Slim Rhodes
"THE HOUSE OF SIN" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 158
Recorded: - February 23, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 225-A mono
THE HOUSE OF SIN / ARE YOU ASHAMED OF ME
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-13 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Dusty Rhodes - Vocal
Dottie Rhodes - Vocal
Slim Rhodes - Guitar
John Hughey - Steel Guitar
Spec Rhodes – Bass

''House Of Sin'' was the Rhodes Band's second release to appear on the Sun label and it features a strongly moralistic tone, consistent with music hillbilly music of the era. Dusty and Dot Rhodes have worked up a lovely vocal harmony on the chorus and after the third hearing of ''A baby cries...'' its hard not to understand the meaning of the songwriter's term ''hook''. This side might have contended for wider attention had Sun's promotional and distribution efforts supported it. Nevertheless, Rhodes sold well in and around Memphis, where his band was well known via radio and TV appearances. (CE)(HD)(MH)
 

Sun 225-A 45rpm



Slim Rhodes
"ARE YOU ASHAMED OF ME" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 159
Recorded: - February 23, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 225-B mono
ARE YOU ASHAMED OF ME / THE HOUSE OF SIN
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-14 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs - Vocal and Guitar
Dusty Rhodes - Fiddle
Slim Rhodes - Guitar
John Hughey - Steel Guitar
Spec Rhodes – Bass

Guitarist Brad Suggs takes the spotlight on ''Are You Ashamed Of Me''. His singing has almost no trace of Hillbilly in it, only the wonderful fiddle playing from Dusty Rhodes takes us back into the country. This is supper club country music. Perhaps the more sophisticated city listeners that Slim catered to demanded this type of material. From this distance, it's hard to tell. At its best, the country music that Phillips recorded can make the hair on the back of your neck stand up with its chilling backwoods intensity. On that count, this recording fails but it probably sold well to Slim's television audience. (CE)(HD)(MH)
 

Sun 225-B 45rpm



Eddie Snow
"AIN'T THAT RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 160
Recorded: - July 19, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 226-A mono
AIN'T THAT RIGHT / BRING YOUR LOVE BACK HOME
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1


Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Snow - Vocal and Piano
Floyd Murphy - Guitar
Eddie Davis - Tenor Saxophone
Bennie Moore - Alto Saxophone
Jeff Greyer – Drums

For the flip-side of his only Sun single, Eddie Snow tried a semi-talking misogynistic blues in the manner of Willie Mabon and, more recently, Ray Charles. This was slick, commercial rhythm and blues, and just the sort of thing that Sam Phillips should have been recording if his head hadn't been turning in an altogether different direction. When Billboard got around to reviewing it in October 1955, it said ''Snow walls some salty philosophy in this potent talking and refrain effort. Should do well in many sectors. Good down-to-earth stuff''. Indeed. (MH)
 

Sun 226-A 45rpm



Eddie Snow
"BRING YOUR LOVE BACK HOME" - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Eddie Snow
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 161
Recorded: - July 19, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 226-B mono
BRING YOUR LOVE BACK HOME / AIN'T THAT RIGHT
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Snow - Vocal and Piano
Floyd Murphy - Guitar
Eddie Davis - Tenor Saxophone
Bennie Moore - Alto Saxophone
Jeff Greyer – Drums

This was the leading contender from Snow's 1955 session, issued on Sun that August. It was a rolling blues with a catchy tune, and it might have done quite well but for Phillips' lack of resources and the fact that Sun was now touting itself in the trade papers as ''America's number 1 Country Label''. As well as saxophonist Eddie Davis, Snow featured another Elven Parr alumnus, Bennie Moore. It's pretty clear from Moore's sax solo here that he had spent long nights listening to Charlie Parkers 78s.  (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 226-B 45rpm



Rosco Gordon
"JUST LOVE ME BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 162
Recorded: - Probably February 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 227-A mono
JUST LOVE ME BABY / WEEPING BLUES
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-17mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1
 

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Billy Duncan - Alto Saxophone
Charles Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Sax
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Foree Wells - Guitar
Tuff Green - Bass
John Murry Daley – Drums

