- CHECKER RECORDS -

Contains
 
Willie Nix - Checker 756
Woodrow Adams - Checker 757
Joe Hill Louis - Checker 763


Willie Nix
"TRUCKIN' LITTLE WOMAN" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Willie Nix
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1026 - Catalog number on label misprint
Recorded: - April 25, 1952
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm Checker 756-A mono
TRUCKIN' LITTLE WOMAN / JUST ONE MISTAKE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Willie Nix - Vocal and Drums
Walter Horton - Harmonica
Billy Love - Piano
Willie Johnson – Guitar

Drummer Willie Nix was a regular sessionman at 706 Union, and like Houston Stokes some six or seven months later, Sam Phillips also recorded him as a vocalist. Phillips later recalled Nix's enthusiasm thus: "Willie was not the subtlest of drummers, I would say, but he drove a session along and he had a feeling for what I wanted to get. He was something of a character, too...".

This song was actually recorded in Memphis at Sun Studios, bought by Chess records, and then released on Checker records, which was a Chess subsidary label, mostly known for releasing most of the early Bo Diddley singles and Little Walter. Nix was a Memphis boy who made more a name for himself among musicians than he did the record buying public. (CE)
 

Checker 756-A 78rpm



Willie Nix
"JUST ONE MISTAKE" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Willie Nix
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1027
Recorded: - April 25, 1952
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm Checker 756-B mono
JUST ONE MISTAKE / TRUCKIN' LITTLE WOMAN

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Willie Nix - Vocal and Drums
Walter Horton - Harmonica
Billy Love - Piano
Willie Johnson – Guitar
 

Checker 756-B 78rpm



Woodrow Adams
"PRETTY BABY BLUES" - B.M.I. - 3:13
Composer: - Woodrow Adams
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1030
Recorded: - May 24, 1952
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Only one copy is known to survive
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm Checker 757-A mono
PRETTY BABY BLUES / SHE'S DONE COME AND DONE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Woodrow Adam - Vocal and Guitar
Sylvester Hayes - Harmonica
Fiddlin' Joe Martin - Drums

With Howlin' Wolf presumably selling well, Sam Phillips pitched Woodrow Adams to Chess, and Chess took one single. Like Wolf, Adams worked in a riff-driven groove with flashes of falsetto, But Adams' lone Checker single sold so poorly that just one copy is known survive. For one thing, Adams doesn't have Wolf's commanding presence. The eerie falsetto is straight out of Tommy Johnson via Howlin' Wolf, although Adams told David Evans that he wasn't familiar with Johnson. The performance breaks down at the end, and it's quite easy to visualize Phillips in the control room gesticulating wildly to get Adams and the 3 Bs to bring the song yo a halt. Three minutes and then seconds was about the limit of a 78rpm disc in those days. Adams name checks Sylvester Hayes at one point, confirming his presence. (CE)
 

Checker 757-A 78rpm



Woodrow Adams
"SHE'S DONE COME AND GONE" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Woodrow Adams
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1031
Recorded: - May 24, 1952
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Only one copy is known to survive
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm Checker 757-B mono
SHE'S DONE COME AND DONE / PRETTY BABY BLUES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Woodrow Adam - Vocal and Guitar
Sylvester Hayes - Harmonica
Fiddlin' Joe Martin - Drums

This time, Adams and the Three Bs (Boogie Blues Blasters) take on Elmore James, randomly stringing together lines from other songs. In a bar on a Saturday might with a buzz from an adult beverage or two, this might sound pretty fine. In the cold light of day, Adams' shortcomings come into sharper focus, and hardly need pointing out. Woodrow Adams was pretty much doomed to local stardom around Robinsonville, Mississippi, where he could be seen on weekends well into the 1970s. (CE)
 

Checker 757-B 78rpm



Joe Hill Louis
"DOROTHY MAE" - B.M.I. – 2:04
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1035 A
Recorded: - July 18, 1952
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm standard single Checker 763-A mono
DOROTHY MAE / WHEN I AM GONE
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15524 AH-2 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - THE BE-BOP BOY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal and Guitar
Walter Horton - Harmonica
Jack Kelly - Piano
Willie Nix – Drums

There's no shortage of blues (or hillbilly songs, for that matter) about women who don't come home at night, but it's unusual the name the woman who doesn't come home... and then marry her one week later, as Joe Hill Louis did when he married Dorothy Mae Pearson on July 25, 1952. Walter Horton played harmonica, presumably because Phillips realized that he got a better performance from Louis when he wasn't trying to play everything in sight and sing through his harmonica. Jack Kelly and Willie Nix round out the all-star combo. This is about as commercial as Joe Hill Louis ever was. Phillips must have had high hopes when he shipped off the masters to Chess, but it didn't sell and Chess took nothing else by Louis, and very little else from Sam Phillips. (CE)
 

Checker 763-A 78rpm



Joe Hill Louis
"WHEN I'M GONE
(SHE TREATS ME MEAN AND EVIL)" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1036 A - Unedited
Recorded: - March 31, 1952
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm Checker 763-B mono
WHEN I'M GONE / DOROTHY MAE
Reissued: - 1986 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal and Guitar
Nolen Hall – Drums

Originally issued on Checker in an edited version as ''When I Am Gone'', this slow, menacing, free-form blues is driven by Louis's back-in-the-alley guitar and anchored by drummer, Nolen Hall, who keeps time with a steady thud. It's among the nastiest of Louis's blues, and the mood of the song is uncharacteristic. He's not singing through his harmonica and he's focusing on one instrument instead of two or three, so this is a very different Joe Hill Louis record in every way. It dates from a session in March 1952 and was noted in Phillips' files as Slow Blues (Echo) ''I'm Going Over The Sea'', which is as good a title as ''When I Am Gone'' or ''Treat Me Mean And Evil''. All three convey the dystopic atmosphere that Louis creates and sustains. (CE)
 

Checker 763-B 78rpm


 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©