CONTAINS
 
1952 SUN SESSIONS 2 
July 1 to December 31, 1952
 
Studio Session for Howlin' Wolf, July 10, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis, July 18, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, July 21, 1952 / Duke Records
Studio Session for Charles Thomas, August 12, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for B.B. King, September 1952 / RPM Records
Studio Session for Johnny Ace, September 1952 / Flair Records
Studio Session for Earl Forest, September 1952 / Flair Records
Studio Session for Walter Horton, September 15, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, September 15, 1952 / RPM Records
Studio Session for Jesse ''Tiny'' Kennedy, September 25, 1952 / Trumpet Records
Studio Session for Sherman ''Blues'' Johnson, September 30, 1952 / Trumpet Records
Studio Session for Billy ''Tag'' Williams, October 1952 / Trumpet Records
Studio Session for Willie Nix, October 2, 8, 9, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Raymond Hill, October 6, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Howlin' Wolf, October 7, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Walter ''Tang'' Smith, October 27, 1952 / J-B Records
Studio Session for Bobby Bland, November 2, 1952 / Duke Records
Studio Session for Red Hadley, November 13, 1952 / Trumpet Record
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis, November 17, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Houston Stokes, November 18, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Red Hadley, December 5, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis, December 8, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis & Walter Horton, December 8, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Willie Nix, December 10, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Joe Willie Wilkins, December 10, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Love, December 11, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Doctor Ross, Late 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Henry Hill, Unknown Date 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Song Fellows, Between 1952-1954 / Sun Records
 
Biography of Artists (See: The Sun Biographies)
 

JULY 1952
 
After his final job by the International Shoe Company, future Sun recording artist Ray Smith entered the Air Force. By this point he had already met his wife-to-be, Lillie. ''I joined the Air Force in July 1952, he told his fan club president Tommie Wix. ''One day at work a friend of mine came to me at lunchtime and said, 'Let's go swimming'. We did, and this brought about my resignation or otherwise be fired'. That led the lead to my enlistment. I was transferred to George Air Force Base, Victorville, California. After nineteen months in Metz, France I was returned to the USA, New York City, where I was discharged with honors and medals for service beyond the call of duty''.
 
Ray Smith began singing under orders from his sergeants: ''I was in basic training at Sampson Air Force Base in Syracuse, New York. There was a talent show and the men in my unit told the C.O. 'Smitty can sing'. The song i sang was ''Lovesick Blues''. I won first prize. That's what influenced me into music, and I have been doing it ever since. I had my first paying job as an entertainer at Nora's Desert Inn, Barstow, California at $12.50 a night, Friday and Saturday only''. In France, Ray and his wife Lillie lived off base. At night and on weekends, Ray played servicemen's clubs. For a time, he considered a career in the Air Force but left in June 1956. 
 
JULY 1952
 
Article in the rhythm and blues magazine ''Beat' reports: ''We are proud of the opportunity given to many entertainers in the Southern field, thru the media of radio station WDIA in Memphis. Some of the boys who have done well from there are Rufus Thomas, B.B. King, Nat Williams, Rosco Gordon, A.C. ''Moohah'' Williams, Jackie Brenston, the Spirit of Memphis Quartet, the Gospel Travelers and Reverend Brewster (the latter three are from the gospel field). A few of these enterprising young men are starting their own company, Tri-State Recording. The label will be called Duke. First batch of releases are out and should be good sellers in the rhythm and blues market''.
 
The Summer Olympics begin in Helsinki, Finland during July of 1952. A total of 69 counties participated in the games with the Soviet Union and Israel doing so for the first time. There were 149 total events with 4,955 athletes competing in them. The United States won the most medals with 76 and the Soviet Union won the second most with 71, the host nation came in eighth place on the medals table with a total of 22 medals. These games also marked the first time that equestrian competitions allowed women to compete with men in mixed events. 
 
JULY 1952
 
Sam Phillips records Rosco Gordon again, this time for Duke Records. Meanwhile, "No More  Doggin'" finally drops off the Rhythm and Blues listings after peaking at number 2 in a 15- week chart run. Rosco is on the road with The Clovers.
 
JULY 1, 1952 TUESDAY
 
CBS debuts the twice-a-week series ''Music Hall'', hosted by Patty Page.
 
JULY 3, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Dick Curless marries Pauline Green
 
JULY 5, 1952 SATURDAY
 
The clogging troupe Ralph Sloan and The Tennessee Travelers joins the Grand Ole Opry,  at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.
 
Rosco Gordon's ''New Orleans Wimmen'' (RPM 358) enters the local charts in Atlanta.
 
JULY 7, 1952 MONDAY
 
Keyboard player Floyd Domino is born. He becomes a member of Asleep At The Wheel and plays with George Strait, appearing on such hits as ''Love Without End, Amen'', ''I've Come To Expect It From You'' and ''If You Ain't Lovin' (You Ain't Livin')''.
 
JULY 8, 1952 TUESDAY
 
The afternoon before marrying June Carter, Carl Smith recorded ''Our Honeymoon'' at Nashville's Castle Studio in the Tulane Hotel.
 
Johnny Horton holds his first recording session for Mercury Records.
 
JULY 9, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
June Carter marries Carl Smith at his sister's house in Alcoa, Tennessee.
 
JULY 10, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Hank and Audrey Williams are divorced for the second and final time.
 
Tennessee Ernie Ford recorded ''Blackberry Boogie'' at the Capitol Studios on Melrose Avenue in Hollywood, California.
 
Studio session with Howlin' Wolf at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.  More details unknown.
 
JULY 11, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Hank Williams recorded ''You Win Again'' a day after his divorce is finalized, along with ''I Won't Be Home No More'' at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel.
 
JULY 12, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Keyboard player Randy McCormick is born in Rogersvill, Alabama. Ho co-writes Eddie Rabbitt's ''Suspicious'' and Conway Twitty's ''Crazy In Love'', and plays on singles by George Strait, Ricky Van Shelton and Kenny Chesney, among others.
 
''Tri-State Denies modern injunction on Rosco Gordon denying earlier published reports to the contrary, Tri-State Recording, the Memphis-based firm which produces disks under the Duke label, stated this week that Modern Records, West Coast indie, has not sought an injunction against them in an ongoing dispute involving Rosco Gordon, rhythm and blues chanter, David Mattis, head of Duke, further mentioned that the contract between Gordon and his company had been approved by the American Federation of Musicians.
 
According to Mattis, ''the AFM has sent a letter to Modern, explaining that Duke's contract with Rosco Gordon was approved and, as far as the Federation is concerned, the singer is under contract to Duke. Gordon's single of '''New Orleans Wimmen'' is an original on the Duke label, which was later recorded and released before the Duke version'', Mattis said.
 
JULY 14, 1952 MONDAY
 
''The Eddy Arnold Show'' debuts as a summer replacement series on CBS-TV, but ends up running on all three major networks through September 1956.
 
The movie ''Son Of Paleface'' debuts in theaters with Bob Hope, Roy Rogers and Jane Russell singing ''Buttons And Bows''. Bing Crosby makes a cameo appearance.
 
JULY 15, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Blue Miller, of The Gibson/Miller Band, is born in Detroit. The Academy of Country Music names the band the Top New Group or Duo in 1994, but Dave Gibson leaves later that year, imploding the group after just one hit, ''Texas Tattoo''.
 
Webb Pierce recorded ''I Haven't Got The Heart'' during an afternoon session at the Castle Studio in Nashville.
 
Woody Guthrie is released from New York's Bellevue Hospital, following a one-month stay in which he was diagnosed, incorrectly, as schizophrenic. Within hours, he is drunk and has a fight with his family.
 
At the age of eight, Gladys Knight receiver &2,000 as the winner of ''The Original Amateur Hour'', hosted by Ted Mack on NBC-TV. She goes on to receive a nomination from the Country Music Association in 1994.
 
Goldie Hill has her first recording session, for Decca Records in Nashville.
 
JULY 16, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
A day after his release from Bellevue Hospital in New York, Woody Guthrie checks into Kings County Hospital, convinced he needs to combat an alcohol addiction. His real problem, still undiagnosed, is a neurological disease, Huntington's chorea.
 
JULY 17, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Nicolette Larson is born in Helena, Montana. Best known for the 1979 pop hit ''Lotta Love'', her brief country career yields a single duet with Steve Wariner, ''That's How You Know When Love's Right''.
 
Arranger and guitarist Billy Strange recorded ''Bumming Around''. The song is a country hit the following year for Jimmy Dean and for T. Texas Tyler. Strange arranged and co-wrote with Mac Davis Elvis Presley's ''A Little Less Conversation''. 
 
JULY 18, 1952 FRIDAY
 
MGM released Hank Williams' ''Jambalaya (On The Bayou)''.
 
Bill Monroe recorded ''In The Pines'' in an afternoon at Nashville's Castle Studio in the Tulane Hotel. The performance is ranked among the 500 greatest country singles in history in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.
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STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
 
STUDIO SESSION: FRIDAY JULY 18, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
There's no shortage of blues (or hillbilly songs, for that matter) about women who don't come home at night, but it's unusual to name the woman who doesn't come home... and then marry her one week later, as Joe Hill Louis did when he married Dorothy Mae Pearson on July 25, 1952.
 
01 - "DOROTHY MAE" - B.M.I. – 2:04
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1035 A
Recorded: - July 18, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm standard single Checker 763-B mono
DOROTHY MAE / WHEN I AM GONE
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-2 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
 Although Louis worked live as a one-man-band, Sam Phillips had begun to record him with other musicians. On paper, the combination of Louis, Walter Horton, Jack Kelly and Willie Nix would have been expected to come up with something a little less commonplace than this: none of the musicians is less than competent, but neither are they any more than that. Horton resolutely comps his rhythm, even through the solo chorus, and neither Kelly or Nix can be heard well enough to discern what they might be doing. That leaves Joe, who happily belts out his verses, all about the said Lady, whom he seems to be getting rid of after she's already left anyway. Who said that women are the weaker sex?
 
Sam Phillips must have had high hopes when he shipped off the masters to Chess Records, but it didn't sell and Chess took nothing else by Louis and very little else from Phillips.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal and Guitar
Walter Horton - Harmonica
Jack Kelly - Piano
Willie Nix – Drums
 
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JULY 19, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Guitarist Allen Collins is born in Jacksonville, Florida. During junior high school, he helps form Lynyrd Skynyrd, whose ''Sweet Home Alabama'' ranks among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.
 
JULY 21, 1952 MONDAY
 
Studio session with Rosco Gordon at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.
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As a result Sam Phillips was forced to find other outlets. In July he recorded Rosco Gordon for a new Memphis label, Duke Records, which precipitated yet another lawsuit from the Bihari brothers. By the end of the summer, Duke, which had been started by WDIA's white program director, David James Mattis, had been taken over by Don Robey, the light-skinned owner of Peacock Records in Houston, Texas, and reputedly the city's black numbers boss, who was said to have put a gun on his desk and declared, whether by word or gesture, ''We have a deal''.
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR DUKE RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: MONDAY JULY 21, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
01 - "TOO MANY WOMEN" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - James
Publisher: - Lion Music Published
Matrix number: - 2264
Recorded: - July 21, 1952
Released: - November 29, 1952
First appearance: - Duke Records (S) 78rpm standard single Duke R-109-A mono
TOO MANY WOMEN / WISE TO YOU BABY
Reissued: 2013 One Day Music Internet iTunes MP3-54 mono
THE SUN BLUES STORY
 
02 - "WISE TO YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - James
Publisher: - Lion Music Published
Matrix number: - 2265
Recorded: - July 21, 1952
Released: - November 29, 1952
First appearance: - Duke Records (S) 78rpm standard single Duke R-109-B mono
WISE TO YOU BABY / TOO MANY WOMEN
 
03 - "I'M WISE TO YOU''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 21, 1952
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal & Piano
The Beale Streeters
Probably
Johnny Ace - Piano
Bobby Bland - Guitar
Billy Duncan - Saxophone
Earl Forrest - Drums
 
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JULY 22, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Bass player Mike Chapman is born. He plays on nearly all of Garth Brooks' hits, plus Kathy Matttea's ''Burning Old Memories'' and Sammy Kershaw's ''Third Rate Romance'', among others .
 
Woody Guthrie is transferred from Kings County Hospital to Brooklyn State Hospital for two months of psychiatric examination. During his stay, he undergoes shock therapy and is eventually diagnosed with a neurological disease, Huntington's chorea.
 
JULY 24, 1952 THURSDAY
 
The western ''High Noon'' opens with starring roles for Gary Cooper, Lloyd Bridges, Grace Kelly and Lon Chaney. The soundtrack album is released simultaneously, with Tex Ritter singing the title track.
 
JULY 25, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Rodeo rider Rex Allen and sidekick Slim Pickens come to the aid of the Army in the western ''Old Oklahoma Plains'', which debuts in theaters. Woodwind player Darol Rice has a cameo role.
 
''Barbed Wire'' appears in movie theaters with Gene Autry portraying a cattle buyer. He's backed by Pat Buttram, Clayton Moore, Frankie Marvin and Jerry Scoggins.
 
JULY 26, 1952 SATURDAY
 
''Peacock gets Duke label includes Gordon pact: Houston. Peacock Records, the rhythm and blues indie headed here by Don Robey and Irving Marcus, has taken over the Memphis-based plattery, Duke Records. The new Duke firm is headed by Robey, Marcus and David Mattis of Tri-State Recording. Peacock will continue to issue wax under the Duke label as well as its own rhythm and blues and spiritual platters.
 
Duke will be operated in the same manner as Peacock, with one pressing plant in the east, one in the south and one in California...
 
First releases on Duke include ''My Song'' by Johnny Ace, ''Baby Baby'' and ''Rock The Bottle'' by Earl Forest, and ''New Orleans Wimmen'' and ''T-Model Boogie'' by Rosco Gordon. Latter represents one of the most valuable properties acquired in the deal, with Gordon now under exclusive contract to Duke, according to officials of that company''.
 
JULY 28, 1952 MONDAY
 
Guitarist Robert ''Jabbo'' Arrington dies at General Hospital in Nashville. He appeared on Little Dickens' ''A Sleeping At The Foot Of The Bad'' and ''Hillbilly Fever'', plus several recordings by Carl Smith.
 
JULY 29, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Webb Pierce recorded ''Back Street Affair'' during a afternoon session at the Castle Studio in Nashville.
 
Jim Rice is born. At age 22, he becomes the father of a future country star, John Rice.
 
JULY 30, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Songwriter Dennis Morgan is born in Tracy, Minnesota. Among his long line of hits, Ronnie Milsap's ''Smokey Mountain Rain'', George Strait's ''River Of Love'', Sylvia's ''Nobody'' and Barbara Mandrell's ''I Was Country When Country Wasn't Cool''.
 
JULY 31, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Guitarist Steve Gibson is born in Peoria, Illinois. The musical director of the Grand Ole Opry, he plays on hits by George Strait, Kenny Rogers, Alabama, Reba McEntire, Wynonna and Randy Travis, among others.
AUGUST 2, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Katie Porter, the mother of Broadway composer Cole Porter, dies of a cerebral hemorrhage. Her son wrote the 1945 country hit ''Don't Fence Me In''.
 
AUGUST 4, 1952 MONDAY
 
Capitol released Tennessee Ernie Ford's ''Blackberry Boogie''
 
Decca released Ernest Tubb's ''Fortunes In Memories''.
 
AUGUST 6, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Elvis Presley worked in the table department at Upholsteries Specialties Company, located at 210 West  Georgia Avenue in Memphis, while in high school. Elvis Presley lying and gave his birthdate as January 8, 1934, to   add one year to his age. As job references, he listed his previous jobs with Precision Tool and Loew's   State Theater. Elvis' uncles Travis and Johnny get him and cousin Gene Smith on the crew at Precision.
 
AUGUST 7, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Eddy Arnold recorded ''I'd Trade All Of My Tomorrows (For Just One Yesterday)'' and ''Older And Bolder'' at the RCA Studios in New York.
 
AUGUST 8, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Hank Snow recorded ''The Gal Who Invented Kissin'' and ''I Went To Your Wedding'' at the RCA Studio in New York City.
 
Drummer Anton Fig is born in Cape Town, South Africa. Best known for his work on David Letterman's late-night show, he plays on Rosanne Cash's ''Hold On''.
 
AUGUST 9, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Hank Williams misses a scheduled appearance on the Grand Ole Opry. Two days later, Opry manager Jim Denny fires Williams.
 
AUGUST 11, 1952 MONDAY
 
Roy Acuff makes the cover of Newsweek
 
Skeets McDonald recorded ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes'' at the Capitol Studios on Melrose Avenue in Hollywood.
 
Grand Ole Opry manager Jim Denny fires Hank Williams from the Opry after the troubled singer, already on thin ice, missed an August 9 Opry appearance.
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Sam Phillips sent Jim Bullet in Nashville some mellow T-Bone Walkerish sides that he had cut on  October 27, 1952 of Walter ''Tang'' Smith, the trombonist who had played on Howlin' Wolf's recent band session on October 7. When Bulleit bought the sides for $250, Sam sent him some more, including a couple of raw ''cottonpatch'' blues by Charles Thomas from this session, whom Sam touted as possessing a style he said, ''a lot like Johnnie Lee Hooker's but I actually think he does a better vocal than Hooker''. Bulleit deferred a decision on this Charles Thomas sides,  until the day  are   not  issued.
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLES THOMAS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY AUGUST 12, 1952
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
No Details
 
01 - ''COLD HANDS''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - August 12, 1952
 
02 - ''4TH AND BROAD''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - August 12, 1952
 
03 - ''UNKNOWN TITLE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - August 12, 1952
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charles Thomas – Vocal & Guitar
 
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AUGUST 13, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Big Mama Thornton recorded one of the first versions of ''Hound Dog''.  The best-known version of "Hound Dog" is the July 1956 recording by Elvis Presley, which is ranked number  on Rollin' Stone magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time; it is also one of the best-selling singles of all-time. Presley's version, which sold about more than 10 million copies globally, was his best-selling song and "an emblem of the rock and roll revolution". It was simultaneously number 1 on the United States pop, country, and rhythm and blues charts in 1956, and it topped the pop chart for 11 weeks, a record that stood for 36 years. Presley's 1956 RCA recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1988, and it is listed as one of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's "500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll".
 
