CONTAINS 1959 SUN SESSIONS 2

Studio Session for Mack Self, 1959 / Rita Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1959 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1959 / Arco Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1959 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1959 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Billy Emerson, July 1959 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Brad Suggs, July 6, 21, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, August 1959 / Judd Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, Probably (Summer) August 1959 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Johnny Powers, Probably August 12, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, August 15, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Vernon Taylor, August 15, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, August 24, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, Probably 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Will Mercer, September 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bush, September 25, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tracy Pendarvis, October 8, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Rayburn Anthony, October 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Rayburn Anthony, Unknown Date(s) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, October 12, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bush, October 12, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bush, Unknown Date(s) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, October 14, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Memphis Bells, October 14, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, October 16, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ira Jay Lichterman, Late 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Teddy Redell, Probably November 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Rockin' Stockin', November 17, 1959 / Sun/Mojo Records
Studio Session for Mack Owen, November 20, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jeb Stuart, Probably Late 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Alice Leslie, Late 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Female Singer, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, Unknown Date(s) 1958 / Sun Records
Studio (Demo) Sessions for Charlie Rich, Unknown Dates / Sun Records
Studio Session for O.C. Holt, Unknown Dates / Sun Records
Studio Session for Wayne Perdle, Unknown Dates / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jack Frost, Unknown Date(s) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, 1959 / Rita Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, 1959 / Rita Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, 1959 / Rita Records
Studio Session for John Pursley / No Details
Studio Session for Don Reynolds & The Reynolds Quartet / No Details

Biography of Artists (See: The Sun Biographies)


1959

Sun recording artist Jimmy Harrell was recalled into the Navy.

Back in Texas, former Sun recording artist Dean Beard continued to record for Slim Willet's labels and for other small labels throughout the 1960s, and remained a popular live act into the 1970s, despite crippling arthritis that he said resulted from an earlier auto accident. His health problems were compounded by high blood pressure and diabates. Sun Records singer Dean Bead died in Coleman, Texas on April 4, 1989. By then, his former band-mates in the Champs, Seals and Croft had become a hugely successful soft rock act on Warner Bross. Records.


SUMMER 1959

One afternoon when there was not much going on, promotion employee Barbara Barnes looked up to see a  serious-looking Sam Phillips's lawyer and Memphis attorney, Roy Scott standing in the door. She invited him  in, and he sat down and began to explain that Sam Phillips was negotiating with the Philips (with one l)  Corporation to sell them the Phillips International segment of the business (On February 1, 1962 opens in the  USA and begins discussion with Sam Phillips and the label eventually folded in 1963 after a series of  discussions with Philips BV, the Dutch electrical giant from Holland that had bought Mercury Records. They  had launched their own imprint in North America in 1962, and saw Phillips International a potential source  of confusion). Roy had come to ask Barbara to prepare a presentation brochure for him to take to a meeting  with the giant corporation from the Netherlands, which was not only a recording company, but also a  manufacturer of electronics equipment. Sam's hope that they'd come to buy his name was coming to pass.

This was a project more easily asked for than delivered. For several good reasons, the Sun archives were  very sparse. When Barbara came to Sun, she given a sheet of papers with names and phone numbers of the  distributors and some cards with names of disk jockeys and/or radio stations. There was a file cabinet, but  there were very few newspaper clippings and only a few artist photos provided by the booking agencies. This  was about all Barbara had to work with when she joined the Sun company, and she hadn't accumulated much
more by the time Roy Scott asked for the presentation. She had album covers and her newsletters. They had  never subscribed to a clipping service, and it had not occurred to me to cut out the ads and little blurbs in the  trade papers, though it would have been a good idea. As a promotion person, Barbara probably should have  had access to financial information, but she didn't. She had next to nothing, in other words.

One factor contributing to the lack of archival material was Sun's lack of staff and organization. Marion  Keisker, when she came with Sam Phillips to help establish the business, not only had her job at Sun, she  worked full-time and later part-time at WREC television. Then Sally Wilbourn came, but she was busy with  bookkeeping and office management, and then Regina Reese came, but by then Sun was hopping with hits  and she was kept busy with the phones, processing orders, and many other tasks. Barbara had been there only  a short time and hadn’t had time to accumulate much. When Roy Scott asked for documentation of the  company's history, it was a stunning challenge.

The lack of archives was expressive of the unstructured way Sun operated. Though a perfectionist in the  aspect of sound recording and scrupulous in some ways, in other matters Sam Phillips wasn't a detail person.  Things were always loose at Sun. Everyone else caught that spirit; everything was of the moment or about  the future. It took a person like Roy Scott to notice that an important matter, the history of the company, had  been overlooked.

Barbara Barnes put together what little she could find for Roy Scott's presentation to Philips of the  Netherlands. Nothing came of the meeting that she know of; she did know that Phillips International wasn't  bought by Philips. She really regretted that the company and/or Roy never returned the scrapbook she had  made, because she had used some photos, clippings, and other materials for which Sun had no copies.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF

SONIC RECORDING STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

01 – ''GOIN' BACK TO GEORGIA'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

02 – ''FOUR WALL, TWO WINDOWS'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

03 – ''LONELY ECHOES'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

04 – ''I'VE GOT PENNIES IN MY POCKET'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self – Vocal & Guitar
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1959

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

"The Shape You Left Me In", was re-recorded by Gene at Hi (without the bluesy vocal opening) and it was later issued on Hi 2039.

01 - "THE SHAPE YOU LEFT ME IN" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Jimmy Donley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 10383
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Chess Records (LP) 33rpm Chess PLP 6025-6 mono
JUST GO WILD AND BOPPIN'
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-26 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

02 - "UNKNOWN TITLE"
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Matrix number: - 10384 - Unissued/Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Probably Bobby Stewart - Bass
Carl McVoy - Organ
Ace Cannon - Saxophone
Jerry Satch Arnold – Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR ARCO RECORDS 1959

RECORDING STUDIOS INCORPORATED
2120 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO 16, ILLINOIS
ARCO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Other Carl and Gene Simmons efforts from the era include "Cold Cold Heart" and "Frankie And Johnny" issued as by the Bobby Stewart Combo on Argo 5374. "We all went to Chicago", recalls Carl. "Me and Gene and Bobby Stewart and we picked up a black drummer there". (Session man from Chess Records, Fred Below). In addition to Stewart, Carl, Gene and Below, the trip north also included promer Sun alumnus Smokey Joe Baugh. "I believe Gene set that session up directly with Chess. They knew us well by then and they were happy to get the pickers from Memphis coming up there to record for them. I have to admit, it did sound a lot like the stuff we were doing in Memphis with Bill Black. Bobby was a bass player at Hi - a session guy. Bobby had actually played bass on some of the Bill Black Combo records when Bill wouldn't play for one reason or another. In my opinion, Bobby Stewart was a better musician than Bill. Bill would be in the studio when the songs were cut, but it was Bobby playing on them. We put our record out under Bobby's name because we had a deal with Hi Records at the time. That Bobby Stewart single sold some records, I remember that! Hi wouldn't cut any more on me, especially anything that sounded like the Bill Black Combo. He was the one who was selling the records and they didn't want any bad feelings".

01 - "COLD COLD HEART" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Publishing
Matrix number: - 10374
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Arco Records (S) 45rpm standard single Arco 6374 mono
COLD COLD HEART / FRANKIE AND JOHNNY

02 - "NO LETTER TODAY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 10375 - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

03 - "DON'T BE CRUEL" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-Elvis Presley
Publisher: - Hill and Range Songs Incorporated
Matrix number: - 10376 - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

04 - "FRANKIE AND JOHNNY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Traditional - Public Domain
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 10377
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Arco Records (S) 45rpm standard single Arco 5374 mono
FRANKIE AND JOHNNY / COLD COLD HEART

05 – "PERDIDO" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Juan Tizol
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 10378 - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bobby Stewart Combo
Bobby Stewart - Bass
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Gene Simmons - Guitar
Smokey Joe Baugh - Piano
Fred Below - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1959

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

01 - "WORRIED MIND" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jimmie Davis-Ted Daffan
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued/Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Other Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1959

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

Gene Simmons and his brother Carl began to record more and more at Hi Records, much in the way they had at Sun years earlier. You can hear an immense difference in sound and style between the Sun sides cut between 1955-1958 and the Hi material cut just a year or two later. Their earliest work was leased by Hi (whose own release schedule was spotty during the formative years) to there labels. Gene's excellent blues "Going Back To Memphis" appeared on Checker 948 in the first months of 1960.

01 - "BAD BOY WILLIE" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 9942
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 45rpm standard single Checker 948 mono
BAD BOY WILLIE/GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-27 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

"Bad Boy Willie" shows an obvious debt to the Coasters teen bad-boy anthem "Charlie Brown" from February, 1959.

02 - "GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS" - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 9943
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 45rpm standard single Checker 948 mono
GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS / BAD BOY WILLIE
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-28 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

Lyrically, "Goin' Back To Memphis" was a close relative of Wilbert Harrison's "Kansas City", which was still on the charts when Gene was in the studio. The sound was clearly in the Bill Black Combo mode, although both Jessie Carter (electric bass) and Carl Simmons (guitar) recall playing on the session.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Jessie Carter - Bass
Ace Cannon - Saxophone
Smokey Joe Baugh or Carl McVoy - piano
Jerry Satch Arnold or Gene Chrisman - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


Gene Simmons >

Jumpin' Gene Simmons passed away on Tuesday, August 28, 2006 in Tupelo, Mississippi, at  the age of 69, following a long illness.

Simmons, not to be mistaken for the long-tongued Kiss  bassist of the same name, was a rockabilly singer and songwriter best known for the novelty  hit "Haunted House" and for co-writing Tim McGraw's first hit song, "Indian Outlaw."



Simmons once worked as an opening act for Elvis Presley, and he eventually signed with Sun  Records, although his tenure there was brief and he never found the success of labelmates  like Elvis and Johnny Cash. "I looked around and saw my buddies having hits, and I started to  think that maybe this was just not meant to be for me'', Simmons once said. "By 1963, I was  ready to hang it up."

Instead, he recorded what would become, and remain, the biggest commercial success of his  career: 1964s "Haunted House'', a novelty track that rose to number 11 on Billboard's pop  chart. His old-time rock and roll offered a stark contrast to the trendier bands of the British  Invasion. Simmons would go on to write songs for a number of Nashville contemporaries, but  it was a younger rising star, McGraw, who put him back in the spotlight with 1994's "Indian  Outlaw" (co-written by Simmons and Tommy Barnes). More recently, Brian Setzer recorded a  version of Simmons' "Peroxide Blonde In A Hopped Up Model Ford" for a rockabilly  compilation honoring the legacy of Sun Records.

*


SUMMER 1959

According to Barbara Barnes, ''The main action in the summer of 1959 was the promotion of Sun LPs and  EPs on Johnny Cash. In fact, Sam Phillips declared August ''Johnny Cash Month'', and gave his distributors  discounts on all the package goods on Cash. Sam had authorized Barbara Barnes to offer distributors 200  free records with each order of 1,000, and the albums were keeping the pressing plants busy. In one day,  Barbara sold 40,000 albums, and re-orders kept coming in. They were still getting strong airplay, especially  on country stations''.

At Sun, Barbara got used to being berated for late shipments, refusals to take unreasonable return requests,  lack of an album on a singer with a hot single, Sam's failure to return a phone call, and any number of other  problems. ''This was a part of my learning to stand up for myself, because I knew Sam expected me to, not  for me individually but for his company'', Barbara said. ''It was not a skill I had learned before, since  southern ladies were supposed to be sweet and compliant, and also I was an only child so I had missed out on  fighting with siblings. Our Cash promotion evoked one of those irate calls'', she said.

Milton Sinsheimer, ran the Baltimore firm that distributed both the Sun and Phillips International lines, got  on the phone, sputtering and yelling, ''What are you trying to do to me, woman! Taking advantage of this  poor colored boy I've got working for me. You've talked him into ordering 2,000 Johnny Cash LPs at one  time''. This was the gist of it, with a few curse words thrown in. It was true, Barbara had sold their company  2,000 copies of Sun LP 1245, and they had given him a 400-album bonus. Barbara explained to him that, for  a market the size of Baltimore, this wasn't unreasonable. Some distribs would call one day for a couple of  thousand and the next day for another thousand. The album was hot! Such a big seller that in September, they  extended the promotion. Barbara managed to talk to Milton until he calmed down, and things were OK.

Strange though it may seem, it was more grateful than offended by Milton and some guys like him. His  manner meant he took Barbara seriously in her job. She was important enough to be yelled at and negotiated  with. She appreciated this aspect of the record business. Chivalry was nice in its place, but what went for  respect in other job's she had was actually condescension, as if only a man could talk business.

On one occasion, Barbara had a set-to with her Albany, New York, distributor, Leonard Smith, whom Jud  Phillips had described in his notes as ''keen as a pin''. He was an aggressive businessman who, Jud reported,  ''can get fabulous results out of a 1.2 market''. On this occasion, he was looking for some free merchandise  that Sun had no reason to be giving away, unlike the situation with Cash.

He responded angrily when Barbara didn't agree immediately to his request. He just wouldn't let it go, so  finally she said “.d take it up with Sam and he could call her back the next day. At the appointed time,  Leonard Smith called again. But this time he was cheerful, even when Barbara gave him Sam's answer,  which was less than he had asked for, but something of a compromise.

Not all distributors were difficult, but they were all different. Jack Taylor in Minneapolis was unfailingly  pleasant and therefore Barbara's favorite, plus he sold a heck of a lot of records. According to Barbara, ''We  always compared notes about the weather, my saying it was always sunshiny in Memphis and his reply being  it was freezing in Minneapolis''. Harry Levin in Boston was aloof; the two partners in New York's Alpha  distributors believed they should deal with Jud Phillips or Sam only; Leroy Davidson of Kansas City rarely  spoke on the phone, leaving the ordering up to others. Barbara came to know the habits of each distributor,  how they promoted and sold Sun's records.

According to Barbara, ''Markets were likewise very diverse. Aside from Los Angeles, we could expect few  orders from the western states. Atlanta, Charlotte, and Nashville moved records, but at first I couldn't  understand why New Orleans wasn't selling. When I asked Sam, he said, ''That's a bastard marked''. It didn't  follow trends, possibly because of heaving so much local music''. Sun's New Orleans distributor, Joe  Caronna, managed Frankie Ford of ''Sea Cruise'' fame and tended to push Ace Records of Jackson,  Mississippi, more than other labels. The other New Orleans artists like Fats Domino and Little Richard were  understandably bigger there than the Sun artists, especially those leaning toward country.

The East Coast and Midwest were Sun's bread and butter, so that's where they had the most important  contacts and where Jud Phillips and Cecil Scaife visited most often. The Great Lakes region was very  populous and prosperous with disk jockeys who loved the introduce new records. It was great not just for  selling, but also for breaking, records. Later, the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame was established in Cleveland,  partly in tribute to the important role Cleveland played in the 1950s music scene.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY EMERSON
FOR CHESS RECORDS 1959

RECORDING STUDIOS INCORPORATED
2120 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
CHESS SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JULY 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – WILLIE DIXON

01 – ''I'LL GET YOU TOO'' – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Tollie Music
Matrix number: - U 9575
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Chess 1740-A mono
I'LL GET YOU TOO / UM HUM MY BABY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-30 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''A MIGHTY LOVE'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Tollie Music
Matrix number: - U 9576
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1959
Released: - Chess Unissued/Lost

Nevertheless there was one further Chess session for former Sun artist Billy Emerson in July 1959, resulting in Chess 1740, issued that fall. It coupled ''I'll Get You Too'', a tough bluesy description of how Emerson is going to get anything he puts his mind to, with ''Um Hum My Baby'', on which Billy was augmented by The Dells vocal group. The session featured a band that included Vincent ''Guitar Red'' Duling with whom Emerson had played briefly in the Clarkdale and early Memphis days. The sound was right up to date though and ''Um Hum My Baby'' was aimed firmly at the smoother end of rock and roll with its interactive, catchy
vocals and handclaps. Both sides featured excellent sax work and, like many Emerson's discs, this could easily have been the one.

According to Chess master lists, Emerson apparently also recorded ''A Mighty Love'' and ''When It Rains It Pours'' at this session, but tapes have not been found.

03 – ''UM HUM MY BABY*'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Tollie Music
Matrix number: - U 9577
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Chess 1740-B mono
UM HUM MY BABY / I'LL GET YOU TOO
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-31 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04 – ''WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 9578
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1959
Released: - Chess Unissued/Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Robert Emerson – Vocal & Piano
Vincent ''Guitar Red'' Duling – Guitar
Willie Dixon – Bass
Phil Thomas – Drums
Joe Jones – Tenor Saxophone
* - The Dells consisting of
Johnny Carter, Marvin Junior, Mickey McGill,
Verne Allison, Chuck Barksdale – Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JULY 1959

Brad Suggs was a guitarist who was there right at the beginning and right at the end of 706 Union as a recording studio. Suggs had recorded as part of the Slim Rhodes Band back in 1950 and again in 1954-1956. He also undertook session work in 1955-1956 and can be heard on Warren Smith's ''Ubangi Stomp'' among other cuts. His return to session work in 1959 coincided with the departure of Roland Janes. Suggs also saw five singles hit the marked under his own name on Phillips International. In July 1959, just as Sam Phillips planned to close the studio, Suggs came up with his own tribute, the guitar riff that was issued on Phillips International as, simply, ''706 Union''. Like the music of all Sun's session men, Suggs' disc could serve as a metaphor for all that was best about Sun records. Tight, rocking and informal. The sound of surprise.

Jerry Lee Lewis plays in St. Louis, Halls, Tennessee and a few nights in Lake Charles, Louisiana, before taking a week off in Coney Island.

JULY 1, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Johnny Horton recorded ''Johnny Reb'' during the evening at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio on Nashville's Music Row.

JULY 3, 1959 FRIDAY

Patsy Cline recorded ''Life's Railway To Heaven'' at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio. It eventually appears in the 2006 soundtrack to the movie ''The Notorious Bettie Page''.

RCA released The Browns ''The Three Bells''.

JULY 4, 1959 SATURDAY

Bill McCorvey, from Pirates Of The Mississippi, is born in Montgomery, Alabama. He signs lead when the band scores a hit in 1991 with ''Feed Jake''.

JULY 5, 1959 SUNDAY

Singer/songwriter Marc Cohn is born in Cleveland, Ohio. He gains a pop hit in 1991, with "Walking in Memphis", and was remade by Cher for her twenty-second studio album ''It's A Man's World'' from which it was released as the lead single in Europe and the United Kingdom on 16 October 1995, and ''Walking In Memphis'' also successfully remade by Lonestar as a country hit in 2003.

JULY 6, 1969 MONDAY

Columbia released Johnny Cash's double-sided hit, ''I Got Stripes'' backed with ''Five Feet High And Rising''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BRAD SUGGS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JULY 6, 21, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

01 - ''POLLY-TICKING'' - 2:12
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 6, 1959
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample-2 mono
BRAD SUGGS - I WALK THE LINE

Brad Suggs you say. First there were those three country ballads issued with the Slim Rhodes band back in 1955. Then between 1959 and 1961 Suggs had five singles issued on Phillips International. Virtually all of them were instrumentals with some novelty aspect to them. This two sides, issued in September 1959, were his first shot at the marketplace.

Suggs tribute to "706 Union" was not lost on The Fireballs who later requisitioned the melody for a chart single entitled "Vaquero".

02(1) - "706 UNION" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 21, 1959
Released: - November 1986
First appearace: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-12-19 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - RAUNCHY
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-8-32 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

02(2) - "706 UNION" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 355  - Master
Recorded: - July 21, 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International 45rpm standard single PI 3545-A mono
706 UNION / LOW OUTSIDE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6


Brad Suggs, circa 1971 >

"706 Union" raises an interesting question. If you were asked to compose a brief instrumental to commemorate the birthplace of Sun Records, would this be it? Consider everything that had happened at 706 prior to this date: Elvis Presley, Howlin' Wolf, Johnny Cash, B.B. King, Carl Perkins, The Ripley Cotton Choppers. Would your music be in a minor key? Of the approximately 200 singles issued on Sun/Phillips International and Flip prior to this date.



Not to mention those sides issued on Chess, RPM, and other labels to which Sam Phillips licensed his recordings, no more than a handful of them were performed in a minor key. So why choose one for the tribute?  Compounding the problem, Martin Willis' sax break sounds like it was lifted from a rock bar mitzvah, and Charlie Rich's piano solo sounds like something drifting out of a lounge in Havana in the early 1950s. Only Van Eaton's echoey drumming sounds remotely Sun-like. All this might have been a lot more acceptable if it weren't titled "706 Union".

03 - "LOW OUTSIDE" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Edwin Bruce-Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 356  - Master
Recorded: - July 21, 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3545-B mono
LOW OUTSIDE / 706 UNION
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

According to Brad Suggs, "Low Outside" was a phrase borrowed from baseball ("the pitch was low and outside"). He recalls that the idea for the title came directly from Sam Phillips, a man rarely associated with baseball. Perhaps, unknown to historians, Sam Phillips spent some August nights at the ballpark when the Memphis Chicks were playing in town.

Although the record label credits the song to Suggs and Bruse (presumably Edwin, who was still making records at Sun as late as summer, 1959), Suggs recalls no involvement by anyone else in the composition. "The song was 100% mine", he maintains. The 1-6-minor-4-5 progression is certainly familiar enough, and Willis' sax solo is deftly borrowed from the Del Vikings' "Whispering Bells". There are three key modulations here, suggesting that these pickers knew their chops, especially Suggs on guitar. The fade on a sustained high note is a subtle reminder of the final bars of "Raunchy".

04 - KING OF FOOLS''
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 21, 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Alt Saxophone
R.W. Stevenson or Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

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JULY 7, 1959 TUESDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded ''(Till) I Kissed You'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Janis Joplin enrolls at Port Arthur Business College to develop clerical skills. She lasts just one month. Her version of ''Me And Bobby McGee'' ranks among country's 500 greatest singles in a book published by the Country Music Foundation, ''Heartaches By The Number''.

JULY 11, 1959 SATURDAY

Rock guitarist Richie Sambora is born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. He gains prominence as a member pf Bon Jovi, a band that earns a country hit in 2006 by teaming up with Jennifer Nettles on ''Who Says You Can't Go Home''.

''Slippin' And Slidin''' songwriter Little Richard shows up six hours late for his wedding to Ernestine Campbell.

Minnie Pearl and Lew Childre guest on ABC-TV's ''Jubilee U.S.A.''.

JULY 12, 1959 SUNDAY

Earl Scruggs performs at the first Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island using Hylo Brown and The Timberliners as his backing group.

JULY 13, 1959 MONDAY

Guitarist Brent mason is born in Vanwert, Ohio. his credits include Alan Jackson's ''Chattahoochee'', plus recordings by Brooks and Dunn, Shania Twain and George Strait, leading him to win the Country Music Association's Musician of the Year twice.

Capitol released Buck Owens' first hit single, ''Under Your Spell Again''.

JULY 20, 1959 MONDAY

Singer/songwriter Radney Foster is born in Del Rio, Texas. He joins Bill Lloyd in the 1980s duo Foster and Lloyd, develops a solo career and authors such hits as Sara Evans' ''A Real Fine Place To Start'' and Keith Urban's ''I'm In''.

Columbia released Johnny Horton's ''Johnny Rep''.

