- ACETATES -

Contains
 
Walter Horton - ''Little Walter's Instrumental''
B.B. King  - ''Questionnaire Blues'' / ''A New Way Of Driving''
B.B. King - ''B.B. Blues''
Howlin' Wolf  - ''How Many More Years''
Dreamy Joe  - AP 101-A-B
Various Artist  - 4-Star NRS 1-A-B
Brother R. Russell &  The Jones Brothers - ''I'm Sealed''
The Jones Brothers - ''Every Night''
Handy Jackson - ''(Have You Ever Had) Trouble'' (Master)
Handy Jackson - ''(Have You Ever Had) Trouble'' (Alternate)

Walter Tang Smith - J-B B 606-A-B

Lloyd Arnold McCollough - Oh, If I Had You''
Lloyd Arnold McCollough - ''You Win Again''
Lloyd Arnold McCollough - ''The Worlds Lonely With You''
Lloyd Arnold McCollough - ''Gonna Win Your Love Again''

 
Walter Horton
"LITTLE WALTER'S INSTRUMENTAL" - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - Acetate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably January 1951
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm SUNBOX 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956  
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-2-12 mono digital
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter Horton - Harmonica
Billy Love - Piano
Joe Willie Wilkins - Guitar
Unknown - Drums

It's widely assumed that this tour de force is Walter Horton's first known recording as a featured artist, although the acetate is undated and the recording isn't noted in Marion Keisker's logs. It first appeared in the early 1970s on the grammatically challenged Memphis Blues at Sunshine LP. Was it really recorded in January 1951? Who are the guys behind him? On both counts, we're unsure. The other side of the acetate held a white female singing Mitt Addington's ''Without Him Blues''. Addington first saw his name on Sun in 1953 when he co-write both sides of Big Memphis Marainey's record, but he was a pal of Keisker's and could have demo'd songs earlier than 1953. All we know for sure is that Walter Horton wasn't known as Little Walter after Walter Jacobs appropriated the name in September 1952. so this tune probably predates the fall of 1952. Adding a further layer of confusion, another ''Walter's Instrumental'' was issued on Bear Family's Joe Hill Louis CD. The questions surrounding provenance and the marginal quality of the acetate notwithstanding, this recording pretty much defines what Walter Horton could do with a harmonica. You get the sense that he could have carried on awhile without running short of ideas. If this indeed the dates to early 1951, it's easy to see why the Biharis accepted two complete sessions of Horton's material after hearing this test. Mention, too, must be made of the guitar playing which echoes the harp in places and acts as a counterpoint in others. (CE)
 

''Little Walter's Instrumental'' 78rpm Acetate



B.B. King
"QUESTIONAIRE BLUES" – B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Riley B. King-Joe Josea
Publisher: - BMG Music Publishing Limited
Matrix number: - MM 1488 - Take 1 - Acetate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 8, 1951
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-14 mono digital
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
B.B. King - Vocal and guitar
Solomon Hardy - Sax
Ford Nelson - Piano
James "Shinny" Walker - Bass
E.A. Kemp – Drums

B.B. King
"A NEW WAY OF DRIVING" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Riley B. King-Sam Ling
Publisher: - BMG Music Publishing Limited
Matrix number: - MM 1490 - Take 2 - Acetate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 8, 1951
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-2-1 mono digital
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
B.B. King - Vocal and guitar
Solomon Hardy - Sax
Ford Nelson - Piano
James "Shinny" Walker - Bass
E.A. Kemp – Drums

King is a true visionary of blues. He was among the first to take blues out on the long highway and to see, on a grand scale, the connection between extensive touring and the sales of records. While King has been working to sell blues to the public, he has also been busy innovating and adding to the music. In his early days, King fused powerful, gospel-inflected vocals and stately, intricate, Texas-flavored blues guitar with the raw guts of Mississippi Delta blues, thus creating and perfecting a hybrid that has been an inspiration to rural and urban musicians alike. His use of a large band with a powerful horn section, elaborate musical arrangements and even strings, also made him popular and influential in the blues world. Today he continues to build on the music, incorporating elements of jazz, funk, pop and soul. And few blues guitarists can match King's clean power and dexterity. (CE)(MH)
 

''Questionaire Blues'' / ''A New Way Of Driving'' 78rpm Acetate



B.B. King
"B.B. BLUES" – B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Riley B. King-Jules Taub
Publisher: - BMH Music Publishing Limited
Matrix number: - MM 1489 - Take 1 - Acetate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 8, 1951
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHM2 835-1-16 mono digital
B.B. KING - THE MODERN RECORDINGS 1950 - 1951