AUGUST 15, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Hank Williams writes ''Kaw-Liga'' near the town of Kowaliga, Alabama.
 
Columbia records Lefty Frizzell's ''Forever (And Always)''
 
AUGUST 16, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Having quit, the Grand Ole Opry when he moved away from Nashville, Grandpa Jones rejoins the cast.
 
AUGUST 17, 1952 SUNDAY
 
Hank Williams is arrested in Alexander City, Alabama, for drunken behavior.
 
AUGUST 20, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Rudy Martin, of The Gatlin Brothers, is born in Olney, Texas. Behind songwriting lead singer Larry Gatlin, the trio earns a Grammy for 1976's ''Broken Lady'', beginning a 12-year string of harmony-packed success.
 
Singer/songwriter John Hiatt is born in Indianapolis, Indiana. He writes such country hits as The Desert Rose Band's ''She Don't Love Nobody'', Suzy Boggus' ''Drive South'' and Rosanne Cash's ''The Way We Make A Broken Heart.
 
Hiatt remains one of the most respected and influential American singer-songwriters. Hiatt was working as a songwriter for Tree International, a record label in Nashville, when his song ''Sure As I'm Sittin' Here'' was covered by Three Dog Night. The song became a Top 40 , earning Hiatt a recording contract with Epic Records. Since then he has released 21 studio albums, two Compilation albums. His songs have been covered by a variety of artists in multiple genres, including Bob Dylan, The Searches, Delbert Clinton, Willy DeVille, Ry Cooder, Linda Ronstadt, Bonny Raitt, Eric Clapton, B.B. Kind, Joe Bonamassa, Willie Nelson. Joan Baez, Paula Abdul, Buddy Guy, Jimmy Buffett, Mandy Moore, Iggy Pop, Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Dave Edmunds, Nick Lowe, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Suzy Bogguss, Jewel, Aaron Neville, Jeff Healey, Keith Urban, Joe Cocker, Chaka Khan, Pauline and many others. The Dutch singer/songwriter Ilse DeLange recorded the album ''Dear John'' with nine of his songs.
 
AUGUST 1952
 
Peacock Records of Houston buy out the Duke label. Initially, Duke's James Mattis is a  minority shareholder together with Peacock's Don Robey and Irving Marcus. Peacock  primarily wants Duke for Johnny Ace, whose, "My Song" enters the Rhythm and Blues charts.
 
Chess Records re-release Harmonica Frank's "Swamp Root". This time around it is  promoted as an rhythm and blues release, although Billboard notes that Pop disc jockeys  might spin it for laughs.
 
Unknown dates, studio session with Doctor Ross at the Memphis Recording Service in  Memphis, Tennessee.
 
An article in the rhythm and blues magazine reads: ''The Rosco Gordon-Glovers package was so successful on its recently concluded tour that they have arranged a new one that will start on the West Coast on September 1 ...''. 
 
AUGUST 1952
 
Memphian builder, Kemmons Wilson, opened his first Holiday Inn on Summer Avenue in  Memphis. A builder who had once been the country's top Wurlitzer jukebox distributor,  Wilson decided to built the sort of dependable family motels he'd always wished for when  the Wilsons were on vacation. Like WHBQ's Lawhead, Wilson found his inspiration in the  movies, naming his revolutionary chain of giant motels after the 1942 film starring Bing  Crosby and Fred Astaire.
 
The Holiday Inn had a commitment to provide comfortable, dependable accommodations, cheerful decor, and, above all, affordable prices, $4 for a single, $6 for a double, children, however many, free. Within months Wilson opened his second motel, on Third Street downtown, and had just announced his plans to open two more, covering all four corners of the city, with a blueprint for a national franchising campaign by the time the fourth Memphis Holiday Inn was built in 1953.
 
AUGUST 23, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Johnnie Ace and His Orchestra performs 10:00 til 2:00 at the Hippodrome, 500 Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee. Admission: advance $1.00 at door $ 1.35. 
 
Roy Rogers and Dale Evans' daughter, Robin Rogers, dies from the mumps just one day before her second birthday.
 
Kitty Wells becomes the first woman to reach number 1 on the Billboard country chart with ''It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels''.
 
AUGUST 24, 1952
 
Vocalist/bass player John Cowan is born in Evansville, Indiana. He becomes the lead singer for progressive acoustic act New Grass Revival in 1973 and contributes to recordings by Garth Brooks, Wynonna and Travis Tritt
 
AUGUST 29, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Songwriter Don Schlitz is born in Durham, North Carolina. His hits include ''The Gambler'', ''Forever And Ever'', ''Amen'', ''On The Other Hand'', ''Strong Enough To Bend'', ''When You Say Nothing At All'' and ''I Feel Lucky'', among many others.
 
Don Schlitz, country and western songwriter (including "The Gambler" and "The Greatest" for Liberty and Capitol Records Nashville recording artist Kenny Rogers and the Broadway musical "The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer"), is born in Durham, North Carolina.
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Session Published for Historical Reasons
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR B.B. KING
FOR RPM RECORDS
 
YMCA BUILDING, 254 SOUTH LAUDERDALE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SEPTEMBER 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR JOE BIHARI
 
Another King single was recorded, the up-tempo side of which is featured here and contains some glorious rolling piano of Ike Turner, but still no guitar?
 
01 - ''BOOGIE WOOGIE WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Jules Taub-B.B. King
Publisher:
Matrix number: - MM 1925
Recorded: - Unknown Date September 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm RPM 374 mono
BOOGIE WIIGIE WOMAN / STORY FROM MY HEART AND SOUL 
Reissued:   - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-12 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957
 
 Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
B.B. King - Vocal & Guitar
Possibly Bill Harvey - Tenor Saxophone
Possibly George Coleman - Alto Saxophone
Possibly Floyd Jones - Trumpet
Possible Ike Turner - Piano
Possibly Richard ''Tuff'' Green - Bass
Possibly Ted Curry - Drums
 
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Session Published for Historical Reasons
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY ACE & EARL FOREST
FOR FLAIR RECORDS
 
YMCA BUILDING, 254 SOUTH LAUDERDALE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SEPTEMBER 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR JOE BIHARI
 
It is also likely that the Flair 1015 single, which featured Johnny Ace and Earl Forest with a side apiece, was cut at this B.B. King session. Ace and Forest were the core of a loose group of musicians collectively called ''The Beale Streeters'' and both recorded virtually exclusively for Duke Records, so how and why they ended up on this Flair release is a bit of a mystery.
 
01 - ''MIDNIGHT HOURS JOURNEY''* - B.M.I. - 3:31
Composer: - Joe Josua
Publisher: - Flair Publishing
Matrix number: - FL 133
Recorded: Unknown Date September 1952
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Flair Records (S) 78rpm Flair 1015 mono
MIDNIGHT HOURS JOURNEY / TROUBLE AND ME
Reissued:   - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-2-9 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957
 
02 - ''TROUBLE AND ME''** - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Joe Josua
Publisher: - Flair Publishing
Matrix number: - FL 134
Recorded: - Unknown Date September 1952
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Flair Records (S) 78rpm Flair 1015 mono
TROUBLE AND ME / MIDNIGHT HOURS JOURNEY
Reissued:   - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-2-10 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Ace - Vocal * & Piano *
Earl Forest - Vocal ** & Drums
Possibly Ike Turner - Piano
Possibly George Coleman - Alto Saxophone *
Possibly Bill Harvey - Tenor Saxophone **
Unknown - Baritone Saxophone **
Unknown - Guitar *
Onzie Horne - Vibraphone *
Possibly Richard ''Tuff'' Green - Bass
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
SEPTEMBER 1952
 
Rosco Gordon is voted 8th most likely artist to come up with rhythm and blues hits by   Jukebox operators (ironically, it will be eight years before his next national rhythm and   blues hit). The Dominoes were number 1.
 
Sam Phillips records Walter Horton for Chess Records. The title "Little Walter's Boogie" is   deliberately misleading, as Checker have a huge hit on their hands with "Juke" by Little   Walter Jacobs. Horton's record is scheduled, but never shipped.
 
Sam Phillips records Tiny Kennedy for Trumpet Records.
 
Legendary film maker Charlie Chaplin is denied re-entry into the United States during September of 1952. Chaplin and his family had been traveling to London for the premiere of his movie “Limelight” when they were told they would not be allowed back into the country. Chaplin, along with many others in Hollywood, had faced harsh scrutiny from the House Un-American Activities Committee and Senator Joseph McCarthy during the height of the Cold War due to Chaplin’s perceived leftist political beliefs. Chaplin vowed to never return to the United States, but eventually visited again in 1972. 
 
SEPTEMBER 3, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Tennessee Ernie Ford and his wife of ten years, Betty Jean, have their second son, Brion Leonard Fabian Ford, in Monterey Park, California.
 
After multiple attempts to understand his unorthodox behavior, Woody Guthrie is finally diagnosed at Brooklyn State Hospital with Huntington's chorea, a rare genetic disease that wreaks havoc on the nervous system.
 
SEPTEMBER 4, 1952 THURSDAY
 
The rhythm and blues group Gladys Knights and The Pips is formed in Atlanta, George. Noted for such hits as ''Midnight Train To Me'' and ''You're The Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me'', Knight earns a Country Music Association nomination in 1994. 
 
SEPTEMBER 6, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Rosco Gordon's next single ''What You Got On Your Mind'' b/w ''Two Kinds Of Women'' (RPM 365) released.
 
Buddy Miller is born in Fairborn, Ohio. Married to Julie Miller, he rises as a noted singer and guitarist during the 1990s, working alongside Emmylou Harris and contributing to the Americana movement.
 
Jambalaya (On The Bayou)'' lifts Hank Williams to number 1 on the Billboard country chart.
 
SEPTEMBER 8, 1952 MONDAY
 
Hank Williams sells a Williamson County farm, one year after its original purchase.
 
Capitol Records released Skeets McDonald's ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes''.
 
SEPTEMBER 11, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Having left New Orleans and the Swingtime label the year before, Ray Charles signs a recording contract with Atlantic Records, where he becomes a major star. Charles goes on to bridge the gap between pop and country with ''Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music''.
 
The daily CBS variety program ''The Steve Allen Show'' is telecast for the final time. Allen wrote the Margaret Whiting and Jimmy Wakely country hit ''Let's Go To Church (Next Sunday Morning)''.
 
SEPTEMBER 12, 1952 FRIDAY
 
MGM released a double-sided Hank Williams hit, ''Settin' The Woods On Fire'' and ''You Win Again''.
 
Columbia released the new single of Carl Smith, ''Our Honeymoon''
 
SEPTEMBER 13, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Don Fagenson is born in Detroit. Under the name Don Was, he becomes a significant pop record producer, and also produces tracks for Travis Tritt and Garth Brooks, plus the album ''Rhythm Country And Blues''.
 
Webb Pierce makes his first appearance on the Grand Ole Opry, where he performs ''Back Street Affair''.
 
SEPTEMBER 15, 1952 MONDAY
 
Decca released Webb Pierce's ''Back Street Affair''.
 
Studio session for Walter Horton and Rosco Gordon at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
 STUDIO SESSION FOR WALTER HORTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
 
STUDIO SESSION: MONDAY SEPTEMBER 15, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
On this time, Little Walter (Jacobs) cracked the rhythm and blues charts with '''Juke'' and was firmly entrenched at number 1. It would, of course, have been absurd to have two Little Walters in the same field of music, never mind on the same label, and it was clear which horse the Chess brothers intended to back. Around the same time, October 1952, Phillips send dubs of Raymond Hill and Willie Nix to Chess, and both were refused. The relationship that had started so promisingly with ''Rocket 88'' eighteen months earlier was ending. The Chess brothers had plans to get Howlin' Wolf to Chicago, and were happy to see the back of Phillips' other artists. Horton didn't get another shot at leading a Chess session until 1964, but he was in Chess's Chicago studio as early as January 9, 1953, first with Gus Jenkins and then as Little Walter's replacement with Muddy Waters.
 
01(1) - "LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - 1041 - Take 1
Is significantly different from the other takes.
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - Chess 1529 was cancelled before release.
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm Chess 1529-A mono
LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE / WEST WINDS ARE BLOWING
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-9 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
01(2) - "LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-12 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
01(3) - "LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited - Tristan Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-16 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
An alternate take of the track originally earmarked for the other side of Chess 1529 (i.e. "West Winds Are Blowing") - and perhaps the title of this side gives a clue as to why Chess pulled the plug on this release, as they were having huge success with Little Walter Jacobs at the time. Mind you, they could easily have retitled this powerful instrumental (what would have been wrong with "Big Walter's Boogie"?) - but it seems that this coincided with their decision not to take any further product from Sam Phillips anyway. Instead they began to concentrate more on in-house productions, and Horton didn't get another chance with Chess Records until 1964.
 
02(1) - "WEST WINDS ARE BLOWING" - B.M.I. - 3:04
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-8 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
02(2) - "WEST WINDS ARE BLOWING" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - Chess 1529 was cancelled before release.
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm Chess 1529-B mono
WEST WINDS ARE BLOWING / LITTLE WALTER'S BOOGIE
Reissued:  - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-14 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
Why Chess shelved this and its projected flip is baffling, as musically it is extremely powerful, the combination of harp and lead guitar from Joe Hill Louis during the break being particularly effective. The instruments blend together perfectly, and the musicians play with an empathy which is notoriously difficult to capture in a studio setting. 
 
Chess scheduled a presently unidentified take of each of the above for issue on Chess 1529, but it was never released.
 
03 - "IN THE MOOD" - 1 - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Garland
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1996
First appearance: -  Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-15 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
Walter Horton and his friends were in the process of working up "We All Gotta Go Sometime", which began as a version of "She Left Me A Mule To Ride", which Sam Phillips in turn had named after the opening verse of "Grandmother Got, Grandfather Told". In fact, its Horton's version of John Lee "Sonny Boy" Williamson's "Shotgun Blues", which he also recorded as "Sonny Boy Jump". Still with us? As good as the first take is, someone must have suggested the musicians loosen up by playing "In The Mood". Everybody starts a bit tentatively, but Walter soon gets into his stride, riffing confidently until it was time to take a solo. During the next few choruses he works on ideas which would resurface some five months later, when he and Jimmy DeBerry recorded their version of Ivory Joe Hunter's "I Almost Lost My Mind" and someone gave it the misleading title of "Easy".
 
04 - "WE ALL GOTTA GO SOMETIME" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1952
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-17 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
Having had a couple of goes at "Grandmother Got, Grandfather Told", the next two takes - while retaining some of the same verses, including the previous title verse - show some variation in the melody line and a radical change in the lyrics. These now are lifted practically piecemeal from Big Bill Broonzy's "I Feel So Good", with  the chorus changed to "We all gotta go sometime". While the evidence is there on tape, one can only speculate as to who suggested the change and why Horton's version remained unissued but Joe Hill Louis' own recording of the song made op one side of SUN 178.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter Horton - Vocal (except - 1) and Harmonica
Jack Kelly - Piano
Joe Hill Louis - Guitar
Willie Nix - Drums
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

 STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR RPM RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: PROBABLY SEPTEMBER 15, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
01 – ''DREAM BABY (DREAM ON BABY)''' – B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1899
Recorded: - Probably September 15, 1952
Released: - November 1, 1952
First appearance: RPM Records (S) 78rpm RPM 369-A mono
DREAM BABY / TRYING
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-15 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS 
 
02 – ''TRYING'' – B.M.I. - 3:31
Composer: - B. Vaughn
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1898 - Alternate Take of RPM 369
Recorded: - Probably September 15, 1952
Released: - November 1, 1952
First appearance: RPM Records (S) 78rpm RPM 369-B mono
TRYING / DREAM BABY
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-16 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS 
 
03 – ''LUCILE (LOOKING FOR MY BABY)'' – B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Rosco Gordon-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1900
Recorded: - Probably September 15, 1952
Released: - November 15, 1952
First appearance: RPM Records (S) 78rpm RPM 373-A mono
LUCILE (LOOKING FOR MY BABY) / BLUES FOR MY BABY
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-17 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS 
 
04 – ''BLUES FOR MY BABY'' – B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Jules Traub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1901
Recorded: - Probably September 15, 1952
Released: - November 15, 1952
First appearance: RPM Records (S) 78rpm RPM 373-B mono
BLUES FOR MY BABY / LUCILE (LOOKING FOR MY BABY)
Reissued: - 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 694-18 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS 
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal & Piano
Probably The Beale Streeters:
Johnny Ace - Piano
Bobby Bland - Guitar
Billy Duncan - Saxophone
Earl Forrest - Drums
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
SEPTEMBER 16, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Bobby Randall is born in Midland, Michigan. He becomes guitarist for Sawyer Brown, performing on such hits as ''Step That Step'' and ''This Missin' You Heart Of Mine''. Randall leaves the band in February 1991.
 
Ray Price remakes ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes'' during a morning session at Nashville's Castle Studio.
 
SEPTEMBER 17, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Steve Sanders is born in Richland, Georgia. In 1987, he replaces William Lee Golden in The Oak Ridge Boys, taking the soulful lead on such singles as ''Gonna Take A Lot Of River'' and ''Beyond Those Years'' prior to Golden's return in 1995.
 
On his 29th, and final birthday, Hank Williams visits the Alamo, then plays San Antonio's The Barn, owned singer Charlie Walker. Future Texas Tornado Doug Sahm, age 11, sits on Williams' lap and plays ''Steel Guitar Rag''.
 
