CONTAINS

PI 3551-3560 Audio Series 

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Sonny Burgess
"A KISS GOODNITE" - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Albert Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 368
Recorded: - Possibly 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3551-A mono
A KISS GOODNITE / SADIE'S BACK IN TOWN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-4 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
J.C. Caughron - Guitar
Frankie Siddeth - Electric Bass
Raymond Thompson - Drums
Unknown - Piano
 
"A Kiss Goodnite" reveals the romantic, or at least the less frenetic side of Sonny Burgess. History has shown this to be a fine, engaging track. The shuffle rhythm works to perfection and guitarist J.C. Caughron has some fun with the vibrato arm of his guitar. It is disappointing that no more Sonny Burgess material was issued in the three years of life still remaining in Phillips International (and six years in Sun). In particular, Sonny's "Find My Baby For Me", recorded with Roy Orbison, would have made a wonderful and worthy single.
 
This record caught the ear of someone on the Albert Embankment in London, and it became the only of Sonny's records to be released overseas while under contract to Sun. (HD)(CE)

 
Sonny Burgess
"SADIE'S BACK IN TOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Albert Burgess-Harry Adams
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 367
Recorded: - Possibly 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3551-B mono
SADIE'S BACK IN TOWN / A KISS GOODNITE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
J.C. Caughron - Guitar
Frankie Siddeth - Electric Bass
Raymond Thompson - Drums and Woody Woodpecker' Noises
Unknown - Piano
 
The Sun log books show that Sonny Burgess returned to Sun in 1959 and cut another single that was issued in January 1960 on the Phillips International label: "Sadie's Back In Town" b/w "A Kiss Goodnite". However, Sonny believes the single was recorded earlier, and released on Phillips International to try and breach a new market, was his last for Sam Phillips. With the unpredictability of Sun paperwork, he could be correct. Oddly, the record sported a thin, poorly balanced sound but was nonetheless true to the Burgess credo.
 
Spirited as ever, Sonny turns in an enthusiastic piece of nonsense, surrounded by a group of sidemen who had obviously never seen the inside of a Prozac bottle. Sonny recalls that his brother-in-law, Harry Adams, came up with "Sadie's Back In Town", although Jimmie Rodgers might very well recognize a good portion of the words and melody as belonging to his 1928 song "My Little Lady".
 
confirm his repeated difficulties) and he manages to blow his solo here as well. But, again, feeling prevailed over perfection.  A final note: That little spoken intro was not accomplished by speeding up the tape in the style of David Seville's "Chipmunks". One of the guys in Sonny's band, drummer Raymond Thompson, could actually speak that way. It seemed to work at gigs, so they decided to include it on one of their records. (HD)

 
Charlie Rich
"LONELY WEEKENDS" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 369 - Overdubbed Chorus
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 1, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3552-A mono
LONELY WEEKENDS / EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-5 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
Martin Willis - Baritone Saxophone
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willes - Baritone Saxophone
 
Overdubbed
The Gene Lowery consisting of
A. Davis, B. Gross, D. Horton, P. Jacobs, C. Walker and P. Walker
Vocal Chorus & Handclaps
 
"Lonely Weekend" is the record that first put Charlie Rich on the map. Interestingly, it was his third single that hit big time, just as had been the case with Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins. This time they finally got it right. "Lonely Weekend" was just what Sam Phillips had asked for: "Big Man" without religion. The version that hit the market in January 1960 was quite different from the tight, tense, passionate small combo effort that Charlie left the can in June 1959. After the session, Sam assigned the tapes to Charles Underwood, who brought them to the new studio at Madison Avenue, for overdubbing. Underwood added the dreaded Gene Lowery Singers, a ton of echo, and some highly unusual rimshots during Martin Willis' baritone sax break. "I never liked that final version as much as the way we originally cut it", observed guitarist Roland Janes recently. "But then I doubt our original would have sold as well".  (HD)

 
Charlie Rich
"EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 370
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 1, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3552-B mono
EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG / LONELY WEEKENDS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-6 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
Martin Willis - Baritone Saxophone
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willes - Baritone Saxophone
 
If ''Lonely Weekends'' hadn't taken off like a rocket, this flipside ''Everything I Do Is Wrong'' might have stood a chance of chart success on shock value alone. Records simply didn't sound like this in January 1960. If you want a one-word description of this record it's ''relentless''. It just keeps coming at you. The song is built around just two chords - which is quite a rarity. Its chorus or release, if that's what it is, involves the same two chords. There's no movement other than the key changes. Just verse after verse after verse separated by key modulations (it starts in G and ends up in A) that are signaled by the wonderful extended single-stroke drum rolls of Jimmy Van Eaton.
 
