubs together. We even did some TV work together", recalled Barbara.

02 - "HANDSOME MAN" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 372 - Master
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3553-A mono
HANDSOME MAN / THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Handsome Man" is strong material. Unfortunately, the flipside, "The Eleventh Commandment", is another story. Virtually no one, including Barbara herself, has a kind word to say about this track. No amount of remixing or de-chorusing can resurrect this recording. In its favor, this abominable production has generated some amusing anecdotes. Guitarist Brad Suggs, who played on the date, still shakes his head in disbelief when remembering the song. "It was a mess, man. Just all out of a meter. Impossible to play on". Barbara recalls, "Charles Underwood came by my house one day at two in the afternoon and said 'Barbara, we've got a session tonight'. I went down and learned to the song and recorded it the same night. I had a reputation then for being able to learn stuff real fast so I could do demos, but I wasn't ready for this. That enormous session! Charlie did the whole thing behind Sam's back. Charlie was the engineer and Sam was sick so he figured he could get away with it. You know, that was the most expensive session they had ever done. You wouldn't believe the session. All the strings, everybody there at one time. No overdubbing. Sam Phillips was in bed with pneumonia. He got out of bed to witness it. The head of the musicians union was also there. It was just incredible. I think Sam went into shock. I know I was scared to death just looking around me in the studio. The song itself was awful. I hated it. It was the worst thing I ever recorded. Its all out of meter. Billy Riley really got me through the session. Him and J.M. Van Eaton, the drummer. Jimmy kept saying to Underwood, 'She's right. The song is out of meter'. And Underwood would say back. 'No. It's fine. She just has to dip here a bit and dip there..."

03 - THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 371 - Master
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3553-B mono
THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT / HANDSOME MAN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

04 - "VOICE OF A FOOL" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Bill Cantrell
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15359-11 mono
I NEED A MAN
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-5 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

There were originally three takes of "The Titles Will Tell" appears to be gone forever. The second, probably the better of the remaining versions, is missing the start. The third (included here) is complete. It is a powerful piece of material, sung to bluesy perfection.

05 - "THE TITLES WILL TELL" - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-3 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Perhaps the most interesting part of the Barbara Pittman story concerns the recent discovery of "The Titles Will Tell", a song previously thought lost. Barbara recalls: "I thought that was gone forever. I haven't heard it since the day we recorded it over 40 years ago. That was a Charles Underwood song. He wrote it for Elvis and I cut the demo for him. The session turned out just great, in fact Charlie thought we could have put the record out as a single. Dewey Phillips fell in love with it, too. He used to listen to it every time he came by the studio. Dewey took the song to Elvis and he loved it, but his management said they couldn't do anything with it unless they had the publishing. Unfortunately, Charlie had already published the song with Sam. Neither side would budge and so noting happened. I'll always remember that Elvis actually said to Dewey, 'Why don't you put the record out by Barbara. She sings it better than I could'". Barbara recalls: "The start of the second tape of "The Titles Will Tell" was erased by Sam Phillips and Dewey Phillips. They hit the record button by mistake when they were playing it over and over. Before anybody could stop them, the first 20 seconds were gone. Just enough to ruin it. Sam and Dewey used to get together in the studio and get stone drunk night after night. They had their buddies Jack Daniels and Haig & Haig with them. The five of them in the studio every night. They used to drive Jack Clement crazy. He would have to go in and re-do sessions".

06 - "JUST ONE DAY" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Bill Cantrell
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15359-9 mono
I NEED A MAN
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-23 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Although Barbara recorded at Sun for a relatively long period of time, but she never had a hit record: "Sam wouldn't push my records even if they started to sell. "Handsome Man" received a bullet in Billboard. "Two Young Fools In Love" was the number 1 record in Memphis for around three months. The flipside had started to sell in Chicago. Sam's brother Jud told me how frustrated he was as well. He said that Sam had told him not to push it. "Raunchy" (by Bill Justis) came out on Phillips International at the same time as "Two Young Fools" and that just buried it. Sam wouldn't do anything to help. Its always bothered me. After more than 30 years, I got on the phone with Sam one night and we talked for over three hours. I finally got him to tell me why he wouldn't promote my stuff. Finally he told me. He was uncomfortable with female artists. He lacked confidence in them, especially somebody like me. I had a low, bluesy, husky voice and his favorite female artist was Doris Day. He told me this! Its the truth. So I said 'Well, Sam, why didn't you tell me this 30 years ago so I could have gone on with my life? Why did you keep me hanging on for four years" It makes me wonder what might have been if he had just been behind me".

Certainly, it is not true that Sam Phillips had no regard for female vocalists. For example, on a number of occasions, he has rhapsodized about the Miller Sisters, whose sweet country harmonies he personally recorded for over three years. Barbara Pittman concedes this point. "He loved them. They had high, sweet, girlish voices. I had a low, growling and husky voice. I was a blues singer. This petite little teenager singing like Koko Taylor. And he just didn't like that. Sam has always been a macho man. The lady has got to be very feminine. Like I said, his favorite artist was Doris Day. That should tell you something".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Barbara Pittman - Vocal
Billy Riley - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jilly Wilson - Piano

The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


FEBRUARY 24, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Carl Dobkins currently serving six month hitch with the Ohio National Guard performs live  from Fort Dixon on NBC-TVs The Perry Como Show. Ray Peterson begins a five week booking  at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Songwriter Don Sampson is born at Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington, D.C. He authors Brad Paisley's ''Waitin' On A Woman'', Alan Jackson's ''Midnight In Montgomery'' and Gary Allan's ''Tough Little Boys''.

FEBRUARY 26, 1960 FRIDAY

Ernie Ashworth recorded ''Each Moment (Spent With You)'' and ''You Can't Pick A Rose In December''.

FEBRUARY 26, 1960 FRIDAY

Lenny Welch performs "You Don't Know Me" on American Bandstand.

FEBRUARY 29, 1960 MONDAY

Bobby Darin and Connie Francis appear on The Ed Sullivan Show.

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''Is It Wrong (For Loving You)'',  Columbia released Ray Price's ''One More Time''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
FOR RITA RECORDS 1960

PEPPER RECORDING STUDIO
2076 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION : UNKNOWN DATE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES & BILLY RILEY

It is probably closer to the mark to say that Billy Riley's records for Sun and Rita were just a little too raw for prime time, although a little of the dumb luck that often separates a hit from a flop could have changed the picture considerably. The reputation of Riley's records as seminal rockabilly is now beyond dispute, although it is worth noting that Riley never considered himself a rockabilly singer. "What we did was rock and roll", asserted Riley to Bill Miller. "There was no hillbilly in it at all. To me, Elvis doing "Blue Moon Of Kentucky" was rockabilly but after Bernero came in he stopped cutting rockabilly, he became a rock and roll singer. I was a rock and roll singer!".

01 - "MY BABY'S GOT LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) BFX 15272 mono
BILLY RILEY & THE LITTLE GREEN MEN
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-27 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Guitar
Wylie Gann - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Tommy Bennett - Piano

Those close to Riley thought that stardom was assured. "I really thought Riley was going to be a big star", asserted James M. Van Eaton. "That was one of the best bands I've ever played with. There were some musicians in that band as good as anyone in the country at that time. I think what it boiled down to was that they (Sun Records) didn't want us to have a hit record because they would lose the staff band".

After starting and folding two more labels in Memphis, Billy Riley eventually left for the West Coast. He slept on Charles Underwood's floor. He played guitar on a few sessions, including Herb Alpert's "Lonely Bull" session, which Underwood engineered, and he recorded for a plethora of labels.

Through the 1960s and 1970s, Billy Riley persevered in the music business. He recorded under his own name and a host of pseudonyms including the Megatrons, the Rockin' Stockings and Sandy and The Sandstones. The list of labels for whom he recorded is even longer. Riley even achieved a small breakthrough on the Entrance label in 1972 with the Chips Moman produced "I Got A Thing About You Baby" (later recorded by Elvis Presley). Immediately preceding his deal with Entrance, Riley had returned to the re-born Sun label in 1969, launching it in fine style with "Kay". Both "Kay" and "Red Hot" were - in their way - definitive performances but the gulf between them highlighted Riley's real problem: he lacked an identifiable style. With all the talent in the world, Riley would not stick in one groove long enough to reap the rewards. His versatility was his greatest asset and his greatest drawback.

He also worked for Sam Phillips' son Knox, recording a rockabilly session for Knox's Southern Rooster label. After feeling once again that his hour had finally come when Robert Gordon and the rockabilly revivalists started doing good business with what was essentially his music, Riley saw his star eclipsed for the last time and retired from the music business to work in construction.

Since 1983 Billy Riley has refused to gig, recorded little and released nothing. If the right offer under the right conditions came along he would probably give it one last -go-round. In the meantime, he supports himself as a contractor, rarely dwelling upon his impressive - if less than successful - past.

"Looking back", recalled Sam Phillips, "all in all I could have had a darn good country and rock and roll label, I really feel that. I think that I stayed in country music alone, and dedicated myself to that, then I had the nucleus of several fine artists who would have made it - Doug Poindexter, earl Peterson, Red Hadley, Malcolm Yelvington, the Miller Sisters, Maggie Sue Wimberly and, in particular, Ernie Chaffin, Charlie Feathers and Warren Smith.

See, my whole thing was, I just loved stylists. People you knew the minute you heard them on record. People like Carl and Johnny and Jerry Lee. That's what its all about, man. Then, once you get that feel and rapport with an artist and a style you can do just whatever you wanted to do, within reason, and still sell records.

But I know that if I had persisted in pure country music, I would have had difficulty in orienting the taste of people and getting the radio play I would needed to succeed. Because it was a different sound in country and rock and roll".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
FOR RITA RECORDS 1960

SONIC RECORDING STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION : UNKNOWN DATE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES & BILLY RILEY

01 - ''MUD ISLAND'' – B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: Roland Janes-Billy Riley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date 1959/1960
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) BFX 15272 mono
BILLY RILEY & THE LITTLE GREEN MEN
Reissued: 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-1-26 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Harmonica
Roland Janes – Guitar
Tommy Bennett - Piano
James M. Van Eaton – Drums
Martin Willis – Tenor Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


Pat Gipson's (aka Barbara Barnes) ''Back Home in Memphis'' story in TV Radio Mirror magazine, July 1960, Volume 54, No 2. >

MARCH 1, 1960 TUESDAY

Red Prysock appears at the Surf Club in Baltimore.

MARCH 2, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Jack Scott sings "Burning Bridges" and ''What In the World's Come Over You" on American Bandstand.

Sergeant Elvis Presley leaves West Germany as the end of his Army hitch nears. Life magazine captures Priscilla Beaulieu waving goodbye.


MARCH 3, 1960 THURSDAY

Sergeant Elvis Presley arrives at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey on his return from West Germany. Nancy Sinatra accompanies him, while Tina Louise, the future Ginger Grant on ''Gillugan's Island'' covers the event for the Mutual Broadcast Newwork.

Bill Anderson recorded ''The Tip Of My Finger'', and  Duane Eddy winds up a month long term in his hometown of Phoenix, Arizona.

Review from Cash Box says that ''Baby, Baby, Bye Bye'' (Sun 337) by Jerry Lee Lewis, ''The performer has a contagious outing here. The fine Lewis essay is enhanced by a delectable combo-chorus sound. Could be a big one, and ''Old Black Joe'' an even faster, honky-tonkish approach to the old favorite. It's a strong sound, but title may see programming difficulties''.

MARCH 4, 1960 FRIDAY

This was a red letter day in Memphis, because it marked the return from military service of Elvis Presley.  Everyone was ecstatic, and there were many fans at the station to welcome him. Seeing him waving from the  train where he got off at Buntyn Station in Memphis, immediately one could see that the rough edges of the  rebel in the outlandish outfits had been smoothed to a more polished veneer. Here was a wholesome, motherand- country-loving boy even the older generation could adore. Colonel Tom Parker and the William Morris  Agency would find him an even more valuable property now than when he had inspired teenagers to riot at  his every concert.

Elvis Presley's return inspired Barbara Barnes to query a fan magazine about a ''Back Home in Memphis''  story. TV Radio Mirror accepted the story, and Barbara wrote it under the byline ''Pat Gipson''. She did not  want her Sun Records identity to be involved with this piece.

Some of the information for the article Barbara Barnes gleaned from accounts in the Memphis Tress  Scimitar, which had always had a strong entertainment section. As she said in her article, ''Graceland,  Presley's $100,000 home in Memphis , was thrown open to the press on Elvis' first night home, and the  reporters got a chuckle as Mr. Rock and Roll imitated President Eisenhower'' in welcoming the reporters. He  stated he had requested to be sent home by ship because of his fear of flying, but ''you know how it is in the  army. They tell you to fly, you fly''. Presley demurred when asked to pose with his teddy bear, saying, ''It  might look silly for a 25-year-old man home from the service to be playing with dolls''.

Other tidbits were contributed by the various friends of Elvis who dropped into the studio. From another  friend, perhaps Elvis's former schoolmate George Klein, Barbara said, ''I learned that, after staying up all  night, Elvis awoke on his first day home about noon and asked Alberta Holman, Graceland's cook-made, to  cook him up some bacon, black-eyed peas, and hash browns. I can't recall if it was George or someone else  who commented on Elvis's diet, saying, ''Elvis likes grease. Every meal, I couldn't eat all that grease''. I left  this observation out of my article''.

Sun producer Charles Underwood was still on the scene, and he would drop by with frequent updates as the  week of Elvis's homecoming rolled on. Underwood was one of Elvis' good friends and had contributed to his  image by designing for him the leather guitar-case cover that fans recognized when he pulled out his acoustic  guitar.

''What do all you guys do all night?'' Barbara asked Charles. It was a halfteasing question, but one Charles  took seriously. He thus contributed some insider information for Barbara's article. ''Well, at first Elvis wanted  to stay at home. So we just hung around Graceland, playing pool and listening records. Elvis likes to show  off his karate lessons. One night he wanted to see some movies, so he rented the Memphian for 1:00 a.m.  And we saw ''Cash McGall'' and ''Seven Thieves''. He added, ''We might go to the skating rink, he has to rent  that out, too''.


MARCH 4, 1960 FRIDAY

Tennessee senator Estes Kefauver honors Elvis Presley's Army service in the Congressional Record saying ''this young American became just another G.I. Joe''.

''Maybellene'' songwriter Chuck Berry is found guilty in St. Louis of violating the Mann Act, for taking an under-age female across the state line with reputedly improper motivation. It is the first of three such cases in which he will be tried over 13 months.

MARCH 5, 1960 SATURDAY

Jackie Wilson headlines a three day Alan Freed production at the State Theater in Hartford,   Connecticut.

Elvis Presley is discharged from the Army.

MARCH 1960

Sam Phillips contributed to the complexion of Charlie Rich's music had been to introduce  him to the world of commercial rock and roll and country music which set the stage for his  moment in the spotlight ten years later. ''At first I didn't dig country'', recalled Rich to  Fanfare magazine in 1975. ''As a matter of fact, we put it down because we wanted to be  jazz pickers. I had to make a drastic change at Sun Records and I didn't really appreciate  country music until I went there. Now I like to mix them up, put some jazz licks in country  and some country licks into a heavy driving jazz piece''.

MARCH 7, 1960 MONDAY

The single, Sun 337 ''Old Black Joe'' b/w ''Baby Baby Bye Bye'' by Jerry Lee Lewis issued.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY MARCH 7, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 – ''COME BACK''* - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: None - Master
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - August 23, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1970 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS WITH CHARLIE RICH

02 – ''COME BACK'' - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-27 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''School Days'', tracks like, ''Apple Blossom Time'' and ''Come Back'' were originally issued with Excessive choral overdubs by the Gene Lowery singers. Nearly 40 years later, we can begin to appreciate the performances that Rich left on tape, without all the gratuitous ''sweetening''. The ballads, in particular, reveal a depth that was only hinted at in their original release. Charlie was simply incapable of performing a standard as it was originally composed or best known. On each of these performances, Charlie has digested the original and reinvented it to reflect his indelible streak of blues and jazz sensibility.