Sonny James recorded his first hit, ''That's Me Without You''.
 
SEPTEMBER 19, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Porter Wagoner holds his first RCA recording session at KWTO Radio in Springfield, Missouri, beginning with a cover of Hank Williams' ''Settin' The Woods On Fire''.
 
SEPTEMBER 20, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Hank Williams introduces ''Louisiana Hayride'' producer Horage Logan to Billie Jean Jones, the former girlfriend of Faron Young. Williams marries her four weeks later.
 
SEPTEMBER 21, 1952 SUNDAY
 
Kenneth Trebbe is born in Topeka, Kansas. Under the name Kenny Starr, he has a 1975 country hit with ''The Blind Man In The Bleachers''. The song is simultaneously a pop hit for David Geddes.
 
CBS viewers watch Roy Rogers, Dale Evans and ''Over The Rainbow'' songwriter Harold Arlen take bows from the audience on ''Toast Of The Town'' hosted live from New York by Ed Sullivan.
 
SEPTEMBER 22, 1952 MONDAY
 
Woody Guthrie is released from Brooklyn State Hospital in New York. During the previous four months, he was treated at three different hospitals for alcoholism but later diagnosed with a neurological ailments, Huntington's chorea.
 
The Louvin Brothers recorded ''Let Us Travel, Travel On'' in their first session for Capitol Records. The song is reprised by Marty Stuart and Del McCoury in the award-winning tribute album ''Livin', Lovin', Losin'': Songs Of The Louvin Brothers''.
 
SEPTEMBER 23, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Hank Williams recorded ''Take These Chains From My Heart'', ''Kaw-Liga'' and ''Your Cheatin' Heart'' during what proves to be his final recording session, at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel.
 
SEPTEMBER 24, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Hank Williams signs a three-year contract to return to The Louisiana Hayride for $200-a-week for Saturday night performances.
 
The Carlisles recorded ''No Help Wanted'' in Nashville.
 
SEPTEMBER 25, 1952 THURSDAY
 
The CBS series ''Music Hall'', hosted by Patti Page, airs for the last time after less than three months on the air.

Studio session with Tiny Kennedy at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee. While Lillian McMurry may have concentrated her early promotional efforts on Sonny Boy Williamson's  and Willie Love's records, it was after all because the initial tallies showed them to be the best-selling. And while it was true that she auditioned all comers at The Record Mart, she also frequently stepped out with her husband Willard or her brother Milton to the Alamo Theatre, just a few doors down in the 300 block of North Farish, in Jackson, Mississippi, where their neighbor and Alamo Lehman would invite them to enjoy bands and revues he booted. There, sitting in the back with Arthur and Willard, she first saw Tiny Kennedy sing with Tiny Bradshaw's Orchestra in October of 1951.

''Tiny was so big and fat, when he sang his fat just went up and down rockin' with him'', she remembers. ''We put him under contract and recorded him''. Painfully aware of the limitations of the cumbersome sonic process at Scott's, which required a new blank disc for every take, sometimes running to 120 takes per title, Lillian was already searching for a better alternative and decided to try the taping facilities at WHBQ in Memphis, Tennessee. She sent Kennedy and the band of Jackson's musicians including Elmore James there on October 22, 1951, but the session turned out poorly and she scrapped it and determined to try again. She planned to record Tiny during the historic Cedars of Lebanon session in Jackson that December. ''I sent Tiny a plane ticket'' she recalled, ''and had Mose Allison's band come up from Baton Rouge. Tiny didn't show up and spent the money''. The young Allison, then a student at Louisiana State University, had stopped by The Record Mart now and then to advertise his talents, and had gained Lillian's respect. She would have to pay Mose and his band for travel expenses and wait nearly a year before finally getting some good takes on blues belter Kennedy.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
Jesse Tiny Kennedy had already recorded for Capitol in 1949 with the great pianist Jay McShann. An all-out entertainer, he spent his career touring, doing blues, popular jazz numbers and comedy routines with slick bands like Bradshaw's, which was booked by the prestigious William Morris Agency in New York. Bradshaw's Orchestra recorded many sides for the King label in Cincinnati. In fact, Kennedy listed his home address as Cincinnati during the mid-fifties, although his original contract named 1006 King Street, Chattanooga as home.
 
Kennedy never actually recorded with Bradshaw, and seems to have been an elusive quarry for recordings in general. It remained for Sam Phillips to finally capture Tiny Kennedy for Trumpet in ''Finest Sonocoustic Sound'' at 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, with a mighty band of local musicians, several of whom were regulars at Phillips' blues sessions period. His Memphis Recording Service offered up-to-the-minute taping technology in a newly designed studio, along with a variety of services for hire, which paid the bills while he struggled to start his own Sun label. Lillian McMurry booked the session for September 25, 1952, somehow managed to convince Tiny show up, and let Sam provide the house band and do the engineering, as well as run dubs and acetate masters for eventual pressings. The results were memorable.
 
Kennedy's ability to ''rock the house'' with his gutsy vocals a perfect complement in the playing of Sun regulars Richard Sanders, Calvin Newborn, and Houston Stokes. This nucleus had achieved a level of communion that had them riding the cutting edge of rhythm and blues into the dawn of rock and roll with a fluid, ebullient sound that does indeed rock, roll, swing, drive, and alternately simmer and burst into flame throughout the session.
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR JESSE ''TINY'' KENNEDY
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR TRUMPET RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
TRUMPET SESSION: THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 25, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER
 
Tiny Kennedy was anything but diminutive, either in stature or vocal range. "Big and fat" was how Trumpet Records boss Lillian McMurry vividly described him, and she should know: Trumpet recorded the shouter in 1951 and again in 1952.
 
The vocalist born as Jesse Kennedy, Jr., on December 20, 1925 in Chattanooga, Tennessee had recorded with the great Kansas City pianist Jay McShann for Capitol in 1949 prior to joining Tiny Bradshaw's jumping band as one of its featured front men. After a session with Elmore James in 1951 didn't result in anything releasable, McMurry sent Kennedy up to Sam Phillips's fledgling Memphis Recording Service on the famous 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, in September of 1952.
 
Sam Phillips did some mastering and copying for other labels, but very little custom recording. He made an exception for Lillian McMurry at Trumpet Records in Jackson, Mississippi. McMurry had signed Tiny Kennedy but couldn't get the results she wanted at the WHBQ studio in Memphis.  After that, he'd failed to show up for a session in Jackson, so she must have booked time at Phillips' Memphis Recording Service with some trepidation. She'd signed Kennedy after seeing him at Jackson's Alamo Theater when he fronted Tiny Bradshaw's orchestra. Kennedy was a mountain of a man with a voice to match, and he was from Chattanooga, as this song attests.
 
Sam Phillips placed him with the cream of musicians on the session, which produced the fine "Strange Kind Of Feelin'," "Early In The Mornin', Baby" (with overdubbed crowing by "Elmer, the Disc Jockey Rooster"), and "Blues Disease," included guitarist Calvin Newborn and saxophonist Richard Sanders. After the session, McMurry lit upon the idea of dubbing a rooster onto the intro.
 
In nearby Hattiesburg, Chuck Thompson was the early morning man on WFOR, and he had a pet rooster, Elmer, who crowed on cue and was sufficiently well known for Minnie Pearl's ''Pickin' And Singin' News'' to do a little feature on him. Phillips added Elmer to the tape, and McMurry crudely collaged him to Kennedy's promo photo.
 
01(1) - ''EARLY IN THE MORNING, BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC 130
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 187-A mono
EARLY IN THE MORNING, BABY / STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-26 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
01(2) - ''EARLY IN THE MORNING, BABY'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Golbe Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (CD) 500/200rpm AA701-3 mono
THE ALLIGATOR TRUMPET SERIES - STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'
 
On ''Strange Kind Of Feelin''', the rhythm section of Wilbur Steinberg, Calvin Newborn, Ford Nelson, and Houston Stokes propels this jumping blues. Add three saxophonists and an obese vocalist, and 706 Union must have been very full that day, so full that Phillips might have been the saxes or Kennedy out in the lobby. Lillian McMurry told researcher Marc Ryan that she grew tired of trying to nail down Tiny for sessions, and let him have his release. Three years later up in New York, Kennedy recorded ''Strange Kinda Feelin'' once again, this time for RCA's Groove imprint. For neither label was ''Strange Kinda Feeling'' a hit.
 
02(1) - ''STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Robbins Music
Matrix number: - DRC 131
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 187-B mono
STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN' / EARLY IN THE MORNING, BABY
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-27 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
The alternate take of ''Strange Kind Of Feelin''' heard here, previously unreleased, was at first chosen for issue on Trumpet 187 by the McMurry's, who then changed their minds in favor of the other take at the last minute.
 
02(2) - ''STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (CD) 500/200rpm AA-701-1 mono
THE ALLIGATOR TRUMPET SERIES - STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'
Reissued: - 1990 Trumpet (CD) 500/200rpm Trumpet AA-701 mono
STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'
 
Sam Phillips' multitracks the backing vocals for an unusual effect at the intro of Kennedy's second Trumpet single, ''Blues Disease''. On some level, the song is fairly mundane, but the rhythm section, accented by a very busy Calvin Newborn on guitar, is so tight and slick, it redeems the record.
 
03 - "BLUES DISEASE" - B.M.I - 2:29
Composer: - Tiny Kennedy
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC-132
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 188-A mono
BLUES DISEASE / DON'T LAY THIS JOB ON ME
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-28 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
Thieving clergymen had been a staple of black vaudeville from the get-go, and Kennedy draws on that long tradition with a narration inexplicably titled ''Don't Lay This Job On Me''. Specifically, Kennedy seems to be drawing on vaudevillian Bert Williams' ''Elder Eatmore'' narrations. The Money to build a new church has been purloined, and the threat of damnation hangs over everyone. Ford Nelson carries the accompaniment in an oddly inappropriate cocktail blues style. If this was an anomalous entry in the music recorded at 706 Union, it was a good one. It all comes down to Kennedy, and he pulls it off.
 
04 -  "DON'T LAY THIS JOB ON ME" - B.M.I - 3:06
Composer: - Tiny Kennedy
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC-133
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 188-B mono
DON'T LAY THIS JOB ON ME / BLUES DISEASE
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-29 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
On ''Don't Lay This Job On Me'' finds the group noodling along in an effete jazz style with pianistic by Al Nelson that suggest Erroll garner, while Tiny carries on with his mock sermon, a vaudeville tradition that dated back at least fifty years to the pioneering recordings of black ragtime comedians like Bert Williams, Shelton Brooks, and Ham Tree Harrington. 
 
05 - ''HONEYMOON WALTZ'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 157 - Trumpet Unissued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
 
06 - ''YOU CAN'T HAVE YOUR CAKE AND EAT'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 158 - Trumpet Unissued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
 
07 - ''HEART FOR SALE'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 159 - Trumpet Unissued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
 
08 - ''HAVE YOU HEARD ABOUT THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER'' - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Jesse Kennedy
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 25, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (CD) 500/200rpm AA-701-2 mono
THE ALLIGATOR TRUMPET SERIES - STRANGE KIND OF FEELIN'
Reissued: - July 2, 2013 Blue Paradise Records Internet iTunes MP3-8 mono
COMPILATION - BLUES ICON
 
The biting, bumping and grinding guitar solo by Calvin Newborn, the brother of the more famous Phineas Jr., in ''The Farmer's Daughter''does as much as Tiny's evocative lyrics to conjure up the image of the bucolic beauty.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jesse Tiny Kennedy - Vocal
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Alfordson ''Ford'' Nelson - Piano
Richard Sanders - Saxophone
Bill Fort - Saxophone
Robert Hamp - Saxophone
Wilburn Steinberg - Bass
Houston Stokes - Drums
Elmer, the disc jockey Rooster - Crowing (DRC 130)
 
A final Trumpet session for Kennedy, arranged by Lillian at the Nola Studios in New York City in June of 1953, failed to produce anything that she considered original enough to issue. Ultimately despairing in his ability to come through with fresh material, and unable to work closely with him due to the constant touring that kept him roaming up and down the East Coast most of the time, Lillian released Tiny from his contract in 1955 so he could sign with the New York-based RCA's  Groove subsidiary. For years afterward, Kennedy would pass through the south once a year on tour with the Harlem Revue, and would call Lillian and Willard whenever he sang at the State Fair in Jackson, Mississippi. Sometime during the 1960s, he stopped calling, and to this day, his fate is unknown. ''We never did get a sensible explanation about the time he didn't show up here, for this session'' remembered Lillian. ''Tiny was like a child in a lot of ways, you know. He couldn't seem to understand some things, but he dang sure could sing the blues''. 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

LILLIAN SHEDD MCMURRY - was an American record producer, influential in the development of blues  music. Lillian Shedd was born on December 30, 1921 in Purvis, Mississippi, and married furniture-store  owner Willard McMurry in 1945, settling in Jackson, Mississippi. In 1949, she was helping her husband  clear out a shop he had bought when she came upon a pile of old shellac 78rpm phonograph discs, including  Wynonie Harris' recording of "All She Wants to Do Is Rock". Curious, McMurry played it on the store's record player and became so inspired that, as well as selling the stock she had discovered, she also decided to  record more music like it.

By her own account, until that point she, as a white woman, had been completely  unaware of the music being made on her doorstep by her African-American neighbours.

She formed Trumpet Records in Jackson in 1950. The first releases were of gospel music, but she soon  auditioned and recorded both slide guitarist Elmore James, on his original recording of "Dust My Broom",  and "Sonny Boy Williamson" (Aleck "Rice" Miller). Initially, McMurry apparently thought that  "Williamson" was the original musician of that name. Many of the sides he first recorded for Trumpet, such  as "Eyesight To The Blind" and "Nine Below Zero", later became blues standards.
 
Rising debts caused Trumpet to fold in 1955, and McMurry went back to working in her husband's shop. In  1998, she was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame, one of the few record producers to be granted that  honour.
 
Lillian McMurry pioneering work was recognized in 1998 when she was inducted into the Blues Hall of  Fame; sadly, McMurry died of a massive heart attack on March 18 of the following year. She was 77 years  old.
 
On November 17, 2007, Lillian Shedd McMurry and Willard McMurry were honored with a historical  marker on their former recording studio in Jackson, Mississippi. Her daughter, Vitrice, her son-in-law, and  her granddaughter attended along with Dr. Woody Sistrunk. The McMurry family was awarded a plaque to  go along with the historical marker
 
CHUCK THOMPSON & ELMER – Was America's most unusual WFOR disc jockey team. Chuck  Thompson and his partner, Elmer, (a rooster), who perform for WFOR when Chuck's neighbor dared him to  take a bantam rooster on his early morning show. Since they have performed over 500 shows together,  Chuck translates Elmer's crowing, and Elmer, translations Thompson served WMGY and WJJJ,  Montgomery, Alabama, after being graduated from Alabama, and hit WELO, Tupelo, Mississippi, en route  here. Elmer earns his feed from the feed folks, Chuck has to buy his.

 

SEPTEMBER 27, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Virginia Hensley debuts as a singer with Bill Peer and His Melody Boys at the Brunswick Moose Hall in  Winchester, Virginia. He becomes her manager and gives Patsy Cline her new first name.
 
Sue Thompson makes her debut on the Grand Ole Opry.
 
SEPTEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY
 
Dulcimer player David Schnaufer is born in Hearne, Texas. He appears on Kathy Mattea's 1988 hit ''Life As  We Knew It'' plus Alison Kraus ''You Will Be My Ain True Love'' from the movie ''Cold Mountain''.
 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1952 MONDAY
 
Gene Autry is an undercover agent in the Old West with the on-screen debut of ''Wagon Team'', co-starring  Pat Buttram. Autry re-visits his signature song, ''Back In The Saddle Again''.
 
Jean Shepard has her first recording session for Capitol Records at the label's recording studio on Melrose  Avenue in Hollywood.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR SHERMAN JOHNSON & HIS CLOUDS OF JOY
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR TRUMPET RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
TRUMPET SESSION: TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 30, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER
 
During the very brief period when Sam Phillips was doing custom work for Lillian McMurry's Trumpet Records, he was handed Sherman Johnson, an undistinguished shouter who took his band's name from Andy Kirk's ''Clouds Of Joy'' and his style from Wynomie Harris. As was the case with Tiny Kennedy, McMurry tried to record him elsewhere before paying Phillips to handle the session.
 
01(1) - ''PRETTY BABY BLUES'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Krazy Kat Records (LP) 33rpm Krazy Kat KK 7427 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - UNISSUED TITLES FROM THE 1950s
 
  01(2) - ''PRETTY BABY BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 134
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 189-A mono
PRETTY BABY BLUES / SUGAR MAMA
Reissued: - May 1994 Alligator Records (CD) 500/200rpm Alligator ALCD 2800 mono
SHOUT, BROTHER, SHOUT - 1950S R&B FROM THE LEGENDARY TRUMPET RECORDS LABEL
 
No more distinguished on his other Trumpet release, Sherman Johnson coupled a Korean War novelty song with the paint-by-numbers ''Pretty Baby Blues''. Newborn Sr's band swung professionally, and Richard Sanders rocked out on baritone sax, but they can't compensate for the ordinariness of Johnson's voice and song. Even with a strong local following as an rhythm and blues jock in Meridian, Johnson gave Lillian McMurry no incentive to schedule another session; if anything, he gave her incentive to sue him. In 1853, he pitched ''Saving My Love For You'' to Johnny Ace. Problems was that in October 1951, McMurry had recorded Johnson singing that song and she'd copyrighted it.
 