This was the first record by Rosco Gordon to appear on the Sun label (technically it was on both Sun and Flip), although Gordon was no stranger to 706 Union Avenue. For two years, Sam Phillips had recorded him, peddling his music to Chess and RPM. He had also custom-recorded a Rosco session for Duke. In fact, it was Rosco's hits like ''Booted'' and ''No More Doggin'''that helped to convince Phillips that he could compete in the cut-throat rhythm and blues business. So, in June 1955, when Rosco's Duke deal was up, Sam signed him to Sun on a three-year contract. Rosco was still living in Memphis when he signed, although by 1957 he had moved to New York. 

Although he brings a confident and idiosyncratic vocal to ''Just Love Me Baby'', this remains one of Rosco's least distinguished offerings. The band finds a fine mid-tempo groove and the saxes riff like they tell you in the manual, but somehow this side never rises above mediocrity. (HD)(CE)
 

Sun 227-A 45rpm



Rosco Gordon
"JUST LOVE ME BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 162
Recorded: - Probably February 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1955
First appearance: - Flip Records (S) 78rpm standard single Flip 227-A mono
JUST LOVE ME BABY / WEEPING BLUES
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-17mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1
 

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Billy Duncan - Alto Saxophone
Charles Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Sax
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Foree Wells - Guitar
Tuff Green - Bass
John Murry Daley – Drums
 

Flip 227-A 78rpm



Rosco Gordon
"WEEPING BLUES" - B.M.I. - 3:09
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 163
Recorded: - Probably February 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 227-B mono
WEEPING BLUES / JUST LOVE ME BABY
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Billy Duncan - Alto Saxophone
Charles Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Sax
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Foree Wells - Guitar
Tuff Green - Bass
John Murry Daley – Drums

This B-side, ''Weeping Blues'' is rooted in a gimmick, one that had worked for Clyde McPhatter on Billy Ward's recording of ''The Bells'' in 1953, but one that fell flat here. (HD)(CE)
 

Sun 227-B 45rpm


 
Rosco Gordon
"WEEPING BLUES" - B.M.I. - 3:09
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 163
Recorded: - Probably February 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1955
First appearance: - Flip Records (S) 78rpm standard single Flip 227-B mono
WEEPING BLUES / JUST LOVE ME BABY
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Billy Duncan - Alto Saxophone
Charles Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Sax
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Foree Wells - Guitar
Tuff Green - Bass
John Murry Daley – Drums
 

Flip 227-B 78rpm



Smokey Joe
"THE SIGNIFYING MONKEY" - B.M.I. - 3:15
Composer: - Bill Taylor-Stanley Kesler-Joseph Bauch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 170
Recorded: - August 25, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 15, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 228-A mono
THE SIGNIFYING MONKEY / LISTEN TO ME BABY
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Smokey Joe Baugh - Vocal and Piano
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Buddy Holobaugh - Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Bill Taylor - Trumpet
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar

The story about ''Monkey'', of course Smokey Joe, Stan Kesler, and Bill Taylor can no more take credit for writing this song than anyone else. Its origins are embedded deep in African American myth, as far back as Yoruba folklore according to some sources. One of America's preeminent African American scholars, Henry Louis Gates, wrote a book about literary signifying within black culture titled ''The Signifying Monkey - A Theory Of African American Literary Criticism''. The question to which we don't have a good answer is where Smokey Joe became acquainted with the potty-mouthed primate. His contribution was to clear it up, although Johnny Bernero remembered that Joe would sing the unexpurgated version from time to time. Once again, the backing is disarmingly simple. Bernero sustains the show with some rock-solid drumming while Buddy Holobaugh works a repeated boogie riff. There had been other attempts to get the ''Monkey'' on record, most recently by the Big Three Trio (featuring Willie Dixon) back in 1946. Cab Calloway and Count Basie covered Dixon song. Joe's version appears to have sold quite well in late 1955, certainly in excess of 25,000 copies, and the song reportedly gained him an invitation to play at the Apollo Theatre in New York, where his white face and blonde hair would have created a stir. Stan Kesler remembered the ''Monkey'', and prevailed upon Sam the Sham to record it for a label he co-owned, XL Records. It was the record before ''Woolly Bully'', but probably sold sufficiently well to incentivise Phillips to re-release this one in 1964.  (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 228-A 45rpm



