CONTAINS

Sun 391-400 Series 

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Billy Adams & Jesse Carter
''TROUBLE IN MIND'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Richard M. Jones
Publisher: - Leeds Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 503 - Duet Billy Adams & Jesse Carter
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1964
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 391-A mono
TROUBLE IN MIND / LOOKIN' FOR MY MARY ANN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Adams – Vocal & Drums
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter – Vocal & Bass
Russ Carlton – Saxophone
Bill Yates – Piano

If you liked the formula on Adams' previous record, you're gonna love this one too. ''Trouble In Mind'' is a virtual clone of Miz Betty: a strong harmonica vocal with Jesse Carter on a piece of traditional black/folk material. The whole thing is packaged in a format that makes you want to blow the cobwebs off your ''How To Do The Stroll'' handbook. And on top of that, we have Russ Carlton's wailing sax adding a tough of melodic soul and some stinging guitar work by Lee Adkins. (HD)

 
Billy Adams
''LOOKIN' FOR MY MARY ANN'' - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Billy Adams-Jesse Carter
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 504
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1964
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 391-B mono
LOOKIN' FOR MY MARY ANN / TROUBLE IN MIND
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Adams – Vocal & Drums
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter – Bass
Russ Carlton – Saxophone
Bill Yates – Piano

The flipside finds the boys in their ''Hi-Heel Sneakers'' groove with another fine sax solo courtesy of Russ Carlton. If Tommy Tucker could have had just a penny for every bar band that took this riff to the bank six nights a week he might have retired in prosperity instead of dying in obscurity. There's even a sly vocal reference to Tucker's opus during the fade. (HD)

 
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"WIDE OPEN ROAD" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Johnny Cash Music
Matrix number: - U 505
Recorded: - Mid 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 392-A mono
WIDE OPEN ROAD / BELSHAZZAR
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-23 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass
Unknown Overdub - Steel Guitar

Its official. The bottom of the barrel had finally been reached. This is Johnny Cash's last release in 1964 on the original Sun label. For it, the powers that be had to go back, all the way back, to the beginning. How many Cash fans in May 1964 knew that they were listening to Cash's audition tape from nearly ten years earlier, featuring the likes of Mr. Red Kernodle on steel guitar? If its primitive you like, its primitive you get. Stan Kesler led an overdub session that could do little to disguise the raggedness of the original, although the song's gently baiting, self-deprecating humor was probably one of the factors that sold Sam Phillips on Johnny Cash all those years earlier. (HD)

 
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"BELSHAZZAR" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 506
Overdubbed on some pressings of LP 1275.
Recorded: - Summer 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 392-B mono
BELSHAZZAR / WIDE OPEN ROAD
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-24 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

On this side, "Belshazzar"   (misprint on label as ''Belshazah'')  had originally been passed over because of its religious leanings. That was just one of several bones of contention between Sam Phillips and Johnny Cash - Sun's unwillingness to give full commercial vent to Cash's spiritual side. Granted, there was one religious tune on Cash's original Sun LP, but "Belshazzar" was just a bit too much. Until the barrel had been scraped virtually clean in 1964, that is. Then it was hurriedly overdubbed with some annoyingly out of tune piano and foisted on the single-buying public. All in all, Cash entered the Sun catalogue a lot more impressively than he left in. (HD)

 
Smokey Joe
"SIGNIFYING MONKEY" - B.M.I. - 3:15
Composer: - Bill Taylor-Stanley Kesler-Joseph Bauch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 349
Recorded: - August 25, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 393-A mono
SIGNIFYING MONKEY / LISTEN TO ME BABY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-25 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Smokey Joe Baugh - Vocal and Piano
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Buddy Holobaugh - Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Bill Taylor - Trumpet
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar

The story about ''Monkey'', of course Smokey Joe, Stan Kesler, and Bill Taylor can no more take credit for writing this song than anyone else. Its origins are embedded deep in African American myth, as far back as Yoruba folklore according to some sources. One of America's preeminent African American scholars, Henry Louis Gates, wrote a book about literary signifying within black culture titled ''The Signifying Monkey - A Theory Of African American Literary Criticism''. The question to which we don't have a good answer is where Smokey Joe became acquainted with the potty-mouthed primate. His contribution was to clear it up, although Johnny Bernero remembered that Joe would sing the unexpurgated version from time to time. Once again, the backing is disarmingly simple. Bernero sustains the show with some rock-solid drumming while Buddy Holobaugh works a repeated boogie riff. There had been other attempts to get the ''Monkey'' on record, most recently by the Big Three Trio (featuring Willie Dixon) back in 1946. Cab Calloway and Count Basie covered Dixon song. Joe's version appears to have sold quite well in late 1955, certainly in excess of 25,000 copies, and the song reportedly gained him an invitation to play at the Apollo Theatre in New York, where his white face and blonde hair would have created a stir. Stan Kesler remembered the ''Monkey'', and prevailed upon Sam the Sham to record it for a label he co-owned, XL Records. It was the record before ''Woolly Bully'', but probably sold sufficiently well to incentivise Phillips to re-release this one in 1964.  (HD)(MH)

 
Smokey Joe
"LISTEN TO ME BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Joe Bauch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 348
Recorded: - August 25, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 393-B mono
LISTEN TO ME BABY / SIGNIFYING MONKEY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-26 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Smokey Joe Baugh - Vocal and Piano
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Buddy Holobaugh - Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Bill Taylor - Trumpet
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar

There is a wonderful drive to ''Listen To Me''. The little combo works the off-beat for all it's worth,  overlaying it with a steady boogie woogie. There are some early Jamaican rhythm and blues and ska  records that sound kinda like this. Johnny Bernero and Buddy Holobaugh power the record, and Stan  Kesler contributes some tasty work on steel. Bill Taylor can be heard on trumpet from time to time. The  lyrics are hardly groundbreaking but, once again, The Snearly Ranch gang reveals a genuine feeling for this  type of music. It is a matter for conjecture whether the patrons of the Bel Air lounge or the VFW club knew  what a treat were getting when this combo climbed on to the stage. Overlooked in the rush to deify the  rockabilly musicians who leaped out of Memphis the following year, this group combined black and white  styles with as much verve and enthusiasm as the rockabillies. In many ways, they comprised the best that  Memphis had to offer at that point.  (HD)(MH)

 
Billy Adams
''RECONSIDER BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Lowell Folsom
Publisher: - Arc Music
Matrix number: - U 350
Recorded: - September 21, 1964
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 394-A mono
RECONSIDER BABY / RUBY JANES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-27 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Adams – Vocal & Drums
Bill Yates – Piano
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter – Bass
Russ Carlton – Saxophone

Except for retreads from the Johnny Cash & Jerry Lee Lewis catalogues, material by Bill Adams and Bill Yates were by this point in 1964 the mainstay of the Sun release schedule. Whether consciously or otherwise, on his third release, drummer Billy Adams sounded quite a bit like Rosco Gordon. In fact, Adams' reading of ''Reconsider Baby'' didn't sound all that different from sides Rosco was cutting at the very same time for Vee Jay. Once again, Adams has borrowed the ubiquitous Tommy Tucker riff for his arrangement of the Lowell Fulson classic blues tune. This was a long way from Fulson's original version or, for that matter, from Elvis's well known cover on his 1960 ''Elvis Is Back'' LP. (HD)

 
Billy Adams
''RUBY JANE'' - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Billy Adams-Jesse Carter
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 351
Recorded: - September 21, 1964
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 394-B mono
RUBY JANES / RECONSIDER BABY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-28 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Adams – Vocal & Drums
Bill Yates – Piano
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter – Bass
Russ Carlton – Saxophone