In November 1953, Ace's producer, Don Robey, wrote to McMurry to inform her that he had acquired all rights to the song, and that the earlier copyright was invalid. McMurry chose not to fight Robey or sue Johnson.
02 - ''SUGAR MAMA'' - B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Music Diam
Matrix number: - DRC 135
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 189-A mono
SUGAR MAMA / PRETTY BABY BLUES
Reissued: - May 1994 Alligator Records (CD) 500/200rpm Alligator ALCD 2800 mono
SHOUT, BROTHER, SHOUT - 1950S R&B FROM THE LEGENDARY TRUMPET RECORDS LABEL
 
 Was ''Hot Fish'' a double entendre blues? Almost certainly. It was based quite closely on a saucy old vaudeville number best known as ''Get 'Em From The Peanut Man'' and sung by Lil Johnson and Georgia White back in 1936. As Sherman Johnson was a disc jockey on WTOK in Meridian, Mississippi, McMurry might have thought she could move sufficient copies in south Mississippi to pay for the session. She might have been wrong. Johnson was clearly discouraged when he wrote to McMurry soon after the record was released, but she admonished him, saying, ''You are about the nicest guy and we do appreciate your attitude, but I feel like spanking you because you seem to have given up''.
 
03 - ''HOT FISH'' - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC 136
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 190-A mono
HOT FISH / LOST IN KOREA
Reissued: - May 1994 Alligator Records (CD) 500/200rpm Alligator ALCD 2800 mono
SHOUT, BROTHER, SHOUT - 1950S R&B FROM THE LEGENDARY TRUMPET RECORDS LABEL
 
04 - ''LOST IN KOREA'' - B.M.I. - 3:19
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC 137
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 190-B mono
LOST IN KOREA / HOT FISH
Reissued: - May 1994 Alligator Records (CD) 500/200rpm Alligator ALCD 2800 mono
SHOUT, BROTHER, SHOUT - 1950S R&B FROM THE LEGENDARY TRUMPET RECORDS LABEL
 
05 - ''BLUES JUMPED A RABBIT'' - B.M.I. - 23:59
Composer: - Sherman Johnson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 30, 1952
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Krazy Kat Records (LP) 33rpm Krazy Kat KK 7427 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - UNISSUED TITLES FROM THE 1950s
Reissued: - March 30, 2012 Vintage Masters (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE MOST UNDERRATED BLUES PLAYERS EVER
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sherman ''Blues'' Johnson - Vocal
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Phineas Newborn, Jr. - Piano
Richard Sanders - Saxophone
Phineas Newborn, Sr. - Drums
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY ''TAG'' WILLIAMS
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR TRUMPET RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
 
TRUMPET SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE OCTOBER 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER
 
Billy ''Tag'' Williams sang around Texarkana, Arkansas, and was represented by agent Lynn Farr, who had approached Trumpet with aspirations for a record deal. Williams had been the vocalist on Sammy Kaye's hit recording of ''The Old Lamplighter''. But whereas his smooth vocalizing worked well in a big-band context, it lacked character. This was glaringly obvious when he assayed country material. Although a fine honky-tonk band was enlisted for session, there was really nothing that could offset the bland, correct, and emotionally barren singing on ''Island Of Heartaches'', ''One-Sided Love'' and ''Sweetheart, I Wouldn't Change a Thing''. There was no excitement, no commitment, nothing challenging about the choice of tunes - although a beautiful piano accompaniment distinguished ''By And By''. Tag Williams's work affirmed everything predictable about country music and the lives of its audience, but in contrast to Jimmie Rodgers or Hank Williams, ''Tag'' was unable to offer any new insights into old predicaments or to hold out any fresh hopes or challenging responses. This ''same old'' aspect was just what Mrs. Lillian McMurry was trying to avoid, but she went ahead and released the tunes, apparently hoping that such merely serviceable stuff would find its niche.
 
01 - "ISLAND OF HEARTACHES" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Lynn Farr-H. Blair
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC-140
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 192-A mono
ISLAND OF HEARTACHES / BY AND BY
 
02 - "BY AND BY" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Lynn Farr-H. Blair
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC-141
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1952
Released: - December 1952
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 192-B mono
BY AND BY / ISLAND OF HEARTACHES
Reissued: - January 6, 2010 Goldenlane Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - MISSISSIPPI HILLBILLY
 
03 - "SWEETHEART I WOULDN'T CHANCE A THING" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Lynn Farr
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC-142
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 193-A mono
SWEETHEART I WOULDN'T CHANCE A THING / ONE-SIDED LOVE
Reissued: - January 6, 2010 Goldenlane Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - MISSISSIPPI HILLBILLY
 
04 - "ONE-SIDE LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Lynn Farr
Publisher: - Globe Music
Matrix number: - DRC-143
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1952
Released: - April 1953
First appearance: - Trumpet Records (S) 78rpm standard single Trumpet 193-B mono
ONE-SIDED LOVE / SWEETHEART I WOULDN'T CHANCE A THING
Reissued: - January 6, 2010 Goldenlane Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - MISSISSIPPI HILLBILLY
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy ''Tag'' Williams - Vocal
More Details Unknown
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR WILLIE NIX
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
 
SUN SESSION: OCTOBER 2, 8, 9, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER
 
Skinny as a rake and blessed with a loftiness that would do a high school basketball player proud, Willie Nix was one of the first musicians to be hired when The Memphis Recording Service opened for business in 1950. In the pre-Sun days, Sam Phillips hived-out Nix's recordings to RPM and Checker and then with the tag of "The Memphis Blues Boy" he came good for one in-house single with this personalised checklist of rolls and buns. Later sides appeared on Chance in Chicago.
 
01 - "SEEMS LIKE A MILLION YEARS" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Willie Nix-Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 59 - Master
Recorded: - October 8, 1952
Released: - January 30, 1953
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78rpm standard single SUN 179 mono
SEEMS LIKE A MILLION YEARS / BAKER SHO BOOGIE
Reissued:  - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-1-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1
 
''Seems Like A Million Years'', a  sad theme is explored here, and receives appropriately serious treatment from the cascading piano work of Albert Williams to Joe Willie Wilkins' taught guitar- playing. Nix's vocal is measured, and his drumming simply follows the rhythmic line.
 
02(1) - "BAKER SHOP BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Willie Nix-Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 60 - Master
Recorded: - October 2, 1952
Released: - January 30, 1953
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78rpm standard single SUN 179 mono
BAKER SHOP BOOGIE / SEEMS LIKE A MILLION YEARS
Reissued:  - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-1-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1
 
This stomping boogie surely earns Nix the title of Jelly Roll King as he lauds the Lady's backing technique, and even her oven! Mucho sexual unnuendo indeed, and the tongue-in-cheek vocal is boosted by James Cotton's meaty harp solo. As limited as Nix was as a vocalist and as insufferable as he was personally, ''Baker Shop Boogie'' rocks out. This wasn't the first baker-sex analog, and it's not as well known as Lonnie Johnson's ''Here A Jelly Roll baker'' or even Blind Lemon Jefferson's ''Baker Shop Blues'', but it's irresistible nonetheless.
 
02(2) - "BAKER SHOP BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Willie Nix-Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 9, 1952
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30114-A-4 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 7 – SUN BLUES
Reissued: - June 18, 2012 JSP Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - JUKE JOINTS 3 - VOLUME 2
 
 Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Willie Nix - Vocal and Drums
Joe Willie Wilkins - Guitar
Albert "Joiner" Williams - Piano
James "Jimmy" Cotton - Harmonica
 
Like Joe Hill Louis, Willie Nix was a local musician who worked sessions for Sam Phillips as well as seeing releases on Sun and Modern. A drummer and sometime guitarist, Nix had a radio show in West Memphis, Arkansas with Joe Willie Wilkins who plays guitar on this session. Albert Williams piano and Jimmy Cotton, harmonica complete the combo on this fine amalgam of cottonfield and city influences.
 
Sexual metaphor is no stranger to the blues. The joys of sex, indeed of anatomical detail, have been rhapsodized in terms of a host of metaphors, ranging from fast cars to musical instruments. Here, Nix's woman is a baker whose oven and sweet jelly roll(s) are a source of such joy to him that he was immortalized her charms in a boogie. The March 28, 1953 issue of Billboard' failed to appreciate his devotion, claiming "The material is ordinary, but Nix sings it out".
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
OCTOBER 1952
 
Joe Bihari arrives in Memphis to see Ike Turner, and to arrange further sessions for Modern Records. 
 
Sam Phillips pitches another Willie Nix acetate to Chess Records, which is refused  (he later uses it in the re-launch of Sun Records). Chess also turn down a Raymond Hill  single, as do Trumpet Records, who currently have a massive hit in their hands with Elmore  James' "Dusty My Broom". 
 
Sam Phillips records Walter "Tang" Smith for Jim Buleit's Nashville-based J-B label.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR RAYMOND HILL
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
 
SUN SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 6, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
Raymond Hill quit Jackie Brenston's Delta Cats to launch his own group. In October 1952, he returned to Sun with yet another ''Rocket 88'' alumnus, guitarist Willie Kizart.
 
01 - "LONG GONE RAYMOND" - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Raymond Hill
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 6, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-18 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
By all accounts Raymond Hill began to record solo for Sam Phillips because he felt he wasn't getting his financial due from previous efforts with Ike Turner and Jackie Brenston. Here he honks his way tunefully through a straight ahead outling, ably supported by pianist Evan Bradshaw, and mercifully confirming that not all   sax-players of the era were obsessed with replicating hippo farts. 
 
Although this track was never released, Sam Phillips was sufficiently impressed with Hill's sax style to continue recording him over the next couple of years. In 1954 Raymond Hill finally saw a Sun release, "Bourbon Street Jump"/"The Snuggle" (SUN 204).
 
On this 1952 session, Hill and Kizart were joined by yet another of Ike's Kings of Rhythm, bassist John Edward Nash. It might have been Phillips who supplied two local Memphis musicians, pianist Bradshaw and drummer Houston Stokes. Bradshaw played the steady roll behind Hill. If Hill had something on his mind, when he concocted this tune, it was probably Jimmy Forrest's ''Night Train''.
 
02 - "MY BABY LEFT ME*" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Raymond Hill
Publisher: - Cop Cont - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None -  Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 6, 1952
Released: - 1976 
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126-A-1 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 11 - MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
Reissued:  - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-19 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
It is, of course, a well-worn cliché, but as a vocalist Raymond Hill makes a pretty good sax player. Here, alongside several of his confreres from the "Rocket 88" session, Raymond reworks Elmore James' riff. Willie Kizart's guitar is outstanding and the backing is rock solid, but there is no getting away from the shortcomings of Raymond's vocal - which is doubtless why it was not released at the time.
 
03(1) - "SOMEBODY'S BEEN CARRYIN' YOUR ROLLIN ON*" - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Raymond Hill
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 6, 1952
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30103-B-3 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 3 - DELTA RHYTHM KINGS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-20 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Two very distinct versions of ''Somebody's Been Carryin' Your Rollin' On'' were recorded. This (take 1) is the unadorned track, but at some point Phillips added echo and a vocal group to another take, making a polished master that went some way toward disguising Raymond's weak vocal. The other version (take 2), audibly dubbed from acetate, appeared on an early 1970s Redita Records collection, Memphis Blues at Sunshine''. 

Chess Records was sufficiently interested in the overdubbed version and another song that has disappeared from the vault, ''Hold Me Baby'' to assign master numbers, but the release was cancelled in the disagreement that set in between Chess and Phillips. Earlier, Sam Phillips had sent a dub of this song to Lillian McMurry at Trumpet, who's refused it.
 
03(2) - "SOMEBODY'S BEEN CARRYN' YOUR ROLLIN ON*" - 2 - B.M.I.
Composer: - Raymond Hill
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - F 1039 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Unknown Vocal Group
Recorded: - October 6, 1952
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Redita Records (S) 78rpm Redita 105 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES AT SUNSHINE
 
This (Take 1) slow blues takes on added depth of meaning if you suppose that the singer is the 'somebody': "Have you ever loved a woman/and she's always doing you wrong/well, I'm gonna tell you if you don't know...". Now it becomes one of those 'best friend' melodramas that so frequently square the eternal triangle. Hill's voice may be lacking in nuance but part of his limitation stems from his attempts to sing in the then-fashionable-laid-back style of West Coasters like Charles Brown and Amos Milburn. He gets the job done but lacks the extra commitment that Jackie Brenston could supply, seemingly with little effort.
 
04 - "SITTIN' ON TOP OF THE WORLD" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Raymond Hill
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 6, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - 1986 Krazy Kat Records (LP) 33rpm KK 7427 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - UNISSUED TITLES FROM THE 1950
Reissued:  1992 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-12 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
 
 05 - "HOLD ME BABY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Raymond Hill
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 6, 1952
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Redita Records (S) 78rpm Redita 105 mono
HOLD ME BABY / SOMEDODY'S BEEN CARRYIN' YOUR ROLLIN ON
 
06 - "YOU'VE CHANGED" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Raymond Hill
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 6, 1952
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126-A-2 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 11 - MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
 
07 - "I'M BACK PRETTY BABY*" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Raymond Hill
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 6, 1952
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30126-A-3 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 11 - MEMPHIS BLUES SOUNDS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-21 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
Like almost all of the tracks from this session, this relies upon Willie Kizart's bedrock boogie patterns, this time played in union with the bass. Evan Bradshaw's piano also gets to peep through the cracks at times, after supplying an opening solo. Hill's tenor solo is relaxed and rasping, making this perhaps the most successful and rounded performance from the session. Even so, this was his one and only outing as a budding vocalist.
 
Sam Phillips assigned a Chess master number F 1039 to ''Somebody's Been Carrying Your Rollin' On'' but Chess refused the title. Phillips subsequently pitched it to the Diamond Record Co. (Trumpet) but they also refused it.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Raymond Hill - Vocal (except - 1) and Tenor Saxophone
Evans Bradshaw - Piano
Willie Kizart - Guitar
John Ed Nash - Bass
Houston Stokes - Drums
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
OCTOBER 1952
 
Sam Phillips did some recordings for Trumpet Records' Lillian McMurry, the lady who had given the Bihari brothers such a hard time when they tried to steal her artists. And Sam sold a couple of hard blues sides that he had recorded on Joe Hill Louis earlier in the year of 1951, to 4-Star proprietor Bill McCall, who had put out the very first records ever to come out of the Memphis Recording Service. But clearly he no longer had enough of a ready market to sustain his recording activities. There was a brief flicker of hope when Leonard Chess announced the formation of a new sister label, Checker, in the spring, but than just a couple of months later Checker had an entirely unexpected instrumental hit by Muddy Waters' virtuosic harmonica player, Little Walter. ''Juke'', which topped the rhythm and blues charts for five weeks in the fall, not only smashed all previous Chess sales records, it pretty much put paid to any hopes Sam might have had of promoting his own harmonica virtuoso, Walter Horton, as brilliant in his way as his younger namesake, in whom both Leonard Chess and the Bihari brothers had shown some interest in the past.
 
What hurt most about this final break with Chess Records was losing Howlin' Wolf once and for all. Sam Phillips had one last session with Wolf on October 7, 1952, from Sam's perspective it was the least satisfying session yet, with Chess insisting on a fuller horn section and Sam complying by putting together an off-kilter trombone-saxophone combination, probably not the commercial direction that the label had in mind. From Sam's point of view Leonard Chess, like the Biharis, was more interested in ''excitement'' than in ''feel''. And while to the casual observer, or even to the passionate Wolf fanatic, the difference may have seemed slight, Sam clearly felt pressured (''I don't think they wanted to take the time to say, 'Hey man we're proud of this damn music''), and, in any case, there were to be no more sessions. For the next year and a half Leonard Chess did his best to get the Wolf to quit Memphis, and Wolf, who could be as obstinately principled as the next person, in fact, sometimes considerably more so, staunchly resisted.
 
There were no more Wolf singles until January 1953, when two sides were culled from the last session, and then, as if to say to Wolf, ''If you don't move to Chicago, you're through, 'nothing for the last eleven months of the year. Wolf got so fed up that he appears to have recorded some sides on his own, probably at the radio station, and then gone to Les Bihari, the oldest of the Bihari brothers, why by 1953 had moved to Memphis and, with his brothers' active participation, started a studio and a label, Meteor, of his own. According to this Bihari, neither the most stable personality nor the most reliable of sources, ''Howlin' Wolf came to me, and he says he's supposed to have a record released. I called Leonard and I told him I had Howlin' Wolf in the office, and if he wasn't going to record him and put it out, I was''. After being assured that Chess had no intention of letting Wolf go, Bihari evidently sent the tapes to the label, and just two or three months later, finally satisfied that the time was right, Wolf set out for Chicago, where he would remain until his death in 1976, an unrivaled exponent of the raw, wrenched-from-real-life feel that for Wolf, and for Sam Phillips, too, was at the heart of the blues.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR HOWLIN' WOLF
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
 
STUDIO SESSION: TUESDAY OCTOBER 7, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER
 
MOST OF THE REPERTOIRE ON THIS SESSION WAS DUBBED FROM
ACETATE OR DISC SOURCE
MANY OF THE ORIGINAL MASTER TAPES HAVE BEEN LOST
 
Howlin's Wolf last known appearance in Sam Phillips' studio. Phillips' log book noted that Wolf was to return and cut some more titles to fulfill his obligation, but there is no indication that he ever did. The tape box was marked "Wolf With Big Band" and the session featured an often ragged horn section.
 
01(1) - "OH RED"*/** - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-1 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1
 
This uptempo cut, was derived from a pre-War song by The Harlem Hamfats but Wolf may have recorded it in deference to local pianist and fellow Chess artist, Billy "Red" Love (Also known as Drop Top Red) who might be playing piano on the session.
 