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
B.B. King - Vocal and guitar
Solomon Hardy - Sax
Ford Nelson - Piano
James "Shinny" Walker - Bass
E.A. Kemp – Drums

Solomon Hardy's squealing tenor sax wails throughout the mid-tempo ''B.B. Blues'', King shouting the blues full-throttle. The patriotic Korean War epic ''Questionaire Blues'' and the double-entendre boogie ''A New Way Of Driving'' stem from the same session as ''B.B. Blues'' but had to wait a couple of decades to see light of day on that same historic Kent LP. Rounding out the session was the easy-swinging ''Fine Lookin' Woman'', issued as RPM 348 with Hardy squawking up a storm and is also on offer here in an alternate rendition.

B.B. King had recorded for Bullet Records at the WDIA radio studio in 1949 before recording three singles for RPM at Sam Phillips' studio. This was the fourth. Phillips'willingness to court the unusual betrayed itself on ''B.B. Blues'', recorded on this session and pulled for release six months later. Solomon Hardy's wailing sax punctuated B.B's vocal to striking effect. While B.B. seemed quietly resigned to his misery, Hardy screamed in anguish. Pianist Ford Nelson was one of B.B.'s fellow disc jockeys on WDIA and performed with him as an on-air duo. (CE)(MH)
 

''Bee Bee Blues'' 78rpm Acetate



Howlin' Wolf
"HOW MANY MORE YEARS" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Unpublished
Matrix number: - None - Presto 78rpm Acetate
Recorded: - July 1951
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 1973
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm RLP-105 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES AT SUNRISE
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460 AH-20 mono digital
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Howlin' Wolf - Vocal and Harmonica
Willie Johnson - Guitar
Willie Steele - Drums
James Cotton - Harmonica

"It was Ike Turner got us recording", said James Cotton. "He played piano and was acting as some kind of talent scout for the Sun label. They was paying him to find people to record, so we went in there and recorded "Moanin' At Midnight" and "How Many More Years". It was a little old room, we just played how we felt and Sam Phillips kept himself busy getting the microphones right. We didn't think we were making a new sound or anything, we were just playing the way we played. Sam Phillips got real excited, he was real friendly and far as I was concerned he was a real nice person... Then Wolf decided he was gonna go up to Chicago, so  he left Willie Johnson behind and took Hubert Sumlin along with him". (CE)(MH)
 

''How Many More Years 78rpm (Wrong Dated Presto Acetate)



Dreamy Joe
"HOLSUM BOOGIE"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Unpublished
Matrix number: - Acetate
Recorded: - Probably 1953
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Action Products (S) 78rpm AP 101-A mono
HOLSUM BOOGIE / YOU'VE DONE ME WRONG

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Steele - Vocal and Guitar
and/of
Joe Manuel - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown - Guitar
Unknown – Bass

Rare custom pressing for Holsum Bread radio commercials. Sources suggest either Joe Manuel or Gene Steele as the artist. Similar records for other breads were made, for example: Daisy Bread, Hardin Bread and Sweetheart Bread.
 

Action Production AP 101-A 78rpm Acetate



Dreamy Joe
"YOU'VE DONE ME WRONG"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Unpublished
Matrix number: - Acetate
Recorded: - Probably 1953
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Action Products (S) 78rpm AP 101-B mono
YOU'VE DONE ME WRONG / HOLSUM BOOGIE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Steele - Vocal and Guitar
and/of
Joe Manuel - Vocal  and Guitar
Unknown - Guitar
Unknown – Bass

Rare custom pressing for Holsum Bread radio commercials. Sources suggest either Joe Manuel or Gene Steele as the artist. Similar records for other breads were made, for example: Daisy Bread, Hardin Bread and Sweetheart Bread.
 

Action Production AP 101-B 78rpm Acetate


4-Star NRS 1 Various Artists

Ultra-rare promotional 10" inch 78 RPM sampler with locked grooves including  both sides of Lost John Hunter's upcoming release in 1950.

4-Star NRS-1-A 78rpm Acetate



Brother R. Russell & The Jones Brothers
"I'M SEALED" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - Acetate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1953
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-8-29 mono digital
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brother R. Russell - Vocal
The Jones Brothers consisting of:
William Gresham - Vocal /  Jake McIntosh - Vocal
Charles Jones - Vocal /  Eddie Hollins - Vocal
Johnny Prye - Vocal /  James Rayford - Vocal
Charles Bishop – Guitar

Note: On ''I'm Sealed'' the Jones Brothers not heard.