03 – ''SCHOOL DAYS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:30
Composer: - Cobb-Edwards
Publisher: - Mills Music - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - P 385 - Master
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3560-B mono
SCHOOL DAYS / GONNA BE WAITIN'
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

''School days'' is another matter. The idea of taking an ancient (we're talking 1907) tune like this and wrapping it in a modern, somewhat jazzy arrangement is novel, to say the least, but the excessive choral overdubs killed whatever promise the idea may have had. The final version seems ill-considered. It's odd to hear Charlie's soulful vocal punctuated by pseudo-hip Frank Sinatra-esque lines (''swingin' bunch of kids'') trying to make its way through gelatinous mounds of choral sweetening. Neither a pretty picture nor Charlie's finest hour at Sun.

04 - ''SCHOOL DAYS'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:31
Composer: - Cobb-Edwards
Publisher: - Mills Music - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - None – Undubbed  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-7 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

05 - ''I'VE LOST MY HEART TO YOU'' - B.M.I. - 3:10
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-18 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

06 - ''THAT'S HOW MUCH I LOVE YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - August 23, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1970 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS WITH CHARLIE RICH
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-24 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

07 – ''UNCHAINED MELODY'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Hy Zaret-Alex North
Publisher: - Frank Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-10 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Unchained Melody'', in all likelihood, this track was little more than a one-take studio warm-up that ended up on tape. Little concentration seems to have gone into the recording, and indeed the whole mid section of the song (''Lonely rivers flow to the sea'') is missing. In addition, Charlie has made an interesting lyric change, altering ''Time goes by so swiftly...''. Even with such a slapdash effort, Charlie's powerful and soulful way with a ballad are obvious. Because of the name value of the title, this track actually appeared – overdubbed with additional instrumentation (including an organ!) - on a budget LP in the 1970s.

08 – ''UNCHAINED MELODY'' - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Hy Zaret-Alex North
Publisher: - Frank Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Gusto Records (LP) 33rpm Gusto GT-103 mono
WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN'GOIN' ON

09 - ''JEANNIE WITH THE LIGHT BROWN HAIR'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Stephen Foster
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-23 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

* - Overdubbed in Nashville

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Brad Suggs – Guitar
R.W. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


MARCH 1960

From March through August of 1960, the sessions at the new studio were most about the ones with Charlie Rich, for an  eventual album. It seemed to be a very slow process and, except for Charlie come and go a few times, and  Barbara Barnes didn't hear much about what they were getting. Finally, in midsummer, Sam Phillips told her  that they should get some artwork started for an album cover, and late in July she heard the acetate. Barbara  was disappointed both in the sound and the choice of material. To her, the old studio had a more intimate and  mellow sound. She liked some cuts, and she was sure in writing the liner notes to praise the diversity of  Charlie Rich's stylings, but she just wasn't impressed with all they had put down. However, one point she did  emphasize was a belief in Charlie's destiny as a major star, and this was a wholly honest opinion. Barbara  also hoped the album would sell, because they didn't have anyone else to pin the hopes on that she knew it.

Charlie Rich was working in Memphis a great deal during that period, and one morning Barbara was  surprised to get a phone call asking her to pick him up and bring him to the studio. He gave her an address in  East Memphis, and she set out to find the place. When she drove up, she saw Charlie standing at the door  with a woman she didn't recognize. They seemed to be having the proverbial ''fond farewell''. Barbara had  heard from Bill Justis that Charlie liked to drink and also that women found him irresistible. Bill said they  made all the moves and sometimes practically kidnapped Charlie after the gigs.

It was a little strained when he got in the car and neither of they said anything for a while, except Charlie  finally said ''thanks''. Barbara told him ''anytime'', but added, ''Charlie, when you make it big, and I am sure  you are going to make it big, don't forget Margaret Ann. Your success is going to be her success, too''. His  only answer was, ''Hmmmm''.

According to Barbara, ''Charlie Rich, being Bill Justis's protege, wasn't part of the clique of musicians Jack  Clement had built up during his Sun says. Instead of hanging out with him, he spent more time with Bill and  sometimes Regina Reese than with me. In the early days, this meant lunch or coffee at Mrs. Taylor's.  Sometimes it was just Charlie and me, and he also would come talk with me on break when I dropped into  the Sharecropper bar. So we became friends, and he introduced me to some of his cronies''.

Charlie Rich's talent was being limited by two factors, seeking to get hits with what was rently commercial,  that is, appealing to teens, and restricting his repertoire largely to tunes published in-house, mostly his own.  It didn't seem to occur to Charlie or the individuals who had produced him that a new approach might work.  Sam Phillips had success with blues, they wondered why he didn't get out some of those old tunes of his  black artists and try Charlie on them. He apparently thought that scene was over.

Charlie's friend Bruce Reynolds was disappointed in the new album Phillips International had put out on  Charlie, saying the material was weak, especially ''School Days''. Bruce said, ''School Days! Everybody hates  school. Who wants to hear about school days''? He had a point. Charlie was too nice and pliable, trying to  give Bill Justis and Sam what he thought they wanted, instead of asserting his own talent and what he was  good at.

MARCH 7, 1960 MONDAY

Johnny Horton recorded ''Sleepy-Eyed John'' just before midnight at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

MARCH 8, 1960 TUESDAY

Guitarist Jimmy Dormire is born in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He replaces Michael Lamb in Confederate Railroad in 1995, after the band's peak years with ''Trashy Women'', ''Queen Of Memphis'' and ''Daddy Never Was The Cadillac Kind''.

Sun 338 ''The Legend Of The Big Steeple'' b/w ''Broken Hearted Willie'' by Paul Richy issued.

MARCH 9, 1960 WEDNESDAY

The Mystics sing "Hushabye" on American Bandstand.

MARCH 11, 1960 FRIDAY

Jimmy Jones begins a week at the Howard Theater in Washington, D.C. The Flamingos play two days at the  Lindenwood Inn in Philadelphia.



Paul Richy >

Writer and producer Charles Underwood, composer of the superb "Bonnie B", spent a fair bit of time hanging around Sun end of 1959 and early 1960 and was actually entrusted with several productions. Be thankful he never had the producer's chair turned completely over to him. There might have been a lot more Sun records sounding like this. How can one calculate the distance, in miles or years, from "We Wanna Boogie" to "good simple people praying for a sleeple?".


Paul Richy from Arkansas. Moved to Memphis in 1954. Made one record for Sun on March 11, 1960, Sam Phillips met Richy at a disc jockey convention in Nashville and brought him up to the Sun studio.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR PAUL RICHY (RICHEY)
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY FRIDAY MARCH 11, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Despite the presence of Roland Janes, Jimmy Van Eaton, and Charlie Rich, this slice of sentimental dreck was pretty tame, even if it was not out of touch with the pop market in early 1960. These sides were probably among the earliest tracks recorded at 639 Madison Avenue. Its doubtful they could have fit the church bells through the door at 706 Union Avenue.

01 - "THE LEGEND OF THE BIG STEEPLE" - B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Jack Music
Matrix number: - U 394 - Master
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960
Released: - March 8, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 338-A mono
THE LEGEND OF THE BIG STEEPLE / BROKEN HEARTED WILLIE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Charles Underwood didn't give up without a fight. The same session that produced these sides also yielded two unreleased titles. One was a tear jerker penned by Underwood called "Flight 303". It (mercifully) never appeared on Sun, but when label alumnus Edwin Bruce visited Nashville for his first RCA session in 1960, he had Underwood's composition in his little hands. It appeared as one side of Bruce's rare first single on RCA. The RCA connection extends deeper, too. Some six or eight weeks before Richy recorded "Big Steeple", Porter Wagoner recorded it for RCA, but it was one of the few Wagoner singles from this era not to chart. Paul Richy, incidentally, is the brother of George Richy, one-time musical director of "Hee-Haw" and sixth husband of Tammy Wynette.

02 - "BROKEN HEARTED WILLIE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 395 - Master
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960
Released: - March 8, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 338-B mono
BROKEN HEARTED WILLIE / THE LEGEND OF THE BIG STEEPLE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

On this side, Richy chronicles the trials and tribulations of Willie. Again, this is pretty dire stuff, although Jimmy Van Eaton's surprising kickass drumming shines like a beacon. It turns out that Willie was really a stand-in for Job, and the Lord bails out ole Willie for hanging in with him through all the rotten dates and trials of his teenage years. In its own quiet way, SUN 338 seems to have been a spiritual.

03 - "BROKEN HEARTED WILLIE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960

04 - "FLIGHT 303''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960

05 - "THREE STARS, THREE WISHES''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Paul Richy - Vocal Roland Janes – Guitar
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Jimmy Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Gene Lowery Singer - Background Vocal

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


THE OLD PAYOLA ROLL BLUES - Decline that affects Phillips' labels through the early 1960s  had even deeper causes than his diminishing interest or the audio characteristics of the new  studio. The character of the entire industry was changing.  Sun had swept to prominence with some of the most starkly underproduced music ever  recorded. ''Blue Suede Shoes'', ''I Walk The Line'', and ''Whole Lotta' Shakin' Gonna On''  featured just three or four instruments and vocalist, but such productions were swiftly going  out of vogue. If Phillips had followed his nose back toward rhythm and blues, he would have  been well placed to capitalize upon the soul music boom a few years later. Instead, he and  his staff followed the trend toward a fuller pop sound. As a result, a Sun record produced in  the early 1960s was less likely to be disingguishable from the fifty or one hundred other  records released during the same weeks.

Other factors hastened the retrenchment. The wide ranging payola investigations under way  in the late 1950s effected subtle but important changes within the industry. Payola (the  payment of money or other incentives in exchange for radio play) had started with song  pluggers before world war II, and after the war it became a feature of the rhythm and blues  business. It was not until the rhythm and blues record labels began to get national exposure,  using the same promotional methods they had perfected in leaner times, that the protests  started. Phillips was called on to explain his dealing with Dick Clark on the ''Breatless''  promotion, but otherwise emerged unscathed. Parsimony had brought forth its reward.  Other companies such as Chess, made detailed disclosures of their payments to disc jockeys.  The protracted saga was played out as the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) hearings made their way across the country.  Leonard Chess from Chess Records and Jerry Wexler from Atlanta were among those  compelled to confess and recant. A few careers were shattered, most notably that of Alan  Freed. In the end, payola went underground for a few years, but the more insidious result  was that the music business became more conservative.

In the move back to safer ground, the major labels reasserted their power, and there was a  general atmosphere of caution. Six of the Top 10 records from June1957 had been on  independent labels; by June 1960 just three carried that distinction.

By the early 1960s, Sun was part of the musical establishment. Like the rest of the industry,  they were concentrating on good-looking boys with a whitebread sound. What Sam Phillips  had been able to do in the mid-1950s, with Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and  all the others was carve out a secttor of the market no one had known to exist. The artist  that Sun signed during the 1960s were competing in the same sector of the market as the  major labels, but without the majors' promotional clout. In the mid-1950s the mayors a were  playing catch-up to Phillips; by the early 1960s, he was trying to catch up to them.


MARCH 11, 1960 FRIDAY

Fabian, Jackie Wilson, Freddy Cannon and Santo and Johnny appear on the Dick Clark Show.

MARCH 12, 1960 SATURDAY

Cash Box combines its pop and r & b charts. In an editorial appearing on the front page of  that issue, the magazine justifies this decision by noting the similarity between the pop and  r & b charts; that is, the r & b listing was at the time almost ninety percent pop in nature.  Cash Box evidently had second thoughts about this policy, and reinstated the separate rhythm and blues  compilation on December 17, 1960 ("Top 50 in Locations"). Billboard used the same  reasoning in deleting its rhythm and blues singles charts between November 23, 1963 and January 30,  1965. On the latter date, Billboard ultimately returned to the two-chart system.

MARCH 13, 1960 SUNDAY

Chuck Berry's trial for the violation of the Mann Act begins. Two weeks later Berry is found  guilty and sentenced to five years in prison and fined $5,000. Berry immediately appeals.

MARCH 14, 1960 MONDAY

In England, Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran begin a week at the Empire Theater with British  rockers Billy Fury, Georgie Fame and Tony Sheridan. Sam Cooke begins a tour of the  Caribbean with a performance at Montego Bay, Jamaica.

Review in Billboard magazine says that ''Baby, Baby, Bye Bye'' (Sun 337), ''Jerry Lee Lewis comes thru with a strong reading of sprightly rocker that has a solid beat and a rhythmic infectiousness. Good wax, and that ''Old Black Joe'', ''wild, stompin' performance of the Stephen Foster tune by Jerry Lee also featuring some solid boogie piano''.

Life magazine runs a photo of Priscilla Beaulieu waving goodbye to Elvis Presley as he ends his stay in Germany. A caption portrays her as the ''girl he left behind''.

Columbia released Johnny Cash's double-sided hit ''Seasons Of My Heart'' backed with ''Smiling Bill McCall'', and Freddie Hart's ''The Key's In The Mailbox''. The song becomes a hit for Tony Booth 12 years later.


MARCH 1960

Charlie Rich did not easily give up the notion of session/producer at Sun. Even as ''Lonely  Weekends'' was building momentum, Charlie was in the studio playing piano on songs he had  written for other artists. On March 14, 1960, vocalist Carl Mann entered the new studios on  Madison Avenue hoping to rekindle the success he had enjoyed barely a year earlier with  ''Mona Lisa''. With Charlie at the keyboard, Mann was able to leave his rudimentary piano  skills on the shelf and concentrate on singing a new tune Charlie had written for him called  ''I'm Coming Home''. The performance ranked among Mann's finest work for sun, and was  doubly gratifying for Rich when the song ended up on one of Elvis's LPs within the year. Both  Charlie Rich and his wife, Margaret Ann were surprised by that turn of events since they had  done nothing to promote the song or persuade Presley to record it. Their subsequent efforts  to pitch their song ''Gentle As A Lamb'' to Presley feel on deaf ears, thus reinforcing their  belief in the capriciousness of fame and fortune. Things only happen when you least expect  them or have given up caring.



© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


From left: Carl Mann, Kay Bain, and Buddy Bain, 1960. >

March 1960 found Carl Mann at the new studio to work on his album. Charlie Rich, on the cusp of his first touch of success was sitting in on piano. Another webb Pierce song, \\I'm Walking The Dog'' from 1954 draws the best from everybody, and is recorded on a later session in August.


The sound of Rich on piano is quite apparent here. The fact that Sam Phillips wanted some album tracks drawn from his own publishing companies posed an unusual problem for an artist who had built a career on rocking up ''standards''.

Tunesmith Charlie Rich supplied a novel solution by contribution the standout ''I'm Coming Home''. Rich' songs is based quite closely on the chordal structure of Mann's reading of ''Mona Lisa''. Carl had taken considerable liberties in his adaptation of the Cole hit and Rich seems to have based his song on Car's version, thus circumventing copyright problems. There is no more impressive track in the Carl Mann Sun legency than ''I'm Coming Home'', a judgement that Carl himself shares.

''I was real happy with the cut we got on that. I was proud to begin with that Charlie Rich had written the song especially for me. Then he played piano on it and we got a beautiful groove (going). Everything just worked perfectly. I was also very flattered when Elvis recorded a version of the song based on our arrangement. He had obviously been listening to our record and that made me feel good'', recalls Carl Mann.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY MARCH 14, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

A Session was paid for on July 15, 1960 for Mann, Rich, Van Eaton, Stevenson and Moore. Some of the titles below derive from that session.

Arguably, the fate of the A-side barely mattered in this case. The joy that awaited anyone brave and smart enouch to flip record over more than compensated for all studio excesses. ''I'm Coming Home'' is quite simply Carl Mann's masterpiece. It is his best recording at Sun and, thus, his best work ever. The reasons are quite straightforward. Charlie Rich has written a wonderful tune based entirely on the melody line used by Carl on ''Mona Lisa''. Since Carl had actually improvised that melody (rather than using the one performed by Nat Cole) there was no fear of plagiarism. Moreover, Carl wisely surrendered the piano stool to Charlie Rich, thus focussing his attention on singing. This also allowed some finely crafted piano stylings to appear on a Carl Mann record – another first. Everything comes to perfection here, right down to the choreographed slow-down ending that makes this tiny little studio combo sound like a well oiled machine.