JULY 21, 1959 TUESDAY

Stonewall Jackson recorded ''Mary Don't You Weep''.

JULY 24, 1959 FRIDAY

Richard Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev argue about advantages of communism and capitalism in a Kitchen known as the ( Kitchen Debate ).

JULY 31, 1959 FRIDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''Amigo's Guitar''.

Jazz guitarist Stanley Jordan is born in Chicago, Illinois. He provides a rippling solo at the close of Kenny Rogers' 1995 country hit ''Morning Desire''.

JULY 1959

PI 3544 ''Flea Circus'' b/w ''Cloud Nine'' by Bill Justis and His Orchestra is issued.

END JULY 1959

After the Summer Dance Party Festival ended, Carl Mann signed with the Jim Denny Artist  Bureau in Nashville. He fronted his own band, but Denny's experience was in booking  country lounges and Mann's act was more pop-oriented. "I felt more comfortable with my  own band behind me, though", says Carl. "I was able to duplicate the sound we got on  records. I was scared to death on that first tour, especially when they pulled me off to do  the Dick Clark Show in New York. It was all so new to me. I'd never even flown anywhere  before".


AUGUST 1959

Bill Fitzgerald was hired by Sam Phillips to be Sun's general manager, a position that had not previously  existed. In the September Sun-Liners listed that he was going to be Sam's right-hand man, charged with  supervising activities associated with Sun's move to the fine new studios, thereby letting Sam return to  cutting records. According to Barbara Barnes, ''I had often talked with Bill at Music Sales, where he was  manager of out Memphis distributor, and knew him to be a mild-mannered person who had known and  admired Sam a long time''.

As a part owner of Duke Records with a WDIA executive, David James Madis, whose professional  experience had acquainted him with black music, he also knew many of Memphis's black artists. Duke was a  serious competitor of Sam's for musicians in the days when Sam was cutting masters to sell to other  companies, but the label was sold to Peacock Records of Houston sometime before Bill came to Sun.

Barbara said, ''Though Bill knew the world of independent labels from several angles, Sam had not given  him much responsibility right away, possibly because things were slow for Sun when he came in. Thus he  had the time to sit around and talk with Regina and me every day. We found him sincere, idealistic, and  likable, a good church-going family man. He wore a diamond Masonic ring and swept his blond hair in a sort
of swirl over his forehead''.

''Regina and I decided that in many ways he seemed by our standards to be the most normal man we had  come across in the Sun environment. He did have one quirk, though. He loved to tear of a little corner of any  paper he came across, roll it into a ball, and chew on it. We always knew, ''Bill was here'', when we saw  invoices, memos, etc., with a little corner missing.

Barbara continued say, ''He was the one who confided to me one day that in the days before rhythm and  blues developed into rock, the term ''rock and roll'' meant sexual relations. I either already knew or had  concluded as much, though in my college years as I was listening to pure rhythm and blues, I had taken rock  and roll to mean to dance, which in the context of many songs it did. Later it meant just to ''get on with it''  whether that meant traveling or most anything else'', Barbara said.

AUGUST 1, 1959 SATURDAY

Little Jimmy Dickens guests on ABC-TV's ''Jubilee USA''.

AUGUST 3, 1959 MONDAY

Johnny Horton's father, John ''Lolly'' Horton, dies.

AUGUST 4, 1959 TUESDAY

Skeeter Davis joins the Grand Ole Opry,  at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.



Bill Fitzgerald >

AUGUST 4, 1959 TUESDAY

Bill Fitzgerald, formerly of Music Sales and Duke Records, is hired as general manager of Sun Records, Phillips International Records, and the publishing companies.

Jerry Lee Lewis performs on Richard Haye's ''Big Beat'' show on TV.

AUGUST 5, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Singer/songwriter Darrell Scott is born in London, Kentucky. Gaining credibility as an alternative-country act, he scores hits by writing Travis Tritt's ''It's A Great Day To Be Alive'', The Dixie Chicks' ''Long Time Gone'' and Sara Evans' ''Born To Fly''.

The movie ''Carnival Rock'' debuts in theaters with appearances by David Houston, James Burton, The Platters and Louisiana Hayride creator Horage Logan.

AUGUST 6, 1959 THURSDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis appears on ''Rate The Record'' TV show.

AUGUST 7 1959 FRIDAY

Michael Peterson is born in Tucson, Arizona. He wins the Male Star of Tomorrow award in the TNN/Music City News awards in 1999, on the heels of a debut album that brings hits with ''Drink, Swear And Lie'' and ''From Here To Enternity''.

Stonewall Jackson recorded ''Life Of A Poor Boy''.

AUGUST 8, 1959 SATURDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis performs on Alan Freed's ''Big Beat Party'' TV show.

AUGUST 9, 1959 SUNDAY

Diane Williams is born on the Hahn Air Force Base in West Germany. She joins the female vocal quartet The Girls Next Door, which lands a Top 10 single, ''Slow Boat To China'', during 1986 for Mary Tyler Moore's MTM Records.

AUGUST 10, 1959 MONDAY

Decca released Ernest Tubb's ''Next Time''.

AUGUST 1-10, 1959

Jerry Lee Lewis plays the Rip Tide Club in Coney Island, New York. Bass player Jay W. Brown is called back on August 9, because Jerry Lee needs a bass player

AUGUST 10, 1959 MONDAY

The Billboard issue reports: "When people think of Sun Records today, they are  more likely to think of artists who used to be with the label". At this time, Sun is attempting  to rebuild but only Charlie Rich and Carl Mann show any real promise. Pure country  recordings on Sun have almost ceased to appear.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

It took a little time for Ray Smith to enter the Judd Records. Charlie Terrell eventually secured his release from his contract with Sun and, according to Terrell: ''There was a song called ''Rockin' Little Angel'' that Judd Phillips heard by a band of four black boys from Mobile, Alabama. They had it on a little disc down there, called ''Rock And Roll Angel''. Jud told me about it and soon after when I was in Mobile I heard it too. So we decided it was right for Ray to record, but my wife, Joanne Terrell, changed the song to ''Rockin' Little Angel''.

The idea was to soften it a little, as we all throught that the harder rock and roll wouldn't last. Jud paid $600 to hire RCA studio B in Nashville and we had Chet Atkins and Grady Martin, Bob Moore, Floyd Cramer, all the top players, and the Jordanaires singing back-up. 

Bill Justis was the engineer – I was the one who loaned him the money to move to Nashville from Memphis. We recorded ''Rockin' Little Angel'' and  ''That's All Right'' and after we'd done it Chet Atkins liked the songs so much he called Steve Sholes at RCA head office and they wanted to buy the tapes. Jud wouldn't let them go, though. He had faith in Ray Smith''.

According to Jud's son, also named Jud, ''Chet Atkins called Steve Sholes and said he had a talent in the studio on a rental session that was worth looking at for RCA. Sholes reportedly called my father and offered $10.000 advance to Smith and that RCA would take over the sessions from that point. Apparently my father turned down the offer''.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
FOR JUDD RECORDS 1959

RCA VICTOR STUDIO B
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
UNKNOWN DATE AUGUST 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – BILL JUSTIS

01 – ''THAT'S ALL RIGHT'' – B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Nelson-Burch
Publisher: - Studio Music – Tunevile Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 6813
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1959
Release: - August 1959
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1016-A mono
THAT'S ALL RIGHT / ROCKIN' LITTLE ANGEL
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-7 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''ROCKIN' LITTLE ANGEL'' – B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Jimmy Otto Rogers
Publisher: - Starway Music – Singing River Music
Matrix number: - P 6814
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1959
Release: - August 1959
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1016-B mono
ROCKIN' LITTLE ANGEL / THAT'S ALL RIGHT
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-8 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Chet Atkins – Guitar
Grady Martin – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Floyd Cramer – Piano

The Jordanaires consisting of
Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews,
Hugh Jarrett, Hoyt Hawkins – Vocal Chorus



Original Sheet Music ''Rockin' Little Angel'' by Ray Smith. >

Jud Phillips did go for an alternative deal involving Bill Lowery's National Recording Corporation out of  Atlanta, Georgia. Jud issued an initial pressing of Judd 1016, ''Rockin' Little Angel'' and ''That's All Right'' at  his own expense, and it was reviewed in the trade press in August 1959. When the record started to hit, all  subsequent copies bore the legend – ''Subsidiary of National Recording Corp Atlanta''.



Charlie Terrell  remembered it this way: ''I instigated the deal where NRC became involved with Judd Records. I knew Bill  Lowery pretty good, and told him about Ray Smith's abilities and the great new record he had on Judd. So  Bill called Jud and wanted to get involved.   Bill Lowery and NRC paid for all Ray''s Judd sessions after the first  one, and they were all made at RCA in Nashville.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


BILL LOWERY - was from Leesburg, Louisiana, born in 1924, and he had lived and worked in  radio variously in California, then Shreveport, Hot Springs, Arkansas, Oklahoma City, Wichita  Falls, and Elizabethton, Tennessee by the time he was 23 years old. In Elizabethton at WBET  he became the youngest radio station manager in the country in 1947.  In 1949 he helped set  up the programming format of a new station, WQXI in Atlanta, and in 1951 he was on the  much bigger Atlanta station, WGST where one of his many roles was as Uncle Ebeneezer  Brown, a country character and disc jockey.


Bill Lowery (left) with quartet in RCA Studio B., Nashville, Tennessee. ^

While doing this he began developing and  booking talent, and from there he got into publishing with his musician partner Dennis  'Boots' Woodall, starting with a gospel song by Joseph Cotton' Carrier. Lowery soon  developmed a link with Capitol Records producer Ken Nelson. In 1956, he picket up the  publishing on Gene Vincent's ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'', and didn't look back.

In 1957 Lowery started to dabble in recording with the Fox label and the Stars label,  recording at WGST. In March 1958, he set up National Recording Corporation, and started  issuing discs on the NRC label. Billboard reported: ''A new label N.R.C. (which stands for  National Recording Corporation) has been set up in Atlanta, Georgia, by Bill Lowery. Latter is  the publisher of such recent hits as ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'', ''First Date, First Kiss'', and ''Young  Love''. Lowery has already cut his firms first release with youngster Paul Peek, formerly of  Gene Vincent's Blue Caps''. Lowery had a recording studio in Atlanta in a former school  building. He soon set up the Scotie and Jax labels, and diversified his operations, setting up  a publishing office in Nashville (1958 to 1961), a distribution operation in Birmingham (from  April 1959), and a record pressing plant in Atlanta. It was at this time that he started taking  on other record labels for pressing and distribution.

On October 1959, Billboard announced: ''The NTC record company here (Atlanta) has just  purchased Jud Phillips' Judd label, which currently has a promising single in Ray Smith's  ''That's All Right''. Phillips is joining NRC's office here and will work on promotion for both  Judd and NRC labels''.

Lowery continued in music publishing, along with studio ownership, and artist management of a list of successful artists. Prior to his death, Lowery Music was sold to Sony/ATV Music Publishing. His work with the Friends of Georgia Music organization assured that Georgia-based artists would be honored in the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. Artists with whom Lowery was connected include (but are not limited to): Joe South, Jerry Reed, Robert Ray Whitley, Ray Stevens, Mac Davis, Tommy Roe, Atlanta Rhythm Section, Dennis Yost, & Classic IV, Backalley Bandits, Bertie Higgens and Billy Joe Royal. Noted session and touring drummer, Michael Huey, began his career with the Lowery Organization as a staff musician.

Bill Lowery died on Tuesday, June 8, 2004, after a four-month battle with cancer.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1959

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE,
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: SUMMER PROBABLY AUGUST 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

And why, you might ask did it take nearly a year and a half between Gene Simmons' recording the sides of Sun Recordings and Sam's releasing then on Sun? That in itself is a tale whose punchline we may never know for sure. The simple truth is that Gene Simmons and his boys had been in and out of the Sun studio more times than we can count over a three year period of time. They had recorded at least 14 titles that we know of and come away with nothing to show except a few stories to tell. They had finally stopped trying, choosing to invest their energy where the chance of success seemed a little higher. That meant Hi Records, Joe Cuoghi's label across town. Hi was pieced together by former Sun record alumni like Ray Harris, Bill Cantrell, and Quinton Claunch. Hi wasn't sure what it wanted to be )other than lucrative) and was not driven by a singular artistic vision as clear as the one Sam Phillips brought to his company. It also held none of the allure of that little yellow Sun label. No history of discovering, Elvis, Cash, Jerry Lee, Charlie Rich, Carl Perkins, or Howlin' Wolf. Nevertheless, the folks who owned Hi Records were guys with some credentials and some mileage on them. They had a nice little studio containing an Ampex tape recorder. Most importantly, the door was open. Maybe Gene and Carl and Jessie could finally get something going here. You could hardly blamee them after all these years.

And so they started laying down some tracks at Hi, once it became clear that the Sun stuff just wasn't going to go anywhere. If Sam had been serious, he would have put something out long ago, right? Right. In late 1957 Hi had issued their first single by Carl McVoy, and discovered that the cost of pressing a hit single could put them out of business almost as quickly as they had started. They leased their single to Sam Phillips International subsidiary, while the boys at Hi put their heads together to decide what to do next. At some point around March, 1958, Sam finally decided it was time to do something with this kid from Tupelo who had never bugged him for a release. Maybe it was the interest that Hi had begun to express in Gene, although as Gene recalled, Sam Phillips "never had an inkling I'd ever have a hit record". In any case, Sam sat down in his little studio on Union Avenue, probably poured himself a few more drinks, and started playing through all the sessions he had on Gene Simmons and company. That means he heard everything you can hear on Gene's tracks, and a few more alternates to boot.

01 - "YOU LOVE ME TOO" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 9531
Recorded: - August 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Hi Records (S) 45rpm standard single Argo 5345 mono
YOU LOVE ME TOO/OUT OF THIS WORLD
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-30 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

The record was released as by The Simmons although Carl recalled that original plans were to call them The Simmons Brothers.

02 - "OUT OF THIS WORLD" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Quinton Clauch-Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 9532
Recorded: - August 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Hi Records (S) 45rpm standard single Argo 5345 mono
OUT OF THIS WORLD/YOU LOVE ME TOO
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-29 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Simmons: Gene & Carl Simmons - Vocal and Guitars
Bobby Stewart - Bass
Other Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


Jerry Lee Lewis and Barbara Barnes sitting at the cabin cruiser around the Mobile Bay near Gulf of Mexico, summer of August 1959 >

AUGUST 1959

Jud Phillips was still plugging on with Jerry Lee Lewis. Jud half-believed that Jerry was his own creation,  and Jerry concurred, crediting Jud with making him the success he had been. Jerry kept working, despite the  meager pay he could now command. Roland Janes was away from the studio often, accompanying Jerry Lee  on his live show.

Jud kept trying to figure some angle to bring Jerry back to international prominence. He  had gotten two of his hometown friends from the Tri-cities area of Alabama to invest in Jerry's future, and he  was having a meeting with them, his brother Tom, and Jerry Lee at a beach house on Mobile Bay. It was late  August when Jud called and said that Sam had agreed to send Barbara Barnes to that meeting to represent  Sun.

Jud Phillips was still angling for a way to get Jerry some favorable press coverage, so that people could  know a more favorable human side of the performer. Privately, Jud worried whether Jerry had the substance  to sustain a career. ''Jerry Lee Lewis is the most oversold artist in America'', he said. The problem was partly  that he had never had an act to go along with his hit songs, beyond shaking his golden locks and hurling  piano benches across the stage. He had proven this during an ill-fated nightclub date in the New York area he  had contracted to do upon his return from England. He could announce a song, but that's as far as he could  go. Harry Kalcheim had been there and told he was totally dismayed by Jerry's performance.

Jud's brother, Tom, seemed to be looking upon the whole scene with a jaundiced eye. He and Barbara had  talked from time to time; he told her during a lull when no one was near that he was a former alcoholic and  concerned that both Sam and Jud were headed for the road he had taken. He shook is head, asking Barbara,  ''How did you get mixed up in this nest of Phillipses''? His words, with the allusion to snakes or wasp,  seemed to carry a warning. When it came time to leave, but there was no Harry Kalcheim, and neither was  Jud. Barbara had nothing substantive to report to Sam, and she kept on as before, trying to sell his records  with scant success.

AUGUST 1959

Johnny Powers came from points north and apparently made a few trips to Memphis bringing his abundance  of Presley-generated style, unbounded enthusiasm, and, on ''With Your Love, With Your Kiss'', a groove that  wouldn't quit. Ultimately, it just wasn't quite ''different'' enough and Powers only saw one single released on  Sun.

AUGUST 11, 1959 TUESDAY

Sun 325, Vernon Taylor's ''Sweet And Easy'' b/w ''Mystery Train''; Sun 326, Jerry McGill's ''I Wanna Make Sweet Love'' b/w ''Lovestruck; and Sun 328, Sherry Crane's ''Willie Willie'' b/w ''Winnie The Parakeet'' are released.

The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''A Woman's Intuition'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio In Nashville, Tennessee.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY POWERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY AUGUST 12, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS,
AND/OR STAN KESLER

By the time he'd reached his eighteenth birthday, Johnny Powers had already seen two high-octane singles released on local Detroit labels. Both were cut from standard rock and roll cloth but as the ex-john Pavlik hailed from the same northern-most region as rockabilly best-seller Jack Scott, he readily adopted the latter's dusky baritone for his brief moment in the Sun spotlight. Powers would ultimately find his true worth on the shop floor of the music industry, in mastering and distribution.

01 - "WITH YOUR LOVE, WITH YOUR KISS" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Johnny Pevlik
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 370  - Master
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 327-A mono
WITH YOUR LOVE, WITH YOUR KISS / BE MINE, ALL MINE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3


Johnny Powers 1959 >

Johnny Pavlik from Detroit City turned in a real two-sided barn burner on his sole Sun single. Powers is a highly energetic vocalist, to say the least. The highlights on the bluesy "With Your Love, With Your Kiss" include the rather unorthodox use of a 3-chord during the verse, and the kick-ass drumming of session stalwart Jimmy M. Van Eaton. Martin Willis, who seemed to be spending more time at 706 Union than at home, reprises his sax solo from "One More Time". It was beautiful the first time, so why not repeat it?.


No one has ever discovered what happened at the end of this recording. The original 45 was released with the final note awkwardly cut off.  Subsequent reissues have sounded as if attempts were made to edit the ending to sound intentional, or fade it altogether. At this point, no tape with a clean ending exists.

02 - "BE MINE, ALL MINE" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Johnny Pevlik-Tommy Moers
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated - Asterisk Music
Matrix number: - U 371  - Master
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 327 mono
BE MINE, ALL MINE / WITH YOUR LOVE, WITH YOUR KISS
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3



Powers shifts gears on "Be Mine, All Mine", using a sneering talk/sing approach that just drips with good natured menace. The song rests on a gimmicky yodel during the release, under which Jimmy Van Eaton inserts some fine bass drum work. In fact, it is Van Eaton's assertive accenting on the snare, and lively right foot on the bass drum that propel this record. Powers seems to have borrowed a line of melody from his hero Elvis' "Too Much". Happily, Martin Willis' sax solo sounds like it actually belongs here.



Stuart Colman recalled, ''I was able to grill Johnny Powers about his long and varied career when he headlined a series of shows in the United Kingdom during May 1986. As he explains here, his time at Sun was brought about in a somewhat freewheeling manner by an insidious character named Tommy Moers.

Although his Memphis connection might have been short and sweet, Johnny was nevertheless associated with the company long enough to pervade some of the rockabilly passion that was then becoming tough to track down.

03 - "INTERVIEW JOHNNY POWERS" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-15 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

04 - "ME AND MY RHYTHM GUITAR" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated - Asterisk Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1031-8 mono
COUNTRY ROCK SIDES
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-22 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

05(1) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - 1 - B.M.I. - 1:25
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1031 mono
COUNTRY ROCK SIDES
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-13 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16

05(2) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - 2 - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (LP) 33rpm Norton ED 229-1 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR
Reissued - 1992 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm Norton CED 229-15 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

05(3) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - 3 - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm Norton CED 229-16 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR
Reissued: – Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-43 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – LONG BLOND HAIR

05(4) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - 4 - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm Norton CED 229-20 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR
Reissued: – Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-45 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – LONG BLOND HAIR

05(5) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - 5 - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm Norton CED 229-23 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

06 - ''BUT NOW THAT IT'S OVER'' - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-29 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-30 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

07 - ''DON'T LIE TO ME'' – B.M.I. 2:22
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (LP) 33rpm Norton ED 229-19 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-26 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

08 - ''EVERYBODY SAYS I'M A LUCKY GUY'' – B.M.I. - 1:35
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 2007
First appearance: – Roller Coaster (LP) 33rpm 2017-15 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – CAN'T RESIST THAT ROCK AND ROLL
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-34 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

09 - ''I GOT A GIRL WHO KNOWS HOW TO LIVE'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 2007
First appearance: – Roller Coaster (LP) 33rpm 2017-14 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – CAN'T RESIST THAT ROCK AND ROLL
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-33 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

10 - ''TROUBLE (I'M EVIL)'' – B.M.I. - 1:43
Composer: - Lindsey Buckingham-Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1029-15 mono
SHAKE AROUND
Reissued: - 1986 Roller Coaster (LP) 33rpm 2010-9 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - ROCK! ROCK! ROCK!

''Trouble'' issued on LP 1029 and Roller Coaster 2010 as ''I'm Evil''.

11 - ''WON'T YOU PLEASE, PRETTY BABY'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 2007
First appearance: – Roller Coaster (LP) 33rpm 2017-8 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – CAN'T RESIST THAT ROCK AND ROLL
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-28 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

12 - ''DON'T GO AWAY'' – B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-28 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS

The next four tracks by Johnny Powers probably recorded at Sun Records at unknown dates (1958/1959). More information is needed. Let us know.

13 - ''TREAT ME RIGHT'' – B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958/1959
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BB LP 2001-1 mono
THE BOP THAT NEVER STOPPED VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1992 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm ED 229-B-1 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

14 - ''MEAN MISTREATER'' – B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958/1959
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BB LP 2000-1 mono
THE BOP THAT NEVER STOPPED VOLUME 1
Reissued: - 1992 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm ED 229-A-4 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

15 - ''I WALKING'' – B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958/1959
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BB LP 2000-2 mono
THE BOP THAT NEVER STOPPED VOLUME 1
Reissued: - 1992 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm ED 229-B-10 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

16 - ''SOMEBODY'S GONNA HURT YOU'' – B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958/1959
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BB LP 2001-2 mono
THE BOP THAT NEVER STOOED VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1988 Magnum Force (LP) 33rpm MFLP 056-6 mono
RED HOT ROCKABILLY VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Powers - Vocal and Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Billy Riley - Bass
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Tenor Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


AUGUST 1959

Sticking true to the formula of rocking up a standard, Mann lighted upon another Nat King  Cole hit, ''Pretend'', for a follow-up, but it pegged out halfway up the Hot 100. That should  have served notice to Mann and Phillips that the formula had run its course; instead,  ''Pretend'' was followed by ''Some Enchanted Evening'', ''South Of The Border'' and ''The  Wayward Wind'', each selling progressively fewer copies. Ironically, both Charlie Rich and  Eddie Bush were contributing some strong material to Mann's repertoire (including ''I'm  Coming Home'', which Elvis Presley later copied note-for-note), but their songs were  relegated to B sides and album tracks. The combination of Mann and Bush might have had  staying power, but their potential was foiled by Phillips' insistence upon revamping  standards.