Adams' arrangement includes a rather tuneless and stinging guitar solo instead of the usual melodic and bluesy sax break by Russ Carlton. The flipside offers very similar fare with a decidedly less distinguished lyric and vocal performance to grace it. Definitely a B-side. (HD)

 
Randy & The Radiants
''MOUNTAIN'S HIGH'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:30
Composer: - Dick St. John
Publisher: - Odin Music
Matrix number: - U 353
Recorded: - October 17, 1964
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 11, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 395-A mono
MOUNTAIN'S HIGH / PEEK-A-BOO
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Randy Jay Haspel – Vocal & Guitar
Bob Simon - Singer/Songwriter
Ed Marshall – Guitar
Howard Calhoun – Bass
Mike Gardner – Drums
Bill Slais – Tenor Saxophone

Here was the first real reflection of changing times in Memphis. Robert Gordon, a chronicler of Memphis in the 1960s and beyond, talks in his book ''It Came From Memphis'' about the cultural upheaval in Memphis that came in the wake of the Beatles. Department stores had promotions of Carnaby Street-styled clothes and hired local musicians to plat British Invasion-styled pop. There was a new crop of bands. To that point, the Radiants had been a teenage rhythm and blues band but they took an entirely new direction after the British Invasion. ''I was sixteen'', Randy Haspel told Robert Gordon. ''My partner Bob Simon had been writing songs since we were kids. When the Beatles hit we already had a band that was up and  working.  The next time we had rehearsal, people started to assume their roles. Mike Gardner loosened his trap cymbals and started to make those kinda slashing motions Ringo would make. I learned how to rock band and forth like John Lennon''.  The Radiants beat out the Devolles (later the Boxtops), the Scepters and the Gentrys in a locale battle of the bands, and became a big noise in Memphis. Their manager, Johnny Dark, was a friend of Knox Phillips. They played Knox's frat parties, then found themselves at Sun where they were the first band Knox produced. (HD)(CE)

 
Randy & The Radiants
''PEEK-A-BOO'' - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 352
Recorded: - October 17, 1964
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 11, 1964
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 395-B mono
PEEK-A-BOO / MOUNTAIN'S HIGH
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Randy Jay Haspel – Vocal & Guitar
Bob Simon - Singer/Songwriter
Ed Marshall – Guitar
Howard Calhoun – Bass
Mike Gardner – Drums
Bill Slais – Tenor Saxophone

''First time we met Sam Phillips'', Haspel continued, ''he'd just come in off the lake, he had on a yachtsman's hat, and sat in there and was just as charming as could be. After that it was, 'We'll do anything for you, Mr. Phillips'. Our initial response was a lot more esitant. We had big plans''. They warmed up with their set list, which included Dick and Dee-Dee's ''Mountain's High''. Sam Phillips came out of the control room. ''What're you doing? He ked. ''Well, we're just warming up, Mister Phillips''. ''Keep playing it'', Phillips told them. ''I like this''. The band looked at each other. ''Mister Phillips, this was a hit just a year or two ago''. Sam didn't care. ''I like it. I want you to do it''. It's as close as Sun Records ever came to garage music. There's a raw, amateurish edge, and, in its way, the music on both sides of this disc is as energetic and direct as most of the music Sun was recording on Union Avenue ten years earlier. It might not be Sonny Burgess, but it shows that there was still primitive music to be found on Sun in very different musical times. As ''Peek-A-Boo'' takes quite clear, this kind of music – homegrown, raw and melodic – represented America's answer to the British Invasion. Check out Rod Argent's ''She's Not There'' by the Zombies for a direct comparison. How ironic that this should come from the same label whose efforts ten years earlier had helped to shape the British music that now fuelled the likes of the Radiants. (HD)(CE)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis
''CARRY ME BACK TO OLD VIRGINIA'' - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - James Bland
Publisher: - Hal Leonard Corporation
Matrix number: - U 354 - Master with Count-In
Recorded: - August 28, 1963
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 15, 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 396-A mono
CARRY ME BACK TO OLD VIRGINIA / I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Scotty Moore – Acoustic Guitar
Roland Janes - Lead Guitar
W.R. Felts - Organ
Herman ''Hawk'' Hawkins – Bass
Morris ''Trap'' Tarrant – Drums

