CONTAINS

Sun 371-380 Series 

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Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumping Piano
''MONEY'' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Bradford-Gordy Jr.
Publisher: - Jobett Music
Matrix number: - U 461
Recorded: - September 21, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - November 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 371-A mono
MONEY / BONNIE B
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-9 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
J Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Wayne Moss - Guitar
Jerry Kennedy - Guitar
Bob Moore - Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon - Drums
Jerry Tuttle - Organ
Jim Hall - Saxophone
Homer Boots Randolph - Saxophone
Karl Gavin - Saxophone
John Wilkin - Horn
Donald Sheffield - Horn
Cameron Mullis - Horn
William Bill McElhiney - Horn

Unknown - Vocal Chorus

Jerry's credentials as an rhythm and blues artist were deepening with every release. Here, he takes on the Motown catalogue with his version of ''Money'', written by Barrett Strong the previous year. In truth, the song was not yet considered a 'classic' when the decision was made for Jerry to record it.  Even the Beatles may not yet have discovered it. This Nashville session from September, 1961 is notable in one important way. Never before had Jerry worked with more horn players. The Union logs list six of them which, along with the usual rhythm session, meant that Sun was paying some serious front money for this date. 
 
Sam C. Phillips was not to be cheated. What he paid for, he heard! Even the liner notes to Jerry's second album, which featured this track, touted Jerry working with ''a big brass sound'', adding ''See if you don't feel he's perfectly at home and in facts shows off the brass to great advantage''. Jerry reads the now famous lyric  against Indian wardrums and his piano manages to hold its own against the blazing horns. The trumpets really cut loose during the final twelve bars and there are times when it's difficult to know where the shrill horns stop and the shrieking chorus starts. (HD)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumping Piano
''BONNIE B'' - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 462
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 371-B mono
BONNIE B / MONEY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-10 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
W.S. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

What better antidote for your aching ears than the sweet rolling tempo of ''Bonnie B''. This side remains one of the most enjoyable items in Jerry's Sun catalogue. Its lovely feel is established during the 6 bar intro when Jerry offers a barrelhouse right hand chord against some two string guitar work neatly lifted from Bill Doggett's ''Honky Tonk''. The mixture works well and is repeated during the piano solo. If you listen closely, you'll find a clear case for unconscious plagiarism here between sweet Miz Bonnie and Melvin Endsley's classic ''Singing The Blues''. It's hard to guess composer Charles Underwood's lyrical intent here. What is the song really telling us? After extolling the virtues of sweet young Bonnie (Underwood's future wife, by the way), Jerry makes it clear that just because she's underage doesn't mean she ought to hesitate about satisfying his lust. Was this what radio programmers needed to hear with the memory of the childbride scandal not so distant? (HD)

 
Ray Smith
''TRAVLIN' SALESMAN'' - B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Nelson-Crutchfield
Publisher: - Champion Music – Tree Music
Matrix number: - U 463
Recorded: - October 24, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - November 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 372-A mono
TRAVLIN' SALESMAN – I WON'T MISS YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-11 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Hargus ''Pig'' Robbins – Piano
Stanley Walker – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Unknown – Guitar
Unknown – Drums
Unknown – Brass Section
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

If anyone could cope with changing times in the record business, it was Ray Smith. The man was a veritable chameleon. As his personal appearances of the day confirmed, he could offer convincing efforts in styles ranging from Elvis Presley and Fran Sinatra. What was a little bluesy funk to a man like that?  The Ray Smith who recorded the next single and one more released in early 1962, was quite different from the rockabilly pretender Sun fans had come to adore during his 1958 stint with the label. This gravelly voiced midtempo blues shouter was a perfect fit for the late 1961 marketplace. There's a mandatory funky tempo and backup white chicks singing like they're in black church. (HD)

 
Ray Smith
''I WON'T MISS YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 464
Recorded: - October 24, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - November 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 372-B mono
I WON'T MISS YOU / TRAVLIN' SALESMAN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-12 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Hargus ''Pig'' Robbins – Piano
Stanley Walker – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Unknown – Guitar
Unknown – Drums
Unknown – Brass Section
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

The material here is anything but ordinary. Smith has taken all the old 'traveling salesman' jokes and turned them inside out. He's the 'husband' of the traveling salesman's girl, and he's sick of all the crap she's buying from her salesman boyfriend. You had to have a taste for the bizarre to connect with, much less understand this storyline! Smith uses his emotive voice well, phrasing adventurously against the foursquare rhythm. He even tries some rather grating bass growls during the instrumental solo and again at the fade. One way or another this song was likely to garner some radio play, although it stopped very short of chart status.  The flipside of ''I Won't Miss You'' is a soul ballad from the practiced pen of Stan Kesler, who had placed similar material (''Playing For Keeps'', ''The Thrill Of Your Love'') with Elvis for the past five years. (HD)