The song is based on essentially the same recipe as ''Lonely Weekends'', minus the romantic angle and the commercial overdubs. The anchor is, once again, Jimmy M. Van Eaton working his bass drum front and center in a dum / da dum beat that drives everything the tension intact. Charlie Rich's vocal is as virile and dramatic as it's ever been; his piano is solid; the lyric is clever, even if it's about a loser, and Martin Willis's baritone sax, played directly into the bass drum mike, rivets our attention for the eight bars it's on display. Charlie knew what he wanted and sang the solo to Willis beforehand, and Willis proceeded to bring it to life on his horn. It's the approach Dave Bartholomew often used on Fats Domino records like ''Blue Monday''. Keep the solo simple; keep it melodic. Then give the song back to the singer.
 
Charlie Rich re-recorded this song in 1965 for his album on Smash. Despite the big production values of a Mercury/Nashville session, the results don't hold a candle to what you have here. (HD)(SP)

 
Barbara Pittman with The Gene Lowery Singers
THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT" - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 371
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3553-A mono
THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT / HANDSOME MAN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-9 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Barbara Pittman - Vocal
Billy Riley - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jilly Wilson - Piano
 
The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony
 
"Handsome Man" is strong material. Unfortunately, the flipside, "The Eleventh Commandment", is another story. Virtually no one, including Barbara herself, has a kind word to say about this track. No amount of remixing or de-chorusing can resurrect this recording. In its favor, this abominable production has generated some amusing anecdotes. Guitarist Brad Suggs, who played on the date, still shakes his head in disbelief when remembering the song. "It was a mess, man. Just all out of a meter. Impossible to play on". Barbara recalls, "Charlie Underwood came by my house one day at two in the afternoon and said 'Barbara, we've got a session tonight'. I went down and learned to the song and recorded it the same night. I had a reputation then for being able to learn stuff real fast so I could do demos, but I wasn't ready for this. That enormous session! Charlie did the whole thing behind Sam's back. Charlie was the engineer and Sam was sick so he figured he could get away with it. You know, that was the most expensive session they had ever done. You wouldn't believe the session. All the strings, everybody there at one time. No overdubbing. Sam Phillips was in bed with pneumonia. He got out of bed to witness it. The head of the musicians union was also there. It was just incredible. I think Sam went into shock. I know I was scared to death just looking around me in the studio. The song itself was awful. I hated it. It was the worst thing I ever recorded. Its all out of meter. Billy Riley really got me through the session. Him and J.M. Van Eaton, the drummer. Jimmy kept saying to Underwood, 'She's right. The song is out of meter'. And Underwood would say back. 'No. It's fine. She just has to dip here a bit and dip there...".  (HD)(MH)

 
Barbara Pittman with The Gene Lowery Singers
"HANDSOME MAN" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 372
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3553-B mono
HANDSOME MAN / THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-7 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Barbara Pittman - Vocal
Billy Riley - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jilly Wilson - Piano
 
The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony
 
"Handsome Man" was Barbara's final release, gets a split vote. The uptempo side was written and produced by Charlie Rich, for whom Barbara has enormous respect. ''Charlie was the best thing that ever came out of Sun, period. I've been a big fan of Charlie's since I first met him when I was about 13 years old. He was always a good friend and I've always been crazy about him. His singing, his playing, his looks. He was a very handsome guy, very shy, very unassuming. Charlie was also a great writer and a fantastic pianist. Charlie and I used to play clubs together. We even did some TV work together", recalled Barbara.  (HD)(MH)

 
Brad Suggs
"CLOUDY" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 373
Recorded: - Probably July 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3554-A mono
CLOUDY / PARTLY CLOUDY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-9 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Alt Saxophone
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums
 
Overdubbed
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony 
 
This is what they mean by "atmospheric music". Brad Suggs third Phillips International single continues the tradition of quirky instrumental outings. Tunes like "Cloudy" were easy to promote and probably got their share of disc jockey attention, but came up short at the cash registers. It was Charles Underwood's idea to overdub the sounds effect on to Suggs' moody guitar work. (HD)

 
Brad Suggs
"PARTLY CLOUDY" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 374
Recorded: - Probably July 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3554-B mono
PARTLY CLOUDY / CLOUDY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-10 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Alt Saxophone
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums
 