Carl Mann was only seventeen when his career began its downward slide, but that was  hardly the worst of his problems: unable to handle the rigors of heavy touring, he had  become an alcoholic. After his band broke up, Mann toured been with Carl Perkins, neither  able to find that elusive second hit. Finally Mann returned whence he came, to Huntington;  he kept his hand in, playing a few night spots, but they were a far cry from the venues he  had worked during the summer of 1959 when the kids had stood and cheered for another  encore of ''Mona Lisa''. His last Phillips International single, shipped in June 1962, coupled  the strangely appropriate ode to illicit liquor ''Mountain Dew'' with yet another oldie, ''When  I Grow Too Old To Dream''. It sold a shade over one thousand copies.

Mann was drafted in 1964 and sent to Germany for his tour of duty. After his return he tried  to pick up the pieces of his recording career, and cut some sides for Monument Records; but  by that point his alcoholism had rendered him unable to promote his career. He married in  1968 and started the painful process of weaning himself off the bottle. A liaison with ABCDot  in 1970 produced five singles in the contemporary country mold, none of which was that  second mayor hit.

''There's hardly a week goes by that I don't wish at some point that I'd stayed with it'', said  Mann in 1987. ''I'd probably have done been gone though. I needed to change the way I was  going with the booze, but it's hard to get off it when you're on the road''. A more recent  conversion to Christianity has further removed Mann from the desire to perform.

If Mann ever needed to reject upon the value of home and security, the example of Eddie  Bush, who continued to drink and drift, certainly offered food for thought. Bush was last  seen in the early 1980s in the record store that Shelby Singleton (owner of the Sun catalog  since 1969) operated in Nashville. Fortified by the bottle, Bush announced to the patrons  that he was the greatest guitarist who had ever come to Nashville. Those who took any  notice probably thought that they were listening to a drunk living out a delusion. Don  Powell, manning the store that day for Singleton, knew better; he had toured once with  Mann and Bush, and knew that Bush really was one of the best. Powell's attempts at  conversation about the old days faltered, as Bush tried to bum some cash.

AUGUST 1959

Surprisingly, it was Harold Jenkins' sometime band-mate in the Arkansas Wood Choppers, Mack Self, who   eventually saw one release on Sun and another on Phillips International. Self's wonderfully archaic ''Easy To   Love'' is on the country box-set, and should be the cornerstone of any 1950s country collection. Trying his   hand at rockabilly, Self had mixed results. His version of ''Goin' Crazy'' is markedly different from the   hillbilly version on the country box-set. If ''Mad Of You'' was rockabilly caught out of time when it was   released in October 1959, that's hardly surprising. It was recorded two years earlier, and was resurrected as   the B-side of a Tom Dooley-soundlike, ''Willie Brown''. Collectors figured that it was Charlie Feathers   singing the bluesgrass-style harmony on ''Mad At You'', a belief that Feathers fostered, but it was actually  Jimmy Evans.

AUGUST 13, 1959 THURSDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hit ''Sweet Nothin's'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville. Charlie McCoy observes the session, the first one the future Hall of fame member ever attends.

Singer/songwriter Bobby Darin signs a million-dollar contract with Paramount Pictures. ''Dream Lover'', a song he wrote, will eventually become a country hit for Billy ''Crash'' Craddock.

AUGUST 14, 1959 FRIDAY

Johnny Cash recorded ''The Rebel - Johnny Yuma'' in Nashville at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

Decca released The Wilburn Brothers'''A Woman's Intuition''.

AUGUST 15, 1959 SATURDAY

Captain Paul Beaulieu arrives in West Germany with his family, including 14-year-old daughter Priscilla, destined to meet and years later, marry Elvis Presley.

Former country hitmaker and current orchestra leader Lawrence Welk graces the cover of TV Guide.

The Browns perform ''The Three Bells'' on ABC's telecast of ''The Dick Clarlk Saturday Night Beechnut Show''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY AUGUST 15, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ERNIE BARTON

This version of "Lovin' Memories" contains far more echo and a slightly different mix. It's a safe bet the track results from an entirely different session. This early take of ''Lovin' Memories'' (a song erroneously released in the past as ''Love Love Memories'') retains a strong country feel despite the presence of Jimmy Van Eaton on drums and Martin Willis on saxophone. It has the same genuine rockabilly feel as some of the Warren Smith items such as ''Hank Snow Medley'' and ''Dear John'', literally a hillbilly song with a rocking beat.

01 - "LOVIN' MEMORIES'' - 2 - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Mac Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-9-8 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-26 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959



Mack Self in later years. >

Motivated initially by Sam Phillips and later by Jack Clement, Mack Self set out prove he could forge the kind of material that would eventually slot into the Sun mandate. His full-bodied "Mad At You" was first tried out at 706 Union in 1956, then a master was cut a year later, although there was no release as such until October 1959. The sweet-spot harmony comes courtesy of Fender bass player, Jimmy Evans, who was on loan from the Harold Jenkins band at the time.


"Willie Brown" this song is the outlier in Mack's recordings for Sun. Certainly it is the least country of all his compositions and owes a clear debt to the folk boom in popular music at the time.

The Kinston Trio's "Tom Doley", another hand down song, had charted less than a year before Mack took "Willie Brown" before the microphone. Another contribution to Mack's unconscious was probably Johnny Cash's "Don't Take Your Guns To Town", another tale of a decent young lad who ends up badly after some violence in a saloon. At a strictly musical smash hit from the era. Like "Willie Brown", the Browns' record also alternates between unaccompanied and accompanied vocal sections. On "The Three Bells", the return to the full band in rhythm is announced by a four note vocal hook ("Bum bum bum bum"). Self's record also uses a four note lead-in, only it's played on the guitar by Roland Janes.

02(1) - "WILLIE BROWN" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 360 - Master
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - October 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3548-A mono
WILLIE BROWN / MAD AT YOU
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This was somebody's idea of a commercial record in 1959. It might have been subtitled "Tom Dooley Meets The Battle Of New Orleans". Ironically, this is the least interesting record Mack Self left in the Sun vaults, an ersatz folk concoction full of dramatic drum rolls and a wholly out-of-place sax. At least it gave them an excuse to resurrect and release "Mad At You" (1957), for which we should be deeply beholden to the hung down "Mr. Brown".

02(2) - "WILLIE BROWN" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-18 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The song seems to be written from the point of view of the dead man. It's not immediately clear who's saying "Hang down, Willie Brown, hang down and die" until you consider the next few words: "My loved ones, they cry". That pretty much identities the murdered man as the speaker. In any case, "Willie Brown" was  worked up over at least two different sessions and underwent some personnel changes in the process. Both Ace Cannon and Martin Willis took a hand at the sax part and both W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland and J.M. Van Eaton played drums. One of those stalwart session drummers (we're not sure which) had a little bit of trouble mastering the military drum roll that appears prominently in "Willie Brown". This becomes painfully clear on a number of takes that had to be aborted when the drummer goofed his attempt at the drum roll. Some alternate takes feature a heavier backbeat than the version issued in October, 1959. The major difference on the alternate take here can be heard in the sax work behind Self's vocal; it seems more adventurous on this unissued take.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley or Jimmy Evans - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Martin Willis or Ace Cannon - Tenor Saxophone
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

03 - "INTERVIEW MACK SELF" - B.M.I. - 4:55
Recorded: - 2007
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-31 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

A fragment of an impromptu performance recorded during a recent (2007) telephone conversation by Hank Davis. Consider it a teaser for the full band version that's included on Mack's self-produced CD recorded recently in Memphis. Despite the primitive sound quality of this snipped, many of you will appreciate the honesty and directness of Mack's solo acoustic guitar performance. It's the next best thing to camping out on Mack's front porch and listening to him sing for friends and family.

04 - "MIDNIGHT MUSIC IN MEMPHIS" - B.M.I. - 1:17
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - 2007
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-31 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Also known as "When Darkness Falls In Memphis", this is Mack's tribute song to his days at Sun Records. In addition to two of his own titles ("Easy To Love" and "Mad At You"), the song also pays its respects to Elvis, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR VERNON TAYLOR
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY AUGUST 15, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

One of Sam Phillips favorite copyrights was trotted out yet again on Vernon Taylor's second Sun release. One   more time, Taylor shows off a fine voice, ideally suited to the kind of rockabilly Sun is famous for. One can   only wish he had been in town during the golden era. Unfortunately, Taylor also reveals that his sense of   timing was a tad less than stellar. He tacitly recognized as much by given up the music business after this   single.

01(1) - ''HEY LITTLE GIRL/MYSTERY TRAIN'' - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Vernon Taylor-Herman Parker
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - May 29, 2013
''Mystery Train'' 4x False Start, 1x Long False Start, 4x False Start released
on BCD 17313 by mistake
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-7-27 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

01(2) - "MYSTERY TRAIN" 2 - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Sam Phillips-Herman Parker
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 367   - Master
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - July 16, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 325-A mono
MYSTERY TRAIN / SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 157803-4-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Although there is nothing technically wrong with his playing, Martin Willis' saxophone was becoming in   1959 what the Gene Lowery Singers had been two years earlier. Ironically, we had temporarily dispensed   with annoying choral overdubs only to find ourselves surrounded by omnipresent sax licks. At its best, as on   "One More Time", Willis' playing made some restrained and meaningful contributions. But too often, the   obligatory appearance of Willi's madly hopping sax suggests that whoever was twiddling the knobs at Sun   had listened to too many Coasters' records. They assumed that King Curtis spelled a one way ticket to sales.   They were wrong. If you can listen through all the manic sax intrusions, the instrumental bed track to   "Mystery Train" is damn fine.

02 - "SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 366 - Master
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - July 16, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 325 mono
SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE / MYSTERY TRAIN
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

The world is still awaiting a definitive version of "Sweet And Easy To Love". Gone is the obnoxious   barbershop-quartet that marred Orbison's original version (one almost hears a distant "do de wada wada wah"   during Taylor's version). Also, the chord structure has been changed here, providing some pleasant 6-  minor/2- minor chords in place of Orbison's original conception. But once again, the sax riffing all but sinks   this outing. The attempted guitar-sax harmony during the solo is particularly dire. Even the redoubtable   Charlie Rich seems curiously lost.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Vernon Taylor - Vocal and Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Martin Willis - Sax
Charlie Rich - Piano
Jimmy Van Eaton - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


AUGUST 21, 1959 FRIDAY

Hawaii becomes the 50th state added to the United State. The Aloha State provides a home for Randy Travis, Kris Kristofferson and Dolly Parton, and a wedding site for Travis, Janis Gill and The Dixie Chick's Martie Maguire.

Hawaii is the only U.S. state located in Oceania and the only one composed entirely of islands. It is the northernmost island group in Polynesia, occupying most of an archipelago in the central Pacific Ocean. Hawaii is the only U.S. state not located in the Americas. The state does not observe daylight saving time.

The state encompasses nearly the entire volcanic Hawaiian archipelago, which comprises hundreds of islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight main islands are—in order from northwest to southeast: Nijhay, Kauai, Oahu, Molokaj, Kahoolawe, Maui and the Island of Hawaiii. The last is the largest island in the group; it is often called the "Big Island" or "Hawaiʻi Island" to avoid confusion with the state or archipelago. The archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania.

Hawaii's diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists. Because of its central location in the Pacific and 19th-century labor migration, Hawaii's culture is strongly influenced by North American and Asian cultures, in addition to its indigenous Hawaiian culture. Hawaii has over a million permanent residents, along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. Its capital is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu.

Hawaii is the 8th-smallest and the 11th-least populous, but the 13th-most densely populated of the fifty U.S. states. It is the only state with an Asian plurality. The state's coastline is about 750 miles (1,210 km) long, the fourth longest in the U.S. after the coastlines of Alaska, Florida and California. The United States President Eisenhower signs the Hawaii Admission Act into law and than Hawaii becomes the 50th state in the United States of America. William F. Quinn is elected as the state's first governor.

AUGUST 23, 1959 SUNDAY

Jimmy Dean appears on the NBC series ''The Dinah Shore Chevy Show''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY AUGUST 24, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) - "ROCKIN' LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-10-12 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - WILLING AND READY
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-25 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

This alternate version contained mistakes of near mythic proportions by bassist Robert Oatsvall which prompted some to wonder if Oatsvall was playing a fretless electric bass which might help explain his miscues. Carl Mann, though, recalled that the reasons for Oatsvall's hit-or-miss approach to his instrument was, as he says, "just lack of practice. Robert had a day job whereas Eddie and I had nothing in our lives but music. We were playing all the time". Oatsvall's lack of expertise bobbed up again when the boys tackled Gogi Grant's 1956 smash ''Wayward Wind''. The early takes disintegrate because Oatsvall is so off-taget.

01(2) - "ROCKIN' LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 357 - Master
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3546-A mono
ROCKIN' LOVE / PRETEND
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Rockin' Love", which accompanied "Pretend" on the follow-up to "Mona Lisa", had already been recorded by Carl Mann for the Jazon label. The Sun out-takes reveal that the first segment of the song was originally taken at a brisker tempo. A sample of that early approach has been here.


Billboard, July 1959 >

"Rockin' Love", was a remake of the lone Carl Mann single on Jaxon Records, recorded prior to his pilgrimage to Memphis. The first half is a tight, tough little record that builds quite a bit of tension.

And then it happens: the band speeds up and just when things should soar into the stratosphere, the sheer incompetence of one band member threatens to destroy the whole gig. Bass player Robert Oatsvall simply goes to piece.


He can barely keep up with the changes awn manages to hit a few clams of near mythic proportion. In truth, it is a wonder that this take was released. Sam Phillips has often told of releasing records with technical imperfections because the feeling was right. "Down The Line" by Jerry Lee Lewis was one such case (listen to the guitar go out of tune).

Here is another. Oatsvall sounds like he studied bass at the Luther Perkins school of fretboard mastery. These aren't exactly complex chord changes but Oatsvall manages to turn finding the 1-chord (the tonic, the key in which the song is being performed) into an adventure as Carl sings the little phrase. Oatsvall stuck around for a few more sessions but by 1960 he had been given his walking papers.

02(1) – "PRETEND" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:36
Composer: - Douglas-Parman-LaVere
Publisher: - Brandon Music
Matrix number: - P 358 - Master
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3546-B mono
PRETEND / ROCKIN' LOVE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Pretend" was cut on the afternoon of Carl Mann's seventeenth birthday.

Nothing in Carl Mann's life had prepared him for what was happening. He spent his seventeenth birthday on the road. For a while, it looked as though his career would hold up. His version of "Mona Lisa" eclipsed Conway Twitty's version, and when he went back into the Sun studio he thought he had stumbled upon a formula that could be applied indefinitely, but "Pretend" pegged out a number 57 on the Billboard Hot 100.
 
"The biggest problem I had after "Mona Lisa" was getting back into the studio", says Carl. "I offered to go back but Sam kept holding us off".

02(2) – "PRETEND/TOO YOUNG" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:47
Composer: - Douglas-Parman-LaVere
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
''Too Young'' False Start released on BCD 17313 by mistake.
Released: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-7-17 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959


Carl Mann's first National tour followed in the ill-fated footsteps of Buddy Holly. >

Sam Phillips reservations may have had more to do with what happening to his little empire. He held out great hopes for his new studio, build on Madison Avenue, a few blocks from the old studio. In the meantime, he had dismissed his resident producer, Jack Clement, and his musical arranger Bill Justis, and his regular session crew were following new directions.  As is the case with most Sun artists, Carl Mann's recording history is a little difficult to piece together.


Tape boxes from the old studio in particular yield few secrets and sessions filed with the Musicians Union were usually a book-keeping exercise. It seems, though, that Carl and his group went back to the old studio in August 1959 just before it closed. "Pretend" and Carl's own "Rockin' Love" were cut then.

"We worked with Sam on "Pretend", remembered Carl Mann. "He was great to work with. He was always wanting to come up with something unique. He wanted us to do "Bali-Hi" or songs from "South Pacific". Charles Underwood took over at the new studio, but the studio on Madison just didn't have anywhere near as good a sound. It might have been a fuller sound, but it just didn't have the magic that the old studio had. The old studio had the greatest sound I'd ever heard. A lot of body. When I heard "Mona Lisa" coming back over the monitors I said, 'That ain't me. I ain't that good'. The sound on Madison was too hollow, too distorted". 

03 - "TAKE THESE CHAINS FROM MY HEART" - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Hy Heath-Fred Rose
Publisher: - ATV Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally issued
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-1 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-27 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Guitarist Eddie Bush shines on "Take These Chains From My Heart", but the overall results prove that not every standard can be forced into the "Mona Lisa" mould. Carl Mann in particular sounds awkwardly selfconscious. "Too Young" appears in the safety masters coupled with "Rockin' Love", suggesting that it was originally scheduled as the follow-up to "Mona Lisa".

04 - "TOO YOUNG" - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Sylvia Dee-Sid Lippman
Publisher: - EMI Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm JAN 33-8022 mono
14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-26 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

After the success of "Mona Lisa", Carl Mann and Eddie Bush inevitable dipped again into the Nat King Cole songbook on this early Sun session. "Too Young" was a major hit for Cole in 1951, and "Pretend" sold two million copies for Cole and Ralph Marterie in 1952. Notes in the out-take boxes suggest that "Too Young" had originally been slated as the follow-up single, but was bounced at some point in favour of "Pretend".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

''Some Enchanted Evening'' was apparently cut at Sam Phillips' insistence. It was first recorded as an aria by Ezio Pinza in ''South Pacific'', but on an enchanted evening ten years later Carl Mann and his band settled down to give it treatment that would have Ezio shudder. It was tried here on this session, but only a fragment of the session remains, and it was re-attempted two months later in October 12, 1959.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


A few weeks after playing small local radio stations, Carl Mann was headlining at a big Amusement Park in Massachusetts. >

END AUGUST 1959

Carl Mann was booked to play the White City Amusement Park in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts.  In a matter of weeks he had gone from playing little 250-watt local radio stations where the  signal carried to the station's parking lot on a clear night to playing holiday resorts for the  well heeled youth of the north-east.


Everyone wanted to strike while the iron was hot. Right  after the Shrewsbury gig ended he had to drive half-way across the country to a date that  Jim Denny had arranged in Kennett, Missouri.  The failure to place Carl Mann with a New York  management team probably hurt his career as much as the insistence upon revamping oldies  long after the formula had gone stale.

After arranging the audition, W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland had signed Mann to a management  contract, and he played with him on the road. He cut himself in for fifty percent of all  personal appearance fees, but Carl Mann didn't baulk until Holland demanded fifty per cent  of recording royalties too. On the first statement for the six months ending June 30, 1959  Sam Phillips accounted for 72,000 copies of Carl Mann's "Mona Lisa". Carl was owed $1900,  but Sam Phillips had already fronted Carl $800 for band uniforms and other out-of-pocket  expenses. This still left $1100 - big money and the promise of much more to follow.

"W.S. and I had a split over royalties", confirmed Carl. "We had an agreement - no contract.  He'd take care of road management and I'd give him fifty percent of road money after  expenses, but he wanted half of everything including the record royalties". Holland quit  Mann's team around July 1960 (there was a lump sum payment to him from Mann's royalty  account that month suggesting a split). He then opted for the security of playing with Johnny  Cash.

Some artists adapted well to life on the road, but Carl wasn't one of them. ''The worst part  was not getting enough rest'', he says. ''We travelled in the car all the time. I remember this  agent booked us into towns five or seven hundred miles apart. We only had time to travel,  set up and play. Any sleep we got was in the car. You'd be half-asleep and you'd take  something to keep awake and that would to something else. You'd end up with all kinds of  problems''.

AUGUST 25, 1959 TUESDAY

Songwriter Tim Menzies is born in Mechanicsville, Virginia. Known under a recording deal as Tim Mensy, he writes Doug Stone's ''I Thought It Was You'', Mark Chesnutt's ''I Just Wanted You To Know'' and Shenandoahs ''Mama Knows''.

AUGUST 27, 1959 THURSDAY

Chuck Berry, the author of future hits for Emmylou Harris, George Jones and Buck Owens, is arrested in Meridian, Mississippi, when a white girl at a fraternity dance kisses him. The African-American rocker is jailed overnight and fined $700.

''Put It Off Until Tomorrow'' singer Bill Phillips and his wife Nita, have a son, William George Phillips, in Waynesville, North Carolina.

AUGUST 28, 1959 FRIDAY

Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper recorded ''There's A Big Wheel''.

AUGUST 29, 1959 SATURDAY

Future Academy of Country Music awards producer Dick Clark appears on the cover of TV Guide.

AUGUST 30, 1959 SUNDAY

A Salute to Dick Clark yields a sold-out show at the historic Hollywood Bowl with guests Jerry Wallace, Duane Eddy, Skip and Flip (Skip Battin and Gary Paxton), Rusty York, Jan and Dean, Anita Bryant and ERnie Freeman, who performs ''Raunchy''.

AUGUST 31, 1959 MONDAY

Ray Price recorded ''The Same Old Me'' and ''Under Your Spell Again'' in an evening session at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Riverside Rancho, formerly a live stomping ground for western swing's Spade Cooley, is deliberately burned to the ground, a training opportunity for Los Angeles firefighters.

The Browns claim a number 1 country single in Billboard magazine with ''The Three Bells''. 


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE POSSIBLY 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

01 - "SATURDAY NIGHT FISH FRY" - B.M.I. – 1:37
Composer: - Louis Jordan-E. Walsh-Barrington-Isenberg
Publisher: - Anglo-Pic Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - With Count-In - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - November 1985
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CDX 9 mono
RED HOT RILEY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-19 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

02 - "FOLSOM PRISON BLUES" - B.M.I. - 0:40
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - November 1985
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CDX 9-26 mono
RED HOT RILEY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-20 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

03 - "BILLY'S BLUES" - B.M.I. - 1:33
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Original Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - November 1985
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CDX 9-29 mono
RED HOT RILEY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-21 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

04 - "DARK MUDDY BOTTOM" - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Billy Riley-Mercy Walton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - November 1985
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CDX 9-28 mono
RED HOT RILEY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-22 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

05 - "WHEN A MAN GETS THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 3:39
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - November 1985
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CDX 9-31 mono
RED HOT RILEY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-23 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

06 - "SWEET WILLIAM" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30117-B7 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 10 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-24 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal, Lead and Acoustic Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar, where heard

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


SEPTEMBER 1959

Rita Records is formed by Roland Janes, Billy Riley and Ira. L. Vaughn. Office located at 2158 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee and they  had a huge hit on their third release with Harold Dorman’s “Mountain of Love”. Rita folded in 1961 and Janes eventually opened Sonic Sound on Madison Avenue in 1962.

A newspaper from 1959 headlined: ''New Label Added by Memphians''. It's located at 2158 Union, formed by Bill Riley, Roland Janes and I.L. Vaughn. Riley is a well-known guitarist and band leader who formerly recorded for Sun Records in his own addition to backing a number of other artists.

Two disc have already been released under the Rita label. They are ''Rockin' At The Zoo'' and ''Funny Paper People'' both written by and sung by Bill Hardy (real name, Bill Huskey), and ''San Antonio Rock'' and ''Cattywampus'' by Martin ''Willy'' Willis band. 

Hardy's pairings are both in the comic vein and he is making personal appearances thru out the Mid-South to plug them. He has already been on Bill Anthony's Big Beat and will be on the Steve Stevens' Show in Little Rock this weekend. Hardy originally approached Riley as manager of another singer. But when he sang a verse of one of the songs he had written for his client, Riley signed Hardy himself to record for Rita Records.