Smokey Joe
"THE SIGNIFYING MONKEY" - B.M.I. - 3:15
Composer: - Bill Taylor-Stanley Kesler-Joseph Bauch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 170
Recorded: - August 25, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 15, 1955
Reissued: - Flip Records (S) 78rpm standard single Flip 228-A mono
THE SIGNIFYING MONKEY / LISTEN TO ME BABY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Smokey Joe Baugh - Vocal and Piano
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Buddy Holobaugh - Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Bill Taylor - Trumpet
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
 

Flip 228-A 45rpm



Smokey Joe
"LISTEN TO ME BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Joe Bauch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 171
Recorded: - August 25, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 15, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 228-B mono
LISTEN TO ME BABY / THE SIGNIFYING MONKEY
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-4-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Smokey Joe Baugh - Vocal and Piano
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Buddy Holobaugh - Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Bill Taylor - Trumpet
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar

There is a wonderful drive to ''Listen To Me''. The little combo works the off-beat for all it's worth, overlaying it with a steady boogie woogie. There are some early Jamaican rhythm and blues and ska records that sound kinda like this. Johnny Bernero and Buddy Holobaugh power the record, and Stan Kesler contributes some tasty work on steel. Bill Taylor can be heard on trumpet from time to time. The lyrics are hardly groundbreaking but, once again, The Snearly Ranch gang reveals a genuine feeling for this type of music. It is a matter for conjecture whether the patrons of the Bel Air lounge or the VFW club knew what a treat were getting when this combo climbed on to the stage. Overlooked in the rush to deify the rockabilly musicians who leaped out of Memphis the following year, this group combined black and white styles with as much verve and enthusiasm as the rockabillies. In many ways, they comprised the best that Memphis had to offer at that point.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 228-B 45rpm



Smokey Joe
"LISTEN TO ME BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Joe Bauch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 171
Recorded: - August 25, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 15, 1955
Reissued: - Flip Records (S) 78rpm standard single Flip 228-B mono
LISTEN TO ME BABY / THE SIGNIFYING MONKEY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Smokey Joe Baugh - Vocal and Piano
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Buddy Holobaugh - Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Bill Taylor - Trumpet
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
 

Flip 228-B 45rpm



Maggie Sue Wimberly
"DAYDREAMS COME TRUE" - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Met Music
Matrix number: - U 167
Recorded: - March 18, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 229-A mono
DAYDREAMS COME TRUE / HOW LONG
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-1-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Maggie Sue Wimberly - Vocal
Bill Cantrell - Fiddle
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Quinton Claunch - Guitar
Marcus Van Story - Bass

''Daydreamin'''was the surprise country hit to emerge from Memphis in the early 1955. Rejected by Sam Phillips a year earlier and dismissed by Billboard as a B-side (''capable rural waxing...'') it nevertheless gave Phillips' competitor, Lester Bihari, his second major hit. In New Orleans, for example, it spent over 30 weeks in the Top Ten. However, the goodnews for Bihari ended here. Deckelman moved to MGM and the team had written ''Daydreamin''', Bill Cantrell and Quinton Claunch, pitched the follow-up to both Sun and Meteor's version featured Buddy Bain, Kay Wain et al, and Sun's version marked the debut of Maggie Sue Wimberly. Maggie Sue's performance betrays her tender years and exhibits the peculiarly American trait of having juvenile performers sing about adult emotions. That said is still a fine record that, to a degree, transcends its problem. The instrumental backing is nothing short of superb; yet another showcase for San Kesler's steel guitar and Bill Cantrell's fiddle.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 229-A 45rpm



Maggie Sue Wimberly
"HOW LONG" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Bill Cantrell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 166
Recorded: - October 25, 1954
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 229-B mono
HOW LONG / DAYDREAM COME TRUE
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-1-2 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Maggie Sue Wimberly - Vocal
Bill Cantrell - Fiddle
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Quinton Claunch - Guitar
Marcus Van Story - Bass