 
Rayburn Anthony
''HOW WELL I KNOW''' - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Buddy Killen-Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Tree Publishing
Matrix number: - U 465
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 19, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 373-A mono
HOW WILL I KNOW / BIG DREAM
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-13 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rayburn Anthony – Vocal
Carl Mann - Piano
Probably Musicians
Eddie Bush – Guitar
R.W. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson – Bass
Tony Austin - Drums
More Details Unknown
Vinnie Trout – Strings Arranged
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

This is a really unusual record. ''How Well I Know'' is a fairly conventional and highly competent Nashville ballad that gives us a deeper look at Anthony's crackling baritone voice. In his own rather limited way, the man was a stylist Groaner to be sure.  This was undeniably a country pop record, but, even so, it's worth mentioning that most country crossover records in 1962 did not feature mellow saxophones in place of steel guitars. (HD)

 
Rayburn Anthony
''BIG DREAM'' - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Tony Austin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 466
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 19, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 373-B mono
BIG DREAM / HOW WELL I KNOW
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-14 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rayburn Anthony – Vocal
Carl Mann - Piano
Probably Musicians
Eddie Bush – Guitar
R.W. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson – Bass
Tony Austin - Drums
More Details Unknown
Vinnie Trout – Strings Arranged
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

''Big Dream'' is where things start to get interesting. Anthony's connection to Carl Mann and the Jackson, Tennessee sound is quite apparent. There's almost no difference between the sound of ''Big Dream'' and the opening to Mann's ''Rockin' Love''.  Whereas Mann broke free and turned his song into a rocker, Anthony maintains this taut little rhythmic riff lead by sticks on a closed hi-hat. Those alternating choruses (''Big dreams sometimes fall apart...'') break some of the tension, but certainly not all of it. And just when you think you're clear, Wham! You're back into that talk-sing ''Yeh, once I Had a big dream'' part of the cycle. In truth, this record is a tape loop. It could have ended after one run through, gone through a second or third, or faded after a fourth try. It doesn't matter. Nothing changes and nothing develops lyrically or musically. But for some reason, this works really well, and when we start the final fade midway into cycle number 3, it feels like, ''yeh, old Rayburn is 'really' stuck. He really 'did' have a big dream that went nowhere''. You've got to love Ray's voicing on the word broken. There's no telling what this guy might have done during Sun's golden era. (HD)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumping Piano
''I'VE BEEN TWISTIN''' - B.M.I. - 3:21
Composer: - Herman Parker
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 467
Recorded: - January 4, 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 19, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 374-A mono
I'VE BEEN TWISTIN' / RAMBLIN' ROSE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
R.W. McGee - Bass
Al Jackson - Drums

Excluding Jerry's earliest records for Sun at the start of his career five years later, this was undoubtedly his strongest two-sided release in memory. Indeed, none of his subsequent releases on the original Sun label would even come close to the standard. Both sides, ''I've Been Twistin'''and ''Rambling Rose'' deserved to have been hits in terms of their musical standard and their synchrony with the marketplace in early 1962. Sadly, neither dented the charts. It's a wonder Sam Phillips (and Jerry himself didn't wonder, ''If you can't make money like this, what's the point?''. ''Twistin'''is a wonderful remake of ''Feelin' Good'', Little Junior Parker's Sun classic from July 1953. Jerry has retained all its zany charm and backwoods folkways, and force-fed them into the twist craze. Instead of the disaster this should have been, the record retains a surprising amount of energy and good nature 35 years later. It my seems like Jerry was reprising 'ancient' material here, yet his source was less than a decade old when he tried his hand at it. It has been four times that long since Jerry's record was released in 1962. (HD)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumping Piano
''RAMBLIN' ROSE'' - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Fred Burch-Marijohn Wilkin
Publisher: - Cedar Wood Music
Matrix number: - U 468 - Extended Master
Recorded: - September 21, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - January 19, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 374-B mono
RAMBLIN' ROSE / I'VE BEEN TWISTIN'
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Wayne Moss - Guitar
Jerry Kennedy - Guitar
Bob Moore - Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon - Drums
Jerry Tuttle - Organ
Jim Hall - Saxophone
Homer Boots Randolph - Saxophone
Karl Gavin - Saxophone
John Wilkin - Horn
Donald Sheffield - Horn
Cameron Mullis - Horn
William Bill McElhiney - Horn
Unknown - Vocal Chorus