Before forming his own company, Riley worked closely with Sam Phillips at Sun, Jack Clement of Summer Records (who will soon bring out a Riley record called ''Too Much Woman''), and with Bill Justis at Play Me Records, ''Cattywampus'', one of Rita's first four sides, was originally done by Justis on Phillips International.

But, Riley quit the label just as it was getting off the ground and sell his stake for $1000 to start Mojo Records.

''When Sam Phillips put in the new studio on Madison Avenue'', said Roland Janes, ''Bill and I went to Sam and asked him to let us retain the old studio and record there with the product going to Sun, but we never actually resolved the question and just drifted into doing our own thing. Rita Records was a co-op deal. Bill and I played on everything, which naturally eliminated having to pay a couple of musicians, and we used our old buddies Martin Willis and J.M. Van Eaton. We came up with a partner, Ira Lyn Vaughan, who had a little money. He was an accountant, and we named the label after his daughter. Mr. Vaughn did all the paperwork, and Bill and I took care of production and getting records to distributors. Riley was a much better salesman than me, but I probably had a better business head''.


The singles PI 3545 ''706 Union'' b/w ''Low Outside'' by Brad Suggs; PI 3546 ''Rockin' Love'' b/w ''Pretend'' by Carl Mann issued.

SEPTEMBER 2, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Drummer Paul Deakin is born in Miami, Florida. He helps found The Mavericks, whose electric brand of country nets two awards a piece from the Country Music Association and Academy of Country Music as Vocal Group of the Year in the 1990s.

SEPTEMBER 7, 1959 MONDAY

Columbia released Ray Price's double-sided single ''The Same Old Me'' and ''Under Your Spell Again''.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1959 TUESDAY

The final installment of ''The Jimmie Rodgers Show'' airs after a five-month prime-time run on NBC-TV.

SEPTEMBER 9, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Capitol Records founder Johnny Mercer joins the guest lineup on the NBC telecast of ''The Milton Berle Show''.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1959 THURSDAY

Priscilla Beaulieu begins attending classes in Wiesbaden, West Germany. Within two weeks, she meets future husband Elvis Presley.

SEPTEMBER 12, 1959 SATURDAY

''Bonanza'' the first western TV series broadcast in color, debuts on NBC, where it remains for 14 seasons.

''Bonanza'' was a NBC television western series that ran from September 12, 1959–January 16, 1973. Lasting 14 seasons and 431 episodes, Bonanza is NBC's longest-running western, and ranks overall as the second-longest-running western series on United States network television (behind CBS's ''Gunsmoke''), and within the top 10 longest-running, live-action American series. The show continues to air in syndication.

The show is set around the 1860s and it centers on the wealthy Cartwright family, who live in the area of Virginia City, Nevada, bordering Lake Tahoe. The series stars Lorne Green, Dan Blocker, Michael Landon, Pernell Roberts (who left after six seasons), and later David Canary and Mithch Vogel. Guitarist Joe Maphis performs the instrumental theme song, and cast member Lorne Green earns a pop/country hit in 1964, with ''Ringo''.

The title "Bonanza" is a term used by miners in regard to a large vein or deposit of ore, and commonly refers to the 1859 revelation of the Comstock Lode discovery, not far from the fictional Pondarosa Ranch that the Cartwright family operated.

In 2002, Bonanza was ranked number 43 on TV Guide 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time and in 2013 TV Guide included it in its list of The 60 Greatest Dramas of All Time. The time period for the television series is roughly between 1861 (Season 1) to 1867 (Season 13) during and shortly after the American Civil War.

During the summer of 1972, NBC aired reruns of episodes from the 1967–1970 period in prime time on Tuesday evening under the title ''Ponderosa''.

''Hometown Jamboree'', a 10-year Southern California tradition produced by Cliffie Stone, airs for the last time on Los Angeles' KTLA-TV. It had featured such acts as Tennessee Ernie Ford, Dallas Frazier, Ferlin Huskey and Lefty Frizzell.

SEPTEMBER 12, 1959 SATURDAY

The Soviet Union crashes the Luna 2 spacecraft into the Moon, making it the first man-made object to reach the Moon's surface. The Luna 2 (Lunik 2) was launched  and after over thirty hours of flight it crashed into the surface of the Moon on September 14th. 

The spacecraft carried Soviet pennants and several scientific instruments like a Geiger-counter to measure radiation and a magnetometer to measure magnetic fields. It ceased operation after impacting the Moon in the Palus Putredinus region.

This was one of the first major events in the space race between the United States and Soviet Union. The United States did not successfully land a spacecraft on the Moon under the Ranger 4 in 1962.

SEPTEMBER 13, 1959 SUNDAY

Specialist Elvis Presley meets 14-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu for the first time, while stationed with the Army in West Germany.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1959 MONDAY

John Berry is born in Aiken, South Carolina. The strong-voiced singer rises in 1994 with his Grammy-nomination ''Your Love Amazes Me'', following up with such melodic hits as ''You And Only You'', ''She's Taken A Shine'' and ''What's In It For Me''.

The Stanley Brothers recorded ''Mountain Dew'' and ''How Far To Little Rock'' at the King Recording Studio in Cincinnati, Ohio. They also cut ''I'm A Man Of Constant Sorrow'' for the second time in their career.

Bing and Kathy Crosby have a daughter, Mary Crosby, in Los Angeles, the same city where he recorded a country hit with The Andrews Sisters in 1944.

SEPTEMBER 15, 1959 TUESDAY

Wynn Stewart recorded ''Wishful Thinking'' at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

The western series ''Laramie'' debuts on NBC-TV, with ''Georgia On My Mind'' songwriter Hoagy Carmichael in the cast for the first year.

The singles, Sun 327 ''With Your Love With Your Kiss'' b/w ''Be Mine, All Mine'' by Johnny Powers; Sun 329 ''You're Just My Kind'' b/w ''The Ballad Of St. Marks'' by Will Mercer; Sun 330  "I Could Never Be Ashamed Of You" b/w Little Queenie''  by Jerry Lee Lewis; Sun 331 ''You Tell Me'' b/w ''Goodbye Little Darlin'''by Johnny Cash; and Sun 332 ''What A Life'' b/w ''Together'' by Jimmy Isle are issued.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WILL MERCER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SEPTEMBER 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS 
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

Most Sun fans will agree that this record by Will Mercer is a vast improvement over its immediate predecessor, "Winnie The Parakeet". On the other hand, Mercer's solo release on Sun is not about to overshadow the best of Sonny Burgess.

01 - "YOU'RE JUST MY KIND" - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Smith-Ernie Barton
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 374  - Master
Recorded: - September 1959
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 329-A mono
YOU'RE JUST MY KIND / BALLAD OF ST. MARKS
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Mercer offers serviceable readings of music from two entirely different genres. "You're Just My Kind" is a routine up tempo piece of teen fluff, the highlight of which is probably Martin Willis' raspy sax work.

02 - "BALLAD OF ST. MARKS" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Ernie Barton
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 375  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 329-B mono
BALLAD OF ST. MARKS / YOU'RE JUST MY KIND
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

On this side, Mercer provides some grist for the folk/country crossover mill. There was a big market for story songs with a folkie feel and this one, awash in tragedy and untimely death, had what it took for contention in the far-off Fall of 1959.

03 - "HEY LITTLE GIRL''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959


Will Mercer himself remains something of a shadowy figure. His contract was mailed to Red Foley's ''Jubilee U..S.A.'', the Pringfield, Missouri television show that had started as ''The Ozark Jubilee'' and was just about to pass into history. Then in June 1960 - some nine months after this record was released, Billboard reported that Mercer was doing promotional work for the Sheraton Hotel chain in French Lick, Indiana, has shaped up for early waxing an album of folk tunes a la Burl Ives. Titled ''Concert At The Sheraton'', the album will be promoted and pitched at all the hotels in the Sheraton chain.
Will Mercer >

Mercer also  performed a showdate for the Shriners in Cincinnati and has been invited to participate in the National Folk Music Festival to be held at Carter Barren Amphitheater in Washington, June 1-4, 1960.

Very few performers were doing shows for Shriners and folkies on successive weekend, and sandwiching a week of promotional activities for a hotel chain in-between, so that brief news item raises many intriguing questions about Will Mercer, all so far unanswered.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Will Mercer - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


SEPTEMBER 16, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Roy Drusky recorded ''Another''.

SEPTEMBER 18, 1959 FRIDAY

After three months on the air, ''Polka-Go-Round'' is telecast for the last time on ABC. Among its regulars is Tom Fouts, who earned a trio of hits a decade earlier as the leather of captain Stubby and The Buccaneers.

Video director Mark Romanek is born. He wins an honor from the Country Music Association in 2003 for his work on the Johnny Cash video for ''Hurt''.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1959 SUNDAY

Glen Campbell marries Billie Jean Nunley in Las Vegas, Nevada. It's his second marriage.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1959 MONDAY

Faron Young recorded ''Face To The Wall'' and ;;Riverboat'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Actor Jason Alexander is born in Newark, New Jersey. Best known for his role as George Costanza on TV's ''Seinfield'', he earns a Country Music Association award as the director of Brad Paisley's ''Online'' video.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1959 THURSDAY

The Browns recorded ''Scarlet Ribbons (For Her Hair)'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B in Nashville. Archie Campbell joins producer Chet Atkins to help the trio learn the song.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BUSH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 25, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCERS AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

The wayfaring Edward Earl Bush saw military service in Hawaii a season with The Louisiana Hayride staff band and a single on the Jaxon label prior to making his mark at Sun. Impressed by his hot licks on Carl Mann's records, Sam Phillips turned the spotlight on Eddie Bush and this neat shuffle was the product of his first session. A single finally emerged but his glory didn't come until 1965 when he scribed Eddy Arnold's country chart topper, "What's He Doing In My World".

01 - "HEY, BABY DOLL" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Edward Earl Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 25, 1959
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1038-11 mono
FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-28 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

02 - "PRETTY BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:45
Composer: - Edward Earl Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 25, 1959
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Rockhouse Records (LP) 33rpm LP 8411-5 mono
ROCK IT
Reissued: - 1993 Rockhouse Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rock CD 9319 mono
ROCK IT - 32 AUTHENTIC R&R AND ROCKABILLY SHAKERS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush - Vocal and Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Robert Oatswell - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums
Possibly Carl Mann - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


SEPTEMBER 28, 1959 MONDAY

Western Union Telegram sent to Sam Phillips from tour promoter Don Zee.

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAM - NSB098 / NS MGB246 (DE MLA035) PD UTICA MICH 28 114AME SAM PHILLIPS, SUN RECORDING CO UNION ST MFS (EW)

Dear Sam: Urgent at least fifty sample copies all off Johnnie Towers getting ready for big northern tour of Michigan repeat urgent you contact me, Don Zee

(1216 PMCSEP28 59)

Note: Johnnie Towers (Must be Johnny Powers)

SEPTEMBER 28, 1959 MONDAY

Decca released Brenda Lee's pop hit ''Sweet Nothin's''.

William Schlappi is born in Voorheesville, New York. Under the name Billy Montana, he signs a recording deal in the 1990s, but scores his biggest success by writing Jo Dee Messina's ''Bring On The Rain'' and Sara Evans' ''Suds In The Buckets''.

SEPTEMBER 29, 1959 TUESDAY

Review in Billboard magazine says that, ''Lewis has two powerful outings that with exposure could easily coast in. ''I Could Never Be Ashamed Of You'' (Sun 330) is a fine revival of the Hank Williams oldie. ''Little Queenie'' is a rhythmic belt of Chuck Berry's hit of a season or so ago. Both rate spins''.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Stamford Productions issues a $100 check to Conway Twitty for a TV appearance. The check, returned because of insufficient funds, is entered as evidence in the payola trail of rock and roll disc jockey Alan Freed.


OCTOBER 1959

The singles, PI 3547 ''The Midnite Whistle'' b/w ''Snow Job'' by Memphis Bells; PI 3448 ''Willie Brown'' b/w ''Mat At You'' by Mack Self; PI 3549 ''I Walk The Line'' b/w ''Oo-Wee'' by Brad Suggs all issued.

Jud Phillips sells the Judd label to NRC owned by Bill Lowery, and they announcement that Jud Phillips would be joining NRC's offices in Atlanta and will work on promotion for both the Judd and NRC labels. This, in fact, never happened. Instead, Jud remained in Florence, where he went back to the used-car business.

OCTOBER 1959

Jackson, Mississippi TV-News.

Barbara Thomas
The Young Lady That Puts The Wheels In "Pro-Motion", At WLBT, Channel 12

When you see your favorite NBC-ABC show advertised locally on TV, rest assured a little blue   eyed gal wrote the script that gives you a clear cut word picture of "things to come".

Barbara Thomas, home town lassie, looking like a teen age school girl, but with a college   degree to her credit, is the young lady behind all that promotion. For the past two years   Barbara has been with the promotion department of WLBT, Channel 3, Jackson. Beginning   last month she serves as hostess on "Teen Tempos", Saturday afternoon at 5:00.

Delighted with the part she plays down at WLBT, Barbara says she has to stay on her toes to   keep up with both networks. Scads of material coming in daily, Barbara goes over every line   in order to give her viewers a concise synopsis in the briefest manner. And right here she   adds a plug for the station... "the best shows one could imagine are scheduled for the   coming fall and winter months" she says.

A Jackson native and member of a musical family of eight, Miss Thomas is a musician in her   own right... singing is her forte. She with her brothers, Ed, Notre Dame graduate and Cliff,   Georgia Tech freshman, have been appearing on programs since childhood, as a singing   group. More recently they have been on the record making end of the profession... the   brothers more extensively than she.

Staying home and not having to go all over the country, working so hard, is much more   preferable to Barbara, as she puts it. However in a more serious tone relative to recording,   the young lady, after making a record for a Memphis Company, was urged to go all out for a   career.

"The idea did not appeal to me at all, as it meant going on my own altogether", Barbara said.   Continuing, "You might be able after months and months of hard work to be successful... and   again you might not. I love Jackson, my family, home and my work, and I want to stay right   here. As for fun... real enjoyment, there is no place better than Jackson with my own folks   and friends".

The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Thomas, she is one of six children in the family, all   possessing musical talent. The parents are both violinists. Mr. Thomas played with the first   Jackson Symphony thirty years ago, under the direction of Roger Phillips. Mrs. Thomas the   former Victoria Joseph, is also a talent musician. However the prodigy of the family is three   year old Douglas, who handless the drums with the ability of a professional. The little man,  according to the family, monopolizes the Hi Fi, has his own idea of good music and refuses to   listen to that, he does not like. The younger sisters, Dolores 12 and Loretta 8, both sing.   With Ed a pianist composer and arranger of music and Cliff playing the guitar, Barbara says   she found herself with a complex... rushed out and bought herself a baritone uke... and our   guess is the boys do not overshadow her.

OCTOBER 1, 1959 THURSDAY

Songwriter Wayne Walker and his wife, Elaine, have a daughter, Capri Walker. Elaine is the daughter of Ernest Tubb.

OCTOBER 2, 1959 FRIDAY

The iconic science fiction television series “The Twilight Zone” airs for the first time on the CBS television network. The Twilight Zone was created and hosted by the talented screenwriter Rod Serling. The Twilight Zone still ranks as one of the most unique and best written television shows in TV history. It ran for five seasons until 1964 and had a total of 156 episodes. Of those 156 episodes, 92 were written by Serling himself and many of them contain some of the most memorable television moments. The show consisted of sci-fi and supernatural mysteries in an anthology setting and featured many then unknown actors who would later become famous, like Ron Howard, Dennis Hopper, Robert Redofrd and William Shatner.

OCTOBER 3, 1959 SATURDAY

Review in Cash Box says that ''Teenagers shoul delight-in songster Lewis' rock drive on ''Little Queenie'' (Sun 330), a one-time noise-maker for Chuck Berry. To add to the youngster's interest, the performer pauses twice to make narrative comments. Side follows the recently active Lewis deck, ''Let's Talk About Us''. Lower-lid finds artist in hard-best, country-flavored ballad form''.

OCTOBER 4, 1959 SUNDAY

The western series ''The Rebel'' begins a three-season run on ABC, with Johnny Cash singing the theme song.

OCTOBER 5, 1959 MONDAY

''Splish Splash'' singer Bobby Darin takes a guest role opposite Jackie Cooper on the CBS-TV drama ''Hennesey''.

LATE 1959

Charles Underwood, the composer of ''Ubangi Stomp'' and ''Bonnie B'', replaces Ernie Barton as Artist & Repertoire man at Sun/Phillips International.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sam Phillips and Ernie Barton produced at least two sessions for Tracy Pendarvis at the old studio. ''We'd drive straight up'',   recalled Pendarvis, ''maybe write a little along the way, jump out of the station wagon and start recording''.  Tracy's first single ''A Thousand Guitars'' used the assertive sonic quality of the old studio to the advantage.   The Gene Lowery Singers who were descending like a plague on Sun releases in those days mercifully   stayed at home. Instead, Tracy's sparse trio was fattened up with a pianist playing the lower register,  imparting an ominous, moody sound to the performance. ''South Bound Line'' was even better with it's   hypnotic train rhythm and eerily charged vocal. Tracy had written the song for old flame in Mississippi.   ''Things went wrong between us - as they will'', concluded Tracy. ''Marjorie LeBruce where are you tonight''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR TRACY PENDARVIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY OCTOBER 8, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ERNIE BARTON
AND/OF STAN KESLER

1(1) - ''IS IT ME'' - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Buffalo Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BP LP 2078-B-4 mono
TRACY PENDARVIS - A THOUSAND GUITARS

''Is It Me'' has a lot to recommend it. Yes, it's a teen pop outing with more than its share of 6-minor chords,   but the record might have been released awash in choral overdubs. To its credit, Sun let things stand and   there's nothing here but the simple rolling sound of Pendarvis's band. The title provides a marvellous vocal   'hook', compressed into a single beat at the end of each verse. Very catchy stuff that deserved a serious look   in the pop marketplace. When Tracy voice breaks, probably unintentionally, in the first line, the record  becomes all the more endearing.

1(2) – ''IS IT ME'' - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 408 - Master
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - August 15, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 345-B mono
IS IT ME / SOUTH BOUND LINE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

2(1) - ''SOUTH BOUND LINE – 1'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Buffalo Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BP LP 2078-B-2 mono
TRACY PENDARVIS - A THOUSAND GUITARS

2(2) - ''SOUTH BOUND LINE – 2'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Buffalo Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BP LP 2078-B-8 mono
TRACY PENDARVIS - A THOUSAND GUITARS

This release by Tracy Pendarvis is about as raw as anything that appeared on the Sun label in 1960. It was a   rare when we heard a vocalist accompanied only by bass, drums and guitar, which is what ''South Bound   Line'' is all about. It's also about a guy with a mighty shaky sense of time, as Perdarvis extends verses and  vocal lines almost arbitrarily. The song is borrowed quite liberally from Jimmie Skinner's ''Doin' My Time'',   which Johnny Cash recorded for Sun two years earlier for his first LP. Cash, too, struggled with the song's   meter.

2(3) – ''SOUTH BOUND LINE'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 409 - Master
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - August 15, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 345-A mono
SOUTH BOUND LINE / IS IT ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tracy Pendarvis - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


OCTOBER 9, 1959 FRIDAY

At age 22, Bobby Darin becomes the youngest performer ever to headline the Copa Room at Las Vegas Sands Hotel. The date come six months after he earned a hit with ''Dream Lover'', destined to become a country success for Billy ''Crash'' Craddock.

Rollin Sullivan, of the comedy duo Lonzo and Oscar, loses his wife, Ruth Sullivan, and brother, Phil Sullivan, when another driver drifts into lane on U.S. Highway 30 in Wyoming, and hits their car head-on. Rollin Sullivan, who was sleeping in the backseat, enters Evanson Memorial Hospital with serious injuries.

OCTOBER 12, 1959 MONDAY

Webb Pierce recorded ''Drifting Texas Sand''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAYBURN ANTHONY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE OCTOBER 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY MONDAY OCTOBER 12, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The connection may not have been as obvious in 1960, but this was essentially one more attempt to cash in the success of Carl Mann's unexpected hit record "Mona Lisa". In fact, Mann's record was still on the charts when this release went out to the disc jockey's.

True, Mann's rather thin teenage voice was replaced here by Rayburn Anthony's rich baritone, but other than that, the formula was similar: Take a standard, put it to a gently rocking beat, and then dazzle the audience with a powerful guitar solo. In this case, more than the formula was borrowed. Mann's guitarist, Eddie Bush, came along for the ride. In fact, Anthony got the benefit of Mann's entire rhythm section!

01 - "ALICE BLUE GOWN" - A.S.C.A.P. - 1:56
Composer: - H. Tierney-J. McCarthy
Publisher: - Leo Feist Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 382   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1959
Released: - October 25, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 333-A mono
ALICE BLUE GOWN / ST. LOUIS BLUES
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

What, you might be wondering, was an Alice Blue Gown? Apparently, light blue had come into vogue after being introduced by Alice Longworth, daughter of ex- president Theodore Roosevelt. An "Alice Blue Gown", therefore, was a light blue gown that Mrs. Longworth might well have worn. Written in 1919 for the musical "Irere", "Alice Blue Gown" became a much-loved waltz in the inter-war years and got another lease on life when "Irene" was adapted for the screen in 1940 with Anna Neagle and Ray Milland.

02 - "ST. LOUIS BLUES" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:15
Composer: - W.C. Handy
Publisher: - Handy Bross. Music
Matrix number: - U 383   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1959
Released: - October 25, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 333-B mono
ST. LOUIS BLUES / ALICE BLUE GOWN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Rayburn Anthony >

The irony is that the whole approach works better here on "St. Louis Blues" than it ever did on a Carl Mann record. Anthony's painfully restricted baritone is part of the success. His voice has the endearing quality of cracking with every effort to stretch it. The intense, if tuneless vocal, is matched perfectly by the electric bass/hi hat-driven rhythm section. Together they create a surprising amount of tension which is deftly relieved by Bush's maniacal guitar solo, during which all hell breaks loose.