01(2) - "OH RED"*/** - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Rounder Records (LP) 33rpm SS 28 mono
CADILLAC DADDY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-14 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2
 
01(3) - "OH RED" */** - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - 1037 - Take 3 - Master
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - Approx November 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single Chess 1528-A mono
OH RED / MY LAST AFFAIR
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-10 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2
 
02(1) - "MY LAST AFFAIR" - B.M.I. - 3:02
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-2 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1
 
02(2) - "MY LAST AFFAIR" - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - 1038 - Take 2 - Master
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - Approx November 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single Chess 1528-B mono
MY LAST AFFAIR / OH RED
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-11 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2
 
03(1) "COME BACK HOME"** - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-3 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1
 
03(2) - "COME BACK HOME" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-12 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2
 
''Come Back Home'' (take 3) is a standout. There is evidence that, this time around, Wolf and his sidemen had worked out an arrangement and agreed the tempo and material up front. The lovely countryish guitar figure that kicks off this track weaves its way under and around Wolf's vocal and provides continuity, not to mention a considerable hook. In fact, it is the single two bar guitar figure that one recalls even after the memory of Wolf's vocal has faded.
 
It's blues combo man Willie Johnson, who made his greatest mark as Howlin' Wolf's lead guitar player. 
 
03(3) - "COME BACK HOME" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - September 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30134 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS – HOWLIN' WOLF
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-15 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2
 
04 - "C.V. WINE BLUES"** - B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - October 7, 1952
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-A-4 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 2 – SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-9 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Howlin' Wolf - Vocal*, Vocal and Harmonica
Willie Johnson - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Willie Steele - Drums
William Johnson - Piano
Walter "Tang" Smith - Trombone**
Charles Taylor - Tenor Sax**
Billy Love - Piano
 
"Leonard Chess kept worryin' me to come to Chicago", Wolf recalled to David Booth. "They talked me the notion to give up my business and come. I turned my farming business over to my brother-in-law, my grandfather's farm that he left me. I moved to Chicago in 1952 or 1953. I had a four-thousand-dollar car and $3,900 in my pocket. I'm the onliest one drove out of the South like a gentlemen".
 
The first two sessions that Howlin' Wolf held in Chicago have sometimes been mistaken as Memphis sessions. They appear as such in Blues Records 1943-1970 (Leadbetter/Slaven). Chess obviously tried to re-create the Memphis sound but the results were considered unsuccessful. Few of the titles were assigned master numbers and only one single (Chess 1557) resulted. There were two or three re-makes of unreleased Memphis recordings, the most notable being "Just My Kind", a breakneck rework of "Color And Kind".
 
Almost a year passed between Wolf's last session at the Memphis Recording Service and the first sessions in Chicago (probably held in September 1953). As Sam Phillips had reactivated the Sun label during that period, there may have been some question whether Wolf was to remain on Chess or transferred to Sun together with Joe Hill Louis, Rufus Thomas and Walter Horton. Chess seems to have placed the matter beyond doubt by bringing him to Chicago or, as Wolf put it, "talking me the notion to come to Chicago".
 
"I left the other guys back in West Memphis and came up to Chicago by myself", he told writer Pete Welding. "They were afraid to take the chance. I went back down there a year later and picked up some of them (notably, of course, Hubert Sumlin), brought them back with me. But at first I was using guys that Chess Records furnished, the studio band that I recorded with, bassist Willie Dixon, guitarist Robert Jr. Lockwood and so on. After moving to Chicago I found it easy to get into those clubs, playing my music, 'cos the people had heard about me before I came. Right off I started playing at a place at 13th Street and Ashland. Muddy Waters had been playing there. Then I went to stretching out all across town".
 
In fact, there is no firm evidence that Leonard Chess put Howlin' Wolf into the Chicago studio until early 1954, since he had such a stockpile of Memphis-cut material to use up, like "Howlin' For My Baby", "Oh Red", and "All Night Boogie". in the meantime, though, in 1952, the Muddy Waters band had spawned the next great Chess star - Little Walter. "I never had anything to do with Little Walter", said Wolf, dismissively. "Cos he was always smoking dope and all that juve and I don't go for that... My reputation is too high to let someone drag it down with a weed. I'll take a drink of whiskey but I ain't fooling with no cigarettes".
 
 © - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
OCTOBER 1952
 
One Howlin' Wolf was in Chicago, the Chess brothers tried to create the sound that Sam  Phillips formulated, even to the point of rerecording some of unissued titles from Wolf's Memphis sessions. After a few missed cues, Wolf evolved a slightly modified sound in Chicago  and eventually brought Willie Johnson up to join him. He became one of the seminal figures  in postwar blues, which ensured that he spent his last years touring college campuses,  where he looked strangely out of place amid a sea of freshly scrubbed, young white faces.
 
After his death in January 1976, he received a tribute from Sam Phillips: ''He had no voice in  the sense of a pretty voice but he had command of every word he spoke.  When the beat got  going in the studio he would sit there and sing, hypnotizing himself. Wolf was one of those  raw people. Dedicated. Natural''. 
 
Sam Phillips never found a bluesman to equal Howlin' Wolf. He has said that he would never  have given up on him, that he would have recorded him until the day he died. Phillips has  even rated Wolf, above Elvis and all others, as his greatest discovery. And even without the  private video that Phillips can play in his mind of Wolf performing in his little studio, his enthusiasm is easy to understand. The bizarre, haunting images that populated Wolf's songs,  the quality of his voice, and his frightening energy were the marks of a true original. His  music ran the gamut, from purest evil to heartbreaking tenderness. There was an emotional  greatness to Howlin' Wolf, a greatness that Phillips was the first to capture.
 
OCTOBER 2, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Shelia Shipley is born in Scottsville, Kentucky. In 1993, she becomes the first woman named to head a major country label when MCA re-activates Decca.
 
OCTOBER 3, 1952 FRIDAY
 
''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet'' debuts on ABC-TV with 11-year-old Rocky Nelson in a regular role.
 
OCTOBER 4, 1952 SATURDAY
 
RCA released Porter wagoner's debut single, ''Settin' The Woods On Fire''.
 
OCTOBER 7, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Lefty Frizzell recorded ''I'm An Old, Old Man (Tryin' To Live While I Can)'' at the Jim Back Studio in Dallas, Texas.
 Red Foley recorded ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes''.
 
OCTOBER 8, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Goldie Hill recorded ''I Let The Stars Get In My Eyes'' in Nashville.
 
NBC debuts ''Scott Music Hall'', hosted by Patty Page, the singing rage.
 
OCTOBER 9, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Red Foley recorded ''Slaves Of A Hopeless Love Affair''.
 
OCTOBER 10, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Columbia released Marty Robbins' first charted single, ''I'll Go On Alone'', and an duet from Gene Autry with Rosemary Clooney, ''The Night Before Christmas Song''.
 
OCTOBER 12, 1952 SUNDAY
 
Faron Young recorded his first hit, ''Goin' Steady'', plus ''I Can't Wait (For The Sun To Go Down)'' at the Castle Studio in Nashville's Tulane Hotel.
 
OCTOBER 13, 1952 MONDAY
 
Decca released Bill Monroe's bluegrass classic ''In The Pines''. The recording is hailes among the 500 greatest country singles ever made in the Country Music Foundation's 2003 book ''Heartaches By The Number''.
 
Faron Young makes his first appearance on The Louisiana Hayride at the Municipal Auditorium in Shreveport.
 
After six months with no activity, there is an entry in the Sun check register for $8.16 in phone call(s) to Nashville. This could be the initial phone discussions with Jim Bulleitt that led to Phillips supplying masters to Bulleitt and Bulleitt eventually becoming a partner in Sun's early 1953 relaunch.
 
OCTOBER 14, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Hank Snow recorded ''Honeymoon On A Rocket Ship'' in the evening at Nashville's Brown Brothers Studio.
 
OCTOBER 15, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Hank Williams signs a document in Montgomery providing for Bobbie Jett and her child, sired by Williams. As an adult, the baby takes the stage name Jett Williams.
 
OCTOBER 18, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Drummer Keith Knudsen is born in Ames, Iowa. He goes on to become a member of rock music's Doobie Brothers and country music's Southern Pacific.
 
Hank Williams marries Billie Jean Jones Eshliman in Minden, Louisiana. On the way to Shreveport, their car runs out of gas.
 
OCTOBER 19, 1952 SUNDAY
 
Charlie Chase is born in Rogersville, Tennessee. Teamed with Lorianne Crook, he becomes a significant TV personality promoting country music, best known for the syndicated show ''Crook and Chase''.
 
Hank Williams and Billie Jean Jones repeat their wedding vows from the previous day in front of a New Orleans concert audience.
 
OCTOBER 20, 1952 MONDAY
 
Decca released Red Foley's ''Midnight''.
 
''South Pacific Trail'' appears in movie theaters, with Rex Allen, Slim Pickens and The Republic Rhythm Riders, including Woodwind player Darol Rice.
 
Capitol released Sonny James' first hit, ''That's Me Without You''.
 
OCTOBER 21, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Keyboard player Brent Mydland is born in Munich, Germany. He joins the rock band The Grateful Dead in 1979. The group will be referenced in the 1996 Lonestar country hit ''No News''.
 
OCTOBER 22, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Rhythm and blues singer Carl Carlton is born in Detroit, Michigan. He earns a 1974 hit with the Nashville-originated ''Everlasting Love'', which becomes a country hit five years later for Narvel Felts.
 
OCTOBER 24, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Mark Gray is born in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Briefly a member of Exile, he pens Janie Fricke's ''It Ain't Easy Being Easy''' and Alabama's ''Take Me Down'' and ''The Closer You Get''. Gray also recorded three 1984 solo hits and a duet with Tammy Wynette, ''Sometimes When We Tough''.
 
OCTOBER 27, 1952 MONDAY
 
Willie Nelson marries Jewel Matthews in Cleburne, Texas.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
 Sam Phillips sent Jim Bullet in Nashville some mellow T-Bone Walkerish sides that he had cut of Walter ''Tang'' Smith, the trombonist who had played on Howlin' Wolf's recent band session on October 7. When Bulleit bought the sides for $250, Sam sent him some more, including a couple of raw ''cottonpatch'' blues by Charles Thomas from the August 12 session, whom Sam touted as possessing a style he said, ''a lot like Johnnie Lee Hooker's but I actually think he does a better vocal than Hooker''. Bulleit deferred a decision on the Charles Thomas sides, even after Sam lowered his price, but scheduled the ''Tang'' Smith for release and at the same time brought up the idea of a potential partnership.
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR WALTER ''TANG'' SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR J-B RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 27, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
The partnership would necessarily depend upon the participation of Sam's wealthy radio patron, Clarence Camp, and, on the basis of Sam's notable success with ''Rocket 88'' and ''Booted'' in particular, would put Sam in charge of recording, Bulleit in charge of sales and promotion. As they went back and forth on the matter, it soon became evident that Bulleit saw Camp as providing him with a way to cut some of his debts, with the new partnership reimbursing him at least in part for the investment he had already made in his company and the back catalogue he would bring to the new label. Once Sam made it clear that he was not in full agreement with this plan, Bulleit's demands came down to no more than a couple of thousand dollars, and then when it turned out Clarence Camp would not be returning to Memphis from his Florida vacation until late spring and had indicated to Sam that he would be unable to consider the matter until then, for some inexplicable reason, perhaps because as an instinctive venture capitalist all he needed to get in was the sense that he already was in, Jim Bulleit proposed that they go full speed ahead. So long as it was understood that he would continue with his own label, J-B Records, and his own little distribution business.
 
There must have been very little room to breathe at 706 Union when they recorded this agreeable tracks in October 1952.
 
01 - "EVERY MONDAY MORNING" - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Walter "Tang" Smith
Publisher: - Delta Music
Matrix number: - Nash 14
Recorded: - October 27, 1952
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - J-B Records (S) 78rpm J-B 606 mono
EVERY MONDAY MORNING / HI-TONE MAMA
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-25 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
Walter sounds more like a pussy on ''Every Monday Morning'' than a poontang persuader here, as he bemoans the departure of his latest "baby". Pull yourself together, man! Briscoe seems to be affected by the self-pity, and delivers a rather pedestrian solo to an accompaniment that approximates a Rosco Gordon louche lope. Walter then works himself into a medium lather, singing a final verse that puts an interesting spin on the "brooks run into the river/river runs into the say" theme.
 
02 - "HI-TONE MAMA" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Walter "Tang" Smith
Publisher: - Delta Music
Matrix number: - Nash 15
Recorded: - October 27, 1952
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - J-B Records (S) 78rpm J-B 606 mono
HI-TONE MAMA / EVERY MONDAY MORNING
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-24 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
There must have been precious little free space in the studio when they cut this agreeable track, which features a rolling piano and a full horn section riffing behind Smith's vocal. There is a double-length instrumental break led by a very aggressive Jewel Briscoe on tenor sax, in which he unlesshes his arsenal of honks and double-honks during the second instrumental chorus.
 
This both sides first appeared as a 78rpm on Jim Bulleit's J-B label whilst Bulleit and Phillips were in the process of consummating the deal which saw the former investing in the relaunch of Sun Records, in January 1953.  For the unitiated, Walter Smith's middle-name "Tang" is an abbreviation of "poontang", which was in turn of local colloquialism for "pussy".
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter "Tang" Smith - Vocal
Unknown - Trumpet
Jewell Briscoe - Tenor Saxophone
James Luper - Tenor Saxophone
Charles ''Chas'' Chinn - Saxophone
Harry Gibson - Piano
Unknown - Bass
L.T. Lewis – Drums
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
OCTOBER 28, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Billie Jean Eshliman's divorce from Harrison Eshliman is finalized, 10 days after she married Hank Williams.
 
Not quite one year after the death of his first wife, Red Foley marries TV personality Sally Sweet in Luka, Mississippi.
 
OCTOBER 31, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Hank Williams checks into a Shreveport hospital with acute intoxication.
NOVEMBER 1952
 
In a flurry of Rosco Gordon releases, Duke Records release their third single, "Too Many   Women"/"Wise To You Baby", recorded by Sam Phillips studio - and RPM Records counter with   two singles within a week.
 
Sam Phillips records a Joe Hill Louis session, which will be used in   Sun's re-launch.
 
Sam Phillips and Jim Bulleit are in discussion about setting up a new distribution network   to facilitate Sun's re-launch.
 
General Dwight D. Eisenhower is elected President of the United States in a landslide   victory over Democratic candidate Adlai Stevenson.
 
NOVEMBER 1, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Rosco Gordon's ''Dream Baby'' b/w ''Trying'' (RPM 369) released. ''Trying'' was a bizarre cover of The Hilltoppers' big pop hit.
 
Chuck Berry, the future author of ''Brown Eyed Handsome Man'', has his second daughter, Melody Berry, in St. Louis, Missouri.
 
Dixie Lee, the wife of pop singer Bing Crosby, dies of ovarian cancer in Los Angeles' exclusive Holmby Hills neighborhood. The previous decade, Crosby netted a country hit with ''Pistol Packin' Mama'', a duet with the Andrews Sisters.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR BOBBY BLUE BLAND
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1952 FOR DUKE RECORDS
 
PROBABLY SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: SUNDAY NOVEMBER 2, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
01 - ''NO BLOW NO SHOW'' - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - David James Mattis
Publisher: - Lion Music Publisher
Matrix number: - ACA 2286
Recorded: - November 2, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Duke Records (S) 78rpm Duke 115 mono
NO BLOW NO SHOW / ARMY BLUES
Reissued:  - 2010 Jasmine Records (CD) 500/200rpm JASCD 564-9 mono
BOBBY BLAND - IT'S MY LIFE, BABY
 
02 - ''ARMY BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - David James Mattis
Publisher: - Lion Music Publisher
Matrix number: - ACA 2335
Recorded: - November 2, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Duke Records (S) 78rpm Duke 115 mono
ARMY BLUES / NO BLOW NO SHOW
Reissued: - 2010 Jasmine Records (CD) 500/200rpm JASCD 564-9 mono
BOBBY BLAND - IT'S MY LIFE, BABY
 
03 - ''WISE MAN BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - David James Mattis-Don Robey
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 2, 1952
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Jasmine Records (CD) 500/200rpm JASCD 564-9 mono
BOBBY BLAND - IT'S MY LIFE, BABY
 
Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Bobby Bland – Vocal
Johnny Board – Tenor Saxophone
Unknown – Alt Saxophone
Johnny Ace – Organ
Unknown – Guitar, Bass, Drums
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
NOVEMBER 1952
 
Gailey D. Hadley, known as "Red", came to Sam Phillips' attention in 1952. An enthusiastic  singer and honky tonk style piano player from Covington, Tennessee. Red Hadley was at  one time scheduled by Sam to be the first country singer on Sun Records. He approached  Sam Phillips toward the end of that year with several songs forged in then-popular country  styles.
 
Sam Phillips was impressed enough to schedule two sessions, on November 13, and  December 5, 1952. The Sun label had lain dormant for several months and Sam Phillips  spoke to Red of resurrecting it with Red's songs. He also spoke of licensing the songs to  another label, and it seems that in the end Sam decided to try the latter course.
 
He restarted  Sun with three blues records, and he sent Red's country recordings to Lillian  McMurry at Trumpet Records in Jackson, Mississippi. Unfortunately they were not issued.
 
NOVEMBER 3, 1952 MONDAY
 
On the eve of the American presidential election, Roy Acuff leads a campaign rally for the Dwight Eisenhower/Richard Nixon Republican ticket at the Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville.
 
Roy Acuff and Eddy Arnold host the first live telecast from Nashville's Ryman Auditorium. The half-hour ''Celebrities For Eisenhower'', financed by the Republican party, airs in five Southern states.
 
Webb Pierce marries for the second time, to Audrey Grisham, in Shreveport, Louisiana.
 
Danny and Annie Lou Dill have a daughter, Ava Tyanne Dill. The couple works regularly as an opening act for Ernest Tubb at the time, although Danny Dill goes on to write such hits as ''Detroit City'' and ''The Long Black Veil''.
 
Decca released Red Foley's version of ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes''
 
Capitol released Hank Thompson's ''The New Wears Off To Fast''.
 