01 – "I'M COMING HONE" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 376 - Master
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3555 mono
I'M COMING HOME / SOUTH OF THE BORDER
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

The result were obviously so compelling that when Elvis Presley heard them he insisted on recording the tune for his ''Something For Everybody'' LP. Along with the ego boost that offered Mr. Mann (not everybody had his records covered by the King), it also provided an unexpected payday for Rich and Sam Phillips, whose publishing company shared the joyride. As a final token of esteem, this track was included on the original LP Sun 1250 titles ''Sun's Million Sellers'', putting it in fast company with selections like ''Blue Suede Shoes'' and ''Great Balls Of Fire''.

''If I Ever Needed You'' was yet another attempt to repackage a ballad from days gone by. The original had been a hit for Eddie Fisher, spending 23 weeks on the charts in 1954. Car's version is nearly as slick as Fisher's original, down to the saccharine chorus.

02 – "IF I EVER NEEDED YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Crane-Jacobs
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-12 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

03 – "ISLAND OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-13 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Another Eddie Bush composition ''Walkin'' And Thinkin'' reveals the kind of dues many Sun artists had to pay for recording at 639 Madison. This fine track would have been a killer if it had been cut at 706 Union Avenue. Instead, its crisp low end, accented by W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland closed hi-hat, has been set awash in a sea of swampy echo.

04 – "WALKIN' AND THINKIN'" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Eddy Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-14 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

05 – "IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER ON" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Carl Mann-Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None  -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-9 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal & Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatswell - Bass
W.S. Holland - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

Sadly, W.S. Holland and Carl Mann came to a parting of the ways sometime in the summer of 1960 following this session at the new Phillips studio on Madison Avenue. Predictably, it was over money. Musicians and groups who make it through the lean years often find unexpected conflict when the money starts rolling in. Until ''Mona Lisa'' starting selling big, Carl and W.S. had made it on a handshake. With revenue from both personal appearances and record sales, the question of exactly what was being split and in what percentage became contentious. At this point, W.S. Holland chose a steady, although unchallenging gig keeping time for Johnny Cash over the ups and downs of working with Carl Mann.

Carl Mann had several 'feel good' moments during his days recording for Sam Phillips' label. Admittedly, his later work for Monument or ABC might have revealed a higher standard of technical perfection, but these early sides by a still very young, optimistic and relatively musician are surely to work for which he will be remembered. There is much to be proud of here.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


MARCH 15, 1960 TUESDAY

NBC's ''Ford Startime'' celebrates Oscar-winning songs, with Tex Ritter singing ''High Noon'' and a current nominee, ''The Hanging Tree''. Nat King Cole is also hand to deliver ''Mona Lisa''.


The LP collected most of Ray's singles alongside some unissued songs. Overall, it reveals a man working within the parameters of rock and roll and the softening sounds of 1960 popular music, but who was nevertheless capable of a wide range of good music. Rockers like ''That's All Right'', and Charlie Rich's ''Rebound'' sit well alongside catchy and classy soft rockers and Dean Martin-inspired ballads that included ''You Don't Want Me'', ''You Make Me Feel Good'' and ''I'll Be Coming Home''. Smith benefited at this time from the contacts Bill Justis and Bill Lowery had with a number of good young songwriters, including Marijohn Wilkin and Ray Stevens.


Judd JLPA 701

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
FOR JUDD RECORDS 1959

RCA STUDIO B.
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
JUDD SESSION: TUESDAY MARCH 15, 1960
SESSION HOURS: 20:00-23:00 & 23:00-02:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – JUD PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

In October 1960 came Ray's fourth and final single, Judd 1021, ''Blonde Hair, Blue Eyes'' and ''You Don't Trust Me'', and an LP called ''Travelin' With Ray'', Judd LP 701. This single and some of the album tracks were made on Tuesday March 15, 1960 in two sessions at RCA, one at 8:00pm and another night session at 11:00pm. Once again, these sessions were produced by Bill Justis.

There were to be no more Ray Smith discs on Judd, however. Despite Smith's hits and two successful discs by Tommy Roe in 1960, including the big hit ''Sheila'' (spelled ''Shiela'' on the record label), Bill Lowery's NRC operation went bankrupt. It was caught in the well-known trap of being unable to collect funds from distributors fast enough to keep up with the outgoings. Lowery ran other small labels later, and guitarist Stanley Walker recorded a single on the Lowery Records label, but in the main Bill Lowery decided to focus on publishing as his main business, Jud Phillips decided to stick to artist promotion and other activities outside music, and Charlie Terrell was left looking for another deal for Ray Smith.

01 – ''BLONDE HAIR, BLUE EYES'' – B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Martin-Blake
Publisher: - Cedarwood Music
Matrix number: - 5-1023
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1021-A mono
BLONDE HAIR, BLUE EYES / YOU DON'T WANT ME
First appearance: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-13 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''YOU DON'T WANT ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Marijohn Wilkin-Stanley Walker
Publisher: - Cedarwood Music
Matrix number: - 5-1024
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1021-B mono
YOU DON'T WANT ME / BLONDE HAIR, BLUE EYES
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-14 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 – ''REBOUNT'' – B.M.I. - 1:42
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music
Matrix number: - S 729
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-30 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04 – ''BABY JUST BECAUSE'' – B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Lazenby-Lazenby
Publisher: - Tuneville Music
Matrix number: - S 729
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-31 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

05 – ''LITTLE MISS BLUE'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Ron Isle-Jimmy Isle
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music
Matrix number: - S 730
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-32 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

06 – ''SPEAK LOW'' – B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Weill-Nash
Publisher: - Chappell Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 729
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-33 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

07 – ''I'LL BE COMING HOME'' – B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Ray Stevens
Publisher: - Chappell Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 730
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-34 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Chet Atkins – Guitar
Grady Martin – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Floyd Cramer – Piano

The Jordanaires consisting of
Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews,
Hugh Jarrett, Hoyt Hawkins – Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JEB STUART
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY MARCH 16, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

Jeb Stuart is what they used to call a stylist. An entertainer. If you're looking for a straight reading, you won't get it from ''Mr. Emotions', as he billed himself. On ''Sunny Side Of The Street'', Stuart brings his frenetic energy to the lyrics. Like fellow stylist Billy Stewart (no relation), Jeb repeats words two or three times. He seems overcome by his own excitement; he just can't bear any pauses in his delivery. Empty space is wasted space. The effect is strange to say the least. How does one classify such an agitated style?

01 – "SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 1:53
Composer: - McHugh-Fields
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - P-379 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3557-A mono
SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET / TAKE A CHANCE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Is it rhythm and blues? Blues? Pop? Jazz? We can pretty much rule out country or gospel, but then what? The situation isn't helped by the new studio at 639 Madison, whose spacey echo only confuses matters more. When you've finished adding overdubs by the Gene Lowery Singers, the effects are beyond recognition. Things become a lot clearer on ''Take A Chance'', which is far more conventional urban rhythm and blues, circa 1960. Once again, though, Stuart is sabotaged by the out-of-control sonics of the new studio.


From the beginning of his career, Stuart seems to have oriented himself toward the white audience. It surely couldn't have been coincidence that a black Memphian named Charles Jones took the name of a Confederate cavalry general. Jones/Stuart claims to have been born on June 2, 1945, although one suspects that there's a birth certificate somewhere that tells a different story. He grew up idolising Billy Eckstine, Nat King Cole, Elvis, Fats Domino, and Little Richard, and left Memphis to study at the Chicago Conservatory of Music under Frank Lavere, one of the writers of Cole's hit ''Pretend''.


Jeb Stuart ^

Back in Memphis, Stuart landed a gig at the Southern Club, and hired Isaac Hayes as his piano player. They were eventually displaced by Sam the Sham, but moved on to several other local venues. Hayes, incidentally, claims to have played piano and arranged one of Stuart's Phillips singles (although the Union logs tell a different story, as they often do).It was Rufus Thomas who suggested that Stuart contact Sam Phillips. Stuart was auditioned by Charles Underwood, who was sufficiently impressed to call Phillips down from the executive suite. Phillips liked what he heard. Stuart and Underwood co-wrote ''Take A Chance'', and, given the choice of signing with Phillips International or Sun, Stuart opted for Phillips because of its uptown image.

02 – "TAKE A CHANCE'' - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Charles Underwood-Jeb Stewart
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 380 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3557-B mono
TAKE A CHANCE / SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stewart - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
More Details Unknown

Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

An ardent Elvis Presley devotee, Donald L. Hinton grew up in Carruthersville, Missouri wearing cool clothes, driving a slick car and singing the kind of rock and roll songs that he hoped the King would approve of. A taste of the real thing came when he opened for Carl Perkins, a move that gave him the concocted with Narvel Felts. His moment at the label came and went in a heartbeat but the peppy ''Honey Bee'' is a deserving lagacy.

STUDIO SESSION FOR DON HINTON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY MARCH 16, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

01 - "HONEY BEE''* – B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Don Hinton-Narvel Felts
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P-378 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3556-A mono
HONEY BEE / JO ANN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Records like ''Honey Bee'' were not that hard to find in the 1960 pop marketplace. They came complete with quasi-Latin rhythms and Elvisy vocals, like Donnie Brooks' popular ''Mission Bell''. Hinton arrived at 639 Madison in March, 1960 and recorded four titles, two of which were released on May 10th. Not bad – a two-month delay for a kid obsessed with Sun Records. The record sold poorly, though, and Hinton's Sun career was over almost as quickly as it started.

The flipside, ''Jo Ann'', is pretty straightforward teen fare circa March 1960, that does little to bring out the best in Hinton's vocal chops.

02 - "JO ANN'' - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Don Hinton-Wolf
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 377 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3556-B mono
JO ANN / HONEY BEE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

03 - "DREAM GIRL''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 16, 1960

04 - "HEART OF GOLD''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 16, 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Hinton - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano

*- Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


UNTOLD SUN STORIES – DON HINTON - Born in Caruthersville, Missouri, some 90 miles north  of Memphis, in 1942, Don Hinton not only grew up in the immediate post-Elvis generation  but in awe of what was happening in Memphis. To him and his buddies, Memphis was the  epicenter of the musical universe. His first gigs were with Junior Upchurch and the Rockers.  They reckoned themselves to be the number 2 local band, second only to Narvel Felts.  There was a jukebox supplier in Caruthersville named Bo Young (rumors of Bo's contacts  with local organized crime seemed to be borne out when he was later murdered).


Young  knew Sam Phillips, and took Don to Memphis. ''Bo liked our songs'', said Don. ''He financed  the session, and Sam was there. Sam liked it well enough to want to release it on Sun. All the  Sun guys were there: Roland Janes, Billy Riley, Charlie Rich... and so on.

Roland liked what  we'd done and wanted to issue it on his label, Rita Records. Hi Records was interested, and  so was Fernwood. I remember going to Fernwood and Bill Black's bass was there with the  white trim. Fernwood wanted the record too, but everyone wanted to be on Sun, and when  Sam says he wanted to release it, we jumped. They pushed ''Jo Ann'' but ''Honey Bee'' was  the side that fit the era much better. Sam told me I should move to Memphis, stay at the  YMCA, and hang out at Sun. I didn't do it, and I've regretted it all these years''.

Hinton says that ''Jo Ann''/''Honey Bee'' was released on the same day as Carl Mann's ''South  Of The Border''. ''They sold 20,000 ''South Of The Border'' on the first day'', he told Dave  Booth, ''and all the Phillips International power was behind Carl Mann. Mind You, if I was  Phillips I would have done the same thing''.

Before and after his Phillips single, Don opened a few shows for Jerry Lee Lewis, Charlie  Rich, Carl Perkins, and others. It was, he says, a joyful period. Then he went to Chicago. ''I  went for a two-week stand in June 1961, and I left in 1972'', he says. He met his wife,  Sabina, in Chicago and when they left it was to take his Elvis show on the road. He modeled  himself after Elvis' Vegas period. Sabina made the sequined jumpsuits. Together, they toured  the United States and Canada. They did this until 1985 or 1986. ''I'd be on the road five or  six months at a stretch'', he says. He'd hang a sign outside the lounges he played, ''If you like  Elvis, you'll love Don Hinton''. Playing places that Elvis didn't play made Don a lot of money,  but much of it went on life sweeteners. He had no home, just a recreational vehicle.

Don came close to Elvis just once. Elvis's girlfriend, Linda Thompson caught his act and  invited him to join a party of Elvis's friends at the Memphian Theater. They watched a bad  war movie, and Don asked Linda if Elvis was in a mood to meet anyone. She went to ask and  never came back. Don was on a trek across Canada when he heard that Elvis had died.

Don eventually settled in Mobile, Alabama. ''I loved the mystique of the town'', he says.  ''Down here on the Gulf, it's a very unique area. We liked anything unique... and I'm not  going to elaborate on that. I flew down one January and bought a house''. There wasn't much  recording after Sun. ''I recorded in Chicago for a little offbeat label. Then I did an LP in 1985  for Mister Music Records in Nashville. It sounds cheesy, and I guess it was. We had two singles  off that record''.

For the greater part of his musical career, Don inhabited the twilight world of bars and  lounges. Tours could be extended indefinitely. If he went over well in one market, his  booker would call ahead to other markets and line up more shows. He had no hits, but he  didn't really need them as long as Elvis was in the charts. Still, it was a punishingly hard life,  and Don now seems more less relieved to be putting on his sequined jumpsuit only for the  occasional charity with his son, Bo, on drums, his son-in-law on organ, and his daughter  Jessica, singing backup, but for the moment (1998) he's in Mobile running a dry cleaning  business.


MID MARCH 1960

As a result of the payola investigations, Washington calls on record companies to stop  sending free promotional records to radio stations.

MARCH 17, 1960 THURSDAY

The Platters open for a week at the Olympia in Paris.

Jeanne Black recorded ''He'll Have To Stay'', intended as a response to Jim Reeves' ''He'll Have To Go''.

Janis Joplin is suspended at high school in Port Arthur, Texas. She eventually gets her degree, and delivers a recording of ''Me And Bobby McGee'', regarded among country's 500 greatest singles in a Country Music Foundation publication, ''Heartaches By The Number''.

MARCH 18, 1960 FRIDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded the pop hit ''Cathy's Clown'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Carl Smith recorded ''Cut Across Shorty''. A Nat Stuckey version of the song becomes a country hit nine years later.

MARCH 18, 1960 FRIDAY

New York deejay Doug "Jocko" Henderson produces the Rocket Ship Reeve featuring the  Coasters, Dave "Baby" Cortez, the Isley Brothers and Luther Bond at the Apollo. Wilbert  Harrison is booked for three days at the Lindenwold Inn in Philadelphia.

MARCH 19, 1960 SATURDAY

Bobby Darin, Freddy Cannon, Dorsey Burnette and the Contours appear on the Dick Clark  Show. Brook Benton and the Coasters break the house record during their week at the  Howard Theater in Washington, D.C.

The Browns perform ''The Old Lamplighter'' on ABC's ''The Dick Clark Show'', also featuring Johnny Cash, Bobby Darin, and The Coasters.

MARCH 21, 1960 MONDAY

Waylon Jennings' third child, Buddy, is born.

Elvis Presley recorded "Stuck On You" backed with ''Fame And Fortune'' is Elvis Presley's first hit single  since he was discharged from the Army.  He recorded the song during March 1960 session at the Nashville's RCA Studio B in his first stereo session, and the single was released within weeks and went to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in late-April 1960, becoming his first number-one single of the 1960s and thirteenth overall. "Stuck On You" peaked at number six on the rhythm and blues chart. The song knocked Percy Faith's "Theme From A Summer Place'' from the top spot, ending its nine-week run at number one on the chart. The record reached number three in the United Kingdom. The song was written by Aaron Schroeder and J. Leslie McFarland and published by Gladys Music, Elvis Presley's publishing company.

In New Zealand (and perhaps other countries), the single had a special paper sleeve with the usual RCA logo top left and 45 R.P.M. bottom left and included, in large letters, "ELVIS" top right and bottom left: "Elvis' 1st new recording for his 50,000,000 fans all over the world''.

Decca released Kitty Wells' ''Left To Right''.

MARCH 21, 1960 MONDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis starts tour of Hawaii and Australia with Tommy Sands as headliner.

Afrikaner police open fire with sub machine guns on demonstrators in the black township of Sharpeville, South African.

MARCH 22, 1960 TUESDAY

The Playmates appear on American Bandstand and sing "Beep Beep''.