About the only weak link in these proceedings is the poor studio quality of the recording. Sun had just moved into their new digs at 639 Madison Avenue and no one had a clue about harnessing the studio echo. Where was 706 Union when you needed it? In any case, Anthony, and his Jackson, Tennessee connection would be back for two more singles before his gig at Sun was complete.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rayburn Anthony - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Mann - Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
Tony Austin - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAYBURN ANTHONY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S)
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

01 – ''ALL I DO IS WRONG'' - 1:59
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-14 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

02 – ''CLIMB THAT MOUNTAIN'' - 1:54
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-12 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

03 – ''GIRLS LIKE YOU'' - 2:21
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox-1-9 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S
Reissued: -  2006  Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-18 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

04 – ''HAMBONE'' - 2:25
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-2-8 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - THE JACKSON CONNECTION
Reissued: -  May 14, 2001  Castle Records (CD) 500/200rpm  5016073334428 3-17 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN RECORDS STORY - VOLUME 2

05 – ''IF I COULD CLIMB'' - 1:24
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-16 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

06 – ''JUST FOR YOU'' - 1:37
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-15 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

07 – ''LOVE OF MY LIFE'' - 2:44
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-11 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

08 – ''MY HEART'S GOING''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

09 – ''OLD MAN TIME'' - 1:16
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-10 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

10 – ''PICK ÉM UP, PUT ÉM DOWN''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

11 – ''THE SAND OF TIME'' - 2:23
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-5 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

12 – ''SILLY'' - 1:34
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-9 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

13 – ''SO COLD'' - 1:09
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-8 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

14 – ''TAKE ANOTHER LOOK''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

15 – THAT'S MY LOVE FOR YOU'' - 1:01
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-3 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

16 – ''TOLLING BELLS'' - 2:39
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-6 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

17 – WALK WITH ME'' - 1: 32
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-2 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rayburn Anthony - Vocal
Unknown Musicians
Unknown Background Vocals

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


The information from the tape boxes is very contradictory. Some of the titles below were probably rerecorded at sessions held at 706 Union Avenue, at an unknown date. >

This session showed that on a musical level Carl Mann was no flash-in-the-pan. He and Eddie Bush had arrived at an unusual style, and Sam Phillips was on the money as usual when he responded to Bush's guitar. Many talented pickers from B.B. King to Scotty Moore and Carl Perkins had set up their amps in Phillips' studios, and in his way Eddie Bush was the equal of any of them.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 12, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

OVERDUB SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
PRODUCER - CECIL SCAIFE
RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 - "SOME ENCHANTED EVENING" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:04
Composer: - Oscar Hammerstein-Richard Rogers
Publisher: - Williamson Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 365 - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3550-A mono
SOME ENCHANTED EVENING / I CAN'T FORGET YOU
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This was Carl Mann's second follow-up to "Mona Lisa" and already the formula was wearing thin. This session showed Carl and the boys were still taking previously melodic standards, removing most of their distinctive features, and rocking them up. Its hard to know whether the butchered melodies and stripped down chord changes occurred by design or default. You'd think somebody would know better. in any case, Carl continued his trademark vocal lick here when he sang the line about a "crowded roo - oo - oo-oom". The audience didn't need to be reminded; they remembered all too and they turned out clutching those dollar bills in ever decreasing droves.

02(1) - "I CAN'T FORGET YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Carl Belew-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Four Star
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-28 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

The undubbed version of "I Can't Forget You" suggests that Carl Mann had turned in a pretty decent and tight reading of a sweet country ballad. But then the tapes were taken from their 706 Union Avenue home to their new residence at 639 Madison Avenue where a choral overdub and spacey echo were added. These gratuitous overdubs took the results so far over the top that it is virtually impossible to take them seriously or regard them as a reflection on Carl's artistry.

02(2) - "I CAN'T FORGET YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Carl Belew-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Four Star
Matrix number: - P 366 - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3550-B mono
I CAN'T FORGET YOU / SOME ENCHANTED EVENING
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

It is a pleasure to listen at long last to Carl Mann's reading of "I Can't Forget You" as it was originally recorded. It has taken thirty years to strip away the numbing effects of the Gene Lowery Chorus and reveal what a splendid performance the original was. Carl Mann confirmed that "I Can't Forget You" was one of his favourite tracks. "I always loved that song but I wasn't happy about the way they put the chorus and everything on there. In those days, we didn't have any say about it, though. After we left, they could add whatever they wanted".

03(1) - "SOUTH OF THE BORDER" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - James Kennedy-Michael Carr
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-29 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA



The original track of ''South Of The Border'' was taken to the new studio on Madison Avenue and overdubbed with percussion, bells, and a chorus. >

On "Sound Of The Border" Carl Mann and his band finally found a tune worthy of their treatment. It features simple chord changes and an appropriately Latin theme to go with their patented rhythm. In truth, the version that Carl left in the studio was far better than the gimmicky overdubbed production that finally hit the market in May 1960.


At this point, sales were on such a precipitous decline that they hardly justified all the time and expense spent on all those overdubbing sessions. Could thing have been worse if Carl's performances were released as originally recorded?

03(2) - "SOUTH OF THE BORDER"* - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:30
Composer: - James Kennedy-Michael Carr
Publisher: - Peter Maurice Music - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - P 375 - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3555-B mono
SOUTH OF THE BORDER / I'M COMING HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

In search of the third hit, Carl Mann lit upon "South Of The Border". The song had been written by two Englishmen, James Kennedy and Michael Carr, for Gene Autry on the occasion of his British tour in 1939. It had also been a big hit for Frank Sinatra before Carl Mann turned his hand to it. The basic track was cut at the old studio, shortly before the doors were closed. The song was doctored-up by Charles Underwood in the new studio at Madison Avenue. A chorus, some additional percussion and a flurry of mission bells were added to the original track. It was eventually released in May 1960, sold some 27,000 copies. The above alternate version has a different approach as well as some sparkling guitar from Eddie Bush.

04 - "KANSAS CITY" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Macmelodies
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-30 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

"Kansas City" had been rendered onto a laconic rock classic by Wilbert Harrison in 1959, but it dated back to "K.C. Lovin'", a 1952 recording by Little Willie Littlefield - and one of the first joint efforts from Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. Guitar player Eddie Bush dazzles in his solo space, and his decision to end on a major seventh chord adds a tough of the bizarre.

05 - ""TODAY IS CHRISTMAS" - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Julep Records (S) 45rpm JULEP 1985 mono
TODAY IS CHRISTMAS
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-31 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

06 - "MOUNTAIN DEW" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Belle-Lunsford
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-3 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

07 - "COMIN' ROUND THE MOUNTAIN'' - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959 / Instrumental
Released: - 1985
First appearance:   - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-6 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

Overdub Session
The Gene Lowery Singer* chorus and percussion effects.
Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
chorus and percussion effects.

The weak link in the chain was bass player Robert Oatsvall whose goofs litter Mann's early recordings. "We'd try to rehearse everything we were going to do", says Carl. "Then we'd get into the studio, do everything we'd rehearsed and Sam would say, 'What else you got?'. Robert was never ready for that". After a year or so, Oatsvall was eased out. He moved to the Dallas area and was replaced by R.W. "T" Willie Stevenson, a bassist from Jackson, Tennessee with jazz leanings who drove a Coca-Cola truck as a day job.

Drummers came and went after Carl and W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland came to a part of the ways. Jimmy M. Van Eaton played with him occasionally, even the formidable Al Jackson, later the linchpin of the Stax house band, was on one session. It was the chemistry between Mann and Bush that made Carl's recordings so memorable and, in their way, original, though. ''I patterned my singing on Eddie's guitar'', says Carl. ''If he did a note different on the guitar, I'd try and follow it with my voice''. It might be closer to the mark, to say that the effectiveness of Carl's records was rooted in the contrast between his straight-as-an-arrow vocals and Bush's eccentric guitar.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


It would be tempting to say that as a singer Eddie Bush was a pretty good guitar player. In truth, he was a credible singer, although his aspirations sometimes outstripped his ability. He was best on mid-tempo material like "Baby, I Don't Care" and "Walkin' And Thinkin'". Both were sabotaged by execrable production at the new studio, and "Baby I Don't Care" later had a chorus added to it. "Walkin' And Thinkin'" suggests that Eddie's vocal style was strongly influenced by Carl Mann's. It is Carl himself, incidentally, who takes the lead vocal on the chorus of "Vanished".
Eddie Bush >


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BUSH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 12, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Eddie Bush also left a fairly large legacy of instrumentals although, interestingly, his best work seems to have been in support of Carl Mann. The tapes include an overlong balled medley and a rambling bluesy improvisation of no great distinction, as well as a version of "Then I Turned And Walked Slowly Away".  Bush was far from your average guitarist, and in a very real sense, it was the partnership between Carl's vocal and Eddie's guitar that makes these recordings so listenable. There is an intuitive musically underpinning their best work that helps to transcend an often overworked formula.

01 – "VANISHED"*/## - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 382  - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3558-B mono
VANISHED / BABY I DON'T CARE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Vanished" is actually a pretty interesting song, although it might have been a touch too unusual for the pop marketplace. Those acoustic guitar major-7ths are powerful, when you can hear them for all the echo, and the wood block percussion adds an atmospheric touch. Interestingly, it is Carl Mann who takes the lead vocal on the chorus of the Flamenco-styled tune. Along with these tracks, Bush left quite a few unissued titles in the Sun vaults. many were instrumentals, which suggested some exciting unknown performances. But the truth is that most of his solo efforts were mediocre at best. The verdict seems to be that Eddie Bush did his finest guitar work in the role of support player behind Carl Mann.

02 - "BABY I DON'T CARE"**/# - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 381  - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3558-A mono
BABY I DON'T CARE / VANISHED
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

If Eddie Bush's vocalizing had just a little of the manic energy or character of his guitar playing, this would have been one hell of a record! No such luck. Its not that these vocal performances are bad, its just that they really lack anything distinctive. That's particularly disappointing considering the energy and excitement Bush's guitar work had brought to Carl Mann's records. In truth, Bush was a pretty fair songwriter as some of his contributions to Mann's output attest. "Baby I Don't Care", a tune by Mann as well as Bush (Carl's version appeared on his Phillips International LP), works pretty well when things are kept simple. Unfortunately, Bush was barely out the door when the coral overdubs started. Ne never had a chance.

03 - "WALKIN' AND THINKIN" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-31 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

04 - "NATURALLY'' - 2:34
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-3 mono
EDDIE BUSH - SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN

05 - "THANK YOU AND COME BACK''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959

06 - "HEY, BABY DOLL" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Edward Earl Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
R.W. STevenson - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums
Carl Mann - Vocal*, Acoustic Guitar** and Piano#

Overdubbed Unknown Date
The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS -   ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BUSH
FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S)
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

AND/OR SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – KNOX PHILLIPS

No Details

01 – ''BLUES INSTRUMENTAL''
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

02 – ''(MEDLEY) TENDERLY/ALWAYS/MISTY''
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

03 – ''BEYOND THE REEF'' - 2:51
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-4 mono
EDDIE BUSH - SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN

04 – ''THEN I TURNED AND WALKED SLOWLY AWAY''
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

05 – ''SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN'' - 2:14
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan/Star Club 33-8022 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued:  - June 25, 2006  Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-2 mono
EDDIE BUSH - SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush – Guitar
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


OCTOBER 1959

Carl Mann's follow-up to ''Mona Lisa'' was the big feature of the Phillips International Scandal Sheet in  October. The tune was ''Pretend'' and again he gave a rocking beat to the beautiful balled Nat King Cole had  popularized. A column saluted Lee Western of KIOA in Des Moines for being one of the first to air the new  release. Also mentioned was disk jockey Don Warnock of Kansas City, who had helped break ''Mona Lisa''.  Kansas City was a pretty big market that could be influential in getting a record started, but smaller cities in  less-populated states like Iowa couldn't do much for national sales. Still, it helped to cultivate jocks in any  market, even on 250-watt stations, because they were constantly moving, and often moving up.

The special spotlight column for disk jockeys was occupied by Sam Blessing of KOSI, Denver, who was  also trying to get established as a music journalist. According to editor Barbara Barnes, ''As time went on, I  kept compiling my disk jockey list from letters they sent me, from the trade publications, and from  distributors. In selecting ones to spotlight, I tried to vary regions of the country and to select jocks who were  not in the very top tier of their profession. The biggest guys wouldn't care if they were featured, but I got  feedback that the plugs really meant something to the jocks I gave some space to. I think our newsletters  were unusual in the industry, where promotion pieces were usually generic and focused on one release the  manufacturer was trying to promote. Since radio play was the chief means of kids hearing new releases,  efforts to court disk jockeys were never wasted''.

Youngsters accounted mainly for Sun's success. In 1956, when Sun was coming into its own, the increasing  affluence of the population enabled pre-teens and teens to have more impact on the economy than ever  before. Their allowances were larger than in the past, many had part-time jobs, and they liked music as much  as their fast food and cars. Above all, they loved to dance. And their numbers were increasing, leaning  toward the first wave of baby boomers.

Teens bought virtually all of the single records and the majority of all recordings. In 1958, the seven-inch  records that spun at 45 revolutions per minute, called 45s, went for 69 to 99 dollar cents in the record and  variety stores in which most were sold. LPs were preferred by adults, and Sam Phillips had some doubts  whether Sun LPs would sell. The distributors who had such success with Cash and Perkins singles, however,  succeeded in convincing Sam that LPs were essential. Subsequent sales proved them correct. Sun was  definitely getting into big business, which is why the majors kept pursuing Sun's artists and Sun kept trying  to get their records played.


OCTOBER 1959

In October 1959, just as Sam Phillips was preparing to close the old Union Avenue studio,  Charlie Rich went in and recorded a tune he called ''Lonely Weekends''. Phillips gave the  tape to Charles Underwood, who took it over to the new studio and overdubbed it for  release with a chorus, some echo-laden rim shots, and more echo thrown onto the finished  master for good luck. The resulting cut was issued in January 1960. Jimmy Van Eaton's  double-timed lick on the bass drum and Rich's assertive Presleysque voice made the record  irresistible.

The Phillips International scandal sheet appeared in October 1959 with news of Bill Justis, our new general manager Bill Fitzgerald, and Wink Martindale. >

''Lonely Weekends'' became Charlie Rich's first hit, and he was swept out of the clubs and  into the promotional whirlwind. ''He could make a front man like me a little nervous'', recalls  Cecil Scaife. ''Charlie was a good-looking boy, and on promotional trips people often mistook  him for Elvis Presley. He had that look... but he was so shy. I remember on one trip to New  York we were scheduled to be on the Dick Clark show. Charlie was a nervous wreck,  perspiring something awful. I said, Charlie, all you gotta do is sit there and lipsync it. The  mike's dead'. After he'd sung ''Lonely Weekend'', Dick Clark tried to interview him and  Charlie just clammed up. Dick would ask a question and then have to answer it. i thought  that would be the end of us on Dick Clark''.

Charlie Rich was an unlike teen idol, his hair streaked with premature gray, his record  collection heavy with jazz, his home shared with his wife and three kids. Rich detested the  traveling and the one-night stands: ''I was traveling quite a bit with all the pop stars of that  time, but that only allowed me to sing ''Lonely Weekend'' brought the first serious strain to  his marriage. Margaret Ann left him, and, when she went to find him a few days later, he was  holed up in the YMCA, the floor strewn with empty gin bottles. With no money to pay the  bill, they sneaked out. The good times were obviously not all they were cracked up to be.

OCTOBER 13, 1959 TUESDAY

Marie Osmond is born in Ogden, Utah. She nets a 1973 country hit with ''Paper Roses'' as a teenager, joins her brother as a host of ABC-s ''Donnie and Marie'' TV show, then makes a mid-1980s comeback as a country singer with ''There's No Stopping Your Heart'' and a Dan Seals duet, ''Meet Me In Montana''.

Webb Pierce recorded the Mel Tillis-penned ''No Love Have I'' at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

OCTOBER 14, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Charlie Rich recorded his first charted record, the pop single ''Lonely Weekends''  (PI 3552) for Sun's sub-label, Phillips International.

Connie Francis recorded the pop hit ''Among My Souvenirs'' at Regent Studio in New York City. Marty Robbins remakes it as a country hit in 1976.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 14, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLIE RICH
RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The basic tracks was later overdubbed by Charles Underwood with a chorus and special effects at 639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee.

01(1) - "LONELY WEEKENDS"* - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 369 -  Master -  Overdubbed Chorus
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - January 1, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3552-A mono
LONELY WEEKENDS / EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Lonely Weekend" is the record that first put Charlie Rich on the map. Interestingly, it was his third single that hit big time, just as had been the case with Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins. This time they finally got it right. "Lonely Weekend" was just what Sam Phillips had asked for: "Big Man" without religion. The version that hit the market in January 1960 was quite different from the tight, tense, passionate small combo effort that Charlie left the can in June 1959. After the session, Sam assigned the tapes to Charles Underwood, who brought them to the new studio at Madison Avenue, for overdubbing. Underwood added the dreaded Gene Lowery Singers, a ton of echo, and some highly unusual rimshots during Martin Willis' baritone sax break. "I never liked that final version as much as the way we originally cut it", observed guitarist Roland Janes recently. "But then I doubt our original would have sold as well".

01(2) - "LONELY WEEKENDS" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Without Overdubbing Chorus - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - April 1987
First appearance: - Zu Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Zu Zazz 2002 mono
DON'T PUT NO HEADSTONE ON MY GRAVE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-30 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Martin Willis has an interesting take on his role at Sun. ''Sam hated me. Actually, he tolerated me. He didn't   want saxes at Sun. Everything was guitars. A solo usually meant a guitar break''. Nevertheless, Willis did   some memorable session work, even on a label that built its reputation on guitars (although Jerry Lee might   tell you differently). Perhaps Willis's two most memorable solos were both out of the ordinary. The first   occurred on Charlie Rich's ''Lonely Weekends''. Willis recalls, ''When Charlie got ready to record ''Lonely  Weekends'' he asked for me. We had already worked together in the studio a bit and done some club dates.   Charlie told me he wanted something different – he wanted a baritone sax solo, which was very rare, maybe   it hadn't even been done on a rock and roll record. He asked if I could get a baritone sax – I didn't own one at   the time. I borrowed the instrument and took it into the studio. Everyone gives me credit for the solo but the   truth is before I played that solo Charlie sat down with me and hummed what he thought the solo should   sound like. So I listened and said 'OK, I got it''. The session was unique for another reason. Willis recounts,   ''Sam barely had enough mikes in there as it was. I had to sit next to J.M. Van Eaton's drums. He had a   separate mike on his bass drum. When it came time to solo, I had to lean over and play my horn into the bass   drum mike. Very few people know that to this day''.

02(1) - "EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 370 - Master
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - January 1, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3552-B mono
EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG / LONELY WEEKENDS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

You get some idea what the undubbed "Lonely Weekends" sounds like by listening to this side "Everything I Do Is Wrong". Except for adding some spacey echo, Underwood mercifully left this track alone.

02(2) - "EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-15 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
Martin Willis - Baritone Saxophone
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willes - Baritone Saxophone

Vocal Overdubs & Handclaps The Gene Lowery* consisting of
A. Davis, B. Gross, D. Horton, P. Jacobs, C. Walker and P. Walker

Although he's suffered ill health in recent years, Cecil Scaife was happy to discuss his role as promotion manager for Sun Records when Stuart Colmann met in Nashville early in 2002. A charismatic individual, Cecil was responsible for birthing Charlie Rich as a hit artist, at a time when new rock and roll stars were becoming distinctly thin on the ground. His was a world that revolved around radio stations and disc jockeys who were willing to apportion airplay - something that Charlie never forgot.

01 - "INTERVIEW CECIL SCAIFE" - B.M.I. - 0:56
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-11 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


OCTOBER 1959

The unusual thing about the ''Lonely Weekend'' session was that Martin Willis used a baritone  sax. Roland Janes recalls, ''Willie usually used an alto or a tenor, but on that record he  switched to the baritone. It gave the record a very unusual sound''.  Martin Willis recounts the story behind the session. ''When Charlie got ready to record  ''Lonely Weekends'' he asked for me. We had already worked together in the studio a bit and  done some club dates. Charlie told me he wanted something different - he wanted a  baritone sax solo, which was very rare, maybe hadn't even been done on a rock and roll  record. He asked if I could get a baritone sax - I didn't even own one at the time. I borrowed  the instrument from a friend and took it into the studio. Everyone gives me credit for the  solo but the truth is before I played that solo Charlie sat down with me and hummed what he  thought the solo should sound like. So, I listened and said ÓK, I got it''.

''Sun wasn't real big about sax solos at that time. Everything was guitars at Sun. A solo  usually meant a guitar break. So Sam kind of tolerated me. He barely had enough mikes in  there as it was. I had to sit next to Jimmy. Van Eaton's drums. He had a separate mic on his  bass drum. When it came time to solo, I had to lean over and play my horn into the bass  drum mike. Very few people know that to this day''.

Roland Janes contends that of the literally thousands of sessions he'd played on, the date  producing ''Lonely Weekends'' continues to stand out in his mind. Ironically, few listeners in  1960 knew just how powerful the results of that memorable session were. The original tapes  were almost immediately overdubbed by Charles Underwood at the newly opened Phillips  studio on Madison Avenue. A chorus was added, along with some echo rimshots during  Willie's sax break. Finally, the tight intensity of the original 706 Union tapes was utterly  destroyed by an overlay of gratuitous echo. The results, released in January 1960, achieved  national attention and gave Rich his first taste of fame and fortune. Despite tampering, the  record was worthy of its reward. It was surely a good record, although it was just as surely  very different from the one Rich, Van Eaton, Janes and Willis left on tape back in October  1959.

With nearly 45 years hindsight, Roland Janes observes, ''I thought both sides of that record  were real good. I still think the overdubs had too much echo on them but at the time that  was part of the mystique. It probably helped sell them. Personally, I liked the cuts a lot  better without those overdubs. Everything was a whole lot clearer''.

In the month after ''Lonely Weekends'' was recorded, Charlie Rich continued to seek a  behind-the scenes role in order to make money in the music business.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE MEMPHIS BELLES
(BETTYE HODGES & SHIRLEY SISK)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 14, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The Memphis Bells, cleverly named after the Mississippi paddlewheel boat, sound like an allgirl band, but in fact the group consisting of two organists, Shirley Sisk and her friend Bettye Jean Hodges, backed by the usual suspects. The ever- unreliable log sheets filed with the Union suggest that its Roland Janes, Billy Riley, Brad Suggs, Charlie Rich, J.M. Van Eaton, and Marty Willis. Bettye Jean, though, remembers that Bill Black was present, and as Smokey had yet to break, she might well be right.

Bettye Jean Hodges was one of Shirley's acquaintances from church. They lived close-by each other, and discovered that they both played the organ.

01 - "SNOW JOB" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Bettye Hodges
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - P 362  - Master
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - October 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3547-A mono
SNOW JOB / THE MIDNITE WHISTLE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6


Bettye Jean Hodges >

Bettye Jean had written many, many tunes, but the limit of her performing experience was playing in church and at organ recitals downtown during the holidays. She was, she says, pushed into recording by her husband and her mother. "Snow Job" wasn't really my style of music", she says, "but I was trying to go with what was selling. I hate to say it, but I had no perseverance, and that's what it takes". As a result, this is the one and only time that Bettye Jean appeared inside a recording studio.


Shirley remembers that "Snow Job" got played quite often around Memphis, and even remembered hearing is as she was driving to California with her husband, but it wasn't the wintertime smash that it might have been.

"Snow Job" was a shuffle rhythm, and its odd to hear Ms. Sisk play organ glissandi a la Jerry Lee behind Roland's guitar break. Listen to those chords during the last two bars! Where'd that come from?

02 - "THE MIDNITE WHISTLE" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Bettye Hodges
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 361  - Master
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - October 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3547-B mono
THE MIDNITE WHISTLE / SNOW JOB
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

The ladies actually offer a touch of blues to go with the skating rink feel. Both melodies were by Bettye Jean, although its Shirley playing the organ on "Snow Job" and Bettye Jean on "Midnite Whistle" (a tune that Bettye Jean says was meant to be called "The Midnight Whistler). "Midnite Whistle" features a very catchy melody. This track truly could have been a left field hit back in 1959. There's a fine piano break by Charlie Rich, and Roland Janes uses his vibrato bar to good effect.



Shirley Sisk >

Shirley Sisk grew up in Memphis as Ernestine Brooks. Shirley Ruth Sisk was at Sun Records  before, during and after Elvis Presley. The reason is simple. Sam Phillips liked her. Born in  Memphis in 1926, she started playing guitar she had picked up on a dump, and, lacking the  60 cents for strings, strung it up with clothes wire. She switched to piano and organ and  begin writing songs. She was met Dewey Phillips around 1950 and worked with Sam Phillips  doing some records for home folks.