The identity of Brother R. Russel is unknown. His music turned up on the flipside of a 1953 acetate made at  the Memphis Recording Service. Despite the label credit on the acetate, ''I'm Sealed'' is a vocal solo with  piano and guitar accompaniment in a style that has almost no bearing on quartet singing. The extent of the  connection between Russell and the Jones Brothers may be social, although it is possible that he ''borrowed''  their guitarist, Charles Bishop for the recording. It is also entirely possible that they went into the Memphis  Recording Service together to split the cost of a vanity session. In any case, this track ''I'm Sealed'', is an  oddity whose connection with either Sun records or the Jones Brothers quartet is indirect, at best. It informs  the bigger picture of the range of black gospel music being performed in Memphis, circa 1953. If we can  speculate, this is a style that would have turned up, not frequently, in the vanity recordings made by Phillips.  it is highly unlikely he would have given it a second thought as far as being a candidate for commercial release. (HD)
 

''I'm Sealed'' 78rpm Acetate



The Jones Brothers
"EVERY NIGHT" - 2 - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Jake McIntosh
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - Acetate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 28, 1954
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-8-30 mono digital
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments )
The Jones Brothers consisting of:
William Gresham - Vocal /  Jake McIntosh - Vocal
Charles Jones - Vocal /  Eddie Hollins - Vocal
Johnny Prye - Vocal /  James Rayford - Vocal
Charles Bishop – Guitar

A newly discovered version of one of the Jones' Brothers issued songs, this preliminary take of ''Every  Night'' is inferior in every way. It's possible that this version stems from the same January 28, 1954 session  that yielded the single release, but the only evidence for that is the tuning of the guitar. It is in tune only with  itself (key of A) but flat to the outside world. It was also in that slightly flat tuning when the group recorded  the subsequent version of the song that was issued on Sun. But there is a much stronger possibility that the  quartet went in to the Memphis Recording Service some time in 1953 to cut this acetate for their own use. As  noted above, they might have gone in with Brother Russell, but that is of little consequence. Sam Phillips  might have been intrigued by what he heard of the quartet and said, ''You fellas bring me something original  for the flipside and I'll do a session on you''. This account actually makes sense because it is odd that an  acetate would have been cut that included this inferior version of a released song.

It is far more likely that the group took this one home with them before they worked up a second song for  their session. It also accounts for why no trace of this take appears in the Sun logs pr tape files. It was truly a  one-off event, kept among Johnny Prye's possessions until his death. In any case, this newly discovered  alternative is much more subdued than the issued version and has a slightly different arrangement as well (an  unlikely thing to change on the fly in the studio). Notice that the version of Sun features what amounts to a  duet between the lead singer and the ''basser'' until the song arrives at its call and response section, during  which the title phrase is repeated over and over. The second difference, and this has a major impact on the  song, is that the group's vocal renderings of the title phrase on this version are odd enough to sound wrong.  They are not simply 1-3-5-8 or 1-3-5-flatted 7 harmonies and they have an unsettling effect as they are  repeated over and over again. Fortunately the problem was rectified before the issued take was recorded. The  timings of the two versions, by the way, are virtually identical at around 2:24 so nothing fundamental about  the song changed between this and the single. (HD)
 

''Everey Night'' 78rpm Acetate


 
Handy Jackson
"(HAVE YOU EVER HAD) TROUBLE" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Handy Jackson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - Acetate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date January 1953
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-9-1 mono digital
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Handy Jackson - Vocal
Gay Garth - Piano
Willie Wilkins or Johnny London - Saxophone
Possibly - Robert Carter - Guitar
Possibly William Cooper - Drums
 

''(Have You Ever Had) Trouble'' 78rpm Acetate



Handy Jackson
"(HAVE YOU EVER HAD) TROUBLE" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Handy Jackson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - Acetate - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date January 1953
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-9-1 mono digital
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Handy Jackson - Vocal
Gay Garth - Piano
Willie Wilkins or Johnny London - Saxophone
Possibly - Robert Carter - Guitar
Possibly William Cooper - Drums