MARCH 1960

Another attempt to break into a different type of music with an LP was cut in the Skyway of the Peabody  Hotel in downtown Memphis, where Sam Phillips had once engineered big-bands broadcasts. Chuck Foster  was popular with Memphians during his two engagements each year at the Peabody, and he had national  standing, having played the Academy Awards Ball and other big events. In March, the band cut a bunch of  sides live during one of their shows. That LP, designated PLP 1965, was intended not only for national  distribution but to be sold to guests at the hotel. This music was pretty formulaic and was exactly of the type  Sam Phillips had grown to detest when he worked there. Tunes of the vintage of ''Oh, You Beautiful Doll''  marked the LP as music of decades past.

This time they returned to the old standby artist, Andy Anderson, and he executed a blue cover with pictures  of people dancing in the Skyway and a bellman leading the famous Peabody ducks through the lobby for  their daily bath. This wasn't a great-selling album either.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHUCK FOSTER
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MARCH 22, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

The muddy Mississippi winds its way to the gulf, lazily flowing by Memphis, where towering bluffs look down. Year in and year out the bluffs see the barges carry away the cotton that provides the wherewithal for the good life that the Southern agriculturist enjoys. Just outside Memphis is the sprawling Delta country of Mississippi and Arkansas, presided over by affluent planters who like to come up to Memphis for their holidays. The often repeated phrase attributed to William Faulkner - "The Delta begins in the lobby of Hotel Peabody" - is no exaggeration.


The Peabody is something of an institution about these parts, and along with the Peabody one thinks of Chuck Foster. Playing his usual month's engagement around the Christmas and New Year's holidays, Chuck provides musical background for the gaiety that goes along with the festive season, which is also a time of celebrations honoring Delta debutantes. When June brings balmy days, when the cotton is planted and he Southern gentleman wants to relax and drink his bourbon and branch water, again he treks to Memphis and Hotel Peabody, and under the stars he dances to the music of Chuck Foster at the Skyway.


PLP 1965 ^

Chuck Foster, also, is an institution. Since 1943, he has played two lengthy engagements per year in Memphis. A veteran showman who got his start on the West Coast prior to World War II, Chuck plays smooth arrangements that are danceable and listenable. From the first strains of the theme, 'Oh You Beautiful Doll', through the end of the set, there's not a loser in this album. Chuck has played at distinguished clubs throughout the country and Music in the Foster Fashion' has provided the background for such glittering events as the Academy Awards Ball. Now you can make a ballroom of your own living room or patio, and join the fun-loving people throughout the country who name Chuck Foster as their favorite bandleader.
Liner notes by Barbara Barnes

01 – ''OH YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:20
Composer: - Brown
Publisher: - Ayer Remick Music
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-1 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

02 – ''WOODCHOPPERS BALL'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:35
Composer: - Herman
Publisher: - Bishop Leeds Music
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-2 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

03 – ''CIMARRON ROLL ON'' – B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Bond
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-3 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER
Reissued: - 2012 Sun Records X5 Group Internet iTunes MPS-9 mono
SUN RECORDS - JUMP BLUES

04 – ''LA DORRACHITA'' - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Esperon
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-4 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

05 – ''SLOW POKE MEDLEY'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:17
Composer: - Gay Johnson-Leo Feist
''Slow Poke'' (King-Price) Ridgeway Music
''Just One More Chance'' (Johnson-Sam Coslow) Famous Music
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-5 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

06 – ''PATRICIA'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:32
Composer: - Davis-Bradman-Vocco-Conn
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-1 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

07 – ''SOUTH'' – B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Motor-Charles-Hates
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-2 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

08 – ''CORN BALL MEDLEY'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 3:00
Composer: - Brooks-Leo Feist-Robinson-Davis-Conrad-Irvin Berlin
Publisher: - Irvin Berlin Music
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-3 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

09 – ''BEGIN THE BEGUINE'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 3:21
Composer: - Cole Porter
Publisher: - Harms Incorporated
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-4 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

10 – ''JOSEPHINE'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:16
Composer: - Kahn-Bivins
Publisher: - Leo Feist Incorporated
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-5 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER
Reissued: - 2012 Sun Records X5 Group Internet iTunes MPS-3 mono
SUN RECORDS - JUMP BLUES

11 – ''MORITAT'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:00
Composer: - Brecht-Weill
Publisher: - Harms Incorporated
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-5 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Chuck Foster Orchestra consisting of
Lester Sexton,  Woodward Sanders,
Dennis Sourwine,  William Howard,
James Maag, Charles Finkiziner,
James Putnam, Eugene Schuette,
Thomas Gran, Walter Major
Unknown Instruments

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Into 1960, former Sun artist Billy Emerson continued to play some of the beat club spots in Chicago and to have his songs published. One was ''Do Me So Good'', recorded on Chess by Little Miss Cornshucks and later picked up by the dancing, singing, movie body Ann-Margret. The Cornshucks disc was backed by another Emerson song, ''No Teasing Around'', and Chess continued to use Emerson as a writer and as a session pianist or organist during the 1960s. He appears on recordings by Larry Williams, Willie Mabon, Sonny Boy Williamson and a number of others.

Emerson's days as a featured singer at Chess were over, though, and he opened the 1960s on the MAD label. This was launched in 1957 on East 53rd Street by Tommy ''Madman'' Jones, who had spent thirty years blowing honking tenor sax solos for Chicago nightclub audiences. By the time he recorded Emerson in March 1960. MAD was part of the Apex Producing Corporation of Chicago that was run by Bill Sheppard and Norman Dempsey.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY EMERSON
FOR MAD RECORDS 1960

UNIVERSAL RECORDING CORPORATION
111 EAST ONTARIO STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
MAD SESSION: THURSDAY MARCH 24, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – RILEY HAMPTON

01 – ''IT DO ME SO GOOD'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Riverline Music
Matrix number: - 60-1840
Recorded: - March 24, 1960
Released: - Mad Unissued/Lost

02 – ''IT TOOK IT SO HARD'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Riverline Music
Matrix number: - 215 / 217
Recorded: - March 24, 1960
Released: - U.S.A. Records (S) 45rpm standard single U.S.A. 777 mono
IT TOOK IT SO HARD / WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS

The MAD single below, came from this session, included two other songs, unissued until later. It has been suggested that the original master numbers and the studio group led by Riley Hampton indicate that the session was done for Vee-Jay and later unloaded by that label, but Emerson denies this, saying ''I did that for Dempsey Nelson who had the MAD label''. Either way, it seems that Bill acquired the tapes later and leased some of them to the USA label, on which he appeared in 1961

03 – ''WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS'' – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 827
Recorded: - March 24, 1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Mad Records (S) 45rpm standard single MAD 1301-A mono
WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS / I NEVER GET ENOUGH
Reissued: 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-32 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The MAD session produced one single, the rocking ''I Never Get Enough'', backed by a new version of ''When It Rains It Pours''. Emerson expands on the lyric a little but his vocal delivery and the arrangement of ''When It Rain It Pours'' is familiar from the Sun version. This is a worthy remake though, with a tight band and a solid overall sound. Emerson remembered: ''I Never Get Enough'' was a Howlin' Wolf type song. That's the only blues been recorded in three quarters time. A guy bet me I couldn't do it. Never bet me!''. Certainly the disc moves along at a storming pace, opening with rabble-rousing guitar figures by a musician Emerson recalled as ''Chico''. The band featured John and Bobby Neely on saxes along with McKinley Easton, and other musicians with whom Emerson was used to working in the studio. It was produced by Riley Hampton. This is a formidable record whether you favour blues, rhythm and blues or rock and roll.

04 – ''I NEVER GET ENOUGH'' – B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Josette Publishers
Matrix number: - S 826
Recorded: - March 24, 1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Mad Records (S) 45rpm standard single MAD 1301-B mono
I NEVER GET ENOUGH / WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS
Reissued: 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-33 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

All four of the songs had new vocals added in the mid-1960s, and were issued on the Tarpon and Chirrup labels.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Robert Emerson – Vocal & Piano
Chico – Guitar
Wilburn Green – Bass
Jimmy Cottrell – Drums
Riley Hampton – Alto Saxophone
Bobby Neely – Tenor Saxophone
John Neely – Tenor Saxophone
McKinley Easton – Baritone Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


MARCH 23, 1960 WEDNESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's first single after his military service, ''Stuck On You'' backed with ''Fame And Fortune'' (RCA Victor 47-7740).

''Time Don't Run Out On Me'' songwriter Carole King and Gerry Goffin welcome a daughter, Louise Goffin.

MARCH 24, 1960 THURSDAY

Jimmie Rodgers appears an ABC-TV's The Pat Boone Show.

MARCH 25, 1960 FRIDAY

The Temptations sing "Barbara" on American Bandstand. Ray Charles headlines at the Opera  House in Chicago, Illinois. Jerry Butler, the Spaniels, Big Maybelle, Etta James appear at  Chicago's Regal Theater.

Ray Charles recorded Hoagy Carmichael's ''George On My Mind'' at the Capitol Studios in New York. The song later becomes a country hit for Willie Nelson.

Roy Orbison recorded ''Only The Lonely'' in Nashville's RCA Studio B.

MARCH 26, 1960 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley gets $125,000 for a six-minute appearance in the taping of ''The Frank Sinatra Timex Special'' at Miami's Fontainbleau Hotel, performing ''Fame And Fortune'' and ''Stuck On You''. He harmonizes with Frank Sinatra ''Love Me Tender/Witchcraft''.

''Wild River'' debuts in movie theaters, with Montgomery Clift in the starring role. Tootsie's Orchid Lounge co-owner Big Jeff Bess makes an appearance in the picture.

Frankie Avalon headlines the Dick Clark show.

MARCH 27, 1960 SUNDAY

Brenda Lee recorded ''I Want To Be Wanted'' and the Jerry Reed-penned pop hit ''That's All You Gotta Do'' at the Bradley Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

MARCH 28, 1960 MONDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hit ''I'm Sorry'' at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Cut Across Shorty''. The song becomes a hit nine years later for Nat Stuckey, and Columbia also released Charlie Walker's ''Who Will Buy The Wine''.

The Drifters begin a Southern tour.

MARCH 29, 1960 TUESDAY

Tootsie's Orchid Lounge opens on lower Broadway in Nashville, just around the corner from the Grand Ole Opry. The small, lavender bar becomes a hangout for the likes of Willie Nelson, Harlan Howard, Hank Cochran and Mel Tillis.

A Los Angeles judge approves Nat ''King'' Cole's adoption of a 13-month-old boy, Nat Kelly Cole. The senior Cole appeared on an early version of the Billboard country chart in 1944 with ''Straighten Up And Fly Right''.

MARCH 30, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Sun 339 ''Whose Gonna Shoe Your Pretty Little Feet'' b/w ''There's No Tomorrow'' by Rayburn Anthony are issued.

Sun 340 ''Bobaloo'' b/w ''Bad Times Ahead'' by Bill Johnson is released. It is the first on the label by a black artist for a year and a half.

The Olympics sing "Big Boy Pete" and "Baby, Hully Gully" on American Bandstand.

MARCH 31, 1960 THURSDAY

Paul Anka headlines the Chase in St. Louis, Missouri.

Jim Reeves recorded ''I'm Gettin' Better'' in an evening session at RCA Studio B in Nashville. He also recorded ''Oh, How I Miss You Tonight'', which becomes a duet with Deborah Allen nearly 20 years later.

Little Jimmy Dickens recorded ''We Could'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville. Charley Pride turns the song into a hit 14 years later.

LATE MARCH

Little Richard's former back-up band The Upsetters are on the road with Little Willie John.

Lloyd Price is at Pep's Lounge in Philadelphia.


APRIL 1960

The singles, 3553 ''The Eleventh Commandment'' b/w ''Handsome Man'' by Barbara Pittman and PI 3554 ''Cloudy'' b/w ''Partly Cloudy'' by Brad Suggs issued.

The extended play Sun SEP 117 ''So Doggone Lonesome'' by Johnny Cash issued.

APRIL 1, 1960 FRIDAY

Carl Dobkins is released from the Ohio National Guard. Louis Jordan, the Four Tops and  Lenny Welch are at the Apollo Theater for a week.

APRIL 2, 1960 SATURDAY

Bless their little pea-pickin' magazine, Tennessee Ernie Ford is featured on the cover of TV Guide.

Jimmy C. Newman recorded ''A Lovely Work Of Art'' during an afternoon session at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

Buck Owens sings ''Above And Beyond'' on ABC's ''Jubilee USA''.

APRIL 3, 1960 SUNDAY

The Everly Brothers begin a three weeks in England with a concert at the New Victoria  Theater in London.

Elvis Presley recorded "It's Now Or Never" at the Nashville's RCA Studio B, and is a ballad recorded by Elvis Presley and published by Gladys Music, Elvis Presley's publishing company, in 1960. It is one of two popular songs based on the Italian song ''O Solo Mio'' (music by Eduardo di Capua), the other being "There's No Tomorrow", recorded by U.S. singer Toni Martin in 1949, which inspired Presley's version. The lyrics were written by Aaron Schroeder and Wally Gold. The single is the second best-selling single by Presley, and one of the best-selling singles of all time.

In the late 1950s, while stationed in West Germany with the U.S. Army, Presley heard Martin's recording. According to The New York Times, quoting from the 1986 book Behind The Hits, "he told the idea to his music publisher, Freddie Bienstock, who was visiting him in Germany. Mr. Bienstock, who many times found songwriters for Presley, returned to his New York office, where he found songwriters, Aaron Schroeder and Wally Gold, the only people in that day. The two wrote lyrics in half an hour. Selling more than 20 million records, the song became number one in countries all around and was Presley's best selling single ever, a song [they] finished in 20 minutes to a half hour was the biggest song of [their] career''. 

In 1960, "It's Now or Never" was a number-one record in the United States, spending five weeks at number one and the U.K., where it spent eight weeks at the top in 1960 and an additional week at number one in 2005 as a re-issue, and numerous other countries, selling in excess of 25 million copies worldwide, Elvis Presley's biggest international single ever. Its British release was delayed for some time because of rights issues, allowing the song to build up massive advance orders and to enter the UK Singles Chart at number one, a very rare occurrence at the time. "It's Now or Never" peaked at number seven on the rhythm and blues charts.

A live version featuring "'O Sole Mio" is available on the 1977 live album ''Elvis In Concert''. "'O Sole mio" is sung by tenor Sherrill Nielson.

In early 2005, the song was re-released along with the other Presley singles in the UK, and again reached number one on the UK Singles Chart for the week of 5 February 2005. The song also appears in the TV mini-series ''Elvis''.

APRIL 4, 1960 MONDAY

Jimmie Rodgers begins two weeks at the Cave Supper Club in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Elvis Presley recorded Are You Lonesome Tonight'' and ''Such A Night'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Billboard magazine reports that RCA has become the first record label to release pop singles in stereo.

Warner Bros. released The Everly Brothers' pop hit ''Cathy's Clown''. Reba McEntire reinvents it as a country single in 1989.

APRIL 6, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Guitarist Warren Haynes is born in Asheville, North Caroline. A member of The Allman Brothers Band and a founder of Gov't Mule, he co-writes the Garth Brooks hit ''Two Of A Kind, Working On A Full House''.

EARLY APRIL 1960

Bill Haley and His Comets are on a four week tour of Mexico.

APRIL 8, 1960 FRIDAY

Lenny Welch begins two days at the Safari Club in Long Island, New York. Brook Benton  opens at the Regal in Chicago.

John Schneider is born in Mount Kisco, New York. He portrays Bo Duke on the TV series ''The Dukes Of Hazzard'', then shifts into a country career that nets 10 Top 10 hits, including ''I've Been Around Enough'' and ''County Girls''.

RCA released ''Elvis Is Back'' ( RCA Victor LPM/LSP-2231) , Elvis Presley's first album since he was discharged from the Army, and is the tenth studio album by Elvis Presley. It was released on RCA Victor in mono and stereo in April 1960. Recorded over two sessions in March and April, the album marked Presley's return to recording. ''Elvis Is Back''! topped the Album Chart and reached number two in Billboard Top LPs. Initially, the release received mixed reviews, but over subsequent years its critical reception became progressively more positive. The album was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America in 1999.

Lewis Pruitt recorded ''Softly And Tenderly (I'll Hold You In My Arms)''.