NOVEMBER 4, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Dwight Eisenhower defeats Adlai Stevenson for President while singer-songwriter Stuart Hamblen, running on the Prohibition ticket, finished fourth. Because of Stevenson's loss, Ernest Tubb loses $200 in a bet with Eddy Arnold.
 
Ferlin Husky recorded ''Gone'' under the pseudonym Terry Preston. He recorded the actual hit version of the song under his own name four years later.
 
Pop singer Perry Como recorded a remake of Skeets McDonald's country hit ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes''.
 
NOVEMBER 8, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Following two years with Capitol, Carl Butler signs a recording contract with Columbia.
 
NOVEMBER 9, 1952 SUNDAY
 
One day after signing a new contract with Columbia, Carl Butler holds his first recording session for the label.
 
NOVEMBER 10, 1952 MONDAY
 
Steel player Pat Severs is born in Camden, South Carolina. As a member of Pirates Of The Mississippi, he plays on the 1991 hit ''Feed Jake''.
 
NOVEMBER 11, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Guitarist Biff Watson is born. He becomes a prominent Nashville session musician, playing on hits by Alabama, Shania Twai, Reba McEntire, George Strait, Carrie Underwood and Martina McBride, among others.
 
NOVEMBER 12, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Musician Mark Johnson, known for his work in Bill Anderson's Po' Folks band, is born in Montgomery, Alabama.
 
NOVEMBER 1952
 
Sam Phillips maintained his connection with Lillian McMurry's Trumpet Records the next weeks. Sam continued to recorded tracks on performers who just happened to wander in.. ''He'd just listen to anything they wanted to play'', said Marion Keisker. At the beginning of November and December, Sam recorded some sides on a hillbilly piano player from Covington, Tennessee, named Red Hadley, who had a little band that Sam thought might have some potential. He brought in black drummer Houston Stokes, who played on many of his blues sessions, to add a little oomph to the sound, cutting two instrumentals on Red and a Lefty Frizzell ''answer song'' with a hard Hank Williams edge. He cut some nice sides on Joe Hill Louis and Walter Horton and even talked with Leonard Chess about the possibility of establishing a new basis for a business relationship. And on the recommendation of Buster Williams he sent out dubs to Jim Bulleit, the legendary record man whom Sam had first met at WSM when he was looking for a job at the Opry, who had only recently returned to Nashville and started up a new label of his own.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR RED HADLEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR TRUMPET RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: THURSDAY NOVEMBER 13, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER
 
"In the early part of the 1950s", recalled Sam Phillips, "I mainly concentrated on the blues, but I always would spend time with a country artist or two if they had any potential. I recorded several people back before I opened my own Sun label. We had the basis here of some good talent. I just don't think I came up with the songs I'd have liked to have on them. I don't think I was able to devote the time to get out of them the intensity that I got from the bluesmen. We did have a few things - Red Hadley and Frank Floyd particularly".
 
Recorded in the winter of 1952, Red Hadley perhaps sought to emulate the successful honky tonk piano solos coming out of Nashville from artists like Del Wood and Johnny Maddox. Dave Simmons comes in halfway through with a welcome steel guitar variation on Red's piano theme while two guitars and some fairly minimal drumming provide the rhythm. This recording was made when Sam Phillips was in-between his first and second attempts at releasing records on Sun, and Phillips pitched Hadley's music to Lillian McMurry's Trumpet Records in Jackson, Mississippi. Despite Hadley's obvious talent, no deal was made.
 
01(1) - "TENNESSEE DRAG" - B.M.I.
Composer: - G.D. ''Red'' Hadley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Sun Unissued
Recorded: - November 13, 1952
 
01 - "TENNESSEE DRAG (2)" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - G.D. ''Red'' Hadley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 13, 1952
Released: - November 1989
First appearance: - 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-11 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-29 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959
 
Returning to his instrumental format, Red again leads throughout on the top range of his piano while steel and rhythm join in enthusiastically. ''Boogie \Ramble'' was something of a theme song for Red's band for several years until the onset of rockabilly made ''Rockin' With Red'' seem more appropriate.
 
02 - "BOOGIE RAMBLE" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - G.D. ''Red'' Hadley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 13, 1952
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-13 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-30 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959
 
The addition of Red's raw vocalising toughens the sound of his band considerably. ''If I Had As Much Money As I Have Time'' was written by Red as an ''answer'' to the series of hits by Lefty Frizzell which were performed on a similar theme in his Texas honky tonk style. The steel guitar weaves in and out of Red's vocal and piano above a solid foundation from an acoustic guitar and an electric guitar played on the bass strings. The sound quality drops a little here and there but otherwise the sixty year old paper-backed tape has survived quite well
 
03 - "IF I HAD AS MUCH MONEY AS I HAVE TIME"* - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - G.D. ''Red'' Hadley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 13, 1952
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-2-12 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-1-31 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959
 
On his endeavours on this two occasion, Red was backed by the Wranglers and by a drummer brought in by Sam Phillips to give a little more drive to their sound. Although it seems incongruous, this drummer was in fact Houston Stokes a black musician who recorded blues with Rufus Thomas, Jimmy DeBerry and others on Sun. Interestingly, this same week as this Hadley session, Stokes recorded for Phillips as a featured singer backed by a band that included jazz alto saxophonist Frank Strozier. Stokes had certainly covered all the bases that week. Sam Phillips recalled recently: "Stokes wasn't an essential drummer but he had a feel for rhythm and blues and he also had a great desire to adventure a little bit. He would play anything with anybody, black or white". 
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Red Hadley - Vocal and Piano*
Paul Brazile - Guitar
Jay ''Junior'' Hadley - Guitar
Dave Simmons Jr. - Steel Guitar
Houston Stokes - Drums
 
"Red Hadley was a guy I hoped I could get a hit on", recalled Sam Phillips. "He was one of these type people - he would come in and sound extremely good, but he just wouldn't apply himself consistently so I could get the most out of him. He sold himself, you know. He had it. He could have made a great record, I'm sure".
 
Sam Phillips remembers Red with affection. "He had it, he could have made a great record. But he just wouldn't apply himself consistently". Other people have expressed the same views. Fellow bandleaders Malcolm Yelvington and Doug Poindexter both remember Hadley's Wranglers as a talented group of individuals who didn't get along with one another. Fiddle player and record man Bill Cantrell said, "Red Hadley was a really good artist. Maybe one of the very best Sam Phillips ever had. But he had this thing with his brother Jay, where there was always a lot of contention between them. It was hard to get them to work efficiently together". 
 
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NOVEMBER 15, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Rosco Gordon's new single ''Lucile'' b/w ''Blues For My Baby'' (RPM 373) released.
 
NOVEMBER 17, 1952 MONDAY
 
In November 1952 it was determined that the Presley's projected annual income had risen to $4,133 a   year, well over Housing Authority limits, and on this date the Presley family got an eviction notice,   requiring them to move out by February 28, 1953, of the Lauderdale Courts.
 
On the Presley family's 1952 two W2's tax return Gladys declares an income of $555.70 from St. Joseph's   Hospital and Vernon $2,781.18 from United Paint. Vernon's mother, Minnie Mae, is declared a live-in   dependent, and Gladys' retarded brother, Tracy Smith, is listed as a resident ten days a month. The income   return is handwritten. Elvis is listed as a dependent. Both copies are on a standard withholding form,   beige in color with brown lettering. Vernon's W2 is torn on the left bottom side. Also attached is a adding   machine tape with the total amount of income, deductions, and amount due on the tape.
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STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY NOVEMBER 17, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
The common thread running through the first five recordings is the presence of Joe Hill Louis. With the paint   still drying on the Sun sign, this talented individual from the wryly-named Froggy Bottom, Tennessee, was   crucial to Sam's gameplan. As well as playing just about any instrument thrust in front of him, Louis could   fashion a decent song and he cut a trough of leased masters before the homespun doctrine heard here served   as his one Sun single called "We All Gotta Go Sometime".
 
Playing harmonica fills between vocal lines while playing guitar necessitated a harmonica rack and the rack   was positioned squarely between Joe Hill Louis's mouth and the microphone, hence the distorted vocal.   Drummer Willie Nix and pianist Albert Williams were always perfectly attuned to Joe Hill Louis's music,   never more so than here. It's hard to know which side of Sun 178 was considered the A-side, assuming   Phillips even thought in those terms back then. Certainly, both were excellent rowdy blues. In its issue of   March 28, 1953, Billboard picked this as the A-side, commenting on what was then the suggestive nature of   the subtitle. The vocal sounds a little distant on the other side, ''We All Gotta Go Sometime'', but doesn't have   the distortion heard here because there's almost certainly someone else playing harmonica. It's clear that Sam   Phillips had his eyes on the prize with this one. Instead of using Louis in his customary One Man Band role,   Phillips added a drummer and piano player to the session and the effect is quite positive. There's no   mistaking the presence of a full drum kit and a musician who was able to concentrate on drumming, rather   than singing, playing harp and guitar at the same time. The piano is far more in balance on this issued   version as well. The One Man Band routine may have increased Louis's fortunes on the street, but when it   came time to record, bringing in some other musicians to fill the sound was a wise decision.
 
01(1) - "SHE MAY BE YOURS
(BUT SHE COMES TO SEE ME SOMETIME)'' B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 58-1 - Take 1 - Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 17, 1952
Released: -  Reissued: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-4-8 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
01(2) – "SHE MAY BE YOURS
(BUT SHE COMES TO SEE ME SOMETIME)" - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis- Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 58-2 - Master Take 2
Recorded: - November 17, 1952
Released: - January 30, 1953
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78rpm standard single SUN 178-B mono*
SHE MAY BE YOURS (BUT SHE COMES TO SEE ME SOMETIME /
WE ALL GOTTA GO SOMETIME
Reissued - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-1-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1
 
If nothing else is clear, Joe Hill Louis recorded this song on at least two different occasions with different   results. This early alternative (number 2 here) to the Sun single fades in, a sort of ''joined in progress effect'',   and the harp and guitar are never quite in sync. If Louis played both instruments, the effect is odd; it's hard to   imagine a musician going out of sync with himself but the effect is unmistakable. There are only three chords   in this blues progression but these instruments seem to be in different places.
 
The ''all right'' before the instrumental solo makes this take distinctive, as does the increase in guitar level   during the solo, which marks this as a warm-up version. The very end of the recording features the sound of   a piano, which was apparently there all along, although not particularly audible in the mix.
 
01(3) - "SHE MAY BE YOURS
(BUT SHE COMES TO SEE ME SOMETIME)'' - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: -  Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: -  U 58-3 - Take 3 - Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 17, 1952
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-9-7 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
02 - " KEEP YOUR ARMS AROUND ME" - 1 - B.M.I. - 3:10
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 17, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-23 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
03 - "SHE COMES TO SEE ME SOMETIME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - November 17, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued
 
04 - "WE ALL GOTTA GO SOMETIME''
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - November 17, 1952
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal, Harmonica and Guitar
Albert Williams - Piano
Willie Nix - Drums
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR HOUSTON STOKES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: TUESDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
Houston Stokes was one of several singing drummers in Memphis, and proves to be a competent vocalist as he fronts what was, in many respects, a Memphis junior all-star jazz band. Trumpeter Matthew Garrett was an educator at Manassas High School (the city's preeminent school for music, where Jimmie Lunceford once taught). Garrett taught modern jazz trumpeter Booker Little as well as avant garde hero  Charles Lloyd, and he's the father of jazz singer Dee Dee Bridgewater. The Garretts left Memphis for Flint, Michigan soon after this session, but it was Garrett who assembled this band for Stokes, and it features some of the kids he taught. Alto saxophonist Frank Strozier was just fifteen years old. After leaving Memphis, he became a renowned hard bop jazzman and a sideman for Miles Davis, Chet Baker, among others. Pianist Evans Bradshaw was once touted as highly as Phineas Newborn. He made a couple of fine LPs for Riverside in 1958 and 1959, and died in 1978. Saxophonist Gilmore Daniel was born in Memphis in 1935, and gigged around the city with Rufus Thomas before leaving town with Percy Mayfield and Lowell Fulson.
 
After some years in Milwaukee, he returned to Memphis in the early 1970s and recorded for David Evans' Highwater Records. He died in Memphis in 1986. Gilmore, incidentally, told Evans that the pianist on Stoke's session wasn't Bradshaw, but another jazz titan-in-training, Harold Mabern. It's unlikely, though, that Marion Keisker would have logged Bradshaw if Mabern had actually been there. The mystery man is guitarist Erskine McClellan, of whom we know nothing. Gilmore told Evans that McClellan moved to New York and changed his name. Colin Escott talking at length about the sidemen in part because most of them went on to carve out in careers in music and in part because their arrangement is the best thing about this record. The chart behind the sax solo is deftly executed Clearly, these were some very accomplished guys.
 
01 - "YOU'LL BE SORRY SOMEDAY" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 18, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4-1 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
For a couple of years Houston Stokes was virtually house drummer at Sun Records, so its hardly surprising that he eventually got a session to himself - even if the fruits of that session remained largely unreleased until the appearance of the original SUNBOX. Stokes appears to have been one of several singing drummers in Memphis, and proves himself to be a competent (if unremarkable) vocalist as he fronts a jumping City-styled combo. Evans Bradshaw and Erskine McLellan on piano and guitar respectively are pretty much the stars of the show on this boogie, which also features some bootin' sax from Gilmore Daniels.
 
02 - "WE'RE ALL GONNA DO SOME WRONG" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 18, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-14 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4-4 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
From the delibarate, loping beat set by Bradshaw's piano, this would seem to be an attempt to emulate the Rosco Gordon school of blues. The cliché in the title is the singer's ham-fisted way of trying to get his baby back: "Now I know you didn't mean a word you told him/don't cry about that/you were just excited, baby/you were talking through your hat". Exit baby, hatless. After a suitably intense crescendo, Gilmore Daniels steps up for another solo, this one struggling to get away from its home chord. By the last verse, Stokes' self-justifying belief that his baby will return only reinforces the message in the song's title.
 
So, in fact, what a record! So why didn't this find a home with one of the labels Sam routinely pitched product to? The voice is fine. The piano cloned Rosco Rhythm which was doing business at the time. So what's left? Could it have been the message? was it too progressive for its time?
 
 03 - "4 O'CLOCK BLUES" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 18, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-15 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUNBOX 7 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
 
04 - "BEST FRIEND BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 18, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-16 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
 
  05 - "GOING CRAZY" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 18, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-18 mono
THE SUN BLUES ACHIEVED - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
 
06 - "THE HAMMER" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - November 18, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-19 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
 
07(1) - ''UNTITLED INSTRUMENTAL''
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Sun Unissued
Recorded: - November 18, 1952
 
07(2) - ''UNTITLED INSTRUMENTAL''
Composer: - Houston Stokes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Sun Unissued
Recorded: - November 18, 1952
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Houston Stokes - Vocal and Drums
Frank Strozier - Alto Saxophone
Gilmore Daniels - Tenor Saxophone
Matthew Garrett - Trumpet
Evans Bradshaw - Piano
Erskine McLellan - Guitar
 
Houston Stokes served largely as a studio drummer at Sun, although Sam Phillips did work up a number of vocal sessions with him. Many of Stokes' performances were in a mellow/sophisticated groove that collectors rarely associate with Sun. Nevertheless, tracks such as "4 O'Clock Blues" and "Best Friend Blues" were part of the Memphis scene at this time. In fact, it was this music, not Wolf or Sammy Lewis, that one was likely to hear in the Memphis clubs. 
 
In any cases, Stokes took one of his mellow blues compositions, "We're All Gonna Do Some Wrong", reset it to a Rosco Gordon rhythm, and left it in the Sun vaults. The earlier slow version, probably more typical of Stokes' style, remains in the vaults. The song features some surprisingly enlightened sentiments for macho Memphis culture circa 1953.
 
"Best Friends Blues" suggests that Stokes was paying considerable attention to the Charles Brown(*) - Nat Cole School of Balladry, an honourable tradition at the time. The alto solo here is by Memphis jazz stalwart Frank Strozier, who would go on to make some fine records for Riverside. "The Hammer" shows the post- bop/nascent rhythm and blues side of Stokes' session work. A couple of loose reed squeals suggest this track wasn't quite ready for prime time, but it is a fine cooker nonetheless. Another take or another day, and this was releasable material in the Griffin Bross. mould.
 
"Going Crazy" is a very melodic bluesy tune from the Ivory Joe Hunter school of composition. Stokes' vocal is quite mellow and in stark contrast to the driving sax work during the break. Again, one or two more takes (and maybe a tune-up for the guitar) and this might have been a commercial single.
 
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NOVEMBER 18, 1953 TUSDAY
 
Faron Young is inducted into the Army, at $87.50 monthly. During his two-year stint, he performs on 200   radio stations weekly with Special Services.
 
NOVEMBER 20, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Gene Autry buys Los Angeles radio station KMPC for a reported $800,000.
 
NOVEMBER 21, 1952 FRIDAY
 
MGM released Hank Williams' ''I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive''.
 
Tawnee Hall, a guitarist for Lefty Frizzell, dies at age 25 in Eastman, Georgia.
 
NOVEMBER 22, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Radio station WSM hosts first disc jockey convention in Nashville. The event eventually metamorphosis into   Country Music Week, a series of events that include the Country Music Association awards show.
 
NOVEMBER 23, 1952 SUNDAY
 
''Town Hall Party'' debuts on radio station KFI in Compton, California. It becomes a staple of radio and TV   in the Los Angeles market for the next nine years, providing exposure for Merle Travis, Tex Ritter, Freddie   Hart and Joe Maphis, among others.
 
NOVEMBER 26, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Marty Robbins recorded ''I Couldn't Keep From Crying'' at the Him Beck Studio in Dallas, Texas.
 
NOVEMBER 27, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Hank Williams checks back into a Shreveport sanitarium to battle addictions.
 
NOVEMBER 29, 1953 SATURDAY
 
Mercury released The Carlises' ''No Help Wanted''.
 