Some of the Sun gets through on Suggs' solo on this aptly named side. Otherwise, it was the usual crew (including Charlie Rich and Martin Willis" gliding effortlessly through a pleasant but generally undistinguished 12-bar blues whose sole function was apparently to direct attention to the A-side.  (HD)

 
Carl Mann
"SOUTH OF THE BORDER"* - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:04
Composer: - James Kennedy-Michael Carr
Publisher: - Peter Maurice Music - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - P 375
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3555-A mono
SOUTH OF THE BORDER / I'M COMING HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-12 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. Holland - Drums
 
Overdub Session 639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennesseee
The Gene Lowery Singer* chorus and percussion effects.
Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
chorus and percussion effects
 
On "Sound Of The Border" Carl Mann and his band finally found a tune worthy of their treatment. It features simple chord changes and an appropriately Latin theme to go with their patented rhythm. In truth, the version that Carl left in the studio was far better than the gimmicky overdubbed production that finally hit the market in May 1960. 
 
At this point, sales were on such a precipitous decline that they hardly justified all the time and expense spent on all those overdubbing sessions. Could thing have been worse if Carl's performances were released as originally recorded? (HD)

 
Carl Mann
"I'M COMING HOME'' – B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P-376
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3555-B mono
SOUTH OF THE BORDER / I'M COMING HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-11 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. Holland – Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano
 
Arguably, the fate of the A-side barely mattered in this case. The joy that awaited anyone brave and smart enouch to flip record over more than compensated for all studio excesses. ''I'm Coming Home'' is quite simply Carl Mann's masterpiece. It is his best recording at Sun and, thus, his best work ever. The reasons are quite straightforward. Charlie Rich has written a wonderful tune based entirely on the melody line used by Carl on ''Mona Lisa''. Since Carl had actually improvised that melody (rather than using the one performed by Nat Cole) there was no fear of plagiarism. Moreover, Carl wisely surrendered the piano stool to Charlie Rich, thus focussing his attention on singing. This also allowed some finely crafted piano stylings to appear on a Carl Mann record – another first. Everything comes to perfection here, right down to the choreographed slow-down ending that makes this tiny little studio combo sound like a well oiled machine.
 
Eddie Bush again provides a memorable and distinctive guitar solo. W.S. Holland is in peak form here, offering tasty drum rolls to mark the start and finish of most of the 16-bar segments (the song has no ''release'' or chorus). Some of those rolls are preceded by a visit to the crash cymbal. The piece de resistance is the perfectly synchronized final four bars when the band daringly slows down in unison. A moment to cherish, an chored perfectly by Holland.
 
The result were obviously so compelling that when Elvis Presley heard them he insisted on recording the tune for his ''Something For Everybody'' LP. Along with the ego boost that offered Mr. Mann (not everybody had his records covered by the King), it also provided an unexpected payday for Rich and Sam Phillips, whose publishing company shared the joyride. As a final token of esteem, this track was included on the original LP Sun 1250 titles ''Sun's Million Sellers'', putting it in fast company with selections like ''Blue Suede Shoes'' and ''Great Balls Of Fire''. (HD)

 
Don Hinton
"JO ANN'' - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Don Hinton-Wolf
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 377
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3556-A mono
JO ANN / HONEY BEE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-14 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Hinton - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano
 
Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus
 
This side, ''Jo Ann'', is pretty straightforward teen fare circa March 1960, that does little to bring out the best in Hinton's vocal chops. (HD)

 
Don Hinton
"HONEY BEE'' – B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Don Hinton-Narvel Felts
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P-378
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3556-B mono
HONEY BEE / JO ANN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-13 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Hinton - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano 
 
An ardent Elvis Presley devotee, Donald L. Hinton grew up in Carruthersville, Missouri wearing cool clothes, driving a slick car and singing the kind of rock and roll songs that he hoped the King would approve of. A taste of the real thing came when he opened for Carl Perkins, a move that gave him the concocted with Narvel Felts. His moment at the label came and went in a heartbeat but the peppy ''Honey Bee'' is a deserving lagacy.
 