In 1952 Shirley with her sister-in-law, Judy Dismukes to  cut on February 8, 1952 at the Memphis Recording Service "Let Me Count The Curls" with  ''Mean Old Memphis'' on the b-side as an private record. Sam Phillips successfully pitched  "Let Me Count The Curls" to music publisher Acuff-Rose, and later pitched Shirley's version to  Chess Records, but Chess was the last place on earth it belonged.

Shirley had married a man named Shirley Sisk, and then Shirley and Shirley had a daughter  named... Shirley. Anyone asking for Shirley was likely to get three faces at the door. Shirley  (the husband) didn't like Shirley (the wife) hanging out with all those degenerate musicians,  but Shirley (the husband) was a truck driver so he wasn't always around. When he wasn't,  Shirley would head down to Sun. "I'd go there on the sly", she says. "I used to go in day after  day, but Sam wouldn't come in 'til late. He'd sleep all day. I was waiting there with Elvis  Presley one time. He was waiting on Sam to pick up some money to go buy a car. There was a  black woman up from New Orleans too and Stan Kesler, and we went into the studio and had  a jam session 'till Sam arrived. My husband held me back. He was afraid I was gonna get  independent, I guess. One time I played at the Municipal Auditorium when he was out of  town, and went over so well they invited me back and announced it on the radio. My  husband heard about it on the radio and came home and said, 'You'll never believe it, there's  another Shirley Sisk in Memphis'".

Shirley Sisk was still hanging out at Sun in the 1960s, playing organ on sessions, including  some Jerry Lee Lewis singles. "I had to join the Union for that", she says. "Sam told me, 'I  can find better organists than you any day of the week, but they haven't got what you've  got'. Then we cut the Memphis Belles singles for Phillips and the single that came out on  Sun".

Shirley Sisk eventually divorced Shirley, but never picked up her recording career. As far as  she can remember, she never cut another record, and she joined her family's longstanding  involvement with the United Methodist Church in Memphis.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bettye Jean Hodges - Organ on "Midnite Whistle"
Shirley Ruth Sisk* - Organ on "Snow Job"
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley or Bill Black - Bass
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Charlie Rich - Piano
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


OCTOBER 15, 1959 THURSDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''He'll Have To Go'' during an a.m. session at RCA Studio B in Nashville, then recorded ''Snow Flake'' during the afternoon. 

Kenny Rogers and his first wife, Janice, separate, a year after the birth of their daughter, Carole Rogers.

Mark Dinning recorded the tragic pop song ''Teen Angel'' in an afternoon session at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio. Producing is Jim Vienneau, destined to oversee country hits for Hank Williams Jr., Mel Tillis and Sheb Wool.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY OCTOBER 16, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWNM
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

OVERDUBBED SESSION: SUNDAY OCTOBER 2, 1960
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD OR
SCOTTY MOORE AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

A session was paid for on February 22, 1960 for Mann, Bush, Oatsvall and Holland. The Gene Lowery choral overdubs for PLP 60 were also paid for on that day.

01 - "GRAZY FOOL" - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Carl Mann-Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Sun Spotlight (LP) 33rpm SPO 131 mono
CARL MANN - THE SUN STORY VOLUME 6
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-2 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

02(1) - "THE WAYWARD WIND" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Herb Newman-Stan Lebowsky
Publisher: - Warman Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-1 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

02(2) - THE WAYWARD WIND"* - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Herb Newman-Stan Lebowsky
Publisher: - Warman Music
Matrix number: - P 394 - Master
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3564-B mono
THE WAYWARD WIND / BORN TO BE BAD
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6


Left to right: Sun promotion assistant Barbara Barnes, Sam Phillips, Carl Mann, Cecil Scaife, Sun Studio, July 1959. >

You simply need to listen to these two sides of "The Wayward Wind", as they were originally recorded. There is no way to estimate the damage done here in the name of "sweetening". We may not quite be working in the range of mainting a mustache on the "Mona Lisa", but there is no doubt that a lot has been lost here with the addition of strings, voices and echo. The overwrought productions that hit the marketplace are not a true measure of Mann's ability. 


More to the point, somebody named Charles Underwood, Scotty Moore, or Ernie Barton has a lot to answer for, even if they were only following orders or following trends. It seems the effects were actually more devastating to "Wayward Wind", Gogi Grant's pop hit from 1956.

Carl's group was well rehearsed and tightly recorded here on 706 Union. You'll to take that on faith since there is hardly a shred of evidence of these virtues on the issued single. Although sales barely justified the experiment, it was encouraging that Mann was allowed to record original material of this calibre along with his rock-up the oldies formula.

02(3) - "THE WAYWARD WIND"** - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Herb Newman-Stan Lebowsky
Publisher: - Warman Music - Hillard & Bamboo
Matrix number: - PH 154 - Master - LP Version
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm LP 1960-2 mono
LIKE MANN!

Robert Oatsvall lack of expertise bobbed here up again when the band tackled Gogi Grant's 1956 smash "Wayward Wind". The early takes disintegrate because Oatsvall is so off-target.

03 - "BLUEBERRY HILL" - A.S.C.A.P. - 1:39
Composer: - Al Lewis-Larry Stock-Vincent Rose
Publisher: - Victoria Music Publishing Company Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-4 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

"Blueberry Hill" may be a standard but its hard to believe that any other performer could have found in it the excuse for sly lasciviousness that Fats Domino did. And its surely true that nobody else could have made that sly lasciviousness seem so harmless as this jainty Creole pianist, who owned an accent so thick that Mick Jagger once said he perceived it as a cow to be misunderstood. Don't discount the band, either; the very sonority of Dave Bartholomew's arrangements let fats get over on Top 40 radio with sexually subversive whose appeal hasn't yet been topped. Carl Mann's version is quite a surprise and in its own way quite a standout track. For one thing, it may be the only known post-Fats version that wasn't influenced by him. Rather, this reading has a distinctively loose and jazzy feel to it, reminding us once again just how good a guitarist Eddie Bush was.

The irresistibly playful "Ain't Got No Home" was an imaginative choice for inclusion on Carl Mann's debut album. The song had been a major rhythm and blues success and crossover hit for its writer, Clarence Henry, early in 1957 and had garnered strong audience reaction when Carl performed it on stage. Although the "frogman" and "baby girl" gimmicks were retained, he traded the hard eights feel of the original for a buoyant swing at what became his final visit to the original Sun studio.

04 - "AIN'T GOT NO HOME" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Clarence "Frogman" Henry
Publisher: - Francis Day & Hunter Limited
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm SLP 1960-7 mono
LIKE MANN!
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-11 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

When "Ain't Got No Home" first appeared on Carl Mann's Phillips International album it was mistitled as "I Ain't Got No Home" and credited to Woody Guthrie rather than Clarence "Frogman" Henry. The song had been part of Carl's routine since his earliest days. Beyond its gimmick value, it proves just how tight and full of energy Carl's band was.

05 - "I'LL ALWAYS LOVE YOU DARLING" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - H. Medress-P. Margo-M. Margo
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance:  - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-7 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 - Bear family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-6 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

Overdubbed Session* October 2, 1960
Scotty Moore - Leader
Joan Gilbert - Violin
Noel Gilbert - Violin
Nino Ravarino - Violin

Overdubbed Session** Unknown Date, Memphis, Tennessee
Gene Lowery - Leader and Vocal
A. Davis - Vocal
B. Gross- Vocal
D. Horton - Vocal
P. Jacobs - Vocal
C. Walker - Vocal
P. Walker - Vocal

Carl Mann was a victim of these changing times at Sun Records. He had the talent and potential to survive in the world of early 1960s pop, a world characterised by Jerry Lee Lewis as one dominated by the Bobbys. Carl problem, though, was that he stuck with the same formula for too long. He should have stopped goosing up standards after "Pretend" pegged out half way up the Hot 100. Instead, no-one had the courage to strike out in a new direction. His third and fourth singles sold respectably well, around 25,000 were accounted for on royalty statements, but by the end of 1960 the formula was wearing thin and no-one was listening.

Currently, Carl Mann is without a recording contract. He recorded a couple of sessions for Rockhouse Records in Holland in 1976 and 1980, and toured Europe again in 1984 without recording. Periodically, Carl gives though to re-entering the business, but it now seems to be a remote prospect. Unaccountably, his early music had not enjoyed the same measure of exhaustive reissuing that has come to many of his confreres at Sun Records. This major retropective goes a long way towards redressing that lack.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


OCTOBER 24, 1959 SATURDAY

For the second time in the year, Elvis Presley is hospitalized in a German military hospital with tonsillitis.

OCTOBER 25, 1959 SUNDAY

Sun 333 ''Alice Blue Gown'' b/w ''St. Louis Blues'' by Ray B. Anthony issued.

OCTOBER 26, 1959 MONDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''El Paso''.

Reno and Smiley recorded ''Don't Let Your Sweet Love Die'' in Cincinnati, Ohio.

OCTOBER 27, 1959 TUESDAY

Brenda Lee makes her ''American Bandstand'' debut performing ''Sweet Nothin's''.

OCTOBER 29, 1959 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley is released from a military hospital in Germany, where he's been treated for the previous five days for tonsillitis.

OCTOBER 30, 1959 FRIDAY

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club opens in London, England. The owner, a jazz saxophone player, goes on to write Bonnie Tyler's ''It's A Heartache'' and Shelly West's ''Flight 309 To Tennessee''.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 1959

Memphis was a beautiful old city, giant maples, poplars, oaks, hickory, and other trees turned shades of gold   and crimson before dropping their leaves along the broad streets and boulevards of the residential areas. The   first frost wouldn't come until October 1959, but after Labor Day the women of Memphis dutifully got out   their fall cottons and dark shoes and prepared for a respite from summer's heat.

In the matter of clothes, season meant very to a new artist in the fall. Unlike most of the guys, he patterned   himself after the Nashville country singers and wore cowboy-style clothes with glittering sequins, all year   long. He was Ray Smith, a singer from the Midwest who had enjoyed some success with stage shows   throughout that area.

But to fit the Sun prototype, Ray was given a rock song to record ''Rockin Bandit''. Bill Justis had acquired   the tune from a thirteen-year-old boy by the name Ira Jay Lichterman, whose father Bill knew, Mr. Herbert   Lichterman, who owned a leather goods factory. When ''Rockin' Bandit'' was set for release in September, he   arranged a kickoff dinner at a nice restaurant, the Coach House, to honor Ray and the precocious songwriter.   Bill Justis, Regina Reese, and Barbara Barnes showed up, and they talked and had a drink, waiting for our performer to show. Mr. Lichterman had asked to relay a verbal invitation to Sam Phillips and his wife, a   courtesy which elicited a snort from Sam, and he didn't show up with either his wife or Sally.

Finally, the host decided they should begin with the first course, and just before the entree was served. Ray   finally arrived in his sparkling regalia. Lichterman asked him to sit down and said he would tell the waiter to   bring his dinner. Ray said, ''I've done eat'', and kept standing. He hung around for a while as the rest of they   enjoyed the excellent meal. Herbert Lichterman tried to appear gracious and, since they been the go-between   in conveying the invitations, Barbara mumbled an explanation/apology as best she could. But she could see   how deflated the Lichterman's were by Sam's absence and Ray's odd behavior.

This incident pointed up one thing. The Sun phenomenon and the Memphis establishment of genteel dinners,   Cotton Carnival balls, or other urban socializing were foreign to each other. Mainstream Memphis never   understood Beale Street, Elvis Presley, and all the other blues, hillbilly, and rock musicians. And vice-versa.



Ira Jay Lichterman >

Sun Records was a magnet for talent. All kinds of talent. In his way, Ira  Jay Lichterman was one of the most successful of all Sun graduates. Ira Jay was twelve or  thirteen years old when he wrote some songs and sent them to Bill Justis, a family friend.

Justis encouraged him, and used one of the songs, "Rockin' Bandit", on a Ray Smith session.


Bill Justis had quit Sun by the time Ira Jay Lichterman cut his only Sun single ''You Don't Love  Me''/''More Than Anything'' (Sun 351) at the new Madison Avenue studio in 1960. The  contract file indicates that the record was leased from Ira's father, but Ira insists that it was  a single done for and at Sun Records.

After it failed to budge, he continued to work for Justis' Tuneville Music and Play Me  Records. In 1962, he got his first major break when he and Ed Bruce wrote "Save Your  Kisses", which appeared on the flip-side of Tommy Roe's "Sheila". The following year, Bill  Justis took Ira Jay Lichterman to New York. He was handling a kid up there.

At the age of eighteen, Lichterman go to work for the Stax label in Memphis, and wrote with  Steve Cropper for William Bell, and at the same time he was commuting to Nashville and  writing for Bill Justis' Tuneville Music, were he wrote for Charlie Rich, "No Room To Dance".  He wrote jingles for a lot of the top stars, like James Brown and Buck Owens. He wrote for  National Homes Corporation, and got a Addy Award for a fertilizer ad. That time, Lichterman  produced a syndicated radio program, "Football Over Dixie" in the 1960s and 1970s.

Later, Ira Jay Lichterman had his own music publishing company, "Ira & Friends'' and he  wrote for a big ad agency in Memphis, "Ward Archer & Associates'', were he finally got out in  1976 and started with his brothers in the shoe business today.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR IRA JAY LICHTERMAN II
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

PROBABLY  SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

The grandy-named Ira Jay Lichterman II was a jingle writer who supplied the Memphis radio fraternity with station-idents and drive-time commercials. In return for a publishing glad hand, Bill Justis opened the door at Sun and Ira scored overnight when Ray Smith cut his novel "Rockin' Bandit". The track included here amounts to his token artistic moment mainly because composing was his first love. He wrote for the Stax label in later years along with his golfing-partner, Steve Cropper.

01 – ''YOU DON'T LOVE ME ANYMORE'' - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Ira Jay Lichterman-Dover
Publisher: - Tuneville - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 419  - Master
Recorded: - Late 1959
Released: - November 14, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard singles SUN 351-A mono
YOU DON'T LOVE ME ANYMORE / MORE THAN ANYTHING
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Both sides of this record are lighthearted teenage fluff - from the material, to the swirling (yet decidedly low budget) string section, to Ira Jay's pubescent voice. Coming hot on the heels of Tony Rossini, Ira Jay's record seems to show that Sun was determined to break into the territory dominated by Chancellor Records and Cameo Records.

02 - "MORE THAN ANYTHING" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Ira Jay Lichterman
Publisher: - Tuneville - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 420  - Master
Recorded: - Late 1959
Released: - November 14, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard singles SUN 351-B mono
MORE THAN ANYTHING / YOU DON'T LOVE ME ANYMORE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ira Jay Lichterman - Vocal
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


NOVEMBER 1959

The first sessions are held (October/November) in the new Phillips Recording Studio at 639 Madison Avenue in  Memphis.

Payola scandal breaks, with key music figures accused of accepting bribes to play certain  records. Alan Freed, at the center of the controversy, is fired from WABC radio and ABC-TV  after refusing to sign an affidavit clearing himself of any wrongdoing.



Disc jockey Alan Freed before testifying for House Investigation Committee. ^

Congress opens the payola hearings designed to squash rock and roll disc jockeys who  receive money from record distributors in exchange for airplay, a common practice in all  forms of radio for years. Alan Freed is its main target and becomes its biggest casualty, as he  is found guilty and taken off the air as a result.

NOVEMBER 1, 1959 SUNDAY

The day Bill Anderson turns 22, he's disappointed that his girlfriend fails to recognize his red-letter day. As a result, he writes ''Happy Birthday To Me'', a future hit for Hank Locklin. By the end of the day, he receive a surprise party.

NOVEMBER 2, 1959 MONDAY

Billy Walker recorded ''Farewell Party'' in a late-night session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville. The song has to wait another 20 years to become a hit.

NOVEMBER 5, 1959 THURSDAY

Bryan Adams is born in Vancouver, Canada. The pop/rock star takes record producer Robert John ''Mutt'' Lange to Nashville for Fan Fair in 1993, where Lange meets future wife Shania Twain. Adams and Lange also co-write the Lonestar hit ''You Walked In''.

NOVEMBER 6, 1959 FRIDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis in hospital for appendicitis operation.


ALAN FREED AND THE RADIO PAYOLA SCANDAL – Payola became a household word in the   1950s. The decade’s music scene was the convergence of a number of seismic factors, the   rise of rock and roll and rhythm and blues (which coincided with the rise of small labels), the   introduction of the inexpensive 45rpm single, radio’s shift to Top 40 music (once television   took over dramatic programming), post-war prosperity and the emergence of the teenager as   an economic force.

Records began to replace live performance as the main way to hear, and   sell, music. And labels recognized that popular disc jockeys could influence sales.   In 1950, there were approximately 250 disc jockeys in the United States.

By 1957, the   number had grown to over 5000. The increase was partially due to the sheer amount of new   records being produced, both by major and indie labels.   As the name suggests, a disc jockey   was responsible for sorting through all these releases (naturally, the sorting was influenced   by payola). These on-air personalities had so much clout with younger listeners, Time   magazine called them the ''poo-bahs of musical fashion and pillars of U.S. low- and middlebrow   culture''.

Aware of their rising status, jocks established flat rate deals with labels and record   distributors. A typical deal for a mid-level disc jockey was $50 a week, per record, to ensure   a minimum amount of spins. More influential jocks commanded percentages of grosses for   local concerts, lavish trips, free records by the boxful (some even opened their own record   stores), plus all the time-honored swag. As Cleveland disc jockey Joe Finan later described   the decade, ''It was a blur of booze, broads and bribes''.



A presentation during the payola hearings. >

As payola escalated, Variety and Billboard did lengthy features, calling for reform and  government intervention (to its credit, Billboard wrote, ''The cancer of payola cannot be  pinned on rock and roll''). ASCAP was also vocal in their opposition to payola, using it as a  means to lambaste their competitor BMI. At the time, the larger ASCAP represented the old  guard of mostly white composers from the Tin Pan Alley days.


BMI was associated with the  young, racially mixed writers of rhythm and blues and rock and roll, as well as indie labels  such as Aladdin, King and Chess.  By the mid-1950s, BMI single releases outnumbered ASCAP's  by almost two to one. The older organization cried foul, accusing BMI of promoting payola.

Fingers pointed and words flew over payola, but it wasn’t until the TV quiz show scandals of  1958 (most famously, the show Twenty One was found to be fixed) that the government got  seriously involved. Once the ''Do you now or have you ever …''? questions began, the jig was  up.

With the threat of losing their licenses, some radio stations took the precaution of firing disc  jockeys who might put them at risk. In November 1959, in closed and open sessions before  the U.S. House Oversight Committee, 335 disc jockeys from around the country admitted to  having received over $263,000 in ''consulting fees''. That figure was only the tip of the  payola iceberg (before the hearings, Phil Lind, a disc jockey at Chicago’s WAIT had confessed  that he had once taken $22,000 to play a single record). The trial heated up when the two  most influential jocks in the country took the stand.



Dick Clark during house hearing. >

Alan Freed and Dick Clark both played important parts in the rise of rock and roll (Freed  embodied the incendiary spirit of the music more than Clark, refusing to play white cover  versions of black songs, such as Pat Boone’s ''Tutti Frutti''). And though they both denied  ever accepting payola, it’s almost impossible to imagine two young, popular jocks not  succumbing to a little temptation. Guilty or not, it was Freed who ended up taking the fall  for DJs everywhere.


Why did the committee single him out? Freed was abrasive. He consorted with black rhythm  and blues musicians. He jive talked, smoked constantly and looked like an insomniac. Clark  was squeaky clean, Brylcreemed, handsome and polite. At least on the surface.

Once the  grilling started, Freed’s friends and allies in broadcasting quickly deserted him. He refused,  ''on principle'', to sign an affidavit saying that he’d never accepted payola. WABC fired him,  and he was charged with 26 counts of commercial bribery. Freed escaped with fines and a  suspended jail sentence. He died five years later, broke and virtually forgotten.

Previous to the trial, Dick Clark had wisely divested himself of all incriminating connections  (he had part ownership in seven indie labels, six publishers, three record distributors and  two talent agencies). He got a slap on the wrist by Committee chairman Oren Harris, who  called him “a fine young man.” As Clark told Rolling Stone in 1989, the lesson he learned  from the payola trial was: ''Protect your ass at all times''. Surprisingly candid words from the  eternal teenager.

After Freed went down in 1960, Congress amended the Federal Communications Act to  outlaw ''under-the-table payments and require broadcasters to disclose if airplay for a song  has been purchased''. Payola became a misdemeanor, with a penalty of up to $10,000 in  fines and one year in prison.

The loophole in the legislation was that it didn’t say anything about ''undisclosed payments''.  And so payola joined the cockroach and the fart joke on the list of things that, despite  changing times, always manage to survive.


Teddy Redell >

Teddy Redell returned to Arkansas and began touring with Tommy Trent in 1956. Arlen Vaden asked   Teddy to play backup for a recording session in 1959. When the lead singer came down with   laryngitis, Teddy was given the studio time. ''Knocking On The Backside'' and its flipside, ''Before It Began'', was released on Vaden Records under the stage name Teddy Redell. It quickly  became a popular selection in the juke boxes of eastern Arkansas. 



Teddy Redell also  appeared on Hi Records around the time that he auditioned at Sun, but later concentrated   on songwriting for Sonny James' companies.  Teddy’s second release, ''Corrina Corrina'' / ''Gold Dust'', was recorded at King Studios in     Cincinnati, and released on the Vaden label in 1960. His third release, ''I Want To Hold You'' /     ''Pipeliner'' soon followed, but it was his fourth release that would become his most famous.

''Judy'' was recorded in 1960 and released as the B side of ''Can’t You See'' on the Vaden and   Atco labels. The following year, ''Judy'' was released by Elvis Presley and stayed for several   weeks on Billboard’s Hot 100.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR TEDDY REDELL
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS PROBABLY 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY NOVEMBER 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "ME AND MY BLUES" - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Teddy Redell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30150-12 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL – TENNESSEE COUNTRY
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-28 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16

"Me And My Blues" was a polished performance. The song is well-constructed, witty, and rocks along at a jaunty pace.

02 - "STOP" – B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Teddy Redell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-24 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS
Reissued: - 1999 Boot Records (LP) 33rpm Boot 706/2-6 mono
MEMPHIS BOP - VOLUME 2

03 - "TIRED OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Teddy Redell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-25 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS

04 - "TAKE THE LONG WAY HOME''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

05 - "THAT'S LOVE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

06 - "LOCK THE DOOR''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

07 - "FOR NOW AND EVER''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

08 - "I DON'T KNOW''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Teddy Redell - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
J.C. Caughron - Bass
Bobby Crafford - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


NOVEMBER 7, 1959 SATURDAY

Smokey Robison marries Claudette Rogers, a fellow member of the The Miracles. They remain husband and wife until 1986. During that time, Robinson writes two songs that become country hits, ''Tracks Of My Tears'' and ''You've Really Got A Hold On Me''.

Patsy Cline sings ''Walkin' After Midnight'' on ABC's ''Jubilee USA''.

NOVEMBER 8, 1959 SUNDAY

Johnny Mathis sings the pop classic ''Misty'' on CBS-TV's ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The song is destined to become a 1975 country hit for Ray Stevens.