Rosco Gordon and The Beale Streeters' new rhythm and blues ''Too Many Women'' b/w ''Wise To You Baby''   (Duke R-109) released.
 
NOVEMBER 30, 1952 SUNDAY
 
Gene Autry goes north of the border to work on a dude ranch as the western ''Blue Canadian Rockies''   debuts. Along for the ride is his faithful buddy, Pat Buttram.
DECEMBER 1, 1952 MONDAY
 
Capitol released Faron Young's fir hit ''Goin' Steady''.
 
Decca released Goldie Hill's first hit, ''I Let The Stars Get In My Eyes''.
 
Capitol released Ferlin Husky's first version of ''Gone'', credited to Terry Preston.
 
DECEMBER 2, 1952 TUESDAY
 
Attorneys for Gene Autry and Oakley Haldeman ask a judge to delay a copyright suit filed by an Ohio woman who claims ''Here Comes Santa Claus (Down Santa Claus Lane)'' infringes on her ''Sleepy-Town Journey''. Haldeman, say the lawyers, is recovering from a heart attack.
 
DECEMBER 4, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Eddy Arnold recorded ''Eddy's  Song'' at the RCA Studios in New York.
 
Rabon Delmore dies of lung cancer one day after his 36th birthday. Along with older sibling Alton Delmore, The Delmore Brothers were one of the genre's strongest duos during the 1930s, entering the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2001.
 
DECEMBER 6, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Roy Acuff ends a 20-year association with Columbia Records.
 
George Morgan recorded ''(I Just Had A Date) A Lover's Quarrel''.
 
DECEMBER 7, 1952 SUNDAY
 
Webb Pierce recorded the Marty Robbins-penned ''I'll Go On Alone'', plus ''That's Me Without You'' during a morning session at Nashville's Castle Studio.
 
DECEMBER 8, 1952 MONDAY
 
Jimmy Boyd sings ''I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus'' in an installment of ''The Perry Como Show'' on CBS.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR RED HADLEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: FRIDAY DECEMBER 5, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER
 
Gailey ''Red'' Hadley and Jay ''Junior'' Hadley were from Covington, just outside Memphis and their playing and songwriting, which continues today, was certainly the equal of the nearby Nashville product. They recently (1977) recorded for Shelby County and Glo-Like Records respectively.
 
01 - "IF I HAD AS MUCH MONEY AS I HAVE TIME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Red Hadley
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 5, 1952
 
02 - "I'D BE A MILLIONAIRE" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Red Hadley
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Orginally Issued
Recorded: - December 5, 1952
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30104-A-3 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 4 - COTTON CITY COUNTRY
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8181 mono
SUN HILLBILLY
 
The song "If I Had As Much Money As I Have Time" was the one Sam Phillips saw as a potential single. It had first been tried out at an earlier session on November 13, when Red Hadley also cut two piano instrumentals in the honky tonk style popularised by Del Wood on Tennessee Records out of Nashville.  Red Hadley remained in Memphis after the abortive Sun episode, recording only twice more. In late 1954 or early 1955 he recorded "Brother That's All" for Meteor Records, and in 1974 he recorded "Rockin' With Red" for the Shelby County label. 
 
Apart from the quality of Red's performance, main memory of that day is the argument that blew up from nowhere with Red's brother Jay about why he wasn't featured on the session. Maybe that had also been the point at issue back in 1952?
 
03 - "IF THIS IS LOVE''
Composer: - Red Hadley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 5, 1952
 
04 - "PETTICOAT RAG''
Composer: - Red Hadley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 5, 1952
 
05 - "I STOOD AND WATCHED YOUR WEDDING''
Composer: - Red Hadley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 5, 1952
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gailey ''Red'' Hadley - Vocal and Piano
Paul Brazile - Guitar
Jay ''Junior'' Hadley - Guitar
Dave Simmons Jr. - Steel Guitar
Houston Stokes - Drums 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 
SUN SESSION 1: MONDAY DECEMBER 8, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
01(1) - "KEEP YOUR ARMS AROUND ME" - 2 - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 8, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN CD 27 mono
BLOW IT TILL'YOU LIKE IT - MEMPHIS HARMONICA 1951-1954
 
If it was chilly on December 8, 1952, Joe Hill Louis did his best to heat up the studio with what is probably his most rollicking cut. He blasts away on vocals, guitar, and possibly drums. Never long subtlety, he works to his strength: pure, joyous rhythm. The logbook only notes Albert Williams on piano, suggesting that Louis might even play the harmonica, although, it's more likely that we're hearing Walter Horton.
 
01(2) - "KEEP YOUR ARMS AROUND ME" - 2 - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 8, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued:  - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-4 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
02 - "SWEETEST GAL IN TOWN)" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 8, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-3 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
03 - "SWEETEST GAL IN TOWN"## - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 8, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-5-12 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
Joe Hill Louis took two shots of ''She May Be Yours''. The first, recorded on November 17, 1952, was eventually chosen for release on Sun 178. The second, noted in the logs as ''Sweetest Gal In Town'', was recorded December 8 and features some different lyrics. In place of Willie Nix's kick-ass drumming, we have Louis keeping time, and once again we have lead guitar and harmonica playing simultaneously, suggesting that Walter Horton hung around for this song as well. This is a notable alternate take (2). Aside from a very different kick-off, Louis's vocal is far more spirited. You've gotta love the way time rhymes with town.
 
04 - "I GOT A NEW WOMAN"** - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 8, 1952
Released: - 1969
First appearance: - Rounder Records (LP) 33rpm SS 29* mono
SUN RECORDS - HARMONICA CLASSICS
Reissued:  - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-5 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
05 - "I'M A POOR BOY" - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 8, 1952
Released: - 1969
First appearance: - P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm PLP 304 mono
THE BE-BOP-BOY
Reissued:  - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-6 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY 
 
By the time this song was recorded on December 8, 1952, Sam Phillips may well have decided that Joe was going to relaunch Sun Records, and he'd begun to zero in on the sings which would make up the eventual single. In the meantime, he was also exploring other avenues. One, perhaps inspired by Howlin' Wolf's contract going to Chess Records, was to get Joe sing "like Wolf", something Sonny Boy Williamson was to do some years later at Chess. Joe even came up with a set of lyrics that Wolf would have had no trouble in learning: "Well, I'm   lonesome and I'm troubled/I ain't got no place to go/I ain't got no mother/and my father throwed me out". Despite a strong performance by Joe, this remained unissued for several decades. Clearly, it's Albert Williams on piano, but there's also a lead guitar, harmonica, and drums. If Louis was truly singing and playing all instruments but piano, he was the hardest-working man in show business that day. Singing, playing rhythm guitar, harmonica, and drums is just about do-able, but playing lead guitar, harmonica and drums is damn near impossible. Louis played on a Walter Horton session that day, so it's likely that Horton hung around to play harmonica.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal, Harmonica, Guitar and Drums
Albert Williams - Piano
 
Notes: "Keep Your Arms Around Me"# is a recording of Joe Hill Louis singing a unison vocal to the November 17, 1952 recording of this song. "Sweetest Gal In Town"## was mistakenly identified as the original issued version of "She May Be Yours" from SUN 178 on SUNBOX 105, and Louis blows his harp in a style reminiscent of Sonny Boy Williamson II (who was then recording for the Trumpet label in Mississippi). There is again vocal distortion on this track for reasons Sam Phillips was never able to remedy.
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS & WALTER HORTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION 2: POSSIBLY MONDAY DECEMBER 8, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
On this same day a continuation of previous session for Walter Horton. On SUN 178, Joe Hill Louis works with supporting musicians, eschewing his one man status. "We All Gotta Go Sometimes" is fine back country boogie with somewhat irregular timing. Louis contributes vocals, harp and guitar and is supported by the driving piano of Albert Williams. Unfortunately, Sam Phillips had problems miking Louis' vocals, since at any moment the performer was likely to blow the back off his harp, taking out a fair bit of sensitive circuitry in the process.
 
01 - "IN THE MOOD**" - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Andy Razaf-Garland
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Instrumental -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Possibly December 8, 1952
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Rounder Records (LP) 33rpm SS 29 mono
SUN RECORDS - HARMONICA CLASSICS
Reissued:  - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524-7 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
On ''In The Mood'' Walter Horton thrived at this steady mid-tempo. As on the prior track (from the September session), you get the sense that he could have gone on awhile without repeating himself. He digs into the simple changes, spinning out variation after variation. The tune was one of the most familiar in American popular music after Glenn Miller popularized it in 1939 as ''In The Mood'', The signature riff that everyone can hum was older, though, and can be found in tunes going back to the dawn of recorded jazz, emerging fully formed on Wingy Manone's 1930 record of ''Tar Paper Stomp''. If not for Miller it's doubtful if Walter Horton would have lit upon it, though. The guitarist repeats the lick, giving Horton a solid underspinning.
 
02(1) - "WE ALL GOT TO GO (SOMETIME)(GRANDMOTHER GOT
GRANDFATHER THERE TOLD)"*/** - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Walter Horton-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Possibly December 8, 1952
Released: - Unknown
First appearance: - (LP) 33rpm PV(J) LP 304 mono
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-2-14 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
It seems as if December 8, 1952 was a busy day at 706 Union Avenue. Marion Keisker logged a session with Walter Horton that yielded ''In The Mood'' and five or more cuts of ''We All Gotta Go''. Horton was backed by Joe Hill Louis and Albert Williams. That some day, there was a Joe Hill Louis session with Williams on piano. Marion noted ''Walter Horton, harp'' and then crossed it out. Joe Hill's recording of ''We All Gotta Go Sometime'' has never dated, but it seems as if Horton might be playing on Louis's record because there is harmonica under the vocal on a couple of spots. So the best guess from sixty years' distance is that both Horton and Louis recorded ''We All Got To Go Sometime'' on the same day, and Phillips chose Joe Hill's for release the following month. On release, the song was credited to Louis, but he'd done little more than add a few lines to (John Lee) Sonny Boy Williamson's 1941 song, ''Shotgun Blues''. A Big Bill Broonzy record from that year, ''I Feel So Good'', provided the bits of the melody that Williamson didn't.
 
02(2) - "WE ALL GOT TO GO (SOMETIME) (GRANDMOTHER GOT
GRANDFATHER AFTER TOLD"** - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Walter Horton-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 57 - Master Take 2
Recorded: - Possibly December 8, 1952
Released: - January 30, 1953
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78rpm standard single SUN 178-A mono
WE ALL TO GO SOMETIME / SHE MAY BE YOURS (SWEETEST GIRL IN TOWN)
Reissued - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-1-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

SUN 178 was one of the discs issued in January 1953 as part of Sun's re-launch programme. A favourite theme of Joe Hill's, "Gotta Go" is a strong, uptempo performance laced with much harp, and some particularly forceful piano-playing from Albert Williams. The trio - Willie Nix is on drums - have a drive matched by few others of this era, and this country boogie has a ferocious swing which is doubtless attributable to their many sessions working together. 
 
02(3) - "WE ALL GOT TO GO (SOMETIMES)" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Walter Horton-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Possibly December 8, 1952
Released: - Unknown
First appearance: - (CD) 500/200rpm SUN CD 27 mono
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD 15524 AH-11 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY
 
02(4) - "WE ALL GOT TO GO (SOMETIMES)" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Walter Horton-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Possibly December 8, 1952
 
02(5) - "WE ALL GOT TO GO (SOMETIMES)" B.M.I. 
Composer: - Walter Horton-Joe Jill Louis
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Possibly December 8, 1952
 
02(6) - "WE ALL GOT TO GO (SOMETIMES)" B.M.I. 
Composer: - Walter Horton-Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Possibly December 8, 1952
 
Takes 1 and 2 of "We All Got To Go" significantly different from the others and the correct title would be "She Left Me A Mule To Ride". Session file shows no date on these recordings. A dub of "Keep Your Arms Around Me"/"Sweetest Gal In Town" was made December 13, 1852, suggesting that the above session was held shortly after that date, possible on December 29, when Joe came in and borrowed two dollars from Sam, or at one of the three previous sessions, but in any event, before January 30, 1953, the issue date of SUN 178.
 
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter Horton - Vocal* and Harmonica**
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal, Guitar and Drums
Albert Williams - Piano 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
DECEMBER 1952
 
Trumpet Records released three singles from sessions recorded by Sam Phillips; two by Tiny Kennedy and one by Sherman ''Blues'' Johnson.
 
Billboard announces that Lester Bihari has moved to Memphis and started Meteor Records. The first release by Elmore James is probably released in December. It charts in February 1953.
 
DECEMBER 10, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Studio session with Willie Nix at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee. Probably a studio session on the same date with Joe Willie Wilkins at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR WILLIE NIX
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
 
01 - ''SOLDIER BOY BLUES'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Willie Nix
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 10, 1952
 
02 - ''UNTITLED INSTRUMENTAL'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Willie Nix
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 10, 1952
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Willie Nix - Vocal & Drums
Joe Willie Wilkins - Guitar
Albert ''Joiner'' Williams - Piano
George Lawson - Tenor Saxophone
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE WILLIE WILKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
 
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 10, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
 
01 - ''BIG FOUR''
Composer: - Joe Willie Wilkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably December 10, 1952
 
02 - ''MR. DOWNCHILD'' - B.M.I. - 4:30
Composer: - Joe Willie Wilkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 10, 1952
Released: - October 30, 2006
First appearance: - Red Light Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE DEVIL'S MUSIC - VOLUME 1
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Willie Wilkins - Guitar
Joe Hill Louis - Drums
Bill Johnson - Piano
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
According Robert Henry, ''Now I'm speakin' from 335 Beale. I've been on Beale Street for more than forty-seven years. I've seen Beale Street to its peak at three o'clock in the mornin' that you could hardly get through it. I knew when the musicians on Beale Street was only gettin' two dollars and sixty cents for their work. A dime of it was for car fare and the rest for musicians''.
 
''W.C. Handy and I was very good friends. We stayed together, run together for years to come. We had a place - they called it Pee Wee's where Handy come from. Pee Wee's place was a great spot for musicians - all the musicians hung out there. And when Handy used to say, ''Boys, get together''! he would put a cap on anybody who was a musician and say he belong to Handy's Band. Now at that particular time we what you call Midnight Shows: we had one night for White and the others for Colored. We had Charlie Williamson and his band - they called it the Palace Band.
 
Aw, but they were wonderful, and it was a great day when they give that Midnight Show. The white people packed the street and nothin' too much happened, they got along fine, when they come to that Midnight Show. Charlie Williamson he passed, and the Palace is a picture-show place now. The Monarch - the Monarch was a place wide open. This was on 340 Beale and the Monarch was a place where we called it a gamblin' house at that particular time. They played piano there, blues goin' all the time. They searched you just like you would be if you were goin' to jail. It was a great time then, the streets were full of gamblin' houses where they shot craps. You could do nothin' then to control gamblin'. While we mention about gamblin' there - if you got out of order, that's what it was - Bad Sam! Feller there who'd deal with you and everybody called him Bad Sam. We had another crap house, they called it the Panama. A boy named Howard Evans operated it for years. Aw, it was great in those day''.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
On December 11, 1952, Love came in with another band altogether to record his new song, ''Early In The Morning''. Schoolteacher and bassist Tuff Green was one of the longest established bandleaders in town and often supplied groups to Sam Phillips and other record companies. It may have been Green who put this group together, including drummer Nolen Hall, sax players Robert Hamp and Charles Walker, trombonists Walter 'Tang' Smith and Charles McKinstry, and trumpeter Floyd Shannon.
 
'Tang' Smith also, fronted a session at around this time which Sam Phillips leased to his partner Jim Bulleit for use on J-B Records in Nashville.
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY LOVE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY DECEMBER 11, 1952
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
01(1) – ''GEE I WISH'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 10, 1952
 
01(2) – ''GEE I WISH'' - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 2 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-1 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-9 mono
GEE... I WISH
 
From the session tapes it seems likely that Sam Phillips also recorded two versions of a song called ''You Could Have Loved Me'' and and two early versions of ''Gee I Wish'' at this session. ''You Could Have Loved Me'' is a reflective blues about a man who has sat alone too long and now doesn't want his baby's loving. Charles Walker  takes a breathy sax solo that complements Love's vocal.
 
''Gee I Wish'' was a tune Love would return to later and he recorded it in a number of styles. This early version has a slightly Latin rhythm that alternates with boogie piano and riffing saxes. It's one of those songs that strings together a few vocal phrases in praise of a little girl walking by - themes Rosco Gordon, Billy Emerson and others also recorded for Phillips - but is really a vehicle for the band to rock on out, On this version there is an extended sax solo by Charles Walker and a Trumpet solo by Floyd Shannon.
 
02 - '' YOU COULD HAVE LOVED ME'' - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-1 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-10 mono
GEE... I WISH
 
03(1) - "EARLY IN THE MORNING" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-1 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
 
''Early In The Morning'' was a strong song about how the blues come tumbling down after hours. Love's voice starts quietly while he employs band members to is along to give the effect of a vocal group. His voice then strengthens and, while the full band comes in with impressive sax solos and horn riffs. There is a good sax solo from Charles Walker or Robert Hamp and the song swings along to its conclusion.
 
03(2) - "EARLY IN THE MORNING" - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 –  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1952
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-11 mono
GEE... I WISH
 
03(3) - "EARLY IN THE MORNING" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1952
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-19 mono
GEE... I WISH
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Love – Piano & Vocal
Tuff Green – Bass
Nolen Hall – Drums
Charles McInstry – Trombone
Walter ''Tang'' Smith – Trombone
Floyd Shannon – Trumpet
Robert Hamp – Saxophone
Charles Walker - Saxophone
 
Nothing apparently came of the December session and Phillips's files are completely silent on Billy Love for almost the whole of 1953. It was a strange year for Phillips because his deal with Chess fell apart at the end of 1952 and he relaunched Sun Records in earnest in the spring of 1953, soon hitting chart success with Rufus Thomas and others. Phillips issued a wide range of material on Sun in that first year and the fact that he had accumulated recordings by Billy Love but not issued them seems odd, particularly given his expressed admiration for Love's music. Again we can only conclude that Love was touring or playing music somewhere on his own account or with Rosco Gordon or others.

 © - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

POSSIBLY DECEMBER 1952
 
Lester Bihari forms Meteor Records in Memphis. The label record blues, country, gospel and rockabilly, providing the final impetus for Sam Phillips to revive the Sun label.
 
DECEMBER 11, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Hank Williams discharges himself from a Shreveport sanitarium and promptly gets arrested for drunk and disorderly conduct.
 
DECEMBER 12, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Columbia released Carl Smith's ''That's The Kind Of Love I'm Looking For''.
 
DECEMBER 13, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Hank Williams performs on The Louisiana Hayride in what turns out to be his final appearance on the show.
 
DECEMBER 15, 1952 MONDAY
 
Tommy Sosebee recorded his only country hit, ''Till I Waltz Again With You''.
 
DECEMBER 16, 1952 TUESDAY
 
A sickly Hank Williams cancels a show in Victoria, Texas. Friends believe he may have had a heart attack, or an overdose.
 
Hank Thompson recorded ''Rub-A-Dub-Dub'' in an afternoon session at Capitol's Melrose Avenue studios in Los Angeles.
 
DECEMBER 17, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Hank Thompson recorded ''Yesterday's Girl'' at the Capitol Recording Studio on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.
 
While on tour in Dallas, Hank Williams takes in a Bob Wills performance. It also marks the last that Williams sees his former roommate, Ray Price.
 
DECEMBER 19, 1952 FRIDAY
 
Hank Williams gives his final public performance at Austin's Skyline Club, attended by Justin Tubb. Williams admits to Tubb that the ''walking the floor'' line in ''Your Cheatin' Heart'' was inspired by Ernest Tubb's ''Walking The Floor Over You''.
 
DECEMBER 22, 1952 MONDAY
 
Robin Gibb's future second wife, Dwina Murphy, is born in Kilskeery, Northern Ireland, three years to the date after Robin's birth. He will write such country hits as Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton's ''Island In The Stream'', Olivia Newton-John's ''Come On Over'' and Sisie Allanson's ''Words''.
 
DECEMBER 24, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Elvis Presley performed in the December 1952 Humes High Christmas Talent Show. He sang his standard   repertoire "Keep Them Cold, Cold Icy Fingers Off Of Me" and "Till I Waltz Again With You". Elvis   Presley was the only act awarded an encore; he performed his good luck song, "Old Shep". 
 
Elvis Presley's   history teacher, Mildred Scrivener, remembers how nervous Elvis was performing in front of his   classmates. "He was standing on the edge of the stage, half-hidden by the curtain when I told him, it's   you, Elvis, go out and sing another song". Suddenly Elvis' stature and popularity hit a new high.
 
After   Christmas, as Elvis Presley sat outside Kay's Drive Inn on Crump Boulevard, his newfound confidence   was demonstrated in casual banter with close friends. Frequently ensconced at Kay's Drive Inn, Elvis   Presley got many invitations to perform at house parties. When he sang for friends at these dimly lit   affairs, he covered recent rhythm and blues tunes. These gatherings gave Elvis Presley a chance to   perform the rhythm and blues hits that he spent so much time listening. Yet, as we know, this was only   one form of music that interested Elvis Presley.
 
"Well, I had a nice red flannel shirt with white buttons and Elvis wanted to wear it on the show", recalled   Buzzy Forbess, "He had the shirt on a hanger and when he put it in the closet and closed the door, a small   hole was torn in one of the sleeves of the shirt. He was probably afraid of how I would react when I  learned of the hole in my nice shirt, so when he went on for his number, he had the sleeves rolled up and   before he began singing, he said, 'I want to dedicate this number to Buzzy Forbess".
 
"He was confident in himself, in his abilities", recalls Billie Chiles Turner, a classmate. "It seemed every   time we had a talent show at school, every year we had a school carnival, Elvis seemed to be one of the   performers. He seemed to always be involved in these things". "Each time Elvis would go on stage", she  said, "his classmates would whisper among themselves, 'Not again Elvis'".
 
DECEMBER 25, 1952 THURSDAY
 
Doug Dillard receives a banjo for Christmas. He grows up to co-found The Dillards, a bluegrass band that influences The Eagles and makes regular appearances on ''The Andy Griffith Show'' as The Darlings.
 
Eight-year-old Larry Collins receives a guitar for Christmas. He grows up to write David Frizzell and Shelly West's ''You're The Reason God Made Oklahoma''.
 
The movie ''Ruby Gentry'', starring Jennifer Jones, debuts in New York. The picture inspires Roberta Streeter to adopt a stage name, Bobbie Gentry.
 
DECEMBER 27, 1952 SATURDAY
 
Karla Bonoff is born in Los Angeles. The pop singer/songwriter is best known for her 1982 single ''Personally'', remade as a country hit by Ronnie McDowell. Bonoff also writes Lynn Anderson's ''Isn't It Always Love'' and Wynonna's ''Tell Me Why''.
 
Hank and Billie Jean Williams attend the Blue-Gray Football Classic at Cramton Stadium in Montgomery, Alabama. They leave before half-time of the NVAA game, a 28-7 win for the Gray team.
 
Rhythm guitarist David Knopfler is born in England. He's a founding member of Dire Straits, appearing on the band's 1978 debut album, featuring ''Setting Me Up'', a song destined to become a country hit for Highway 102. 
 
Starting, the Saturday Night Jamboree in Marshall, Texas, was the week's top event (if not the only event), and the show's manager A.T. Young, featured his son, Buddy, for whom he started the label. The show ran from Marshall's City Hall, and was broadcast over KMHT. Future Sun artist Tommy Blake probably appeared on Young's show often enough for Young to give him a shot on his little label. ''Koolit'' became Tommy Blake's first single, cut for Buddy Records in Marshall, Texas in 1956.
 
DECEMBER 28, 1952 SUNDAY
 
Bob Wills' father, John Wills, dies of a heart attack in Houston, Texas.
 
Hank Williams gives his final performance, for 130 people at a holiday party for members of the Musicians' Union in Montgomery.
 
An episode of NBC's ''The Roy Rogers Show features a young Charles Bronson in the role of a killer. Titled ''The Knockout'', the episode naturally includes Dale Evans and Pat Brady.
 
DECEMBER 31, 1952 WEDNESDAY
 
Hank Williams sets out from Birmingham to Charleston, West Virginia, for a New Year's Eve show. Slowed by snow, he tries to grab a flight in in Knoxville, but the flight is canceled. Williams gets a shot of morphine, then takes what proves to be his final ride in the back seat of his blue Cadillac.
 
Guitarist Chuck Berry plays for the first time with piano player Johnnie Johnson in East St. Louis, Illinois. The two are bonded during the time Berry writes ''Johnny B. Goode'', ''Maybellene'' and ''(You Never Can Tell) C'est La Vie''.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR DOCTOR ROSS
AT  THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) LATE 1952
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
Four songs survive from the second Doctor Ross session, ''That Ain't Right'' sung by the mysterious pianist Henry Hill (see Hill's session below), and three vocals by Ross. On the first, ''Shake 'Em On Down'', Reuben Martin's washboard sounds remarkably like a slapped bass and for the first time, Ross himself is playing guitar. Henry Hill's piano is down in the mix, but reinforces the heavy-duty rhythm track. Ross said about ''Shake Ém On Down'', ''That was an old song recorded by Bukka White and in later years I thought I'd cut it again. I met him playing in a juke joint house in Mississippi when I was about 14. Sometimes my cousin and him played together''.
 
01(1) - "SHAKE 'EM ON DOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Bukka White
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4-10 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-1-16 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
Of the three takes of this number, this first one is the most confident and full-blooded. A pair of brief tape faults happening just before Ross' vocal begins are obviously the reason for the subsequent retakes. The tune is a Mississippi blues standard: Bukka White recorded "Shake 'Em On Down" in September 1937, Big Bill Broonzy replied with a "New Shake 'Em On Down" in the following May, and Tommy McClennan chose the same title for his recording two years later. Doctor Ross gives it a new dimension with some sterling harmonica work, including a lung-testing single note held for several measures. Henry Hill's piano is frequently lost during these takes, but he's able to make his presence suitably felt here. This is dance music at its best, proving that lyrics are overrated, and sometimes one chord is all you need.
 
Alan Lomax recorded a woman named Lucille Walker singing it in the Sewing Room at the Women's Camp at Parchman. After the War, it survived in one form or another. Led Zeppelin included bits of it in ''Hats Off To (Roy) Harper, Savoy Brown'' and Fred McDowell cut it, and Jim Dickinson's early sixties punk blues version is an under-regarded classic. And this is as good as any of them.
 
01(2) - "SHAKE 'EM ON DOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Bukka White
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (LP) 33rpm Arhoolie 1065-1 mono
DR. ROSS HIS FIRST RECORDINGS
Reissued: - 2013 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-2-21 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953 - 1956
 
01(3) - "SHAKE 'EM ON DOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Bukka White
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 37 mono
BACK COUNTRY BOOGIE
Reissued: - 2013 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-1-19 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953 - 1956
 
02 - "DOWN SOUTH BLUES (AKA LACEY BELLE)" - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - John Lee Williamson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (LP) 33rpm Arhoolie 1065-2 mono
DR. ROSS HIS FIRST RECORDINGS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4-12 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1959
 
Once again, the Doctor proved himself a skilled adapter of earlier works. The first part of ''Down South Blues'' is Sonny Boy (John Lee) Williamson's song about his wife, Lacey Belle. He deliberately mush-mouths the woman's name in the first verse to obscure the song's  origins. By the second verse, he has decided to call her Miss Elvira. Did Doctor Ross own this 1947 record? we vote yes because he also recorded the flip side, ''Polly Put The Kettle On''. In an anthology titled ''Ramblin' On My Mind'', Lynn Abbott and Doug Seroff wrote, ''The creative process of Southern folk blues songs construction was initially guided by the capacity for unrestricted recombination of commonly shared ingredients''. In Doctor Ross's case he brought that approach to recorded and copyrighted music, and in today's litigious world, his ass would have been sued repeatedly.   The slow, deliberate tempo leaves little for Reuben Martin to do and as usual Henry Hill's piano only makes an impression when Ross pauses for breath. Even with strong amplification, its possible to assess the effort that goes into his harmonica playing, since many of the notes are sounded on the intake of breath, the only time that a note may be 'bent'.
 
03 - "MY BE BOP GAL" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (LP) 33rpm Arhoolie 1065-13 mono
DR. ROSS HIS FIRST RECORDINGS
Reissued: - 2013 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-1-20 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953 - 1956
 
04 - "GOIN' BACK SOUTH" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1972
First appearance: - Arhoolie Records (LP) 33rpm Arhoolie 1065-7 mono
DR. ROSS HIS FIRST RECORDINGS
Reissued: - 1992 Arhoolie Records Internet iTunes MP3-13 mono
DR. ROSS - BOOGIE DISEASE
 
The song ''Polly Put The Kettle On'', an old nursey rhythm, might seem an odd choice for a juke joint bluesman but it was recorded in 1947 by Sonny Boy Williamson on Victor and it is an infectious rhythm item in Ross's hands. The song had an influence on others too: James Cotton recorded it some years later.
 
05 - "POLLY PUT THE KETTLE ON" - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 27 mono
BACK COUNTRY BOOGIE
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16939-11 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charles   Isaiah Ross   - Vocal, Harmonica and Guitar
Henry Hill - Piano
Reuben Martin – Washboard
 
Note: Doctor Ross recorded other versions of these songs at this session.
 
The use of piano at this sessions is intriguing, and the full identity of Henry Hill is unresolved. Hill's rough house style does not appear at all consistent with the smoother sounds of another Henry Hill was recording on Federal at around the same time. Ross's man could easily have been the Henry Hill who owned clubs and roadhouses in Clarksdale and whose son Raymond Hill recorded for Sam Phillips, had Raymond not told researcher Bill Greensmith, ''my father never played piano''. This counters the view of another musician, Houston Stackhouse, who told researcher James LaRocca that he had known Hill's father, ''who was a pianist and juke joint operator''. Doctor Ross never said either way, but from the patter to be heard between songs on the session it seems that Ross and Hill were very familiar with each other's music. None of the songs from their session was issued at the time, and this is a little surprising for Phillips was about to relaunch his own Sun Records label that had released just one disc in 1952.
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
DECEMBER 1952
 
Sometimes in 1952 Isaiah Ross was married (he said, to a first cousin of musician Willie Love) and he   briefly gave up the music in favour of a move to find work, first to Indianapolis and then to Champaign,   Illinois where he worked for General Motors. His marriage did not last though and his wife left him in March   1953, prompting him to return to Memphis. He had already made a trip to 706 Union Avenue at the tail of   1952 when he made his second recording session for Sam Phillips. This time he was accompanied by Reuben Martin op washboard and by a pianist, Henry Hill. It is probably that Phillips was glad to record Ross again, even though his Chess disc apparently did little business, because his down-home mix of blues and good-time rhythms would help to fill the hole left when Modern Records, with whom Phillips had fallen out, started to record Joe Hill Louis themselves rather than use Phillips' studio.
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR HENRY HILL
AT  THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) LATE 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
01(1) - "THAT AIN'T RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Henry Hill-  Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-4-11 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued"- March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-2-23 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
From Doctor Ross's ''Shake 'Em On Down'' session, the doc allows his pianist, Henry Hill, to step into the spotlight. Every one of the eight takes has a different spoken intro. On this version (Take 1), Hill has got a bottle ''of that old kitchen stuff'', one for him and his baby, and one for Doctor Ross too. Armed thus, he tells his girl, ''we gonna play these woogies baby, just for me and you''. And they made good on the promise. The wonderfully jaunty rhythm section comprised Ross, Reuben Martin playing the washboard, and Hill himself filling in erratically on piano. The song is a litany of grievances, and must have gone down well on club dates.
 
01(2) - "THAT AIN'T RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Henry Hill-  Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SUN 37-1 mono
BACK COUNTRY BOOGIE
Reissued"- March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-9-6 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
At least eight takes of this song exist and each one begins with a different Hill soliloquy: "Yeah, Doctor Ross, you know one thing?/Boy, I want you to cut it out, 'cos you done stole my girl from me/but, anyway, I want you to get on down on these here woogies with me". Which is exactly what Ross does, maintaining the rhythm when Hill confuses himself with his verbal asides. Reuben Martin's washboard is so closely miked that a time it sounds as though he's tap-dancing rather than thimble-picking. Later takes find Hill obsessed with bottles of Woldcat, one of which may well have bitten the dust before the session started.
 
01(3) - "THAT AIN'T RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Henry Hill-  Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: - August 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30127-11 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 12 - UNION AVENUE BREAKDOWN
Reissued: November 4, 2013 JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-1-24 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953-1956
 
01(4) - "THAT AIN'T RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Henry Hill-  Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: -   November 4, 2013
First appearance: - JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-1-25 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953-1956
 
01(5) - "THAT AIN'T RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Henry Hill-  Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: -   November 4, 2013
First appearance: - JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-2-8 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953-1956
 
01(6) - "THAT AIN'T RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Henry Hill-  Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: -   November 4, 2013
First appearance: - JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-2-9 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953-1956
 
01(7) - "THAT AIN'T RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Henry Hill-  Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 7 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: -   November 4, 2013
First appearance: - JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-2-18 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953-1956
 
01(8) - "THAT AIN'T RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Henry Hill-  Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 8 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1952
Released: -   November 4, 2013
First appearance: - JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm JSP4239-2-19 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE MEMPHIS CUTS 1953-1956
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Henry Hill - Vocal and Piano
Charles Isaiah Ross   - Harmonica and Guitar
Reuben Martin – Washboard
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - © 
 
The Song Fellows were the junior quartet - the minor league training ground, if you will - for The Blackwood Brothers. The group was started by Cecil Blackwood, nephew of James, who had founded the senior Blackwood Quartet. Joining Cecil in the Song Fellows was Jimmy Hamill, son of the founding pastor of the Assembly of God Church, a Memphis institution known for its Pentecostal fire. Elvis Presley had his heart set on joining the Song Fellows until he was turned away, rather unceremoniously, by Jimmy Hamill who didn't hesitate to share his low estimate of Elvis' singing style.
 
Within a year or two, when Cecil had moved up to the Blackwoods Quartet, there was an opening in the Song Fellows and some possibility that Elvis might be a candidate.  By this time, however, Elvis' first Sun record had come out and his ambition to join the quartet that had once snubbed him had cooled considerably.
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR THE SONG FELLOWS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1952-1954
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 
SUN SESSION: BETWEEN 1952-1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
 
01 - "I NEED JESUS" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Kelsey Marie Stacy
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Between 1952-1954
Released: - 1988
First appearance: P-Vine Special (LP) 33rpm PLP-387-B-8 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - SOUTHBOUND GOSPEL TRAIN
Reissued: -  2000  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387-24 mono
SUN GOSPEL
 
The three tracks left by the Song Fellows in the Sun tape archives have never before been released. Although the tape box is undated, it is almost certain that these recordings were made between 1952-1954. While better rehearsed than many, The Song Fellows represent a style of white southern gospel music that remains essentially unchanged a half century later. There were literally hundreds of groups performing in this manner, playing local church programs and traveling the south in beat-up station wagons. Often at the mercy of poorly tuned church  pianos, their vocal arrangements can be described as complex or cornball, depending on your point of view.
 
02 - "EVERY SUNDAY MORNING'' - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -  Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Between 1952-1954
Released: - 1988
First appearance: P-Vine Special (LP) 33rpm PLP-387-B-9 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - SOUTHBOUND GOSPEL TRAIN
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Song Fellows - Vocals Harmony
 
  
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©