Records like ''Honey Bee'' were not that hard to find in the 1960 pop marketplace. They came complete with quasi-Latin rhythms and Elvisy vocals, like Donnie Brooks' popular ''Mission Bell''. Hinton arrived at 639 Madison in March, 1960 and recorded four titles, two of which were released on May 10th. Not bad – a two-month delay for a kid obsessed with Sun Records. The record sold poorly, though, and Hinton's Sun career was over almost as quickly as it started. (HD)

 
Jeb Stuart
"SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 1:54
Composer: - McHugh-Fields
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - P-379
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3557-A mono
SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET / TAKE A CHANCE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stewart - Vocal
More Details Unknown
 
Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus
 
Jeb Stuart is what they used to call a stylist. An entertainer. If you're looking for a straight reading, you won't get it from ''Mr. Emotions', as he billed himself. On ''Sunny Side Of The Street'', Stuart brings his frenetic energy to the lyrics. Like fellow stylist Billy Stewart (no relation), Jeb repeats words two or three times. He seems overcome by his own excitement; he just can't bear any pauses in his delivery. Empty space is wasted space. The effect is strange to say the least. How does one classify such an agitated style?
 
Is it rhythm and blues? Blues? Pop? Jazz? We can pretty much rule out country or gospel, but then what? The situation isn't helped by the new studio at 639 Madison, whose spacey echo only confuses matters more. When you've finished adding overdubs by the Gene Lowery Singers, the effects are beyond recognition. Things become a lot clearer on ''Take A Chance'', which is far more conventional urban rhythm and blues, circa 1960. Once again, though, Stuart is sabotaged by the out-of-control sonics of the new studio. (HD)(CE)

 
Jeb Stuart
"TAKE A CHANCE'' - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Charles Underwood-Jeb Stewart
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 380
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3557-B mono
TAKE A CHANCE / SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stewart - Vocal
More Details Unknown
 
Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus
 
From the beginning of his career, Stuart seems to have oriented himself toward the white audience. It surely couldn't have been coincidence that a black Memphian named Charles Jones took the name of a Confederate cavalry general. Jones/Stuart claims to have been born on June 2, 1945, although one suspects that there's a birth certificate somewhere that tells a different story. He grew up idolising Billy Eckstine, Nat King Cole, Elvis, Fats Domino, and Little Richard, and left Memphis to study at the Chicago Conservatory of Music under Frank Lavere, one of the writers of Cole's hit ''Pretend''. 
 
Back in Memphis, Stuart landed a gig at the Southern Club, and hired Isaac Hayes as his piano player. They were eventually displaced by Sam the Sham, but moved on to several other local venues. Hayes, incidentally, claims to have played piano and arranged one of Stuart's Phillips singles (although the Union logs tell a different story, as they often do).It was Rufus Thomas who suggested that Stuart contact Sam Phillips. Stuart was auditioned by Charles Underwood, who was sufficiently impressed to call Phillips down from the executive suite. Phillips liked what he heard. Stuart and Underwood co-wrote ''Take A Chance'', and, given the choice of signing with Phillips International or Sun, Stuart opted for Phillips because of its uptown image. (HD)(CE)

 
Eddie Bush
"BABY I DON'T CARE" - B.M.I. - 1:45
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 381
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3558-A mono
BABY I DON'T CARE / VANISHED
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. Holland - Drums
Carl Mann - Acoustic Guitar
 
Overdubbed Unknown Date
The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt
 
If Eddie Bush's vocalizing had just a little of the manic energy or character of his guitar playing, this would have been one hell of a record! No such luck. Its not that these vocal performances are bad, its just that they really lack anything distinctive. That's particularly disappointing considering the energy and excitement Bush's guitar work had brought to Carl Mann's records. In truth, Bush was a pretty fair songwriter as some of his contributions to Mann's output attest. "Baby I Don't Care", a tune by Mann as well as Bush (Carl's version appeared on his Phillips International LP), works pretty well when things are kept simple. Unfortunately, Bush was barely out the door when the coral overdubs started. Ne never had a chance . (HD)

 
Eddie Bush
"VANISHED" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 382
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3558-B mono
VANISHED / BABY I DON'T CARE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. Holland - Drums
Carl Mann – Vocal and Piano
 
Overdubbed Unknown Date
The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt
 
The flip-side, "Vanished" is actually a pretty interesting song, although it might have been a touch too unusual for the pop marketplace. Those acoustic guitar major-7ths are powerful, when you can hear them for all the echo, and the wood block percussion adds an atmospheric touch. Interestingly, it is Carl Mann who takes the lead vocal on the chorus of the Flamenco-styled tune. Along with these tracks, Bush left quite a few unissued titles in the Sun vaults. many were instrumentals, which suggested some exciting unknown performances. But the truth is that most of his solo efforts were mediocre at best. The verdict seems to be that Eddie Bush did his finest guitar work in the role of support player behind Carl Mann. (HD)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis (The Hawk)
''I GET THE BLUES WHEN IT RAINS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:13
Composer: - Klauser-Stoddard
Publisher: - Foster Music
Matrix number: - P 384 - Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3559-A mono
I GET THE BLUES WHEN IT RAIN / IN THE MOOD
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
W.S. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
 