Probably recorded in October 1954, this was saved from premature retirement by the need to find a flipside for ''Daydreams Come True''. Arguably, Maggie Sue was on safer ground here. Her vocal control is used to good effect, especially on the melismatic title phrase. The song is a pure delight and the backing, led as usual by Stan Kesler, is first rate. The song was plucked from obscurity by Rita Robbins who recorded a cover version in the early months of 1956. However, young Maggie Sue saw her own version by the wayside. Times were already changing by the point this was released and its fortunes stood or fell with the continuation of the ''Daydreamin'''sage. Unfortunately, the public seemed to have other things in mind.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 229-B 45rpm



The Miller Sisters
"THERE'S NO RIGHT WAY TO DO ME WRONG" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:21
Composer: - Ted Meyne
Publisher: - Southern Music
Matrix number: - U 168
Recorded: - July 1, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 15, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 230-A mono
THERE'S NO RIGHT WAY TO DO ME WRONG / YOU CAN TELL ME
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-1-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elsie Jo Miller - Duet Vocal
Mildred Wages - Duet Vocal
Buddy Holobaugh or Roy Miller - Guitar
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Jan Ledbetter or William Diehl - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Ace Cannon - Tenor Saxophone

Billboard incorrectly described ''There's No Right Way To Do Me Wrong'' in January 1956 as an effective weeper, which suggest that they had not even listen to it, or, if that had. they’d listened to the wrong version. Despite its theme, the track moves along at a sprightly pace that belies its subject matter. As he did on all the girls releases, Phillips coupled a true weeper with some uptempo material and he must have thought very highly of this song because it was one of the very few non Hi-Lo copyrights released by Sun in 1956. The song was originally recorded at half tempo in December 1953 by Rose Maddox. Although Phillips credits Gabe Tucker and Smokey Stover, Rose's record credits west coast songwriter Ted Meyne.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 230-A 45rpm



The Miller Sisters
"YOU CAN TELL ME" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:37
Composer: - Homer Eddleman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 169
Recorded: - July 1, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 15, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 230-B mono
YOU CAN TELL ME / THERE'S NO RIGHT WAY TO DO ME WRONG
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-1-4 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elsie Jo Miller - Duet Vocal
Mildred Wages - Duet Vocal
Buddy Holobaugh or Roy Miller - Guitar
Stanley Kesler - Steel Guitar
Jan Ledbetter or William Diehl - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Ace Cannon - Tenor Saxophone

This is a powerful piece of country material written by Homer Eddleman Jr. who had submitted a tape to Sun  from Rte. 1, Marianna, Arkansas. Elsie Jo and Millie turn in a stellar performance on the material that keeps  pace with their stylings. The storyline is grabby, telling the tale of a woman who is all too eager te demean  her friend's man because she will be the beneficiary once her gossip breaks up the couple. About ten years  later, blues singer Bobby Bland recorded an interesting variant on this theme called ''Your Friends''. Separate  by years, miles, race, and audience Bland's record shows that some themes are timeless and can be reworked  into and style.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 230-B 45rpm



Charlie Feathers
"DEFROST YOUR HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - William "Bill" Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 164
Recorded: - November 1, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 231-A mono
DEFROST YOUR HEART / A WEDDING GOWN OF WHITE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-5 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Feathers - Vocal and Guitar
Bill Cantrell - Fiddle
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Quinton Claunch - Guitar
Bill Black or Johnny Black - Bass