There are several subtle differences between this newly-discovered alternate take of ''Trouble'', and its issued  counterpart. The guitar is up in the mix on the issued version but almost inaudible here. After the sax break,  Jackson changes his phrasing on ''getting late in the evening...''. On this version he adopts the sly insinuation  of Percy Mayfield; he's more full-throated on the record. But we're still as much in the dark about who  Handy Jackson was and how he happened to be at Sun in 1953. It certainly sounds like Johnny London on  the screaming alto sax but London swears it's not him, as did Gaylord Garth, who played piano on the song.  If the grave marked Handy Jackson that Jim O'Neal discovered in Leflore County, Mississippi holds our  man, it holds the story of this recording, too. (CE)
 

''(Have You Ever Had) Trouble'' 78rpm Alternate Acetate



Walter ''Tang'' Smith
"HI-TONE MAMA" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Walter "Tang" Smith
Publisher: - Delta Music
Matrix number: - Nash 15
Recorded: - October 27, 1952
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - J-B Records (S) 78rpm J-B 606-A mono
HI-TONE MAMA / EVERY MONDAY MORNING
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-24 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter "Tang" Smith - Vocal
Unknown - Trumpet
Jewell Briscoe - Tenor Saxophone
James Luper - Tenor Saxophone
Charles ''Chas'' Chinn - Saxophone
Harry Gibson - Piano
Unknown - Bass
L.T. Lewis – Drums

This track first appeared on Jim Bullet's label out of Nashville. Bulleit and Sam Phillips were in the process of consummating a deal in which Bulleit would invest in the Sun re-launch of January 1953. As part of the deal, Bulleit would also acquire some masters from Phillips. There must have been very little room to breathe at 706 Union when they recorded this agreeable track in October, 1952. It features a rolling piano and full horn section riffing behind Smith's vocal. There is a double length instrumental break led by a very aggressive Jewell Briscoe on tenor sax. Briscoe unleashes his arsenal of honks and double honks during the second instrumental chorus. For the uninitiated, Walter Smith's middle name, ''Tang'' is a short of Poontang, which is, in turn, a colloquialism for pussy. (MH)(CE)(HD)
 

J-B 606-A 78rpm



Walter ''Tang'' Smith
"EVERY MONDAY MORNING" - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Walter "Tang" Smith
Publisher: - Delta Music
Matrix number: - Nash 14
Recorded: - October 27, 1952
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - J-B Records (S) 78rpm J-B 606-B mono
EVERY MONDAY MORNING / HI-TONE MAMA
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-25 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter "Tang" Smith - Vocal
Unknown - Trumpet
Jewell Briscoe - Tenor Saxophone
James Luper - Tenor Saxophone
Charles ''Chas'' Chinn - Saxophone
Harry Gibson - Piano
Unknown - Bass
L.T. Lewis – Drums

This too was issued in late 1952 on Jim Bullet's J-B label. This side presents a fuller, more sophisticated sound than virtually anything in the Sun blues catalog, not to mention the sides Sam Phillips recorded for release on other labels. We actually have a band chart here (likely composed by sax man Jewell Briscoe). Pianist Harry Gibson switches to shuffle rhythm during the tenor sax solo to good effect, and Smith's shouted encouragement adds energy. One ofthose saxmen (there are three of them listed on the session personnel) should have considered investing in a new reed for the session. (HD)
 

J-B 606-B 78rpm



Lloyd Arnold McCollough
''OH, IF I HAD YOU'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Lloyd McCollough
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Acetate
Recorded: February 24, 1953
Released: - Sun Unissued

During 1953 and 1954 Lloyd and his band recorded several demos and acetates at the newly opened   Memphis Recording Service at 706 Union Avenue. During the nineties thirteen of these acetates were relocated   by re-searcher Jim Cole, employed by the University of Memphis.

During those fun filled days, Lloyd and the Drifting Hillbillies had a great time performing at such places as   ''The Old Dominion Barn Dance'', ''The Renfro Valley Barn Dance'', ''Red Foley’s Ozark Jubilee'' and the   ''Louisiana Hayride''. In January of 1955 they performed at the ''Hillbilly Festival'' for WRBL-TV in Columbus, Georgia. In February and March they were in Little Rock, Arkansas at the ''Barnyard Frolic'' and   in December they played ''The Big D Jamboree'' in Dallas, Texas. That same year he hosted another weekly   radio program, for WBIP in Booneville, Mississippi.