In one of the worst kept secrets in music business history, Jerry Lee Lewis had these instrumental sides released under the pseudonym ''The Hawk''. Supposedly, all of Jerry's problems with the musicians union and the marketplace would go away if his identity were masked. The name was suggested by Sun's new general manager Bill Fitzgerald in a desperate attempt to kickstart Jerry's sagging career. There was certainly nothing wrong with these side, although their effect on the marketplace was considerably short of spectacular.
 
In an attempt to get Jerry some much-needed air-play, Sam Phillips in 1960 came up with the idea of releasing an instrumental single by Jerry under the name ‘The Hawk’, releasing it on the Phillips International label. The ruse failed miserably, but ‘I Get The Blues When It Rains’ was the B-side of the single (the A-side was the old Glen Miller hit ‘In The Mood’). A vocal version (albeit with a long instrumental passage) was finally recorded for the ''Country Music Hall Of Fame Hits Volume 2'' album in 1969.
 
''I Get The Blues When It Rain'' (a 1929 hit for Guy Lombardo and others), is done in a style not normally associated with Jerry Lee. It's got an old-timey, Del Wood feel with barely a dollop of blues or rock and roll. Nevertheless, Jerry must have liked the song because he recorded a vocal version about a decade later for Mercury.   (MH)(HD)(CE)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis (The Hawk)
''IN THE MOOD'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:20
Composer: - Andy Rauaf-Joe Garland
Publisher: - Louis Music - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - P 383 - Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3559-B mono
IN THE MOOD / I GET THE BLUES WHEN IN RAINS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
W.S. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
 
"In the Mood" is a big band era number 1 hit recorded by American bandleader Glenn Miller. Joe Garland and Andy Razaf arranged "In The Mood" in 1937-1939 using a previously existing main theme composed by Glenn Miller before the start of the 1930s. Miller's "In The Mood" did not top the charts until 1940 and one year later was featured in the movie Sun Valley Serenade.
 
"In The Mood" opens with a now-famous sax section theme based on repeated arpeggios that are rhythmically displaced; trumpets and trombones add accent riffs. The arrangement has two solo sections; a "tenor fight" solo, in the most famous recording, between Tex Beneke and Al Klink, and a 16-bar trumpet solo. The arrangement is also famous for its ending: a coda that climbs triumphantly, then sounds a simple sustained unison tonic pitch with a rim shot.
 
"In The Mood" was arranged by Joe Garland and Andy Razaf based on a pre-existing melody. The main theme, featuring repeated arpeggios rhythmically displaced, previously appeared under the title of "Tar Paper Stomp" credited to jazz trumpeter/bandleader Wingy Manone. Manone recorded "Tar Paper Stomp" which did not become popular until the middle of 1930, just months before Horace Henderson used the same tune in "Hot and Anxious", recorded by his brother's band, The Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, on 1931 March 19.
 
Under copyright rules of the day, a tune that had not been written down and registered with the copyright office could be appropriated by any musician with a good ear. A story says that after "In the Mood" became a hit, Manone was paid by Miller and his record company not to contest the copyright.
 
The original recording of Joe Garland's version was made by Edgar Hayes and his Orchestra in 1938, with Garland participating. In this recording there was a baritone sax duet rather than a tenor sax battle. Popular thought is that the melody had already become popular with Harlem bands (e.g. at the Savoy Ballroom) before being written down by Joe Garland. Before offering it to Glenn Miller, Garland sold the tune to Artie Shaw, who could not record it because the original arrangement was too long. The Hayes recording also bears signs of being a shortened arrangement. The tune was finally sold to Glenn Miller, who played around with its arrangement for a while. Although the arrangers of most of the Miller tunes are known, things are a bit uncertain for "In The Mood". It is often thought that Eddie Durham (who contributed other arrangements on the recording date of "In The Mood", August 1, 1939 as well), John Chalmers McGregor (Miller's pianist) and Miller himself contributed most to the final version.
 