Although consigned to the flipside of ''Wedding Gown Of White'', this song was another stellar outing by  Feathers. The song is truly beautiful and is matched by Feathers' masterful phrasing. He 'worries' a word or  syllable in the same way as Lefty Frtixell but, at the same time, has the desperation of Hank Williams in his  voice. Once again, Kesler is outstanding while Cantrell limits himself to the intro. The melody of ''Defrost  Your Heart'' owes some debt to Hank Williams 1951 hit ''I Heard That Lonesome Whistle Blow'' but if all  plagiarism were as sweet as this, it would no longer be a crime. Sam Phillips could never understand why  this single was not a hit, and it's a mystery still. Phillips also insisted that Charlie could have been as big as  George Jones if he'd stuck with country music, and, on the evidence of this record, it's flattering George  Jones to say that he was as good as Charlie Feathers. Once again, Stan Kesler shows why the steel guitar  found a place in country music. Its wordless cry precisely echoes the sentiments of so many country songs,  none more so than this. Claunch's deadened bass strings provide all the pulse that these two sides need. After  Elvis Presley was signed to RCA, Sam Phillips concluded a deal that saw songs he published go to Presley's  new publisher, Hill & Range, for exploitation. The Aberbachs, who owned Hill & Range, sent ''Defrost Your  Heart'' to Canadian country artist Bob King.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 231-A 45rpm



Charlie Feathers
"A WEDDING GOWN OF WHITE" - B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - William "Bill" Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 165
Recorded: - November 1, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 231-B mono
A WEDDING GOWN OF WHITE / DEFROST YOUR HEART
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-6 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Feathers - Vocal and Guitar
Bill Cantrell - Fiddle
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Quinton Claunch - Guitar
Bill Black or Johnny Black - Bass

In a sense, ''A Wedding Gown Of White'' was more a follow-up to ''Daydreamin''' than to ''Peepin' Eyes''. This time, our hero has moved on to daydreamin' about his forthcoming marriage. You won't find a less cluttered storyline in country music: ''I love you, I'm going to marry you; Oh boy. Claunch and Cantrell certainly thought that this was a vein they could mine indefinitely. The dismal sales ( a shade over 900 copies) obviously proved them wrong. Feathers provides a wonderfully hard-edged vocal in a style that could strip paint off the wall, while full of earnest love. In fact, it goes beyond love to the point of adoration. Kesler's steel guitar is also outstanding, bracketed by the signature phrase from Wagner's ''Wedding March''. The bass player is either Bill Black, augmenting his meagre earnings with Presley, or his brother Johnny. Bill Black's name was filed with the AFM but Johnny recalls playing the session and was not a member of the AFM, which would have necessitated substituting his name with an AFM member on the session log.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 231-B 45rpm



Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"FOLSOM PRISON BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 173
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 15, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 232-A mono
FOLSOM PRISON BLUES / SO DOGGONE LONESOME
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-8 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

''Folsom Prison Blues'' was not only a moderate country hit for Johnny cash in early 1956, but also a song which would later help to resurrect his career when he recorded it live in Folsom Prison.

Cash was quickly establishing himself as an exceptional country tunesmith. When he claimed ''I wrote ''Folsom Prison Blues'' in August (1955). I had seen a movie called 'Inside The Walls of Folsom Prison' which inspired the song'', there was little reason to doubt him. It now appears that more than a Hollywood movie inspired Cash. In 1953, Gordon Jenkins recorded one of his 'concept albums' called ''Seven Dreams''. It held a track sung by Beverly Mahr called ''Crescent City Blues''. The lyrics included"''When I was just a baby/My mama told me, Sue (a boy named Sue?/When you're grown up I want that you/Should go and see and do/But I'm stuck in Crescent City/Just watching life mosey by/When I hear that whistle blowing, I hang my head and cry''. It ended, ''If I owned that lonesome whistle/If that railroad train were mine/I bet I'd find a man? a little farther down the line/Far from Crescent City is where I'd like to stay/  and I'd let that lonesome whistle/blow my blues away''.

Sound familiar? Gordon Jenkins thought so when he finally heard ''Folsom Prison Blues''. Although he waited until Cash's tenure at Sun was over to sue, Cash suffered a major blow to the ego as well as pocketbook. Regardless of authorship, the original version of ''Folsom'' is a fine record, featuring one of Luther Perkins' most memorable solos.
 