''Ramblin' Rose'', while not typical Jerry Lee fare, is a powerful, bluesy effort that holds a surprising amount of tension throughout its nearly three minutes running time. You know you're listening to something special within that first four bars of instrumental work. The performance is very sexy, without any of the overt gurgles Jerry used to insert gratuitously into his material. The track, not to be confused with the insipid Nat Cole of the same name, features powerful drumming and piano work. Not even the chorus can diminish this one. Sam Phillips' Nashville connection probably acquired the song; it was by Fred Burch (who had co-written ''Tragedy'') and Marijohn Wilkin, together they would go on to write Jimmy Dean's hits, ''PT 109'' and ''Big Bad John''. This, a finer song in every way, stiffed. (HD)

 
Ray Smith
''CANDY DOLL'' - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Marijohn Wilkin-Fred Burch
Publisher: - Cedar Wood
Matrix number: - U 469
Recorded: - October 24, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - February 2, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 375-A mono
I WON'T MISS YOU / TRAVLIN' SALESMAN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Hargus ''Pig'' Robbins – Piano
Stanley Walker – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Unknown – Guitar
Unknown – Drums
Unknown – Brass Section
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

''Candy Doll'' is a tougher record to figure out. Smith was drawing material from Nashville's top publishers and composers – these were hardly homegrown efforts in Memphis. Yet, it's hard to see the hook in this purposefully crafted pop record. Was it the repeated phrasing of the title? Or the growling horn solo? The wailing chorus? It didn't sell and, sadly, marked the end of Smith's recording career for the Sun label. (HD)

 
Ray Smith
''HEY BOSS MAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Benny Joy
Publisher: - Champion Music
Matrix number: - U 470
Recorded: - October 24, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - February 2, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 375-B mono
HEY BOSS MAN / CANDY DOLL
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Hargus ''Pig'' Robbins – Piano
Stanley Walker – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Unknown – Guitar
Unknown – Drums
Unknown – Brass Section
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

This was Ray Smith's second and final Sun release from his post-rockabilly period. As on ''Travlin' Salesman'', Smith is in his white soul bag here with both sides of this outing. ''Hey Boss Mann'' is the standard working man's complaint. For all intents and purposes, this is a Charlie Rich record. The material, instrumental sound and even vocal are not far from the material Rich would be recorded for RCA within a year or two.

Original pressings of this disc revealed how powerful the Twist had become in dictating the music marketplace. The label was printed as ''Hey Boss Man (Twist)''. How bizarre had things become when an essentially black song about an unfair bossman was written, performed and marketed by white men, and sold as the basis of a dance craze!. Chubby Checker had a lot to answer for. (HD)

 
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"BLUE TRAIN" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Johnny Cash-Billy Smith
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 471 - Take 2
Recorded: - May 28, 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 27, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 376-A mono
BLUE TRAIN / BORN TO LOSE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

"Blue Train" is another matter. This is really vintage Johnny Cash, and must have delighted his legion of fans who lamented the loss of the early Johnny Cash sound. Although early pressings of the record credited the song to Cash, in reality the song wasn't an original. The mistake seems natural enough since composer Billy Smith had done his share of listening to early Cash records. In truth, compared to vintage Cash train songs, this one was a little selfconscious and lyrically awkward in places. Cash's stumbling over the words ("as half as bad") doesn't help matters, but on balance this was more than Cash fans had dared to hope for so long after the departure of their man from Sun in 1958. Luther's four bar solos sandwiched between verses add a nice touch and that steel guitar sound on the intro had pickers scratching their heads.

It would be two years before another Johnny Cash single was issued on the original Sun label, and it would be his last. (HD)

 
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"BORN TO LOSE" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - U 472 - Overdubbed Master with Chorus Before Release *
Recorded:- May 15, 1958 - Additional Echo Added
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 27, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 376-B mono
BORN TO LOSE / BLUE TRAIN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson – Piano

Overdubbed Session Probably March 27, 1961
Phillips Studio, 317 Seventh Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee
The Confederates
were a barbershop quartet that performed in the 1950s and 1960s.
The group formed in September 1953 at a SPEBSQSA chapter meeting in Memphis, Tennessee
They consisting of
George Evans - Tenor
Dave LaBonte - Lead
Bill "Bus" Busby – Baritone
Wally Singleton - Bass

Cash's somber reading of "Born To Lose" fits the mood of this country standard like a glove. Composer Ted Daffan could have retired on the royalties he earned from all the versions of this tune since its 1942 copyright. Cash's relatively workmanlike vocal has been engulfed by a sea of echo, and the chorus liberally applied. All things considered, this was not an unreasonable entry into the 1962 country sweepstakes, along with Ray Charles' mega-selling pop version. (HD)