Glenn Miller's "In the Mood", though undisputably a hit, represents an anomaly for chart purists. "In the Mood" was released in the period immediately prior to the inception of retail sales charts in Billboard magazine. While it led the Record Buying Guide (jukebox list) for 13 weeks and stayed on the Billboard charts for 30 weeks, it never made the top 15 on the sheet music charts, which were considered by many to be the true measure of popular song success. The popular Your Hit Parade program ranked the song no higher than ninth place, for one week only (1940).
 
The Glenn Miller 1939 recording on RCA Bluebird, B-10416-A, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1983. The recording by Glenn Miller is one of the most recognized and most popular instrumentals of the 20th century. The song even appeared in The Beatles "All You Need is Love" number 1 single in 1967 and in the Jive Bunny and the Mastermixers rendition in 1989, "Swing The Mood", a worldwide hit. The Glenn Miller RCA Bluebird recording was released as V-Disc 123B in February 1944 and a new version was released as V-Disc 842B in May 1948 by Glenn Miller and the Overseas Band by the U.S. War Department. 1939 sheet music cover, "Introduced by Glenn Miller", Shapiro, Bernstein, and Co., New York.
 
Notable artists who have recorded big-band versions of "In The Mood" include the Joe Loss Orchestra, Xavier Cugat, Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Lubo D'Orio, the Brian Setzer Orchestra, The Shadows and John Williams with the Boston Pops Orchestra.
 
Non-big-band renditions were recorded by the Andrews Sisters, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chet Atkins, Bill Haley & His Comets, Bad Manners, the Puppini Sisters. In addition, in 1959 Ernie Fields and his Orchestra peaked at number 4 on the pop chart and number 7 on the Rhythm & Blues charts. The song charted at number 16 in 1953 in a version by Johnny Maddox. Jonathan King scored a UK Top 50 hit with his version of the song in 1976. Bette Midler recorded the song in 1973 (on the album Bette Midler). The avant-garde synthpop act Art of Noise occasionally performed a rendition of the song on their live shows, in their trademark sampled style. The rock band Chicago added their version in 1995. An unusual version of the song was released on Maynard Ferguson's 'Lost Tapes Volume 2' album. The first 30 seconds are the traditional version, but the band then re-starts with the trumpets taking the lead.
 
A novelty version of the song was recorded by country/novelty artist Ray Stevens in 1977. Stevens' version consisted of him performing the song in chicken clucks, bar-for-bar. The performance was credited to the "Henhouse Five Plus Two". The single was a Top-40 hit in both America and the UK.
 
In 1951 a Ferranti Mark 1 computer at the University of Manchester played "In the Mood", one of the first songs to be played by a computer, and the oldest known recording of digitally generated music. Jive Bunny and the Mastermixers recorded a version of the song as part of a medley entitled "Swing the Mood" which went number 1 in the United Kingdom for 5 weeks. The record reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States where it also went gold. It was the 2nd best-selling single of 1989 in the United Kingdom.
 
Bluesman John Lee Hooker has said that "In The Mood" was the inspiration for "I'm In The Mood" which became a number 1 hit on the Rhythm & Blues Singles chart.   (MH)(HD)(CE)

 
Charlie Rich with The Gene Lowery Singers
''SCHOOLDAYS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:33
Composer: - Cobb-Edwards
Publisher: - Mills Music - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - P 385
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3560-A mono
SCHOOLDAYS / GONNA BE WAITIN'
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Brad Suggs – Guitar
R.W. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
 
Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony
 
''School days'' is another matter. The idea of taking an ancient (we're talking 1907) tune like this and wrapping it in a modern, somewhat jazzy arrangement is novel, to say the least, but the excessive choral overdubs killed whatever promise the idea may have had. The final version seems ill-considered. It's odd to hear Charlie's soulful vocal punctuated by pseudo-hip Frank Sinatra-esque lines (''swingin' bunch of kids'') trying to make its way through gelatinous mounds of choral sweetening. Neither a pretty picture nor Charlie's finest hour at Sun. (HD)

 
Charlie Rich with The Gene Lowery Singers
''GONNA BE WAITIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 387
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
and/of Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3560-B mono
GONNA BE WAITIN' / SCHOOL DAYS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Unknown Musicians
 
Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony
 
Another wasted opportunity. For all his genius, Sam Phillips was none too good at following up hit records. ''Gonna Be Waitin''' is basically an inferior clone of ''Lonely Weekend''. Marty Willis baritone solo has been replaced by a guitar break, but otherwise it's business as usual with little of the original passion or tension.  (HD)

 


 

 
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