APRIL 9, 1960 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley embarks on a $4,000 shopping spree in donwtown Memphis. Among his purchases, a diamond necklace for girlfriend Anita Wood.

Brenda Lee sings ''Jambalaya (On The Bayou)'' during ABC's ''Jubilee USA''.

APRIL 9, 1960 SATURDAY

Dion and the Belmonts sing "Where And When" and "When You Wish Upon A Star'' on The Dick  Clark Show.

APRIL 10, 1960 SUNDAY

The Everly Brothers appear on ATV program Sunday Night at the Palladium in London,  England.

APRIL 12, 1960 TUESDAY

Jackie Wilson appears at the Fountainbleau in Miami Beach, Florida.

APRIL 13, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Johnny Tillotson sings "Earth Angel" and "Pledging My Love" on American Bandstand. Bobby  Darin appears for a week at the Deauville Hotel in Miami Beach. Tickets are $3.50 to $5.00.

APRIL 14, 1960 THURSDAY

Bob Wills and Tommy Duncan recorded together for the first time in 12 years.

APRIL 15, 1960 FRIDAY

The annual Easter Revue begins at the Paramount Theater in Brooklyn, New York. Limiting it  to the more polished acts, Dr. Jive's Rhythm and Blues Revue opens across town at the  Apollo with hot acts.

MID APRIL 1960

Johnny and the Hurricanes are touring the Midwest. The movie ''Because Their Your'' with  Dick Clark starring as a high school teacher is released.

APRIL 16, 1960 SATURDAY

The latest edition of The Biggest Show Of Stars for 60 first stop is at the Municipal  Auditorium in Norfolk, Virginia. Bill Black's Combo performing "White Silver Sands" appears  on the Dick Clark Show along with Jack Scott, Jan and Dean and Bobby Rydell.

Eddie Cochran performs ''Summertime Blues'' live for the final time in Bristol, England, where he shares a concert bill with Gene Vincent. Cochran dies the following day in an automobile accident.

APRIL 17, 1960 SUNDAY

A car taken Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent to the London Airport crashes, killing Cochran, breaking Vincent's collarbone and breaking ''Poor Little Fool'' songwriter Sharon Sheeley's pelvis.

APRIL 17, 1960 SUNDAY

Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran end their twelve week tour of the British Isles with a week  at the Hippodrome Theater in Bristol. While riding in a taxi after the show an accident  occurs and Cochran sustains head and internal injuries. He dies sixteen hours later.

APRIL 18, 1960 MONDAY

Bobby Rydell appears on CBS-TV's "Father Knows Best''.

Elvis Presley heads to Hollywood via train from Memphis do his first post-service movie, ''G.I. Blues''.

''The Kingston Trio'' album goes gold, nearly one year after its best-known song, ''Tom Dooley'', earned a Grammy for Best Country and Western Performance.

Decca released Ernie Ashworth's ''Each Moment (Spent With You)''.

Attracts 100,000 at the "Ban The Bomb" Rally on April 18th in London CND is still an outspoken organization against nuclear, chemical or biological weapons but following the end of the cold war and agreements by the super powers to limit nuclear arms proliferation public support is not as strong as it was.

APRIL 19, 1960 TUESDAY

Jimmy Davis wins the governorship of Louisiana, defeating Republican Francis Grevemberg, taking nearly 82% of the vote.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR DICKEY LEE (DICKEY LIPSCOMB)
FOR DOT RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: APRIL 20, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

01 - ''LIFE IN A TEENAGE WORLD'' - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - MB 14817
Recorded: - April 20, 1963
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Dot Records (S) 45rpm Dot 16087 mono
LIFE IN A TEENAGE WORLD / WHY DON'T YOU WRITE ME

02 – ''WHY DON'T YOU WRITE ME'' - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Hollis
Publisher: - Goden State Songs
Matrix number: - MB 14818
Recorded: - April 20, 1960
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Dot Records (S) 45rpm Dot 16087 mono
WHY DON'T YOU WRITE ME / LIFE IN A TEENAGE WORLD

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Dickey Lee – Vocal & Guitar
Brad Suggs – Guitar
R.W. Stevenson – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano
Vernon Drake - Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


APRIL 21, 1960 THURSDAY

Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys recorded ''Heart To Heart Talk'' at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard in Los Angeles, California.

Mitch Miller, who produced some of Marty Robbins' biggest hits, earns his second gold album for ''More Sing Along With Mitch''.

Dick Clark admits he had a financial interest in more than 25% of the records he played on ''American Bandstand'' and is forced to sell off any conflicting properties. Clark helps establish the Academy of Country Music later in the decade.

The new capital city of Brazil Brasilia is officially inaugurated on April 21, 1960. In 1956  the President of Brazil Juscelino Kubitschek ordered the construction of Brasilia to change the capital city of Brazil from Rio De Janeiro which was not ideal as it was not in a central location, fulfilling the promise of the Constitution and his own political campaign promise. Brasilia was planned and developed by Lúcio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer in order to move the capital from Rio De Janeiro to a more central location. Brasilia was built in 41 months, from 1956 to April 21, 1960, when it was officially inaugurated. The centers of all three branches of the federal government of Brazil are in Brasilia, including the Congress, President, and Supreme Court. Plus over 124 foreign embassies. Brasilia now has an estimated population of about 2 1/2 million.

APRIL 22, 1960 FRIDAY

Jimmy and Sue Dean welcome a son, Robert Ray Dean, at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York City.

APRIL 22, 1960 FRIDAY

The Skyliners are at The Spatz Show Lounge in Hamilton, Ohio. Ray Charles is at the Apollo   for a week.

APRIL 23, 1960 SATURDAY

Dion and the Belmonts are performing at the Armory in Newark, New Jersey. Paul Anka   headlines the Dick Clark Show. Also appearing are Billy Bland and Billy and Lilly.

During the Grand Ole Opry, RCA's Chet Atkins present Jim Reeves a gold record for ''He'll Have To Go''. It is not certified, however, by the RIAA.

APRIL 24, 1960 SUNDAY

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs recorded ''Polka On A Banjo''.

APRIL 25, 1960 MONDAY

A divorce is officially granted to Kenny Rogers and his first wife, Janice. Rogers is required to pay $80 monthly in child support.

APRIL 25, 1960 MONDAY

Eddie Cochran is buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery.

APRIL 26, 1960 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley begins filming G.I. Blues.

APRIL 27, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Sam Cooke opens for a week at the Apollo.

Elvis Presley begins two days of recording session at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood for the soundtrack to his first post-Army movie, ''G.I. Blues''.

APRIL 29, 1960 FRIDAY

Dick Clark, the future producer of the Academy of Country Music Awards, tells a House subcommittee in Washington, D.C., that he never took payola but admits receiving gifts worth $7,000 and $4,400 from record executives.

APRIL 30, 1960 SATURDAY

''The WLS Barn Dance'' ends a 36-year run.

Fats Domino recorded ''Walking To New Orleans'' at the J&M Studio in New Orleans. The pop hit is ranked among the 500 greatest singles in country music history in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.

MAY 1960

PI 3560 ''Schooldays'' b/w ''Gonna Be Waiting'' by Charlie Rich issued.

Jerry Lee Lewis plays on concerts in Alabama, Georgia and Texas.

EARLY MAY 1960

Neil Sedaka ends tour of Japan and begins a tour of the Philippines.

MAY 1, 1960 SUNDAY

U.S. pilot Gary Powers, flying a reconnaissance mission over the U.S.S.R., is shot down and   captured by the Soviets. The U.S. government's initial claim that the U-2 was a civilian craft   is contradicted by Power's confession while in custody. President Eisenhower shortly   announces the suspension of spy flights over the U.S.S.R.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves the use of the first oral contraceptive for   women.

Ernest Tubb and his second wife, Olene, have a fifth child Karen Delene Tibb.

Chicago radio station WLS adopts a rock and roll format, a day after ''The WLS Barn Dance'' hat its final broadcast.

Johnny Horton performs ''Sink The Bismarck'' on CBS-TV's ''The Ed Sullivan Show'' from New York.

MAY 2, 1960 MONDAY

Elvis Presley begins filming ''G.I. Blues'', where he plays soldier Tulsa McLean.

Convected sex offender Caryl Chessman is executed at San Quentin. Fellow inmate Merle Haggard, who communicated with him during a stay in isolation, knows Chessman is dead when he sees a puff of smoke go up from the Death Row chimney.

Stonewall Jackson recorded ''A Little Guy Galled Joe''.

MAY 3, 1960 TUESDAY

Gene Vincent performs at the Liverpool Stadium in England. In attendance, future Beatles John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

George Hamilton IV recorded ''Before This Day Ends'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Charlie Rich sings "Lonely Weekends" on American Bandstand.

MAY 4, 1960 WEDNESDAY

This afternoon on American Bandstand, Dick Clark visits Bobby Rydell at home. Ricky Nelson   sings "Young Emotions" and "Right By My Side" on this evenings episode of ABC-TV's "The   Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.

Roy Drusky recorded ''Anymore''.

MAY 5, 1960 THURSDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''I Know One'' and ''I Missed Me'' in an evening session at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

MAY 6, 1960 FRIDAY

Sam Cooke is at the Howard Theater in Washington, D.C. for a week. The Platters open for   two weeks at Fack's No. 2 Club in San Francisco.

Elvis Presley recorded four songs for the ''G.I. Blues'' soundtrack at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood, California. One of the songs, ''Pocketful Of Rainbows'', also appears in the Tom Cruise movie ''Jerry Maguire''.

MAY 7, 1960 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley shares the cover of TV Guide with Frank Sinatra.

MAY 8, 1960 SUNDAY

The Browns perform ''The Old Lamplighter'' from New York during an installment of CBS-TV's ''The Ed Sullivan Show''.

MAY 9, 1960 MONDAY

Decca released Bill Anderson's ''The Tip Of My Fingers''.

G.D. Searle and Co. receives approval from the Food and Drug Administration for the contraceptive pill Enovid. Fifteen years later, it leads to a controversial Loretta Lynn country hit, ''The Pill''.

Everly Brothers tour Australia for a week. Paul Anka begins a week at Blinstrub's in Boston.

Frankie Avalon is appearing at the Twin Coaches Supper Club in Philadelphia.

MAY 10, 1960 TUESDAY

The singles, PI 3555 ''South Of The Border'' b/w ''I'm Coming Home'' by Carl Mann and PI 3556 ''Jo Ann'' b/w ''Honey Bee'' by Don Hinton issued.

Jimmy Clanton and Roy Orbison begin their tour at the Jolla Club in Tucson. Arizona. Wanda   Jackson begins six days in Las Vegas.

Paul Hewson, better known as U2 vocalist Bono, is born in Dublin, Ireland. A friend of Johnny Cash, he recorded ''Dream With Tears In My Eyes'' for the 1997 album ''The Songs Of Jimmie Rodgers: A Tribute''.

MAY 11, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Gene Vincent returns to England to resume tour cut short by the taxi accident. Ricky Nelson   sings "Ain't Nothing But Love" on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.

Jerry Butler is a   special guest on American Bandstand.

MID MAY 1960

Billy Ward has reformed the Dominoes and the are playing the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas.

Fabian is in Hollywood finishing his latest film High Time and then will start North To Alaska   with John Wayne. Frankie Avalon is appearing at the Casino Royale in Washington.

Carl   Perkins is booked for a week into the Flame Theater in Minneapolis.

MAY 12, 1960 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley in a six-minute appearance in the taping of ''The Frank Sinatra Timex Special'' at Miami's Fontainbleau Hotel, performing ''Fame And Fortune'' and ''Stuck On You''. He harmonizes with Frank Sinatra ''Love Me Tender/Witchcraft''.

Hank Snow recorded ''Miller's Cave'', written by Jack Clement, during an afternoon session at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

''The Ford Show'', starring Tennessee Ernie Ford and Molly Bee, welcomes guests Johnny Cash and Homer and Jethro.

The San Diego school district demands ''Gotta Travel On'' author Pete Seeger agree to not make anti-government statements during a concert two days later. Seeger refuses to sign the agreement, a court rules the show must go on.

MAY 13, 1960 FRIDAY

Gid Tanner dies in Dacula, Georgia. The singer, fiddler and banjo player began making records in 1924 as a leader of the string band The Skillet Lickers'', making him one of country's recording pioneers.

Freddy Fender is arrested for possession of marijuana in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He spends the next three years in Louisiana's Angola State Prison.

To answer Hank Locklin's ''Please Help Me, I'm Falling'', Skeeter Davis recorded ''(I Can't Help You) I'm Falling Too''.

Actress Julianne Phillips is born in Lake Oswego, Oregon. She marries Bruce Springsteen in 1985. During their four-year marriage, Springsteen's ''Stand On It'' becomes a country hit for Mel McDaniel.

MAY 16, 1960 MONDAY

Alan Freed moves from WCBS in New York to KDAY in Los Angeles. His six day a week show   will earn him $25,000.

Decca released Lewis Pruitt's ''Softly And Tenderly (I'll Hold You In My Arms)''.

MAY 17, 1960 TUESDAY

Fats Domino is in Dallas at the Memorial Auditorium. Bobby Freeman appears on American   Bandstand.

TV executive and artist manager Simon Fuller is born in Hasting, England. The creator of ''American Idol'', he signs Carrie Underwood and Kellie Pickler to management deals with his company, 19 Entertainment.

MAY 19, 1960 THURSDAY

Annette appears at New York's Radio City Music Hall.

The Drifters recorded the original version of ''Save The Last Dance For Me''. It subsequently becomes a country hit four times, for Jerry Lee Lewis (Sun 367) in 1961,   for Buck Owens in 1962, for Emmylou Harris in 1979, and for Dolly Parton in 1984.

MAY 20, 1960 FRIDAY

Sam Cooke is at the Tivoli Theater in Chicago along with the Flamingos and the Crests.

MAY 21, 1960 SATURDAY

Mark Dinning, Jimmy Clanton, Neil Sedaka and the Sentimentals appear ABC-TV's The Dick   Clark Show.

MAY 23, 1960 MONDAY

The Biggest Show Of Stars for 1960 plays the Greystone Ballroom in Detroit.

Don Gibson recorded ''(I'd Be) A Legend In My Time'' and ''Far, Far Away'' late at night at Nashville's RCA Studio B. ''Legend In My Time'' is destined to become a hit for Ronnie Milsap almost 15 years later.

MAY 24, 1960 TUESDAY

Ferlin Husky recorded ''Wings Of A Dove''.

Two years after he last produced a country hit for Marty Robbins, Mitch Miller debuts the bouncing ball at the bottom of the screen on NBC-TV's ''Ford Startime''. The following January, his karaoke concept becomes a series, ''Sing Along With Mitch''.

MAY 25, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Joe Bennett and the Sparkletones are American Bandstand's musical guests. Ricky Nelson   sings "Ain't Nothing But Love" on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.

MAY 26, 1960 FRIDAY

Bobby Vee sings "What Do you Want" on American Bandstand.

MAY 27, 1960 SATURDAY

Jackie Wilson headlines the Apollo Theater for the coming week.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY MAY 27, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Charlie Rich loved Chuck Willis's music and recorded three of his tunes at Sun (''Juanita'' and ''C.C. Rider'' appeared on Rich's Phillips International LP). ''It's Too Late'', as originally recorded, was a tense, emotional performance that ranks among Rich's notable efforts. Overdubbing (including strings) has admirably done its job of taking the edge off his performance and rendering it unthreatening enough for a mass market.