Name (Or. No. of Instruments)
Lloyd Arnold McCollough – Vocal and Guitar
The Drifting Hillbillies consisted of
Curley Rainey – Fiddle
Geneva McCollough – Vocal and Guitar
Jim McCollough – Upright Bass
Grady – Steel Guitar
 

''Oh, If I Had You'' 78rpm Acetate


 
Lloyd Arnold McCollough
03 – ''YOU WIN AGAIN'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Acetate
Recorded: February 24, 1953
Released: - Sun Unissued

During 1953 and 1954 Lloyd and his band recorded several demos and acetates at the newly opened   Memphis Recording Service at 706 Union Avenue. During the nineties thirteen of these acetates were relocated   by re-searcher Jim Cole, employed by the University of Memphis.

During those fun filled days, Lloyd and the Drifting Hillbillies had a great time performing at such places as   ''The Old Dominion Barn Dance'', ''The Renfro Valley Barn Dance'', ''Red Foley’s Ozark Jubilee'' and the   ''Louisiana Hayride''. In January of 1955 they performed at the ''Hillbilly Festival'' for WRBL-TV in Columbus, Georgia. In February and March they were in Little Rock, Arkansas at the ''Barnyard Frolic'' and   in December they played ''The Big D Jamboree'' in Dallas, Texas. That same year he hosted another weekly   radio program, for WBIP in Booneville, Mississippi.

Name (Or. No. of Instruments)
Lloyd Arnold McCollough – Vocal and Guitar
The Drifting Hillbillies consisted of
Curley Rainey – Fiddle
Geneva McCollough – Vocal and Guitar
Jim McCollough – Upright Bass
Grady – Steel Guitar
 

''You Win Again'' 78rpm Acetate



Lloyd Arnold McCollough
''THE WORLD'S LONELY WITH YOU'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Lloyd McCollough
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Acetate
Recorded: March 4, 1953
Released: - Sun Unissued

During 1953 and 1954 Lloyd and his band recorded several demos and acetates at the newly opened   Memphis Recording Service at 706 Union Avenue. During the nineties thirteen of these acetates were relocated   by re-searcher Jim Cole, employed by the University of Memphis.

During those fun filled days, Lloyd and the Drifting Hillbillies had a great time performing at such places as   ''The Old Dominion Barn Dance'', ''The Renfro Valley Barn Dance'', ''Red Foley’s Ozark Jubilee'' and the   ''Louisiana Hayride''. In January of 1955 they performed at the ''Hillbilly Festival'' for WRBL-TV in  Columbus, Georgia. In February and March they were in Little Rock, Arkansas at the ''Barnyard Frolic'' and   in December they played ''The Big D Jamboree'' in Dallas, Texas. That same year he hosted another weekly   radio program, for WBIP in Booneville, Mississippi.

Name (Or. No. of Instruments)
Lloyd Arnold McCollough – Vocal and Guitar

The Drifting Hillbillies consisted of
Curley Rainey – Fiddle
Geneva McCollough – Vocal and Guitar
Jim McCollough – Upright Bass
Grady – Steel Guitar
 

''The World's Lonely With You'' 78rpm Acetate



Lloyd Arnold McCollough
''GONNA WIN YOUR LOVE AGAIN'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Lloyd McCollough
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Acetate
Recorded: March 4, 1953
Released: - Sun Unissued

During 1953 and 1954 Lloyd and his band recorded several demos and acetates at the newly opened   Memphis Recording Service at 706 Union Avenue. During the nineties thirteen of these acetates were relocated   by re-searcher Jim Cole, employed by the University of Memphis.

During those fun filled days, Lloyd and the Drifting Hillbillies had a great time performing at such places as   ''The Old Dominion Barn Dance'', ''The Renfro Valley Barn Dance'', ''Red Foley’s Ozark Jubilee'' and the   ''Louisiana Hayride''. In January of 1955 they performed at the ''Hillbilly Festival'' for WRBL-TV in  Columbus, Georgia. In February and March they were in Little Rock, Arkansas at the ''Barnyard Frolic'' and   in December they played ''The Big D Jamboree'' in Dallas, Texas. That same year he hosted another weekly   radio program, for WBIP in Booneville, Mississippi.

Name (Or. No. of Instruments)
Lloyd Arnold McCollough – Vocal and Guitar

The Drifting Hillbillies consisted of
Curley Rainey – Fiddle
Geneva McCollough – Vocal and Guitar
Jim McCollough – Upright Bass
Grady – Steel Guitar
 

''Gonna Win Your Love Again'' 78rpm Acetate


 
 
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