Luther Perkins was known for his limitations more than expertise on the guitar. Johnny Cash's stage show frequently chided Luther in a good-natured way for those limitations, although the routine probably wore a bit thin on Luther over the years. That two-note background and those simple scales that Luther called solos were all part of his charm and the undeniable power of Johnny cash's earliest records. On ''Folsom Prison Blues'', Luther has outdone himself, playing one of the most memorable yet simple guitar solos in country music. In fact he plays it twice. Even more remarkable is the fact that Luther uses the top three strings on his guitar, suggesting he had mastery of the entire instrument. This was Johnny Cash's second record for Sun and that mastery never surfaced again, over 19 more releases and nearly 60 more titles. It's a rarity indeed, but Luther never played better than he does here. There is no telling how many young guitar players in the formative 1950s cut their teeth on this solo. Such was the beauty of Luther Perkins' playing: good enough to inspire, but not so good as to intimidate. It was almost a mantra: If Luther did it, so can you. (HD)
 

Sun 232-A 45rpm



Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"SO DOGGONE LONESOME" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 172 - Take 3
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 15, 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 232-B mono
SO DOGGONE LONESOME / FOLSOM PRISON BLUES
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-7 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

The flipside, ''So Doggone Lonesome'', a true Cash original (as far as we know), actually received more of the chart action at the time of its release, a fact often obscured by the enduring popularity of ''Folsom''. (HD)
 

Sun 232-B 45rpm



Billy ''The Kid'' Emerson
"LITTLE FINE HEALTHY THING" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 174
Recorded: - November 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 15, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 233-A mono
LITTLE FINE HEALTY THING / SOMETHING FOR NOTHING
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-9 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Billy Emerson - Vocal
Billy Love - Piano
Jewell Briscoe - Tenor Saxophone
Moses Reed - Tenor Saxophone
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Kenneth Banks - Bass
Phineas Newborn Sr. - Drums

This is a catchy, melodic composition with more spice and variety than most rhythm and blues titles from the period. It also shows up Emerson's limitations as a vocalist, he was competent, even distinctive, but lacked  the aggressiveness of many of his contemporaries. Emerson seemed to have a penchant for woman who could make ''a bulldog hug a hound...'' a familiar line after Johnny Temple popularized it on ''Big Leg Woman''. Emerson, though, prided himself on being a songwriter, not just another reshuffle of blues cliches. What he says here is both loving and lecherous; a combination. She should have been flattered, who ever she was.

Billy the Kid Emerson's last Sun single was sandwitched between Johnny Cash's ''Folsom Prison Blues'' and Carl Perkins' ''Blue Suede Shoes''. Even before those two records became hits, Emerson saw the writing on the wall, and was gone from Sun Records.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 233-A 45rpm



Billy ''The Kid'' Emerson
"SOMETHING FOR NOTHING" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 175
Recorded: - November 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - January 15, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 233-B mono
SOMETHING FOR NOTHING / LITTLE FINE HEALTY THING
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-10 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Billy Emerson - Vocal
Billy Love - Piano
Jewell Briscoe - Tenor Saxophone
Moses Reed - Tenor Saxophone
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Kenneth Banks - Bass
Phineas Newborn Sr. - Drums

In November 1955, Billy Emerson was back at Sun to record what would prove to be his last session. On the twenty-second of the same month, he was recording for Vee-Jay in his newly adopted home town, Chicago. For his last Sun session, he was reunited with Phineas Newborn, Sr's nightclub band. Emerson rated his work on ''Something For Noting'' very highly, and with good reason, ''That was the best'', Emerson said later. ''That was when I really found my style. You're listening to the real Billy The Kid Emerson''. Talking to Jim O'Neal later, he was a little more forthcoming. ''That song came about from a Butterbeans and Susie routine. 'Now looka here, Susie, you sure is tight, you ain't never gonna treat yo' papa Butter right. 'She made a reply and he would sing, 'Something for noting seems to be your/You oughta get yourself a monkey 'cause you sure don't need no man''. He's remembering Butterbeans & Susie's 1930 record of ''Papa Ain't No Santa Claus (And Mama Ain't No Christmas Tree)''. Talk about handling it on.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 233-B 45rpm



Carl Perkins
"BLUE SUEDE SHOES" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 176 - Take 2
Recorded: - December 19, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 234-A mono
BLUE SUEDE SHOES / HONEY, DON'T
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-11 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Lee Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums

Without a doubt, this single record has done more than any other to spread the gospel of rockabilly and draw the wave of collectors to San and Sun. Subtract ''Blue Suede Shoes'' from the Sun catalogue, and there is no telling how fundamental the changes might be. When this record hit, shock waves were felt all over. Billboard reported ''Difficult as the country field is for a newcomer to crack these days, Perkins has come up with some wax here that has hit the national retail chart in almost record time... Interestingly enough, the disk has a large measure of appeal for pop and rhythm and blues customers as well''.