Strings consisting of
Anne Oldham, Noel Gilbert,
Joan Gilbert, Milton Friedstand
String Arranged by Vinnie Trauth

Chorus led by Hurshell Wayne Wiginton
 
''Carry Me Back To Old Virginia'' the single is another story, however. This was the only track originally issued from Jerry Lee's final Sun session. Jerry himself was already long gone and recording for Smash Records by the time Sun 396 hit the streets in March, 1965. ''Carry Me Back'' was literally the last thing Jerry Lee recorded for Sun Records, and it's a finely crafted piece of work featuring both Roland Janes and Scotty Moore on guitar. Immediately before this final take, Sam Phillips was captured on tape saying, ''We're broke and we're out of tape so this'll have to be the last one''. Undaunted as usual, Jerry Lee replies ''Ah ha, then let's get her!'' and proceeds to do just that. The track begins with Jerry's count off and a surprising 12 bar instrumental lead-in. Sam had been trying, with varying degrees of success, to slow the tempo over the last several takes and finally has his way here. The backbeat is still relatively heavy on this mis-tempo offering, and the guitar plays a strong counter rhythm. The restrained chorus gives the proceedings a very churchy feel. In fact, this is a very southern sounding record, capped by Jerry;s exclamations at the close. ''I'm bringing it on in'' are the final words he spoke (or sang) into a Sun microphone. By any account, Jerry rode off into the Sun-set just about as impressively and confidently as he came in. (HD)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis
''I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS'' - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated – Beckie Music
Matrix number: - U 355
Recorded: - January 4, 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 15, 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 396-B mono
I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS / CARRY MY BACK TO OLD VIRGINIA
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-4 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
R.W. McGee - Bass
Al Jackson - Drums

Jerry Lee talk and sings his way through ''I Know What It Means'', a leftover from the January 1962 session. The bass heavy arrangement is a curious hybrid of old timey and bluesy elements. All in all, this track is a perfect example of a B-side. (HD)

 
Gorgeous Bill
''TOO LATE TO RIGHT MY WRONG''' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Bill Yates
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated – Mara Music
Matrix number: - U 356 X
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1965
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 15, 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 397-A mono
TOO LATE TO RIGHT MY WRONG / CARLEEN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-5 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Yates – Vocal & Piano
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter – Bass
Russ Carlton – Saxophone
Billy Adams – Drums
Jesse Carter or Billy Adams - Vocal Harmony

There's no denying it. Bill Yates' second release for Sun was a damn nice record. In fact, it's hard to imagine why ''Too Late To Right My Wrong'' didn't catch its of pop or rhythm and blues coin in March of 1965. It's got that passionale, slightly off-meter harmony vocal that made Sam Cooke's ''Bring It On Home To Me'' a classic.  It's also got some surprisingly mellow sax work (Russ Carlton doing his magic yet again) in a vein not far removed from Billy Vaughn. All in all, this one had the legs to compete. (HD)

 
Gorgeous Bill
''CARLEEN'' - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Bill Yates
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated – Hara Music
Matrix number: - U 357 X
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1965
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 15, 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 397-B mono
CARLEEN / TOO LATE TO RIGHT MY WRONG
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-6 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Yates – Vocal & Piano
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter – Bass
Russ Carlton – Saxophone
Billy Adams – Drums

Which is more than one can say about the flipside. Derivative is too kind a word. The opening instrumental figure bears much more than a passing similarity to Orbison's ''Oh! Pretty Woman'' (which was still getting big airplay when this was recorded). If this record had ever received significant airplay, it's also a cinch ''Lucille'' would have sued ''Carleen''. (HD)