NOVEMBER 9, 1959 MONDAY

Columbia released Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs' ''Crying My Heart Out Over You''.

Faron Young's ''Country Girl'' reaches number 1 on the Billboard country chart.

NOVEMBER 11, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Freddie Hart recorded the Harlan Howard composition ''The Key's In The Mailbox''. The songs emerges as a hit for Tony Booth more than a dozen years later.

NOVEMBER 16, 1959 MONDAY

Marty Robbins' Sometimes-producer Mitch Miller earns a gold album for ''Sing Along With Mitch''. Among the songs featured, Cole Porter's ''Don't Fence Me In'' and Jimmie Davis ''You Are My Sunshine''.

Columbia released Stonewall Jackson's ''Mary Don't You Weep''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE ROCKIN' STOCKIN'
FOR SUN AND MOJO RECORDS 1959

PROBABLY  SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY TUESDAY NOVEMBER 17, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY RILEY

Presumably every label, even Sun, is to be forgiven some seasonal music. So here is Sun's foray into the Christmas marketplace, courtesy of Billy Riley, entrepreneur. These sides were produced for Riley's Mojo label, and taken over by Sun on November 17, 1959. That made it too late for Christmas 1959, but Sam Phillips had it out in plenty of time for Christmas 1960.

Billy Riley tear a page from the Bill Black Combo songbook, which was thriving across town at the Hi Studios. Notably, Jimmy Wilson's keyboard work on "Rockin' Old Lang Syne" is a little more skating rink than anything Carl McVoy ever attempted for Bill Black.

01 - "ROCKIN' LANG SYNE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - M 20   - Master   - D.J. Copy
Recorded: - Probably November 17, 1959
Released: - November 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 350/1960-A mono
ROCKIN' LANG SYNE / YULEVILLE U.S.A.
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

You wouldn't want a fixed income based on this record's sales in July. In fact, you'd have had a pretty spartan existence based on its sales in December as well.

02 - "YULEVILLE U.S.A." - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - M 21   - Master   - D.J. Copy
Recorded: - Probably November 17, 1959
Released: - November 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 350/1960-B mono
YULEVILLE U.S.A. / ROCKIN' LANG SYNE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4 

Collectors should note that although this record has often appeared in label lists as SUN 350, no copies bearing that number have ever been found. It only appears to have been issued as SUN 1960.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Jimmy Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willis - Saxophone
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


NOVEMBER 18, 1959 WEDNESDAY

The iconic religious epic and award-winning film “Ben-Hur” premieres. The film starred legendary actor Charlton Heston and was directed by William Wyler. At the time of its production, the movie had the largest budget of any movie ever made with an estimated $15.9 million spent. It also had some of the largest sets ever created at the time. The film was a remake of a silent film from the 1920s and was also adapted from a novel by Lew Wallace. Ben-Hur was a huge financial and critical success as the film won eleven Academy Awards.

NOVEMBER 19, 1959 THURSDAY

Johnny ash and The Tennessee Two begin their first overseas tour, playing U.S. military bases in West Germany.

NOVEMBER 20, 1959 FRIDAY

WABC radio in New York fires Alan Freed after the disc jockey refused to sign an affidavit saying he never received payola. Thus begins the undoing of a rock and roll legend, credited as a co-writer of the future Forester Sisters hit ''Sincerely''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Mack Owen >

Mack Owen's only record was a master purchase signed and sealed on November 20, 1959. The music seemed to suggest that Owen needed special material to thrive. To be blunt, uptempo numbers were not his forte. Owen is one of the shadowier figures in Sun history. The little we know is this: he was born in Athens, Alabama on July 27, 1936, and worked in Chicago on Chicago Bandstand.


Someone from Sun Records heard him there, making it almost certain that this was recorded in Chicago. Owen never recorded again, and became a preacher in the early 1960s. He quit the ministry to work for the International Union of Glassworkers, and was living in Indianapolis when he died on October 10, 1991.

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK OWEN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY NOVEMBER 20, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS


Mack Owen live on stage. >

On "Walkin' And Talkin'", he Mack Owen seems ill at ease, and even resorts to coarsening his voice for emphasis. Its not a pretty sound. In contrast, everything comes together on "Somebody Just Like You", a tune that seems custom crafted for Owens' quirky vocal style. This is a mighty fine record. It may not have been what Sun fans were seeking in January 1960, but it had everything it needed to dent the charts in a serious way, without embarrassing any of the participants. 



The chorus provides smooth and restrained harmony, the brishwork is tasty and minimalist, and the piano supports Owen's vocal admirably. Its anyone's guess why this record didn't garner wider exposure. A hit like this on Sun at the start of the 1960s might have altered Sun's direction considerably.

01 - "WALKIN' AND TALKIN'" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Mack Owen
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 390  - Master
Recorded: - November 20, 1959
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 336-A mono
WALKIN' AND TALKIN' / SOMEBODY JUST LIKE YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Recorded (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

02 - "SOMEBODY JUST LIKE YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Mack Owen
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 391
Recorded: - November 20, 1959
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 336-B mono
SOMEBODY JUST LIKE YOU / WALKIN' AND TALKIN'
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Owen - Vocal and Guitar
Scotty Moore - Guitar
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
D.J. Fontana - Drums
Larry Mohoberac - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


Jeb Stuart had a long and fruitful musical career, during which he made several records  that should be in every soul fan’s collection.  Stuart led an rhythm and blues combo in his hometown of Memphis alongside a teenaged  Isaac Hayes.  In a highly implausible move, Jones adopted the name of Jeb Stuart (after a  General who'd fought in the Civil War) before setting out to find a record deal. 

Thanks to a good word from Rufus Thomas, Phillips International unfurled the red carpet in  1960 and this Joe Tex styled stomper very nearly became a national breakout. As Jeb Stuart,  he later recorded for Kent, King and San Wayne Records. Jeb Stuart was an single artist and  never released an album.
Jeb Stuart ^

His early doo wop tracks for Wing Records under his real name Charles Jones sadly isn’t one  of them. ''All For Love'' is a doo-wop influenced soul ballad of some merit, but rather spoiled  by an intrusive background chorus. ''A Whole Lot Of Tears'', however, is a celebrated deep  soul classic with Stuart crying and sobbing his heart out over a solid accompaniment  featuring some lovely guitar runs and fills, and withdrawn horns. The Bingo release is  another very good one with Stuart double tracking his vocal over a hammered slow 12/8  beat. Three of his four King sides are pretty mediocre to be honest, but ''I Don’t Want To  Leave You Darling'' is in a different league. A plodding ballad with a lovely Memphis feel, it  features one of Stuart’s very best vocal tracks. Highly recommended.

Stuart's first release after relocating to Florida is another one to search out. ''Dreamer’s Hall  Of Fame'' is another class slowie, and Stuart really gives of his best, especially at the final 30  seconds. Electrifying stuff. Even better though is Can’t Count The Days when his hoarse tone  really delivers the goods. The melody is better too, as are the background singers who are  far less forward in the mix. It’s not surprising that this garnered a release on the larger Kent  label. In this company the much sought after Big Score 45rpm suffers rather badly.

His initial 45rpm for his own Great American label continued this fine trend. ''Please Give Me  Another Chance'' is one of his greatest records. A completely unrestrained last minute as the  song reaches its climax is merely the icing on the cake of a gritty, committed vocal. The  slightly uncoordinated backing of rhythm, horns and chorus only add to the disc’s air of  improvised agony.

Stuart continued into the 1970s and 1980s on his new Esquire International label, and ''A  Long Time Comin Down'' is a very creditable slab of mid paced country soul, with good horn  support. ''Somebody’s Gotta Win'' is a worthwhile, melodic ballad as well but in these later  days nobody wanted to hear a singer screaming his passion, and Stuart’s vocals are well  restrained.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JEB STUART
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

PROBABY  SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY LATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Although Jeb Stuart was under contract to Sam Phillips, there is nothing about this record to suggest that it was recorded at either 706 Union or Madison Avenue, or with the usual gang. More likely, Stuart recorded the sides elsewhere, then submitted them to Phillips International. This could, in fact, be the session with Isaac Hayes and the Do-Dads.

01 - "COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Don Covay-Frank Berry
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - P 399  - Master  - Promotion Copy
Recorded: - Probably Late 1959
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3567-A mono
COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES / DREAM
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Coming Down With The Blues" is a very effective piece of early 1960s soul music that appears somewhat anomalous in the Phillips International release schedule. The song was written by Don Covay and his partner from the Rainbows, Frank Berry. Covay was the first to record it (as "I'm Coming Down With The Blues") for Big Top Records. Note its somewhat curious structure: three verses, no release. Stuart was really a very good vocalist who would have probably paid dividends if he had been well recorded and promoted. His vocal here could have been the blueprint for an early 1960s Presley record. This title is part of an interesting sub-genre of songs based on the "blues as disease" metaphor. earlier examples include Carl Perkins' "Boppin' The Blues", Huey Smith's "Rockin' Pneumonia And The Boogie Woogie Flu" and, at a stretch, venerable old Dr. Isiah Ross's "Boogie Disease".

02 - "DREAM" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:39
Composer: - Johnny Mercer
Publisher: - Michael H. Goldsen Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 398  - Master
Recorded: - Probably Late 1959
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3567-B mono
DREAM / COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Dream" is likewise a fine piece of nascent soul, again revealing the commercial held by Stuart. A minor quible: this side would have been a lot more impressive if someone on the date had figured out the correct chords to the song, instead of constructing a new melody to fit the chords they did know. A lot of people from Etta James to Vaughn Monroe, from Dinah Washington to the Four Aces had recorded this Johnny Mercer tune and they all managed to get the chords right. Stuart's recitation is really effective, although somewhat unusual stylistically for the era.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stuart - Vocal
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ALICE LESLIE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON   OF CHARLES UNDERWOOD

We were initially unsure whether Alice Leslie, who left several items in the Sun vaults, was the same person who enjoyed a rather colorful performing career, including a 1957 single on the Era label under the name 'Alis Lesley'. Her interview with researcher Will Beard makes it clear that Alice was Alis and her wandering ways did indeed take her through Memphis in 1959.

The song below was written in the minor key style of "Fever", which spent much of late 1958 on the pop charts. Leslie left six takes of "Handsome Man" in the vaults.

01 - HANDSOME MAN" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer:- Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8182 mono
HILLBILLY FILLIES & ROCKIN' CHICKS
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-4-14 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS


"Handsome Man" is a sound that got full expression in the clubs but went missing in action when composer Rich worked by day to provide material for other Sun artists like Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis or, later on, himself. Rich did not succeed in pitching this song (or Alice Leslie) to Sun management.  Ironically, it was a last minute search for material at Barbara Pittman's "Eleventh Commandment" session that led to Charlie's success. Fortunately for Rich, Barbara's expertise at learning songs on the spot (a requirement for most demo singers) led to a better than credible recording of "Handsome Man", which actually made the Memphis charts for several weeks in 1960.

Rockin' little Alice Lesley ^

Alice Leslie was left to watch the song she had originally demoed climb the local charts in the hands of another singer. In any case, she did her watching from Arizona, where she returned to care for her ailing mother. After the death of her mother, Alice attended Arizona State University and received a degree in education, which she put to good use in subsequent years working with Native American children in the Southwest, both as an educator and a missionary.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Alice Leslie - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians


Alice Lesley >

According to Alice Leslie, "I was born in Chicago on April 20, 1938. My father was born in Liverpool, England.  They came over to the States and we moved to Phoenix, Arizona in 1948 and attended the Phoenix Junior College. I had my own band called  the Arizona Stringdusters. We used to perform on KTVN, Channel 3 in Phoenix and local night clubs. I was  discovered by Buddy Morrow, who led a big band. He had me come up on stage I sang "Blue  Suede Shoes", "My Blue Heaven", "Hound Dog" and "See You Later Alligator".


''It was during  "Blue Suede Shoes" that I kicked my shoes off into the audience and they all loved it.  I performed at the Silver Slipper in Las Vegas in 1956. Elvis flew out there to see me. We  never performed together but we were friends. In 1956 I recorded "He Will Come Back To  Me" for Era Records. I also cut a song I wrote called "Why Do I Feel This Way" (This side  remained unreleased).


Alice Lesley with Elvis Presley,  Las Vegas, Nevada, November 14, 1956. >

''In January 1957 I flew into Hollywood from Vegas and cut one more   side called "Heartbreak Harry". The record (Era 1034) came out in April 1957.   While I was in Las Vegas, I was seen by Lee Gordon, an Australian promoter, who signed me   for a tour in 1958. I flew over with Eddie Cochran, who was also on the bill. Little Richard   and Gene Vincent were on the show as well. This was the same show where Little Richard   renounced rock and roll and threw his ring into the ocean''. 


''When I got back from Australian, I   did a lot of shows in the Dakotas, as well as New Jersey and New York City. I appeared with   Bobby Darin in Alabama, and also toured in Quebec, Canada in late 1958 and 1959". '' At this point, Alice Leslie and Sun Records crossed paths. "I was thinking of going with Sun Records, and did some recordings for Sam Phillips in Memphis, but the deal did not go  through".  "I retired in 1980 and have spent a lot of time traveling around the world, studying history   and genealogy. I'm very interested in my British roots. I was stricken with cancer in 1995 and   I'm a cancer survivor. I'm still fighting to live. I continue to sing and do a lot of charity work.   I perform mostly country and western and gospel music and work as a vocal coach to teach   stage presence to young singers".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN FEMALE SINGER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS & OTHERS

This enthusiastic but amateurish demo makes it clear that not all the Elvis wannabees in the world were guys. 

01 - "WEAR MY RING AROUND YOUR NECK" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Bert Carroll-Russell Moody
Publisher: - Wexford Music Incorporated. - Elvis Presley Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably Unknown Date 1959
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-24 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

"Wear My Ring Around Your Neck" is a song written by Bert Carroll and Russell Moody, performed by  Elvis Presley, which was released in 1958. It was particularly notable for breaking a string of ten consecutive  number 1 hits for Presley achieved in just two years. It was Presley's 19th number-one hit in the American  Rhythm & Blues Charts, and peaked at number 2 on the American Pop Charts.

American country music singer Ricky Van Shelton covered the song for the soundtrack of the 1992 movie  ''Honeymoon'' in Vegas. Shelton's version, also included on his album ''Greatest Hits Plus'', peaked at number  26 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart .

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Unknown Singer and Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


NOVEMBER 21, 1959 SATURDAY

Rock and roll disc jockey Alan Freed refuses to say he has not received cash or gifts for playing records on the airwaves in New York. Listed as a co-writer of The Forester Sisters hit ''Sincerely'', he is permanently tarnished by the payola scandal.

NOVEMBER 22, 1959 SUNDAY

Broadway lyricist Sam Lewis dies in New York. The author of ''Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody'' and ''Five Foot Two, Eyes Of Blue (Has Anybody Seen My Girl)'', he also wrote Jimmie Rogers country hit ''In The Hills Of Tennessee''.

NOVEMBER 23, 1959 MONDAY

An RCA spokesman denies rumors that Elvis Presley will change his style after his discharge from the Army.

NOVEMBER 27, 1959 FRIDAY

A doctor from Johannesburg, South Africa, begins a one-month series of treatments to reduce pores and acne scars on Elvis Presley. Presley is thrilled with the results, though those around him see no change.

NOVEMBER 29, 1959 SUNDAY

''The Battle Of New Orleans'' wins Song of the Year for composer Jimmy Driftwood and Best Country and Western Performance for Johnny Horton during the second annual Grammy Awards.

NOVEMBER 30, 1959 MONDAY

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''No Love Have I''.

LATE 1959

W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland quit the line-up of the band of Carl Perkins. He tried managing Carl   Mann for a while and then opted for the security of playing drums behind Johnny Cash,   where he remains. He was replaced by Tony Moore. Jay Perkins had been replaced in the   band of Perkins by Eddie Starr as Perkins tried to keep a regular band together.

The last two really big hits on the Sun label were Carl Mann's ''Mona Lisa'' and Charlie Rich's   ''Lonely Weekends''. Both were recorded at the old studio, although ''Lonely Weekends'' was   doctored-up at the new studio. Then, as Carl and Charlie Rich proved unable to replicate   their success, Sam gradually lost interest. He diversified his interests, and the studio that   had once been his home day and night no longer seemed to excite him. The torch passed to  newer and hungrier labels.

By that time, Carl Mann had some serious problems of his own.

LATE 1959

Although Charlie Rich continued to record fine music at Sun, he seemed to have expended   his commercial potential on ''Lonely Weekends''. On several occasions during his career, Rich   has shot himself in the foot by choosing weak follow-ups; ''Gonna Be Waitin''', which followed   ''Lonely Weekends'', was unexceptional. The music that Rich made for Phillips was as   multifaceted as his diverse musical tastes. But the teenagers who had responded to the   echoes of Elvis in ''Lonely Weekends'' were unlikely to respond to the profoundly adult   sentiments of a record like ''Sittin' And Thinkin''', which opened with the announcement, ''I   got loaded last night on a bottle of gin...''.

Sam Phillips signed Charlie Rich to one of his standard three-year contracts after the success   of ''Lonely Weekends''. Rich acquired a new manager, Seymour Rosenberg, a Memphis   attorney who also played a little jazz trumpet under the name of Sy Rose. Rosenberg was   anxious to place Rich with a company that paid higher royalties and had a stronger   commitment to the record business than Sun. When his contract came up for renewal in   March 1963, Rosenberg signed Rich to the reactivated Groove division of RCA. Phillips filed a   suit against Rich, claiming that the singer had verbally agreed to re-sign with Sun or give   Phillips the chance to match any other offer he might sure. After a month of bickering,  Phillips finally reconciled himself to the inevitable and let Rich depart.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT OR BILL JUSTIS

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Below an another wasted opportunity. For all his genius, Sam Phillips was none too good at following up hit records. ''Gonna Be Waitin''' is basically an inferior clone of ''Lonely Weekend''. Marty Willis baritone solo has been replaced by a guitar break, but otherwise it's business as usual with little of the original passion or tension.

01 - ''GONNA BE WAITIN*''' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 387   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3560-A mono
GONNA BE WAITIN' / SCHOOL DAYS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

The side below is something of a mystery. If the logs can be believed, Charlie cut ''Gentle As A Lamb'' at the same session as ''There's Another Place''. If ever a track deserved release for the pop/teen market, it was ''Gentle As a Lamb'', complete with strings and voices. Instead, that title languished in the vaults for nearly ten years before appearing during the first wave of Sun archaeology in the 1970s. Instead,, ''I Need Your Love'', a rather lackluster Rich composition and performance that had ''demo'' written all over it, appeared on the B-side. Admittedly, it focused all the action on ''Place'', but why not go with the far stronger original ''Gentle As A Lamb''? Perhaps ''Lamb'' was a viewed as too strong a contender, worth its own A-side. Maybe it was scheduled to be Rich's next single. But before that could happen, Charlie Rich had left the fold for the greener pastures at RCA, and the Phillips International label had ceased to exist.

02 - ''I NEED YOUR LOVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 434   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - April 1963
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3584-A mono
I NEED YOUR LOVE / THERE'S ANOTHER PLACE I CAN'T GO
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-4-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Stay" was a beautiful country ballad, amazingly undoctored by the post production crew. The restraint that must have underlies this release truly ranks as one of Sun's finest hours. ("Oh, Sam, just let me put some strings and voices on there. I know I can sweeten this thing up like a dream. We'll really cross over with Charlie this time. You're gonna need strings on there to sell it. Its too bare this way"). But cooler heads prevailed. At least they kept the strings and voices away. What they didn't control was the echo. Its hard to know exactly what went wrong here, but this has got to be the most variable echo on any Sun release. Parts of Rich's performance (like the opening lines) are so swamped with echo that they are all but unintelligible. On the other hand, the release ("Many mistakes...") are virtually dry, revealing how truly wonderful this side might have been.

03 – "STAY" - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 391 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - September 7, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3562-A mono
STAY / ON MY KNEES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

04 – "INTRO/REBOUND - 1" - B.M.I. - 0:45
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – 4x False Starts - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-1 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

05 – "REBOUND - 2" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2- mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

06 – "REBOUND - 3" - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-17 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

07 – "STOP THIEF**" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-4 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Stop Thief'', again, an overlooked gem in Charlie's recorded work for Sun. This is a clever arrangement of a musically complex song that had all kinds of pop potential. A surprisingly effective overdubbed version of this song was issued on Power-Pak LP 245, featuring additional percussion and some masterful guitar work by Jimmy Dempsey. Here the songs issued as originally recorded. A lot went into this production which makes the original decision to consign it to the vault all the more curious.

08 – "STOP THIEF**" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Power Pak (LP) 33rpm 245 mono
CHARLIE RICH - ARKANSAS TRAVELER

09 – "WHAT'S MY NAME" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-19 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

10 – "WHAT'S MY NAME**" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Power Pak (LP) 33rpm 245 mono
CHARLIE RICH - ARKANSAS TRAVELER

11 – "EVERYDAY" – B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-24 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Everybody'', Charlie Rich recorded two tunes by this title while at Sun. The track on CD-2 is a full production featuring Latin percussion. Although the songs has elements of overproduction (similar to ''Lonely Hurt Within''), the vocal also has a decidedly bluesy construction. The same title demo on CD-3 is an entirely different matter. This was plainly written during Rich's attempt to 'Cash-in' during Johnny's final months at Sun when he refused to record any of his own material. Its sentiments are pretty grim: do I forgive you for the adultery you committed? It was a long way from ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen''.

12 – "THE WEDDING'S OVER'' – B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-28 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

13 – "THERE WON'T BE ANYMORE'' – B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-11 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''There Won't Be Anymore'', Charlie recorded this tune for RCA during his generally unproductive year with them in Nashville. Ten years after it was recorded, that version was a number 1 country hit. Shelby Singleton combed his song file, realized he had an earlier demo version of the title, and dubbed it for release to cash in on its current popularity. The irony of course is that this rough demo eclipses the smooth RCA version in every conceivable way except for musicianship. Charlie's performance here is chilling, with emotion building to a fever pitch at the start of the last verse. Enjoy the original undubbed show.

14 – "THERE WON'T BE ANYMORE**'' – B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Power Pak (LP) 33rpm 241 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THERE WON'T BE ANY MORE

15 – "GOODBYE MARY ANN (3)'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun 123-B-1 mono
CHARLIE RICH – A TIME FOR TEARS

''Goodbye Mary Ann', again, one of Charlie's catchier tunes never saw release during his days with Sun. A version of this song first appeared on Charlie's second Sun LP issued by Shelby Singleton shortly after taking over the Sun label. A second version (recorded in 1962) appeared nearly twenty years later on a ZuZazz LP (Z 2002) of Rich rarities. The arrangement here, arguably the best of the three, has never before been issued and appears in an effective stereo mix, thus suggesting this version dates from sometimes after 1960. The dialogue between Sam Phillips and Charlie Rich that precedes the track is quite interesting. Plainly, Phillips is trying to produce Charly, encouraging him to give the song more of an Elvis feel. And just as plainly, Rich is resisting him. Listen closely: Early on, Rich breaks the tension by singing the opening lines to ''Whirlwind''. There is some strained laughter but Phillips keeps pushing him. And then Rich finally tells him ''Don't put me down like that or I can't hit it at all. Then there won't be any record''.