01 – ''IT'S TOO LATE'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Tidelands Music
Matrix number: - P 409  - Master
Recorded: - May 27, 1960
Released: - September 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3572-A mono
IT'S TOO LATE / JUST A LITTLE BIT SWEET
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

02 - ''IT'S TOO LATE'' - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Tidelands Music
Matrix number: - None – Undubbed
Recorded: - May 27, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-13 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

03 – ''C.C. RIDER'' – B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Tidelands Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 7, 1960
Released: - August 23, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1970 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS WITH CHARLIE RICH
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-26 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

04 - ''JUANITA'' - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Chuck Willis-Jesse Stone
Publisher: - Tidelands Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - August 23, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1970 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS WITH CHARLIE RICH
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-22 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

05 – ''APPLE BLOSSOM TIME'' - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Fleeson-Tilzer
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 27, 1960
Released: - August 23, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1970 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS WITH CHARLIE RICH
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-25 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

06 – ''BREAK UP'' - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 27, 1960
Released: - August 23, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1970 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS WITH CHARLIE RICH
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-23 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

07 – ''MY HEART CRIES FOR YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Carl Sigman-Percy Faith
Publisher: - Massey Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 27, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-10 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Carl Sigman and composer/orchestra leader Percy Faith were good friends and often went to the racetrack ("the trotters") at Long Island's Roosevelt Field to blow off some steam. An old French tune that played repeatedly on the track's PA system haunted Percy. One day, he jokingly asked Carl if he thought they could write a hit song in ten minutes using that melodic phrase. They did just that, and "My Heart Cries For You" was born. The minute he heard a demo of the song, Columbia Records super-producer Mitch Miller recognized that this was a hit waiting to happen. He quickly marshaled his orchestra to rehearse an arrangement for Frank Sinatra. When Frank showed up for the session and passed on the song, Mitch had to scramble. Luckily, close at hand was a young demo singer named Al Cernick, and Mitch had him sing the song with the already-prepared arrangement. The name Al Cernick would never do, however. Al was a nice guy, so Mitch gave him the first name "Guy." He added his own first name and before long "My Heart Cries for You" by Guy Mitchell was the number 2 record in the country. It's been covered over the years by dozens of artists including Elvis Presley, Ray Charles, Ben E. King, and Dinah Washington.

08 – ''RIGHT BEHIND YOUR BABY'' - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 27, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-28 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Billy Riley – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Martin Willis – Tenor Saxophone
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


MAY 28, 1960 SATURDAY

Gene McDaniels performs at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium near Los Angeles. LaVern Baker   sings " Shadows Of Love" on The Dick Clark Show.

MAY 29, 1960 SUNDAY

Brenda Lee makes a personal appearance in Huntington, West Virginia.

MAY 30, 1960 MONDAY

Grand Ole Opry comedian Mike Snider is born in Gleason, Tennessee.

Decca released Brenda Lee's two-sided pop hit, ''I'm Sorry'' backed with ''That's All You Gotta Do''.


MAY 30, 1960 MONDAY

Charlie Riche third single for the Sun subsidiary, Phillips International Records, was the 1960  Top 30 hit, "Lonely Weekends," noted for its Presley-like vocals, but the single placed some  new stresses on Charlie's marriage.

As his wife Margaret Ann recalls, ''We had our ups and  down and I'm sure the success of that record did nothing to help us. Success is harder to deal  with than failure in my book. We were accustomed to failure.^


Neither of us was really  expecting success and what happened with ''Lonely Weekends'' shocked us both. It put a  whole new perspective on everything''.

At one point, Charlie Rich moved out of the home they shared and checked into the YMCA in  Memphis. Sitting alone in his spartan quarters, he must have wondered if this was the life  stardom had to offer. In an episode Margaret Ann describes as ''the deepest darkest night'',  she recalls. ''Charlie finally called me from the YMCA and said Í've got to get out of here and I  don't have any money'. He was completely sober when he called. I just got in my car and  drove down there. He was waiting for me by the back door with all his stuff.We just put it in  the car and got out of there really quickly''.

MAY 31, 1960 TUESDAY

Johnny and the Hurricanes perform "Way Down Youder" and Preston Epps "Bongo, Bongo,  Bongo'' on American Bandstand.


JUNE 1960

With Fernwood Records in dire straits, Scotty Moore would sell his shares, or rather unload them, later in the  year, he started looking around for a day job. Sam Phillips told him that in addition to the new studio he was  building on Madison Avenue he was buying in 1960 out a studio in Nashville. He needed someone to oversee  both studios.

Scotty hadn't had a regular job since his days as a hatter at the dry cleaners, but working for  Sam seemed like a good idea. He would no longer be playing for thousands of screaming fans, but he would  still be in the music business.

In June 1960 the Sun-Liners, a newsletter put out by Sun Records, announced the title of Johnny Cash's latest  album, ''So Doggone Lonesome'', along with a release from newcomer Bobbie Jean titled ''You Burned The  Bridges''. Also in the newsletter was an announcement that Scotty Moore had joined the staff of Sam C.  Phillips Enterprises as production manager. In that capacity, he would supervise all aspects of studio  operations, including sessions, mastering, and new artists acquisition. ''His will be a fulltime job with Sun PI,  et al., but he may get together with his old buddies, Elvis Presley and Bill Black, for a gig now and then'',  said the newsletter. ''Persons wishing to utilize Sam C. Phillips Recording facilities for recording may reach  Scotty in Memphis at Jackson 7-8233''.

Scotty's photograph was prominently displayed in a Memphis Press-Scimitar feature that heralded the official opening on September 17, 1960, of the new studio at 639 Madison Avenue. Sam Phillips told the reporter, Edwin Howard, that he  had invested $750,000 in the new facility in an effort to stay competitive. ''Woodshed recordings have had  it'', Sam said. ''You've got to have latitude today, all the electronic devices, built-in high and low frequency  equalization and attenuation, echoes, and metering on everything''.

The new studio, on a site formerly occupied by a Midas Muffler Shop, had all that and more. Howard asked  if there was a possibility Elvis Presley might use the new facilities. ''I don't know'', said Sam Phillips. ''Of  course, RCA has its own studio in Nashville, and Elvis has been cutting there. But Ed Hinds of RCA's  Nashville office is coming over for our opening. Something might develop even tually. Scotty knew there  was fat chance of that; he knew Colonel Parker would never allow Elvis to record again in a studio owned by  Sam Phillips.

The year 1960 was a watershed year for Scotty. At age twenty-nine, with a child on the way, he had come to  terms with his life. For six years, he had been waiting for the economic situation with Elvis to change.  Whenever he thought about it, it gave him a sinking feeling. That's alright, Elvis, he tought, that's alright.

Shortly after he settled into his new routine at the studio, Scotty received a telephone call from someone  from the past. Frankie Tucker had seen his photograph in the newspaper. She reminded him of their liaison in  West Memphis in 1953. Then she dropped a bombshell: she had had his child six years ago, a little girl she  had named Vicki. Would he like to see his daughter?

Vicki recalls her first meeting with her father with that type of fuzzy nostalgia usually reserved for a first  Christmas or a first kiss. ''I pretended I was asleep'', she says. ''He was rubbing my back and looking me over.  He said (to my mother), 'Oh, she has my nose and she has your smile, your lips''. For years after that initial  introduction, Vicki made a mad dash for the television whenever she heard Elvis's name or voice. If it was an  old show, she would see her father standing behind Elvis, always to his right; if it was new footage, she  would wonder where her father was.

''If it wasn't him, I would be so disappointed'', she says. ''We saw each other only once a year, mostly because  Mother's husband was jealous. He wouldn't allow Elvis albums in the house''.

JUNE 1960

Sonico Recordings is opened at 319 7th Avenue North, Nashville by Billy Sherrill, Doug Warren and Bill Cooner.

Jerry Lee Lewis is one of the pallbearers at the funeral of Minnie Bell, the mother of Jimmy Lee Swaggart and Jerry Lee's aunt, in Clayton near Ferriday.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

At the third Madison Avenue session in mid-1960, Jerry Lee Lewis brought new life to yet another folk memory, the tale of the railroad pioneer ''John Henry''. In getting back on the rhythm and blues track, he complemented this with a rousing version of Chuck Willis's ''Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes'', the two being paired for the next single release, Sun 344. This same get-together also witnessed both his first known recording of ''C.C. Rider'', with which Willis had himself scored a hit in 1957, and a frenetic ''What'd I Say. Finally, in a characteristic melding of genres, Jerry Lee refurbished an old western swing favourite, ''When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again'', albeit Elvis Presley had pointed the way on this one with his own uptempo reading of the same song in 1956. (*)


STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY JUNE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

1 – ''HANG UP MY ROCK AND ROLL SHOES'' - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Rush Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start, Count-In - Master Take 1
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-29 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-35 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1 – ''HANG UP MY ROCK AND ROLL SHOES'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Rush Music
Matrix number: - U 407 - Master
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - August 1, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 344-B mono
HANG UP MY ROCK AND ROLL SHOES / JOHN HENRY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

''John Henry'' was the strongest release by Jerry Lee in quite a while. To his credit, the man never failed to surprise. He's turn his hand to a maudlin pop ballad, a vintage hillbilly weeper, or – as he does here – to decidedly bluesy material. ''Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes'' features Jerry's attempt at Chuck Willis's swan song. To add authenticity, Jerry is joined by a honking sax, played either by Ace Cannon or Martin Willis.

But it is the flipside that deservedly caused a stir. ''John Henry'' is what they mean by an artist getting into a groove. Admittedly, this particular groove owed a lot to the fact that Don Hosea was generating a lot of local attention with his own version of ''John Henry'' on Roland Janes's Rita label. The folks at Sun figured they's better get on the bandwagon while the pickings were good, and who batter to call upon than Jerry Lee. The groove Jerry found here owed a lot to Ray Charles, but it was a fine one nonetheless. As Jerry, himself observed mis-session, it was ''too good to stop now!''. In fact, Jerry's music would soon result in his first bona fide hit in years.

It's also clear that Jerry had been doing some hard partying prior to this session, and was singing his heart out during the date. His vocals have rarely sounded more hoarse. There was probably some discussion about whether Jerry's performance was over the line here. Plainly, it was on the cusp, but fortunately, the decision was made to release the track as is. Nearly four decades later, Jerry's vocal state seems to add to the authenticity of the disc.

2(1) – ''JOHN HENRY'' - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Extended Stereo Master
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-30 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-29 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(2) – ''JOHN HENRY'' - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 406 - Master
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - August 1, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 344-A mono
JOHN HENRY / HANG UP MY ROCK AND ROLL SHOES
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

John Henry is an African American folk hero and tall tale. He is said to have worked as a "steel-driving man", a man tasked with hammering a steel drill into rock to make holes for explosives to blast the rock in constructing a railroad tunnel. According to legend, John Henry's prowess as a steel-driver was measured in a race against a steam powered hammer, which he won, only to die in victory with his hammer in his hand as his heart gave out from stress. The story of John Henry is told in a classic folk song, which exists in many versions, and has been the subject of numerous stories, plays, books and novels. Various locations, including Big Bend Tunnel in West Virginia, Lewis Tunnel in Virginia, and Coosa Mountain Tunnel in Alabama, have been suggested as the site of the contest.

The story of John Henry is traditionally told through two types of songs: ballads, commonly called "The Ballad of John Henry", and work songs known as hammer songs, each with wide-ranging and varying lyrics. Some songs, and some early folk historian research, conflate the songs about John Henry with those of John Hardy, a West Virginian outlaw. Ballads about John Henry's life typically contain four major components: a premonition by John Henry as a child that steel-driving would lead to his death, the lead-up to and the results of the race against the steam hammer, Henry's death and burial, and the reaction of John Henry's wife.

The well-known narrative ballad of "John Henry" is usually sung in at an upbeat tempo. The hammer songs (or work songs) associated with the "John Henry" ballad, however, are not. Sung slowly and deliberately, these songs usually contain the lines "This old hammer killed John Henry / but it won't kill me." Nelson explains that: ...workers managed their labor by setting a "stint'', or pace, for it. Men who violated the stint were shunned... Here was a song that told you what happened to men who worked too fast: they died ugly deaths; their entrails fell on the ground. You sang the song slowly, you worked slowly, you guarded your life, or you died.

There is some controversy among scholars over which came first, the ballad or the hammer songs. Some scholars have suggested that the "John Henry" ballad grew out of the hammer songs, while others believe that the two were always entirely separate. Songs featuring the story of John Henry have been recorded by many blues, folk, and rock musicians of different ethnic backgrounds. Many notable musicians have recorded John Henry ballads, including Bill Monroe, Johnny Cash, Drive-By Truckers, Joe Bonamassa, Furry Lewis, Big Bill Broonzy, Pink Anderson, Fiddlin' John Carson, Uncle Dave Macon, J. E. Mainer, Leon Bibb, Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, Paul Robeson, Pete Seeger, Van Morrison, Bruce Springsteen, Gillian Welch, Cuff the Duke, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Jerry Reed, Jerry Lee Lewis, Merle Travis, Harry Belafonte, Mississippi John Hurt (as "Spike Driver Blues"), Lonnie Donegan, Jack Warshaw, Jason Molina, and Steve Earle.

The story also inspired the Aaron Copland's orchestral composition "John Henry" (1940, revised 1952) and the 2009 chamber music piece Steel Hammer by the composer Julia Wolfe. Henry is the subject of the 1931 Roark Bradford novel John Henry, illustrated by noted woodcut artist J. J. Lankes. The novel was adapted into a stage musical in 1940, starring Paul Robeson in the title role. According to Steven Carl Tracy, Bradford's works were influential in broadly popularizing the John Henry legend beyond railroad and mining communities and outside of African American oral histories. In a 1933 article published in The Journal of Negro Education, Bradford's John Henry was criticized for "making over a folk-hero into a clown''.  A 1948 obituary for Bradford described John Henry as "a better piece of native folklore than Paul Bunyan''. Ezra Jack Keats's John Henry: An American Legend, published in 1965, is a notable picture book chronicling the history of John Henry and portraying him as the "personification of the medieval Everyman who struggles against insurmountable odds and wins''.

Colson Whitehead's 2001 novel John Henry Days uses the John Henry myth as story background. Whitehead fictionalized the John Henry Days festival in Talcott, West Virginia and the release of the John Henry postage stamp in 1996. The DC Comics superhero Steel's civilian name, "John Henry Irons," is inspired by John Henry. The Ghost of John Henry appears as a character in Elizabeth Bear's novel "One Eyed Jack''.


03(2) – ''WHAT'D I SAY'' - B.M.I. - 3:22
Composer: - Ray Charles
Publisher: - Unichappel Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-10-A5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS – THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-31 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Jerry recorded this song 3 times (at 2 different studios) within the space of 13 months while at Sun: at one of his final 639 Madison Avenue sessions in January 1960; in June 1960 at Madison Avenue; and at the brand new Phillips studio in Nashville in February 1961. The January 1960 versions (2 takes) weren’t released for many years and indeed appear to have been “lost” until the end of the 1980s when they were issued on Zu-Zazz’s ''Don’t Drop It''! in 1988 and the various artists ''Sun Into The Sixties'' box-set in 1989. Both are perfectly acceptable spontaneous-sounding versions. The June 1960 version was initially released on the 1979 ''Duets'' album LP 1011  as a faked duet with Orion (a.k.a. Elvis sound-a-like Jimmy Ellis). A raucous version with saxophone and raw vocals, it was finally issued undubbed on ''The Sun Years'' box-set in 1983. The 1961 version was released as a tight-sounding single weeks later, reaching number 30 in the United States pop charts and number 10 in the United Kingdom; the backing singers prove that they’re no substitute for Ray Charles’ Raelettes, but nevertheless this was a well-deserved hit, something that very rarely happened in the decade following the 1958 debacle. A ‘live’ favourite for many years (though very rarely performed these days), the song was a natural for the album of (mostly) rock and roll standards recorded in London in January 1973. Released on ''The Session''that year, it is unfortunately overlong and self-indulgent, as several songs at those sessions were.


What'd I Say" (or "What I Say") is a song by American rhythm and blues rhythm and blues musician Ray Charles, released in 1959 as a single divided into two parts. It was improvised one evening late in 1958 when Charles, his orchestra, and backup singers had played their entire set list at a show and still had time left; the response from many audiences was so enthusiastic that Charles announced to his producer that he was going to record it.  After his run of rhythm and blues hits, this song finally broke Charles into mainstream pop music and itself sparked a new sub-genre of rhythm and blues titled soul, finally putting together all the elements that Charles had been creating since he recorded "I Got A Woman" in 1954.

The gospel influences combined with the sexual innuendo in the song made it not only widely popular but very controversial to both white and black audiences. It earned Ray Charles his first gold record and has been one of the most influential songs in R&B and rock and roll history. For the rest of his career, Charles closed every concert with the song. It was added to the National Recording Registry in 2002 and ranked at number 10 in Rolling Stone's "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time".