 
Randy & The Radiants
''MY WAY OF THINKING'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Donna Weiss
Publisher: - Scion Music
Matrix number: - U 360
Recorded: - September 16, 1965
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 25, 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 398-A mono
MY WAY OF THINKING / TRUTH FROM MY EYES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-7 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Randy Jay Haspel – Vocal & Guitar
Bob Simon - Singer/Songwriter
Ed Marshall – Guitar
Howard Calhoun – Bass
Mike Gardner – Drums
Bill Slais – Tenor Saxophone

Once again, Randy and the boys prove they were listening to their radios in the summer of 1965. ''My Way  Of Thinking'' was written by Donna Weiss, who went on to write ''Bette Davis Eyes'', although Ray Davies  of the Kinks might be forgiven for thinking he was hearing an out-take of ''You Really Got Me''. Likewise,  the Supremes seem to have been in heavy rotation when ''Truth From My Eyes'' was assembled. (HD)

 
Randy & The Radiants
''TRUTH FROM MY EYES'' - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 361
Recorded: - September 16, 1965
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 25, 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 398-B mono
TRUTH FROM MY EYES / MY WAY OF THINKING
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-8 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Randy Jay Haspel – Vocal & Guitar
Bob Simon - Singer/Songwriter
Ed Marshall – Guitar
Howard Calhoun – Bass
Mike Gardner – Drums
Bill Slais – Tenor Saxophone

Radiants member Bob Simon wrote ''Truth From My Eyes'', but Sam Phillips was much keener on ''My  Way Of Thinking''. ''We thought 'My Way Of Thinking' was embarrassing'', Randy Haspel told Robert  Gordon. ''Soon 'Truth' was number one on WMPS, and we were in the papers every night, but WHBQ  wouldn't play it. (The program director) said, 'We won't play a Sun record'. I said, 'What're you talking  about?' I told Knox who fired off an angry letter to WHBQ, and as the song was winding up on WMPS it  got a whole new lease on life at WHBQ''. Sadly, Sun no longer had the wherewithal to translate this local  attention into national action.  Jud Phillips was back in the fold, and he planned a tour of the South that  never quite happened. ''It's tough to think you peaked when you were seventeen years old'', said Haspel. ''It  seemed everything was possible, anything could happen, and it was all gonna come true''.

Recently (1998) , Bob Simon has returned to Phillips as a songwriter. For several years, he was in Sam  Francisco, then Nashville where he wrote Reba McEntire number 1 hit ''What Am I Gonna Do About You'',  Randy went to New York, auditioned for John Hammond at Columbia, tried the Nashville experience, and  then he too returned to Memphis. The Radiants still play in town and recorded an unreleased album for the  Sun Studio label in 1991. (HD)

 
Bill Yates
''BIG BIG WORLD'' - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - West
Publisher: - Studio Music
Matrix number: - U 362
Recorded: - January 11, 1966
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 1, 1966
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 399-A mono
BIG BIG WORLD / I DROPPED MY M & M'S
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-9 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Yates – Vocal & Piano
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter – Bass
Russ Carlton – Saxophone
Billy Adams – Drums

Bill Yates' final Sun release stems from a January 11, 1966 session that yielded four titles, two of which remained unissued. ''Big, Big World'' is plainly the side to be reckoned with. This slice of organ-based impassioned Memphis soul would have been at home on a William Bell collection. Yates is a credible vocalist and he knows the genre back and forth – his skill honed by years of nightly club gigs. (HD)

 
Bill Yates
''I DROPPED MY M & M'S'' - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Bill Yates
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated – Hara Music
Matrix number: - U 363
Recorded: - January 11, 1966
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 1, 1966
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 399-B mono
I DROPPED MY M & M'S / BIG BIG WORLD
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-10 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Yates – Vocal & Piano
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter – Bass
Russ Carlton – Saxophone
Billy Adams – Drums