 
Harold Dorman
"IN THE BEGINNING" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Carroll
Publisher: - Sandra Pure Gold Music – Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 473
Recorded: - Unknown Date Early 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 4, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 377-A mono
IN THE BEGINNING / WAIT TIL' SATURDAY NIGHT
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Harold Kenneth Dorman – Vocal
Roland Janes – Guitar
O.T. Shaw – Bass
Al Jackson – Drums
Bobby Wood – Piano
Martin Willis - Tenor Saxophone
Vinnie Trauth - Horn

For just about a year, ending with this release in April 1962, Harold Dorman was one of Sun's main stable of artists. Three releases in 11 months suggests that the powers that be saw potential in Dorman's work. They were right. Dorman was a major artist waiting to happen. He deserved far more than his moment of stardom from ''Mountain Of Love''. Every one of his Sun releases, and this is no exception, reveal an inventive spirit, a fine voice, and a real flair for bringing southern feeling to his music, while acknowledging contemporary trends. The playing in ''In The Beginning'' is hot. It's clear that these guys are fired up. The bass work is adventurous; it's all over those changes. And Stax/Hi stalwart Al Jackson's crisply recorded drumming is truly inspired. The guy just can't sit still. Complete with riffing horns by Martin Willis and Vincent Trauth, this is a tight little combo and Dorman responds with a fine vocal. There is enough groaning in his delivery to keep even Conway Twitty happy.

The theme of this quasi-Biblical epic is a little unusual and rather negative; ''Love hasn't been as good as it used to be ever since the devil got into the act. Stuff used to be simple. You find a woman, she loves you, done! Now, there's deception, sin, heartache, all that misery. Let me give you an example from my own life''. And he does. There is a moment early on, when Dorman starts talking about the ocean end true devotion. Can Human Emotion be far behind? Thankfully, he leaves that territory to Bobby Wood, who, incidentally, was playing the piano on this session. (HD)

 
Harold Dorman
"WAIT TIL' SATURDAY NIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Harold Dorman-Gann
Publisher: - Gando Music – Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 474
Recorded:- Unknown Date Early 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 4, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 377-B mono
WAIT TIL' SATURDAY NIGHT / IN THE BEGINNING
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Harold Kenneth Dorman – Vocal
Roland Janes – Guitar
O.T. Shaw – Bass
Al Jackson – Drums
Bobby Wood – Piano
Martin Willis - Tenor Saxophone
Vinnie Trauth - Horn

If ''In The Beginning'' has a dark, brooding side, there is no such feeling on the flip-side. The contrast is striking. ''Wait 'Til Saturday Night'' is strictly teen-oriented fare, although Dorman manages to give his vocal chops a workout, displaying some admirable range. The spirit of ''Hallelujah! I Love Her So'' hangs over the proceedings as the chord changes again show the strong influence gospel music had acquired over the pop marketplace in 1962. (HD)

 
Tony Rossini
''JUST AROUND THE CORNER'' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Padgett
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 476
Recorded: - Probably August 6, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 4, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 378-A mono
JUST AROUND THE CORNER / (MEET ME) AFTER SCHOOL
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-24 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tony Rossini – Vocal
More Details Unknown

''Just Around The Corner'' is not typical Tony Rossini fare. Whereas ''(Meet Me) After School'' fairly bristles with teenage angst (note the references to the soda shop and angry teachers), ''Just Around The Corner'' is a totally adult song, with a Forties sensibility to the lyrics. It hints at the career as a lounge singer that Tony enjoyed. (HD)(CE)

 
Tony Rossini
''(MEET ME) AFTER SCHOOL'' - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Davidson
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 475
Recorded: - Probably August 6, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 4, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 378-B mono
(MEET ME) AFTER SCHOOL / JUST AROUND THE CORNER
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-23 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tony Rossini – Vocal
More Details Unknown

''Sam was there for the mixing on those sessions'', Tony remembers. ''Sam and Scotty would bring me in late at night sometimes to re-do parts. Even as a kid, I knew there was something special about going to Sun. Sam had the most beguiling personality. It was like you were going to see the King of the Mountain. Seeing Jerry Lee Lewis, even Elvis was no big deal. Elvis used to pull my sister's ponytails, but there was something about Sam''. (HD)(CE)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis
''SWEET LITTLE SIXTEEN''' - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Chuck Berry
Publisher: - Chuck Berry Music - Arc Music
Matrix number: - U 477
Recorded: - January 5, 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - July 7, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 379-A mono
SWEET LITTLE SIXTEEN / HOW'S MY EX TREATING YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-25 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes – Guitar
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Jay W. Brown – Bass
Al Jackson – Drums
Shirley Sisk - Organ