Ray Charles was 27 years old in 1958, with ten years of experience recording primarily rhythm and blues music for Downbeat and Swingtime record labels, in a style similar to that of Nat King Cole and Charles Brown. Charles signed with Atlantic Records in 1954 where producers Ahmet Ertegun and Jerry Wexler encouraged Charles to broaden his repertoire. Wexler would later remember that Atlantic Records' success came not from the artists' experience, but the enthusiasm for the music: "We didn't know shit about making records, but we were having fun". Ertegun and Wexler found that a hands-off approach was the best way of encouraging Charles. Wexler later said, "I realized the best thing I could do with Ray was leave him alone".

From 1954 into the 1960s Charles toured for 300 days a year with a seven-piece orchestra. He employed another Atlantic singing trio named The Cookies and renamed them The Raelettes when they backed him up on the road. In 1954 Charles began merging gospel sounds and instruments with lyrics that addressed more secular issues. His first attempt was in the song "I Got A Woman", based either on the melodies of gospel standards "My Jesus Is All the World to Me" or an uptempo "I Got A Savior (Way Across Jordan)". It was the first Ray Charles record that got attention from white audiences, but it made some black audiences uncomfortable with its black gospel derivatives; Charles later stated that the joining of gospel and rhythm and blues was not a conscious decision.

In December 1958, he had a hit on the rhythm and blues charts with "Night Time Is The Right Time", an ode to carnality that was sung between Charles and one of the Raelettes, Margie Hendricks, with whom Charles was having an affair. Since 1956 Charles had also included a Wurlitzer electric piano on tour because he did
not trust the tuning and quality of the pianos provided him at every venue. On the occasions he would play it, he was derided by other musicians.

According to Charles' autobiography, "What'd I Say" was accidental when he improvised it to fill time at the end of a concert in December 1958. He asserts that he never tested songs on audiences before recording them, but "What'd I Say" is an exception. Charles himself does not recall where the concert took place, but Mike Evans in Ray Charles: The Birth of Soul places the show in Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Shows were played at "meal dances" which typically ran four hours with a half hour break, and would end around 1 or 2 in the morning. Charles and his orchestra had exhausted their set list after midnight, but had 12 minutes left to fill. He told the Raelettes, "Listen, I'm going to fool around and y'all just follow me".

Starting on the electric piano, Charles played what felt right: a series of riffs, switching then to a regular piano for four choruses backed up by a unique Latin conga tumbao rhythm on drums. The song changed when Charles began singing simple, improvised unconnected verses ("Hey Mama don't you treat me wrong / Come and love your daddy all night long / All right now / Hey hey / All right"). Charles used gospel elements in a twelve-bar blues structure. Some of the first lines ("See the gal with the red dress on / She can do the Birdland all night long") are influenced by a boogie-woogie style that Ahmet Ertegun attributes to Clarence "Pinetop" Smith who used to call out to dancers on the dance floor instructing what to do through his lyrics. In the middle of the song, however, Charles indicated that the Raelettes should repeat what he was doing, and the song transformed into a call and response between Charles, the Raelettes, and the horn section in the orchestra as they called out to each other in ecstatic shouts and moans and blasts from the horns. The audience reacted immediately; Charles could feel the room shaking and bouncing as the crowd was dancing. Many audience members approached Charles at the end of the show to ask where they could purchase the record. Charles and the orchestra performed it again several nights in a row with the same reaction at each show. He called Jerry Wexler to say he had something new to record, later writing, "I don't believe in giving myself advance notices, but I figured this song merited it".

The Atlantic Records studio had just purchased an 8-track recorder, and recording engineer Tom Dowd was familiarizing himself with how it worked. In February 1959 Charles and his orchestra finally recorded "What'd I Say" at Atlantic's small studio. Dowd recalled that it did not seem special at the time of recording. It was second of two songs during the session and Charles, the producers, and the band were more impressed with the first one at the session, "Tell The Truth". "We made it like we made all the others. Ray, the gals, and the band live in the small studio, no overdubs. Three or four takes, and it was done. Next!".

In retrospect, Ahmet Ertegun's brother Nesuhi credits the extraordinary sound of the song to the restricted size of the studio and the technologically advanced recording equipment used; the sound quality is clear enough to hear Charles slapping his leg in time with the song when the music stops during the calls and responses. The song was recorded in only a few takes because Charles and the orchestra had perfected it while touring.

Dowd, however, had two problems during the recording. "What'd I Say" lasted over seven and a half minutes when the normal length of radio-played songs was around two and a half minutes. Furthermore, although the lyrics were not obscene, the sounds Charles and the Raelettes made in their calls and responses during the song worried Dowd and the producers. A previous recording called "Money Honey" by Clyde McPhatter had been banned in Georgia and Ahmet Ertegun and Wexler released McPhatter's song despite the ban, risking arrest. Ray Charles was aware of the controversy in "What'd I Say". "I'm not one to interpret my own songs, but if you can't figure out 'What I Say', then something's wrong. Either that, or you're not accustomed to the sweet sounds of love''.

Dowd solved the recording issues by mixing three versions of the song. Some call-outs of "Shake that thing!" were removed, and the song was split into two three-and-a-half minute sides of a single record, titling the song "What'd I Say Part I" and "What'd I Say Part II". The recorded version divides the parts with a false ending where the orchestra stops and the Raelettes and orchestra members beg Charles to continue, then goes on to a frenzied finale. Dowd later stated after hearing the final recording that not releasing the record was never an option: "we knew it was going to be a hit record, no question''. It was held for the summer and released in June 1959.


Billboard magazine initially gave "What'd I Say" a tepid review: "He shouts out in percussive style ... Side two is the same''. The secretary at Atlantic Records started getting calls from distributors, however. Radio stations refused to play it because it was too sexually charged, but Atlantic refused to take the records back from stores. A slightly sanitized version was released in July 1959 in response to the complaints and the song hit number 82. A week later it was at 43, then 26. In contrast to their earlier review, Billboard several weeks later wrote that the song was "the strongest pop record that the artist has done to date".


Within weeks "What'd I Say" topped out at number one on Billboard's rhythm and blues singles chart, number six on the Billboard Hot 100, and it became Charles' first gold record. It also became Atlantic Records' best-selling song at the time.

"What'd I Say" was banned by many black and white radio stations because of, as one critic noted, "the dialogue between himself and his backing singers that started in church and ended up in the bedroom". The erotic nature was obvious to listeners, but a deeper aspect of the fusion between black gospel music and rhythm and blues troubled many black audiences. Music, as was much of American society, was also segregated, and some critics complained that gospel was not only being appropriated by secular musicians, but it was being marketed to white listeners. During several concerts in the 1960s, the crowds became so frenetic and the shows so resembled revival meetings while Charles performed "What'd I Say" that the police were called in, when the organizers became worried that riots might break out. The moral controversy surrounding the song has been attributed to its popularity; Charles later acknowledged in an interview that the beat was catchy, but it was the suggestive lyrics that attracted listeners: "See the girl with the diamond ring. She knows how to shake that thing.' It wasn't the diamond ring that got 'em''. "What'd I Say" was Ray Charles' first crossover hit into the growing genre of rock and roll. He seized the opportunity of his immense newfound success and announced to Ertegun and Wexler that he was considering signing with ABCParamount Records (later renamed ABC Records) later in 1959. While he was in negotiations with ABCParamount, Atlantic Records released an album of his hits, titled ''What'd I Say''.

Michael Lydon, another of Charles' biographers, summarized the impact of the song: "'What'd I Say' was a monster with footprints bigger than its numbers. Daringly different, wildly sexy, and fabulously danceable, the record riveted listeners. When 'What'd I Say' came on the radio, some turned it off in disgust, but millions turned the volume up to blasting and sang 'Unnnh, unnnh, oooooh, oooooh' along with Ray and the Raelets. It became the life of a million parties, the spark of as many romances, and a song to date the summer by. The song's impact was not immediately seen in the U.S.; it was particularly popular in Europe. Paul McCartney was immediately struck by the song and knew that when he heard it he wanted to be involved in making music. George Harrison remembered an all-night party he attended in 1959 where the song was played for eight hours non-stop: "It was one of the best records I ever heard''. While The Beatles were developing their sound in Hamburg, they played "What'd I Say" at every show, trying to see how long they could make the song last and using the audience in the call and response, with which they found immense popularity. The opening electric piano in the song was the first John Lennon had ever heard, and he tried to replicate it with his guitar. Lennon later credited Ray Charles' opening of "What'd I Say" to the birth of songs dominated by guitar riffs.

When Mick Jagger sang for the first time with the band that would become The Rolling Stones, he performed a duet of "What'd I Say". Eric Burdon from The Animals, Steve Winwood of The Spencer Davis Group, Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys, and Van Morrison counted the song as a major influence on why they were interested in music and incorporated it into their shows. Music historian Robert Stephens attributes the birth of soul music to "What'd I Say" when gospel and blues were successfully joined; the new genre of music was matured by later musicians such as James Brown and Aretha Franklin. "In an instant, the music called Soul comes into being. Hallelujah!" wrote musician Lenny Kaye in a retrospective of Atlantic Records artists.

In the late 1950s, rock and roll was faltering as its major stars dropped from public view. Elvis Presley was drafted, Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran died in 1959 and 1960 respectively, Chuck Berry was in jail, and Jerry Lee Lewis had been disgraced by press reports that he married his 13-year-old cousin. Music and culture critic Nelson George disagrees with music historians who attest the last two years of the 1950s were barren of talent, pointing to Ray Charles and this song in particular. George writes that the themes in Charles' work were very similar to the young rebels who popularized rock and roll, writing.

By breaking down the division between pulpit and bandstand, recharging blues concerns with transcendental fervor, unashamedly linking the spiritual and the sexual, Charles made pleasure (physical satisfaction) and joy (divine enlightenment) seem the same thing. By doing so he brought the realities of the Saturday-night sinner and Sunday-morning worshipper, so often one and the same, into raucous harmony.

"What'd I Say" has been covered by many artists in many different styles. Elvis Presley used the song in a large dance scene in his 1964 film ''Viva Las Vegas'' and released it as a single with the title song on the B-side. Cliff Richard, Eric Clapton with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers, The Big Three, Eddie Cochran, Bobby Darin, Nancy Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., and Johnny Cash all put their own style on the song. Jerry Lee Lewis found particular success with his rendition in 1961, which peaked at number 30 and spent eight weeks on the charts. Charles noticed, later writing "I saw that many of the stations which had banned the tune started playing it when it was covered by white artists. That seemed strange to me, as though white sex was cleaner than black sex. But once they began playing the white version, they lifted the ban and also played the original''.

Charles later spoofed this double standard on the television comedy show Saturday Night Live in 1977. He hosted an episode and had the original band he toured with in the 1950s to join him. In one skit, he tells a producer that he wants to record the song, but the producer tells him that a white band named the "Young Caucasians", composed of beaming white teenagers, are to record it first, which they do on the show, in a chaste, sanitized, and unexciting performance. When Charles and his band counter with their original version, Garrett Morris tell them, "Sorry. That'll never make it''.

Charles closed every show he played for the rest of his career with the song, later stating, "'What'd I Say' is my last song onstage. When I do 'What'd I Say', you don't have to worry about it, that's the end of me; there ain't no encore, no nothin'. I'm finished!". It was ranked tenth on Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time", with the summary, "Charles' grunt-'n'-groan exchanges with the Raeletts were the closest you could get to the sound of orgasm on Top Forty radio during the Eisenhower era".In 2000, it ranked number 43 on VH1's 100 Greatest Songs in Rock and Roll and number 96 on VH1's 100 Greatest Dance Songs, being the oldest song in the latter ranking. The same year it was chosen by National Public Radio as one of the 100 most influential songs of the 20th century. A central scene in the 2004 biopic Ray features the improvisation of the song performed by Jamie Foxx, who won an Academy Award for his portrayal of Charles. For its historical, artistic, and cultural significance, the Library of Congress added it to the U.S. National Recording Registry in 2002. The Rock And Roll Hall of Fame featured it as one of 500 Songs that Shaped Rock And Roll in 2007.

4(1) – ''C. C. RIDER'' - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Progressive Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Stereo LP Master
Recorded: - Probably June 1960 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - December 1969
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun 107-B3 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS – ROCKIN' RHYTHM AND BLUES
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-32 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

"See See Rider", also known as "C.C. Rider" or "See See Rider Blues" or "Easy Rider" is a popular American 12-bar blues" song. It was first recorded by Gertrude "Ma" Rainey in 1924, and since then has been recorded by many other artists. The song uses mostly traditional blues lyrics to tell the story of an unfaithful lover, commonly called easy riders: "See see rider, see what you have done," making a play on the word see and the sound of easy.

The song is generally regarded as being traditional in origin. Ma Rainey's version became popular during 1925, as "See See Rider Blues''. It became one of the most famous of all blues songs, with well over 100 versions. It was recorded by Big Bill Broonzy, Mississippi John Hurt, Leadbelly, Lightnin' Hopkins, Peggy Lee and many others. Broonzy claimed that "when he was about 9 or 10", that is, around 1908, he had learned to play the blues from an itinerant songster named "See See Rider", "a former slave, who played a one-string fiddle.... one of the first singers of what would later be called the blues...".



In 1943, a version by Wee Bea Booze became a number 1 hit on the Billboard "Harlem Hit Parade'', precursor of the rhythm and blues chart. Some blues critics consider this to be the definitive version of the song. A doo-wop version was recorded by Sonny Til and The Orioles in 1952. Later rocked-up hit versions were recorded by Chuck Willis (as "C.C. Rider'', also a number 1 rhythm and blues hit as well as a number 12 pop hit, in 1957) and LaVern Baker (number 9 rhythm and blues and number 34 pop hit in 1963). Willis' version gave birth to the dance craze "The Stroll''.


Other popular performances were recorded by Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheels (as part of a medley entitled "Jenny Take A Ride!'', number 10 US pop hit in 1965) and The Animals (number 10 US pop hit in 1966).

The Animals' heavy version (featuring Eric Burdon's screaming) also reached number 1 on the Canadian RPM chart, and number 8 in Australia.  It was the last single before the group disbanded in September 1966. The arrangement of the song was credited to band member Dave Rowberry.

Other renditions came from Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Ray Charles, Chuck Berry, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, The Who, The Everly Brothers, Charlie Rich, Janis Joplin, The Grateful Dead, Leon Thomas, Snooks Eaglin, John Fahey, Old Crow Medicine Show and many more.

In later years, Elvis Presley regularly opened his performances with the song, such as was captured on his 1970 On Stage album and in his Aloha from Hawaii television special. Elvis's drummer Ronnie Tutt opened Elvis's version with a rolling drum riff followed by the band entering and Elvis's famous brass melody.

Similarly, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band long had "C.C. Rider" as part of their "Detroit Medley" encore romp, which achieved significant visibility on the 1980 No Nukes live album. Film director Martin Scorsese credited the song with stimulating his interest in music. He later said: "One day, around 1958, I remember hearing something that was unlike anything I'd ever heard before... The music was demanding, "Listen to me!"... The song was called "See See Rider'', which I already knew from the Chuck Willis cover version. The name of the singer was Lead Belly... I found an old Folkways record by Lead Belly... And I listened to it obsessively. Lead Belly's music opened something up for me. If I could have played guitar, really played it, I never would have become a filmmaker''.

In 2004, the original Ma Rainey recording received a Grammy Hall of Fame Award. There is a chapter in Richard Brautigan's classic Trout Fishing in America titled "Sea, Sea Rider''.

The term "See See Rider" is usually taken as synonymous with "easy rider." In particular, in blues songs it often refers to a woman who had liberal sexual views, had been married more than once, or was skilled at sex. Although Ma Rainey's version seems on the face of it to refer to "See See Rider" as a man, one theory is that the term refers to a prostitute and in the lyric, "You made me love you, now your man done come'', "your man" refers to the woman's pimp. So, rather than being directed to a male "easy rider," the song is in fact an admonition to a prostitute to give up her evil ways.

5(1) – ''WHEN MY BLUE MOON TURNS TO GOLD AGAIN'' - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Wiley Walter-Gene Sullivan
Publisher: - Peer Music International Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Stereo
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-1 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-1 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

''When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again'' is a song written by Wiley Walker and Gene Sullivan in 1940. They first recorded it for Columbia Records in 1941 (Columbia 20264). Walker was inspired to write the song while travelling in West Texas with the full moon in his face. As he drove down the highway, daybreak approached. Walker noted the apparent change of colour of the moon from a bluish tint to gold.