This release closed Sun's 300 series at a time when Memphis was again prominently displayed on the musical map. This time, however, it was those upstart competitors, Stax and Hi, who were leading the with Stan Kesler's X-L productions in the running and Quinton Claunch's Goldwax Records coming on strong. (HD)

 
The Jesters
''CADILLAC MAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Tommy Minga
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 367
Recorded: - January 22, 1966
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 1, 1966
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 400-A mono
CADILLAC MAN / MY BABE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-12 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jim Dickinson – Vocal & Piano
Teddy Paige (Edward LaPaglio) – Guitar
Jerry Phillips – Guitar & Maracas
Billy Wulfers – Bass
Eddie Robertson – Drums

The only label not doing so well in Memphis music's second (or third) coming was Sun. By 1966, it was operating more like a small, family-owned local label than one at the hub of an internationally known recording center, never mind one that had delivered icons to the world's door. Sam owned it, his older son Knox, Artist & Repertoire man, it and – with this release by the Jesters – his younger brother Jerry recorded for it. The Jesters were led by guitarist Teddy Paige (Edward LaPaglio), and a rather lackluster vocalist, Tommy Minga. Paige had something of a proto-punk attitude (his song introductions included the winning ''Here's another one you're not gonna like'').  He had written a few songs, ''Cadillac Man'' among them. Sam Phillips sat in on the early sessions and hated Minga's singing, so Page called in Jim Dickinson, ostensibly to play piano. Minga wasn't told about the session. ''I read the lyrics off notebook paper while we cut it'', Dickinson remembered. ''Sam had a suit and tie on, and he was walking around with a clipboard in his hand, writing down microphones and stuff. I got real excited. I'd never really met him. That session was the first time. I felt the hand of a master. I looked into black pools of madness in Sam's eyes and I saw the same thing Elvis and Howlin' Wolf saw''.  Knox worked the board and had the drums feeding into the same channel as the piano. When he increased the input level on the piano during the break the drums bled into the piano microphone with an eerie echo that Dickinson called ''pure Africa''. The record didn't do well, and Dickinson, who was under contract to Bill Justis's New Beale Street Sheiks, never joined the group. (HD)

 
The Jesters
''MY BABE'' - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Willie Dixon
Publisher: - Arc Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 366
Recorded: - January 22, 1966
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 1, 1966
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 400-B mono
MY BABE / CADILLAC MAN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-2-11 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jim Dickinson – Vocal & Piano
Teddy Paige (Edward LaPaglio) – Guitar
Jerry Phillips – Guitar & Maracas
Billy Wulfers – Bass
Eddie Robertson – Drums

How and why Tommy Minga's voice was deemed unsuitable for issued wax is unclear, but  once it was decided to bring Jim Dickinson in on piano and lead vocals, ''Cadillac Man'' was  transformed into another creature all together. Rather than a snarling, Them/Rolling Stones  styled garage rocker, it became a throw back to an earlier era at Sun, that of full throated  screamers like Sonny Burgess and Billy Lee Riley. Sam Phillips was said to be highly excited  by the possibilities, and secured Jim Dickinson (who had previously cut two singles under  the tutelage of Sun alumni Bill Justis) contract release and put the band back in the studio to  cut a/b-side, a version of Little Walter's ''My Babe'' (itself a version of Sister Rosette Tharpe's  version of the old gospel standard ''This Train''). ''Cadillac Man'' b/w ''My Babe'' was issued by  Sun in 1966 and died a quick death. In a year (1966) that saw the ''Shadows Of Night'', ''13th  Floor Elevators'' and ''Standells'' hit the charts, the Dickinson led version of ''Cadillac Man''  had probably less commercial appeal than the material cut with Tommy Minga singing. It was  also the beginning of the end for the Jesters. There would be no follow up. At some point  they recorded a version of Smokey Robinson's ''What So Good About Goodbye'' with Jimmy  Day singing, but it too sat on the shelf for decades.  (HD)(MH)

 


 

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