Jerry began his June, 1962 session with ''Sweet Little Sixteen''. What might have simply been a warmup take to get things going, apparently had more planning behind it. This song was tried on at least three occasions, suggesting that it was being groomed for release right from the start. Jerry rarely turned in a bad version of a Chuck Berry song and this is no exception. It's surprisingly laid-back compared with Chuck Berry's original, and it is revealing to note that on at least one of the surviving alternate versions Jerry storms its way through the changes and includes some driving piano work. When it came time to select a version for release, the powers at Sun rightly concluded that laid-back and mellow were the order of the day. (HD)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis
''HOW'S MY EX TREATING YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Vic McAlpin
Publisher: - Tree Music
Matrix number: - U 478
Recorded: - June 14, 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - July 7, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 379-B mono
HOW'S MY EX TREATING YOU / SWEET LITTLE SXTEEN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804 DI-4-26 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes – Guitar
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Jay W. Brown – Bass
Al Jackson – Drums
Shirley Sisk - Organ

If one side of this track below was geared to kiddies, albeit the mellow ones, this side ''How's My Ex Treating You'' was plainly adult fare. The spirit of Marty Robbins and his hits ''Don't Worry'' and ''It's Your World'' loom large over the proceedings here as J. W. Brown and his electric bass growl their way through the arrangement. Even Shirley Sisk, last glimpsed sitting at the organ on Sun 365, supports Jerry Lee on this one. There is a deep bluesy vein to this Vic McAlpin tune, thus laying the groundwork for Jerry's pedigree in the country market for the next several decades.

In September 1962, this became the last charted record on the Sun label – some nine years after the first. It was a sad commentary on Jerry Lee's declining fortunes and Sam Phillips' declining commitment to the business that it rose to the rather lowly peak of number 95. (HD)

 
Tony Rossini & The Chippers
''YOU MAKE IT SOUND SO EASY''' - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Reynolds
Publisher: - Jack Music
Matrix number: - U 481
Recorded: - Unknown Date June 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - July 10, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 380-A mono
YOU MAKE IT SOUND SO EASY / NEW GIRL IN TOWN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tony Rossini – Vocal

The Chippers
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Roland Janes – Guitar
Larry Mohoburac - Piano
Booker T Jones – Organ
Steve Cropper – Guitar
Lewie Steinberg – Bass
Al Jackson – Drums
Unknown Vocal Chorus

Tony does his share of belting on the flipside (although he's not exactly working the same territory as Wynomie Harris). The chorus is appropriately teen sounding as they implore him ''Tony, won't you love me'', but the guy just isn't sure. Yeah, you're thinking Elvis or Billy Riley wouldn't have hesitated. And Jerry Lee would have been finished and out of the backdoor already. Unfortunately, these were different times. About the most positive thing one can say for ''You Make It Sound So Easy'' is that Larry Mohoberac turns in some fine piano work toward the end of the side. (HD)

 
Tony Rossini & The Chippers
''NEW GIRL IN TOWN'' - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Steve Cropper-Richy
Publisher: - East Publishers
Matrix number: - U 482
Recorded: - Unknown Date June 1962
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - July 10, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 380-B mono
NEW GIRL IN TOWN / YOU MAKE IT SOUND SO EASY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805 DI-1-2 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tony Rossini – Vocal

The Chippers
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Roland Janes – Guitar
Larry Mohoburac - Piano
Booker T Jones – Organ
Steve Cropper – Guitar
Lewie Steinberg – Bass
Al Jackson – Drums
Unknown Vocal Chorus

By July 1962, when this record was released, Tony Rossini's name was appearing more frequently on Sun labels than any artist's. This was his fourth record, with yet another in store one year in the future. ''New Girl In Town'' is a commercial outing aimed squarely at the teen market as it sounded nearly four decades ago.  Tony plays a high school student trying to con his parents into going away during vacation time so he can be alone with the nymphet in the song's title. Most fans of Sun's golden age will turn a disdainful or deaf ear to this music, rightly arguing that it comes from a different universe than classic recordings by Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis. 
 
The irony, of course, is that both Scotty Moore and Roland Janes – the guitarists responsible for those vintage sides – played on these titles by Rossini. In fact, throw in the nucleus of Booker T and the MG's as well. This is simply the kind of music that Memphis's finest was capable of making when they turned their attention to commercial teen fare in the early 1960s. (HD)

 
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