16 – "LONG LONG WAY FROM TENNESSEE'' – B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - December 1974
First appearance: - Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 856-B-3 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - KINGS OF COUNTRY – VOLUME 1

''Cloud Nine'', the known version of this lovely Charlie Rich tune first appeared on Bill Justis's LP (and as a flipside to his single ''Flea Circus''). Rich played piano on that date, but apparently left a solo version of the tune at Sun. Roland Janes believes that this track began life as a simple demo and was later overdubbed of the new studio into the form we hear here. Perhaps it was just an early exercise in overdubbing at the new studio. In any case, the track was not originally issued and has never appeared before.

17 – "CLOUD NINE'' – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-26 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

18 – "MY BABY DONE LEFT ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-13 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''I Need Your Love'', a shorter version of this title appeared as the flip-side of Charlie Rich's last single. Here managed to uncover a previously unissued version of ''I Need Your Love'' that features an extended guitar solo.

19 – "I NEED YOUR LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 3:11
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None – Alternate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-29 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

** - Overdubbed in Nashville, 1974

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Unknown Musicians

* - Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

On balance, Rich's single release for the Phillips International label maintained a very high standard. It is worth remembering that for every tittle by Charlie Rich that was ever released by Sam Phillips, there are at least four others that sat behind in the vaults. Some of these were rough demos and never candidates for the marketplace. But many others weren't. They were finished masters into which a lot of thought and work were invested. Titles like ''Gentle As A Lamb'', ''Lonely Hurt Within'', ''Stop Thief'', ''What's My Name'', ''Every Day'', and ''Goodbye Mary Ann', to name but a few, could well have appeared above Charlie's name on a Phillips International label. Some of these efforts represented extentions of Rich's existing style. But others, like ''Lonely Hurt Within'', would have been a radical departure in directions that might have played havoc with his subsequent development.

Where did these titles come from? Roland Janes recalls, ''Charlie always recorded what he wanted to when he wanted to. It wasn't a real big expensive thing like it is today. Charlie was always experimenting. He and Justis would try stuff all the time. Especially when we got to the new studio, even though it didn't sound as good initially, it opened up a lot of possibilities that hadn't been there at 706 Union. Charlie also did a lot of stuff with Scotty Moore. I think I remember ''Every Day'' and ''Lonely Hurt Within''. Those were probably things that Scotty Moore did with him at the new studio. I remember hearing some of that and thinking. That doesn't sound like Charlie. Charlie would listen to what was being played and try to write one of his own. There was a lot of searching for a direction with Charlie. The problem was he was so adaptable, so good at some things''.

Drummer Jimmy M. Van Eaton recalls, ''Charlie was very much an even keel type of guy in the studio. A pleasure to work with, Kind of the opposite of Jerry Lee, where it could get out of hand. We never struggled to get the session done and we always seemed to be happy with what we put down. There was never any finger pointing or problems like that. With Jerry it could get wild. If you didn't get it in three takes, forget it. You just moved on''.

Van Eaton also has a slightly more cynical view of the creative process surrounding Charlie and at Sun in general. ''During the latter part of Charlie's stay at Sun there really wasn't anybody around. The creative people had left. Sam wasn't coming down anymore. Jack Clement had left, Justis was gone. When they lost these guys, they lost the heart of the label. When they brought in the Ernie Bartons and Charles Underwood – it made a real difference. Something big was lost. These new guys, they just weren't bringing anything to the table. It got to where we were just doing a job when we went in there.

Van Eaton's views of the creative downturn at Sun is shared by others. However, the question is whether an artist like Charlie – whose creative energies were overflowing – was as affected by the lack of external ideas as some of his less talented label mates.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
FOR SUN RECORDS UNKNOWN DATES

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT OR BILL JUSTIS OR ERNIE BARTON

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD OR SCOTTY MOORE

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENT AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL OR SCOTTY MOORE

''ALL DEMO TAPES''

Contains Charlie's demos. Some have been issued before, although many exist only on rare or out-of-print LPs. Others appear here for the first time. These demos are undoubtedly that least polished recordings but, in many ways, his most rewarding. None of them was ever intended for release. This is a very special glimpse into the development of Charlie's music. Some of it would probably have embarrassed him. During his earliest period Charlie was almost always searching musically. He was taking chances, playing in styles that were alien to him. Some of these experiments were surprisingly successful. Others were expendable failures. Some were abandoned, nearly on the spot. Others gave rise to patterns, songs, even instrumental riffs that would surface later in his career.

01 - ''AIN'T A SHAME'' - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-3 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962 

''Baby I Need You'', this is one of the simplest and most enjoyable of Rich's early attempts at rock and roll. He plainly was a man at odds with a genre here, essentially clueless and struggling to work even the squirrels in the park into his teen love song. You can decide for yourself whether this brief demo works better with Charlie's piano or Jack Clement's acoustic guitar in support. Incredibly, Shelby Singleton included the piano version of this tune on his second Sun International Rich LP.

02 - ''BABY I NEED YOU'' - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-8 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

03 - ''BALLAD OF BILLY JOE'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 839 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THE GREATEST

04 - ''BALLAD OF BILLY JOE'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date – Overdubbed in the 1970s
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 134 mono
CHARLIE RICH – GOLDEN TREASURES

05 - ''CLOSED FOR REPAIR'' - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30101-B-7 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 1 - CATALYST

06 - ''BABY I NEED YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-13 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

07 - ''GRAVEYARDVILLE'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date - Instrumental
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-18 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

08 - ''GRAVEYARDVILLE'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Alternate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date - Instrumental
Released: 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 132 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THE EARLY YEARS

''How Blue Can You Be'', this and ''I'm Making Plans'' are an essential part of this demos. They may not be everybody's favorite selections, but they were an undeniable part of the man who came to work at Sun Records in 1958. Material like this, demoed by Rich during his first year at Sun, was a fundamental part of who he was musically. A gig at the Vapors and the Sharecropper might contain these songs, back-to-back with Jimmy Reed's ''Big Boss Man''. That kind of electicism or, if you will, musical schizophrenia remained central to Charlie Rich until the end. These demos are arguably among the best but there are at least half a dozen more titles in the same genre that remain unissued.

09 - ''HOW BLUE CAN YOU BE'' - B.M.I. - 1:33
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-23 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962


10 - ''IF YOU KNEW''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

11 - ''I JUST THOUGHT YOU'D LIKE TO KNOW''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

12 - ''I'M MAKING PLANS'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-33 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''I Said Baby'', this previously unknown title emerged from its unknown untitled status during the most recent search of the Sun vaults. There is a strong bluesy edge to its otherwise country style, and a surprising melodic tension. The song plainly needed some reworking ( and a better demo) but since we are not likely to see either in this lifetime, here is the only glimpse of the song Charlie left us, possibly from as early as 1958.

13 - ''I SAID BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-9 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

14 - ''JUST A LITTLE BIT SWEET''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

''Life Is A Flower'', this tune was known to Sun discographers only as a Ray Smith recording. It is now apparent, from this rough demo, that Charlie Rich had some role in its development, possibly even wrote it. If he did, he certainly does a laughably poor job of singing his own lyrics. He gets ''Life is a flower/Love is the honey'' correct the first time through, but from there it is all downhill. And every one of those little stumbles seems to have disruptive effects on his piano playing as well as vocal phrasing. The tune is rather Presleyish and surprisingly catchy, even if it is far from regular Charlie Rich fare.

15 - ''LIFE IS A FLOWER'' - B.M.I. - 1:22
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-31 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

16 - ''LITTLE BY LITTLE'' - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 134 mono
CHARLIE RICH – GOLDEN TREASURES
Reissued: - April 1989 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-3-9 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO 60S - KEEPERS OF THE FLAME

17 – ''INTRO/SCATTER/LITTLE WOMAN FRIEND OF MINE'' – B.M.I. - 0:32
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-1 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Little Woman Friend Of Mine'', unlike many Rich compositions, this title never progressed beyond the demo stage. That is somewhat surprising considering some of the material that was given the full treatment. This tune is vintage Rich. A bluesy underpinning, a passing nod to Presleyana, some fine boogie piano, and interesting chord changes despite the simplicity of the material, And, like Charlie's best songs, this is no simple piece of fluff. There is a real story here. One gets the feeling with a little effort this lyric could have been fleshed out into a steamy piece of southern fiction. Considering how Charlie was shuttling in those tears between Arkansas town with three digit populations and downtown Memphis, the lyric might have held some meaning for him.

18 – ''LITTLE WOMAN FRIEND OF MINE'' – B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-2 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

19 - ''NEVER MIND, LITTLE GIRL''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

20 - ''NO HEADSTONE ON MY GRAVE''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

21 - ''ROCK AND ROLL PART'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1975
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300 004 mono
CHARLIE RICH – LONELY WEEKENDS


22 - ''SITTIN' AND THINKIN''' – B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-25 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

23 - ''SOMEHOW WE'LL FIND A WAY''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

24 - ''SO YOUNG''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

25 - ''STOP FAKIN'YOUR LOVE''' - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-4 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

26 - ''TIME'S A-WASTING''' - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-19 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

27 - ''TOO MANY YEARS''' - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-16 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

28 - ''UNSUSPECTING ME''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

29 - ''WE WERE MADE FOR EACH OTHER''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

30 - ''WHEN'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1975
First appearance: Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 861 mono
CHARLIE RICH – THOSE MIDNIGHT BLUES

31 - ''WHY, WHY, WHY''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

32 - ''YES MA'AM'' - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-14 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

33 - ''YOU MADE A HIT'' - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-20 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''You Made A Hit'', this tune was written by Walter P. Maynard, Jr. who owned Walmay Music, a local publishing/recording company that featured Charlie Feathers among its artists. This song, later recorded on Sun by Ray Smith, was demoed by Charlie Rich although he had no formal interest in the song. It is interesting to compare the feel of Rich's demo with Smith's issued version. Smith's enthusiastic rockabilly mannerisms are replaced here by the almost jazzy feel of Rich's version. The uncredited drummer provides some surprisingly nice accenting to this minimalist recording.

34 - ''UNTITLED INSTRUMENTAL'' - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-26 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Untitled Instrumental'', this oddity is included (despite the gadawful drumming that goes with it) because it holds a window on Rich's musical development. In crude form, this was simply an instrumental idea with no lyrics to adorn it. By the time Rich appeared at RCA several years later, this very riff became the background for his effective reading of ''Old Man River'', which appeared on his first LP. Like most great musicians, Charlie Rich rarely squendered a good idea.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


DECEMBER 1959

Elvis Presley's former bassist, Bill Black, gives Hi Records its first hit with ''Smokie (Part 1 and 2)''.

DECEMBER 2, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Ricky Nelson sings ''Mighty Good'' during a frat-themed episode of ABC's ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

DECEMBER 3, 1959 THURSDAY

The Browns recorded ''The Old Lamplighter'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

DECEMBER 5, 1959 SATURDAY

New Orleans mayor Delesseps Morrison and Jimmie Davis finish 0ne-two among 11 Democratic candidates for governor of Louisiana. They're rematched in a runoff primary election five weeks later.

DECEMBER 6, 1959 SUNDAY

Pop and rockabilly singer Jimmie Rodgers appears in the NBC-TV special ''Give My Regards To Broadway'' starring Jimmy Durante.

DECEMBER 4-7, 1959

Jerry Lee Lewis performs at Jimmy Maddin's Sundown Club in Los Angeles, California.

DECEMBER 7, 1959 MONDAY

Rose Maddox leaves her protesting mother at a San Francisco hotel room to marry her second husband, club owner Jimmy Brogdon, in Las Vegas.

Patsy Cline sings ''Lovesick Blues'' on ABC-TV's ''Jubilee USA''. She also delivers Christmas carols with Red Foley and Ferlin Husky.

DECEMBER 8, 1959 TUESDAY

Marty Raybon is born in Greenville, Alabama. As the lead singer for Shenandoah, he puts an identifiable stamp on ''Two Dozen Roses'', ''The Church On Cumberland Road;; and ''If Bubba Can Dance''.

DECEMBER 10, 1959 THURSDAY

Red Foley is indicted on charges of income tax evasion, covering the years 1954 and 1955. After two trails, he is eventually found not guilty.

DECEMBER 12, 1959 SATURDAY

During an appearance at the Grand Ole Opry,  at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.  Bill Monroe is presented with divorce papers filed by the former Carolyn Brown, who charges he's had an affair with bass player Bessie Lee Mauldin since 1941.

DECEMBER 14, 1959 MONDAY

Skeeter Davis recorded ''Am I That Easy To Forget''.

Decca released Roy Drusky's first hit, ''Another''.

Johnny Cash recorded ''Second Honeymoon'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

DECEMBER 15, 1959 TUESDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded the pop hit ''Let It Be Me'' at Bell Sound Studio in New York. Willie Nelson's version becomes a country hit in 1982.

DECEMBER 16, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Hank Thompson recorded ''A Six Pack To Go'' in an over-night session at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood.

Tuesday Weld guests on ABC's ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet'', with Ricky Nelson singing ''For You''.

DECEMBER 17, 1959 THURSDAY

Hank Thompson recorded ''She's Just A Whole Lot Like You'' in the evening hours at the Capitol Studio in Los Angeles, California.

George Morgan recorded ''You're The Only Good Thing (That's Happened To Me)''.

DECEMBER 21, 1959 MONDAY

The Marty Robbins western classic ''El Paso'' takes over the top spot on the Billboard country single chart.

Gene Autry, Patti Page and comedian Frank Gorshin guest on ''The Ed Sullivan Show'' on NBC

DECEMBER 22, 1959 TUESDAY

''Maybelline'' songwriter Chuck Berry is charged in St. Louis with violating the Mann Act, for reputedly transporting a female across state lines for sexual purposes.

Record producer Mark Bright is born in Shreveport, Louisiana. Raised in Longview, Texas, he oversees session by Carrie Underwood, Rascal Flatts, Reba McEntire, Luke Bryan, The Swon Brothers, Sara Evans and BlackHawk.

DECEMBER 23, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''Excuse Me (I Think I've Got A Heartache)'' and ''Above And  Beyons'' in a productive afternoon session at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood, California. 

DECEMBER 24, 1959 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley kicks out a dermatologist who's been giving him treatments for a month when he discovers the doctor is gay. The doctor returns that night, threatening to expose a relationship with an underage girl, Priscilla Beaulieu.

DECEMBER 25, 1959 FRIDAY

While spending Christmas in West Germany, Elvis Presley gives Priscilla Beaulieu a gold watch with diamonds. She present him bongo drums.

DECEMBER 29, 1959 TUESDAY

Columbia released the George Morgan single ''You're The Only Good Thing (That's Happened To Me)''.

DECEMBER 30, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Songwriter Don Henry is born in San Jose, California. He co-writes Kathy Matteas's ''Where've You Been'' and Miranda Lambert's ''All Kinds Of Kinds''.

DECEMBER 31, 1959 THURSDAY

Sun 334 ''Straight As In Love'' b/w ''I Love You Because'' by Johnny Cash issued.

Bass player Jeff Johnson is born in Nashville, Tennessee. He joins the cowpunk band Jason and The Scorchers, whose ''Absolutely Sweet Marie'' ranks among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR O.C. HOLT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Session details unknown.

01 – ''THIS TRAIN'' – B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - O.C. Holt
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Dates
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1016-B-5 mono
GOOD OLE MEMPHIS COUNTRY
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8181-18 mono
SUN HILLBILLY

02 – ''POOR BOY'' – B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - O.C. Holt
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Dates
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1016-B-4 mono
GOOD OLE MEMPHIS COUNTRY

03 – ''PINK WEDDING GOWN'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - O.C. Holt
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Dates
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1016-B-6 mono
GOOD OLE MEMPHIS COUNTRY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
O.C. Holt – Vocal & Guitar
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WAYNE PERDLE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Session details unknown.

01 – ''TRAIN OF MEMORIES'' – B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Dates
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8181-20 mono
SUN HILLBILLY
Reissued: - 2001 Buffalo Bop (CD) 500/200rpm BP 55152-19 mono
CHOO CHOO BOP

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wayne Perdle – Vocal
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JACK FROST
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S)
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

No Details

01 – ''HEART THROB'' - 2:49
Composer: - Jack Frost
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)
Released: - 1997
First appearance: -  Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8236-23 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 4

02 – ''TELL ME''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

03 – ''I'LL BE AROUND''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number – None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Frost – Vocal
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©




After a four year involvement with Sun Records, Billy Riley decided to quit again. Jack Clement and Bill Justis had been dismissed in early 1959. Both started their own labels. Riley did some work for Justis, cutting an instrumental record pseudonymous for Jaro/Top Rank under the name "Spitfires". By this point he had reunited with Roland Janes and they held down a steady gig at the Starlight Club in Memphis. It was there that they came up with the idea for Rita Records.



Bill Justis arranges for Billy Riley and Roland Janes to record as the Spitfires for Top Rank's Jaro Records. >

"When Sam was finishing the new studio on Madison Avenue", recalled Roland Janes to Colin Escott, "Riley and I went to him and asked him whether we could maintain the old studio, record there with the product going to Sun. Sam was pretty busy at the time and we never actually resolved the question. We just drifted into doing our own thing".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
FOR RITA RECORDS 1959

PROBABLY SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
OR PEPPER RECORDING STUDIO
2076 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION : UNKNOWN DATE END 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES & BILLY RILEY

"Rita Records was a co-op deal. Bill and I naturally played on everything which eliminated having to pay a couple of musicians and we used our old buddies. James M. Van Eaton and Martin Willis. Jimmy Wilson had left town by this point so we used Tommy Bennett and Larry Mohoberac on piano. We came up with a partner who had a little money, Ira Lynn Vaughn. He was an accountant and the label was named after his daughter Rita".

"Mr. Vaughn took care of the paperwork. Bill and I took care of production and getting records to the distributors. Riley was a tremendous salesman. He could go in and talk someone into something - and probably talk them out of it before he left!. He was much better than me as a salesman but I probably had a better business head. Our business address was Mr. Vaughn's office but we worked out of our homes". 

01 - "RED HOT" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - William R. Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15272 mono
BILLY RILEY & THE LITTLE GREEN MAN
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-25 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal, Guitar and Harmonica
Roland Janes - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


END 1959

When Sun's promotion assistent Barbara Barnes returned to Memphis from Chicago for visit friends, she tried to convince Billy Riley  to develop a single act modeled after Josh White. ''Billy was really good looking, and when he wasn't  shouting as he did on his rock records, he had a passable voice. He played guitar well, and I thought the time  was right for some blues and folk music'', recalled Barbara. ''I knew he'd grown up alongside black workers  in the cotton fields of Arkansas and that he knew all kind of blues songs. I saw him as a Josh White, just a  little lighter with his olive complexion and glossy black hair. 'Why don't you see if you can get a solo  booking at the Rivermont? You could wear a black turtleneck and pants and get close to your audience. You  could really sing to them, instead of shouting and jumping around. The ladies will love you if you'll romance  them a little. You could try out some material that way and find some blues to record'', Barbara says.

''Yeah'', Billy crooned. ''Sex-ville''. Barbara continued, ''No one at Sun was thinking of selling folk-based  records, but I thought it could be done. Billy listened to me thoughtfully, his eyes lighting up, and I could see  he was envisioning himself as a cabaret singer. This new musical identity would allow him to re-invent  himself. He was always saying his name was unlucky, and if he could just find the right name, he was sure  he'd be a star. With other labels later, he recorded as Darren Lee and Skip Wylie before finally settling on  adding Lee to his name, thereby coming to be remembered as Billy Lee Riley'', says Barbara.

Billy didn't follow up her advice for a single act, but he did put his blues roots out there when he formed his  own label, Rita Records, sometime later. Calling himself ''Lightnin' Leon'', he sounded like an authentic  blues singer on a tune called ''Repossession Blues. The back side, all about the endless hours farm laborers  spent in those times driving a mule down cotton furrows, was also authentic-sounded blues. He was a fine  harmonica player and, as one whose family were the only white sharecroppers on a large Arkansas  plantation, he came as close as a white man could come to playing the real Delta blues.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
FOR RITA RECORDS 1959

PROBABLY  SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
OR PEPPER RECORDING STUDIO
2076 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE END 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES & BILLY RILEY

AND/OR
FERNWOOD STUDIO, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES & BILLY RILEY
RE-ISSUE PRODUCER - COLIN ESCOTT
MASTERED BY BOB JONES
TRACKS WERE RECORDED ON DIFFERENT SESSIONS

Chorus overdubbed at Pepper Studio, Memphis, Tennessee.

Surprisingly, neither Billy Riley nor Roland Janes recorded prolifically for Rita. "We were so involved with trying to record everyone else that we forgot about ourselves", said Janes. "I guess we wanted to be producers and moguls". Riley saw two releases on Rita.

01 - "DARK MUDDY BOTTOM" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Mercy Walton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Issued under the name Lightnin' Leon
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Rita Records (S) 45rpm standard single Rita 1005 mono
DARK MUDDY BOTTOM / REPOSSESSION BLUES
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-1-18 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

02 - "REPOSSESSION BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Roland Janes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Issued under the name Lightnin' Leon
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Rita Records (S) 45rpm standard single Rita 1005 mono
REPOSSESSION BLUES / DARK MUDDY BOTTOM
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-1-19 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

"Dark Muddy Bottom" and "Reposession Blues" was released under the pseudonym of Lightnin' Leo. Its authentic down home flavor fooled many blues fans into thinking that Leon had emerged from the Delta around 1960, cut one record and returned to the cotton patch.

03(1) - "THAT'S WHAT I WANT TO DO" - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Huskey
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Rita Records (S) 45rpm standard single Rita 1013 mono
THAT'S WHAT I WANT TO DO / TOO MUCH WOMAN FOR ME
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-1-20 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

By the time "That's What I Want To Do" was released, Billy Riley had quit Rita Records, reportedly selling his share for $1000 just as Harold Dorman's "Mountain Of Love" was breaking. He promptly started Mojo Records and covered "That's What I Want To Do" for Mojo with Billy Garner handling the vocals.

03(2) - "THAT'S WHAT I WANT TO DO" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Huskey
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Rita Unissued Undubbed Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15272-6 mono
BILLY RILEY & THE LITTLE GREEN MAN
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-28 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal, Guitar and Harmonica
Roland Janes - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Larry Mohoberac - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


POSTSCRIPT - All music recorded at the original Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis,  which was closed the end of 1959. By this time, the classic period of Sun blues and  country was over. However, Charlie Rich and Carl Mann, in particular, continued to make  fine country flavoured records at Sun as did Jerry Lee Lewis. The recordings for Sun and Phillips International continued in a new studio at 639 Madison Avenue. Some blues, soul and gospel sessions were held. These included the rhythm and blues session by Frank Ballard in March 1962 for a Phillips International album, the Frank Frost sessions in April 1962 for a Phillips International and single, the rhythm and blues/soul recordings by the Climates in 1967, and Brother James Anderson's gospel session of May 1962 finally released on Sun in 1967.

Through the late 1960s, Sun  produced occasional country sessions most notably the 1962 sessions by Eddie Bond and  the 1966 sessions by Dane Stinit. To all intents and purposes, though, the true story of Sun  country is contained within the years 1950 - 1959 covered in on this site.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JOHN PURSLEY
NO DETAILS

01 – ''HOLD ME''

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
John Pursley – Vocal
Unknown Group

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DON REYNOLDS & THE REYNOLDS QUARTET
NO DETAILS

01 – ''I'LL TELL MYSELF A LIE''

02 – ''PEACE LIKE A RIVER''

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Reynolds & The Reynolds Quartet - Vocals


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©