Elvis Presley recorded ''When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again' (RCA Victor EPA-992) on September 2, 1956 at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood, California, with Thorne Nogar and Bones Howe behind the board. Elvis sang "When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again" in his appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show" (January 6, 1957) and on his TV special taping "Elvis", June 27, 1968, at the 6:00pm and 8:00pm shows. It has also been recorded by Zeke Manners (1947), in 1947 by The Singing Lariateers (RCA 20-2130), in 1949 by Tex Ritter (Capitol 1977), and recorded by Cindy Walker, Cliffie Stone, Sammi Smith, the Statler Brothers, Hank Thompson, Emmylou Harris, Eddy Arnold, Jim Reeves, Bill Monroe, Merle Haggard, and of course, Jerry Lee Lewis, among others.


5(2) – ''WHEN MY BLUE MOON TURNS TO GOLD AGAIN'' - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Wiley Walter-Gene Sullivan
Publisher: - Peer Music International Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - 2nd Series Take 1
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - July 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-A6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS – ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-3 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Leo Ladner - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Martin Willis or John Ace Cannon - Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SONNY WILSON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SUMMER 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 – ''THE GREAT PRETENDER'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:51
Composer: - Buck Ram
Publisher: - Panther Music
Matrix number: - U 400   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1960
Released: - August 1, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 341-A mono
THE GREAT PRETENDER / I'M GONNA TAKE A WALK
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-25 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

"The Great Pretender" is a popular song recorded by The Platters, with Tony Williams on lead vocals, and released as a single on November 3, 1955. The words and music were created by Buck Ram, the Platters' manager and producer who was a successful songwriter before moving into producing and management. "The Great Pretender" reached the number one position on both the rhythm and blues and pop charts in 1956. It also reached the UK charts peaking at number 5.

Buck Ram reports that he wrote the song in about 20 minutes in the washroom of the Flamingo Hotel in order to have a song to follow up the success of "Only You (And You Alone)''. Stan Freberg parodied this version. In 2004, the song was voted 360th greatest song of all time by Rolling Stone magazine.George Harrison led Phil Spector into cutting a simple acoustic version of it in 1970-71 while in the studio jamming on other songs, it was pressed onto acetate but never officially released. There is a 1969 cover version by Gene Pitney; this version is clearly the model that Freddie Mercury used for his much later version, although demos of Mercury's 1987 song sound like the original Platters take. It was covered in 1984 by Dolly Parton, who made it the title song of an album of covers from the 1950s and 1960s ''The Great Pretender''.Other significant recordings by Kathy Young with the Innocents covered the song in 1961 as the B-side to their single, "Baby Oh Baby"; Stan Freberg made a parody version in 1956; Pat Boone covered it on his Moody River album in 1961; Dan McCafferty covered it on Dan McCafferty album in 1975; Gene Summers included it on his 1997 album ''The Ultimate School Of Rock And Roll'' issued on Crystal Clear Sound Records; The Band covered it on ''Moondog Matinee'', an album of covers. Perhaps most radically, it was tackled by Lester Bowie in 1981 and extended to nearly seventeen minutes of improvisation on his album of the same name. It was covered in the UK by Jimmy Parkinson, an Australian vocalist. It entered the Top 20 on 3 March 1956, six months ahead of the Platters' version, Parkinson's hit peaked at number 9 and remained in the Top 20 for 10 weeks.Jackie Riggs, a US doowop singer also covered it in March 1956; George Faith covered the song on his album ''Reggae Got Soul''; The Statler Brothers covered the song on their final live CD. Country singer Roy Clark performed a comedy routine in which he sings the song with comic sound effects, odd guitar strokes and occasional segues into other, different songs. Finally, the song was re-popularized in 1987 by Freddie Mercury, the lead singer of the rock band Queen. Mercury's version reached number four on the UK Singles Chart.



Sonny Wilson & The Rhythm Rockers.  From left: Sonny Wilson, Glenn Allen, Billy Robley, Doc McQueen  on stage at McQueen's Hernando Hideaway, Memphis, Tennessee. >

Absolutely nothing is known about Sonny Wilson or the session that produced this surprising rockabilly treatment of the old Platters hit. Perhaps there were death threats from desperate rockabilly collectors, and this recordings was offered up as a sacrifice to keep their loyalty. In any case, there was much to treasure here in the pale Sun summer of 1960.


From the outset, it's hard to know if Wilson is serious about his opening ''Wel..heh..heh..heh..heh..hell'' or whether he's torn a page from Elvis self-parody book.

Regardless, the artist tried his damndest to keep things on track here. There are a couple of timing fluffs, like the extra beat before the second release, but they're deftly wallpapered over. 

Somebody takes a fine 16 bar guitar solo, which deserved to be retained despite that one muted clam in the 12th bar. The electric bass work when Wilson sings the release (''Too real is that feeling...'') is quite a delight. All things considered, the Gene Lowery Singers are less annoying here that usual because they're pretty much confined to imitating the Platters.

The bluesy side below, is highly similar to Billy Riley's work on ''One More Time; or, more recently, Tracy Pendarvis's effort on ''Is It Too Late''. There's nothing particularly striking or original here, and about the only insight we get into Wilson's vocal style is that he had obviously done a lot of listening to Conway Twitty.

02 – ''I'M GONNA TAKE A WALK'' – B.M.I. -2:08
Composer: - Dalahite
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 401  - Master
Recorded: Unknown Date Summer 1960
Released: - August 1, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 341-B mono
I'M GONNA TAKE A WALK / THE GREAT PRETENDER
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-26 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Wilson – Vocal & Guitar

Probably Following Musicians
Billy Robley – Guitar
Doc McQueen – Piano
Glenn Allen - Drums
Bill Black – Bass
Charlie Rich - Piano

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LANCE ROBERTS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY JUNE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 – ''THE GOOD GUY ALWAYS WINS'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Bill Husky
Publisher: - Rise Music – Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 413   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably June 1960
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 348-A mono
THE GOOD GUY ALWAYS WINS / THE TIME IS RIGHT
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Let's start out with a simple point. ''The Time Is Right'' is almost a great song, a perfect example of that gospel-tinged Elvisy ballad that Memphis labels cranked out effortlessly in their heyday. Indeed, Lance Roberts seems to have had a knack for the genre and turns in a hell of a performance.

Moreover, Charlie Rich, although uncredited in the session logs, seems to have a dominant force at this session. Still, something keeps this from being one of Sun's latterday masterpiece. The most obvious problem is the chorus. Not their presence per se, because this arrangement surly needed some vocal support, but rather ''this'' chorus.

Lance Roberts ^

It is possible for a vocal group to take itself and its lines too seriously. These folks bring just a bit too much fervor to their reading, and the result is overblown, even comic, which is hardly the effect they were after. Wa ha ha hoo, indeed.

Things don't improve much on the uptempo side. In fact, if you can get through the first four bars of ''The Good Guy Always Wins'' without losing your cookies, you're made of sterner stuff than most Sun fans. Again, blame the chorus who must have thought they were accompanying a Wagnerian opera.

Roberts himself is another of the unknown artists who seemed to populate Sun's 300 series. His contracts were mailed to a town called Norman Park, Georgia on May 12, 1960, but beyond that little is known.

02 – ''THE TIME IS RIGHT'' - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Charlie Feathers-Jerry Huffman
Publisher: - JEG Music Publishers - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 414  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably June 1960
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 348-A mono
THE TIME IS RIGHT / THE GOOD GUY ALWAYS WINS
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

03 – ''MONEY WON'T BUY LOVE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably June 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Lance Roberts – Vocal
Billy Riley - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
More Details Unknown

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JUNE 1960

In the summer and then early in the fall of 1959, Sam Phillips had hired two people he was hoping would   help to invigorate the business. Ernie Barton, a guitar player and singer originally from Florida, and an Elvis  friend named Charles Underwood, had come aboard. Ernie was to do Artists and Repertoire and Charles, who also was a songwriter, was to do mastering and some other technical jobs in the new studio as well as  A&R.

Ernie Barton was kind of squirrel-faced, a jolly sort who seemed pretty green. He wrote and recorded a few   songs on himself, and brought in his fiancee and lawyer Bobbie Jean to cut a single, too. They were not very  successful. Charles was large and languorous. The thing that impressed most people about Charles was his  wife Bonnie, who was a somewhat tousled look-alike for the French film star Brigitte Bardot. Bonnie always  appeared as if someone had awakened her from a deep sleep and she didn't quite know where she was. Her  husband had written a song about her, ''Bonnie B'', which Jerry Lee Lewis eventually recorded. Neither of these turned out to be very successful A&R men, and they didn't stay at Sun too long.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

After Bill Justis and Jack Clement were fired by Phillips in 1959, Ernie Barton convinced Sam Phillips that he should take over as in-house producer/arranger. He married a Little Rock lawyer, Bobbie Jean Farrabee, and used his position at Sun to record his wife, who actually was not a bad singer. She had one release on Sun, "You Burned The Bridges" (an answer record to Jack Scott's "Burning Bridges") / "Cheaters Never Win", which came out on Sun 342 in July 1960, credited to Bobbie Jean. Her best recording was probably "I Won't Worry" (another answer song, this time in response to Marty Robbins's "Don't Worry"), which finally saw a release in 2002, on the "Memphis Belles" Bear Family box-set. There are letters from Bobbie Jean Barton in the Sun files demanding that Sam issue an album by Ernie. Obviously, she didn't know that Phillips was uncomfortable with releasing LP records, let alone by someone who never had anything resembling a hit single. Barton and his wife both ran afoul of Sam Phillips at some point in 1961.

STUDIO SESSION FOR BOBBIE JEAN BARTON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JUNE 1, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD 
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

01(1) - ''YOU BURNED THE BRIDGES'' - S.E.S.A.C. - 2:07
Composer: - Walter Scott
Publisher: - Sage and Sand
Matrix number: - None - Demo
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-6-8 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

01(2) - ''YOU BURNED THE BRIDGES'' - S.E.S.A.C. - 2:08
Composer: - Walter Scott
Publisher: - Sage and Sand
Matrix number: - U 402   - Master
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - July 7, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 342-A mono
YOU BURNED THE BRIDGES / CHEATERS NEVER WIN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

This side of this commercial venture was an answer record (a practice that has all but died) to Jack Scott's 1960 megahit ''Burning Bridges''. String sections weren't the usual fare at Sun and this production raised a few eyebrows among Sun's distributors and faithful disc jockeys.

It is the next side, ''Cheaters Never Win'', that warrants special attention, though. The song, itself is pretty, if undistinguished, but Vinnie Trauth's string arrangement is another matter. Rather than write a chart around Bobbie Jean's vocal line, this arranger has written a violin fantasy to the song's chord changes. It might as well have been released as a solo recording by strings, so irrelevant is Ms. Barton's smokey vocal. In fact, the violins kick off their own melody before Bobbie Jean has a chance to utter a single word. Taken on its own terms, this side works better that it has right to and serves its own little niche in Sun record history.

This side was written by Sun session guitarist Brad Suggs. ''I originally wrote it for Nat Cole'', Brad Suggs recalls. ''It had a kind of Frank Sinatra-ish feel. The singer got to sing behind the beat and do some fancy phrasing''.

02 - ''CHEATERS NEVER WIN'' - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 403   - Master
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - July 7, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 342-B mono
CHEATERS NEVER WIN / YOU BURNED THE BRIDGES
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

A variety of other tunes were recorded by Bobbie Jean, although nothing passed muster and appeared on either Sun or Phillips International. It is clear that Ernie Barton used his position at Sun to record both himself and his wife quite liberally. In addition to her lone single, there are some previously unissued material ''I Just Discovered Boys'' and ''What Are You Gonna Do Now'' are of particular interest. In the latter case, are including an entire segment of a session to provide a glimpse of the songs development, false starts and all. In the case of ''Boys'', you can hear Bobbie Jean's sarcasm as she attempts to vocalize in a whiny pre-teen manner for the commercial market. At one point she makes reference to ''copying all the words down from the record'' while talking to her husband, Ernie. It is not clear which record was the source of this session, although the tape of an old 45 of this song (artist unknown) remains in the Sun archives. In addition, recordings of ''Boys'' and ''Gonna Do Now'' were made in similar arrangements by Charlotte Smith, whose versions also appear in the Memphis Belles collection. Somebody (Ernie Barton?) obviously believed in the potential of this piece of pre-teen pop.

03(1) - ''I JUST DISCOVERED BOYS'' - 1:33
Composer: - John Smith-Bonnie Smith
Publisher: -   Zest Music Company
Matrix number: - None – Demo
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609 1-17 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

03(2) - ''I JUST DISCOVERED BOYS'' - 1:59
Composer: - John Smith-Bonnie Smith
Publisher: -   Zest Music Company
Matrix number: - None – False Starts
Recorded: - Probably   June 1, 1960   - Studio talking
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609 2-26 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

04 - ''I WON'T WORRY'' - 3:01
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609 2-16 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

05 – ''TAKE A TIP'' - 2:24
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-17 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

06 – ''WHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO NOW'' - 2:16
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-25 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

07 – ''I'D RATHER HURT'' - 1:43
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-4-26 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bobbie Jean Barton - Vocal
Ernie Barton Orchestra
Ernie Barton - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Vinnie Trauth's String Arrangements
Other Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ERNIE BARTON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JUNE 1, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD 
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

01 – ''HAVE YOU EVER BEEN LONELY'' - B.M.I. - 1:46
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

02 – ''HAVE I TOLD YOU LATELY THAT I LOVE YOU'' - B.M.I. - 1:34
Composer: - Scott Weisman
Publisher: - Leeds Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

03 – ''HERD OF TURTLES'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox-3-8 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S
Reissued: -   June 12, 2006   - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

04 – ''HEY GOOD LOOKIN''' - B.M.I. - 0:57
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

05 – ''I WALK THE LINE'' - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

06 – ''I WAS BORN FOR YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

07 – ''NO GOOD WITHOUT YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

08 – ''NO LETTER TODAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Barton - Vocal & Guitar
Scotty Moore - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
D.J. Fontana - Drums
Larry Mohoberac - Piano

Noel Gilbert, Thomas Lowe,
 Milton Friedland, Nino Ravarino - Strings

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ERNIE BARTON
FOR SUN RECORDS

UNKNOWN RECORDING STUDIO
UNKNOWN LOCATION
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN

01 – ''ALWAYS ANYTIME, ANYMORE'' - B.M.I. - 1:31
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

02 – ''YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE'' - B.M.I. - 1:13
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

03 – ''SHUT YOUR MOUTH''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

04 – ''WHIRLPOOL'' - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

05 – ''SOMEDAY''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Barton - Vocal & Guitar
Unknown - Group

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JUNE 1960

The singles, PI 3557 ''Sunny Side Of The Street'' b/w ''Take A Chance'' by Jeb Stuart and PI 3558 ''Baby I Don't Care'' b/w ''Vanished'' by Eddie Bush issued.

JUNE 1, 1960 TUESDAY

Ray Charles headlines the Hitmakers of 1960. Also appearing are the Drifters, Mary Johnson,   Ruth Brown, Ray Bryant, Ron Holden, Billy Bland and Preston Epps.

''Brown Eyed Handsome Man'' writer Chuck Berry is found not guilty on two counts of violating the Man Act. It is the second of three trials he undergoes during 1960-61 for allegedly transporting a woman across state lines for sexual reasons.

JUNE 2, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Bobby Darin appears for three weeks at the Copacabana in New York. Chuck Berry is found   not guilty for Violation of the Mann Act for the one concerning a female in Topeka, Kansas.

JUNE 4, 1960 SATURDAY

June Carter makes her first appearance on ''The Louisiana Hayride'' in Shreveport, Louisiana, backed by guitarist Jerry Kennedy. She performs ''Big Iron'', ''Gotta Travel On'', Chuck Berry's ''Thirty Days'' and The Carter Family's ''Wildwood Flower''.

Patsy Cline songs ''Lovesick Blues'' during an episode of ABC's ''Country Music Jubilee''. Eddy Arnold and Cowboy Copas also appear.

JUNE 5, 1960 SUNDAY

''The George Gobel Show'' airs on CBS-TV in its final prime-time appearance, concluding a six-year run that began on rival NBC. Gobel began his career as a comedian on WLS Radio's landmark ''National Barn Dance'' program.