''Blue Suede Shoes'' deserves its notoriety. Its impact is as direct today, nearly 55 years and millions of plays later. Perkins' vocal and guitar work are as energetic and full of goodnatured menace as the day were conceived. To understand the importance of slap bass rockabilly, try to imagine this record mixed differently, driven by drums and not the clicking bass strings. It is entirely possibly the results and fortunes of ''Blue Suede Shoes'' would have been radically different. (HD)
 

Sun 234-A 45rpm



Carl Perkins
"HONEY DON'T" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 177 - Take 3
Recorded: - December 19, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 234-B mono
HONEY, DON'T! / BLUE SUEDE SHOES
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-12 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Lee Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums

None of the trade papers knew what to call Carl's ''Shoes'' or its flipside ''Honey Don't'' when it was released in December 1955. Terms like ''rhythm ditty'' or ''country boogie'' were tossed around, but it wasn't until the fall of 1956 that the world would begin hearing the phrase rockabilly to describe what had been born at Sun. (HD)
 

Sun 234-B 45rpm



Carl Perkins
"SURE TO FALL" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Carl Perkins-William E. Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 178 - With Jay Perkins Taking The Lead
Recorded: - December 19, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm standard single SUN EPA 115 mono
BLUE SUEDE SHOES
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-13 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

May have been scheduled as Carl and Jay Perkins

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Lee Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums

May have been scheduled as Carl and Jay Perkins

Sun 235-A Unissued

''Sure To Fall'' is a lovely country song written by Quinton Claunch and Bill Cantrell. According to Cantrell, it was originally scheduled as the flipside of Sun 234. As Cantrell remembers it, he did little to further his own cause, persuading Phillips that the two rockers belonged together. In the cold light of history, there is no telling how much that touch of humility cost Cantrell. ''Tennessee'', another uptempo country song is a brag song by Carl about his home state, taking credit for everything from Eddy Arnold to nuclear waste. (HD)
 

Sun 235-A Unissued



Carl Perkins
"TENNESSEE" - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 179
Recorded: - December 19, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1225 mono
DANCE - THE BEST OF CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-14 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

May have been scheduled as Carl and Jay Perkins

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Lee Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums

Sun 235-B Unissued

Here is the famous missing single. The mystery wasn't that great. On the master log, the artist entry is left blank, and Sun 235 was probably to be issued under the name of the Perkins Brothers Band.

Both sides of what would have been Sun 235 are familiar to most Perkins fans. They appeared on Carl's first Sun album. Both relegate Carl to the role of backup singer and lead guitarist. Nevertheless, his presence is still strong here, so much so that most listeners never thought it odd when these sides appeared without special billing on Carl's album. The reason is quite simple: at this point, the name Carl Perkins really did mean the Perkins Brothers Band. It wasn't until the success of ''Blue Suede Shoes'' and the death of Jay that Carl became a solo act. Even then, his familiar vocals and driving guitar sound retained the illusion that nothing had changed.
 
The song itself (Sun 235) sat in the can until making an appearance as filler on Carl's first album. We include it here on the strenght of Carl's flowing, skilful and melodic solo. The playing is fluid and combines pure country touches with elements of dissonance that would become a hallmark of Carl's best rockabilly work. The second time through his solo Carl emphasizes chords over single notes, but again manages to integrate country and rock elements without breaking a sweat. Playing in the honky tonks prepared Carl Perkins to be as adept a country picker as he was a rock guitarist. (HD)(SP)
 

Sun 235-B Unissued



Jimmy Haggett
"NO MORE, NO MORE" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Jimmy Haggett
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 180
Recorded: - August 23, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 236-A mono
NO MORE, NO MORE / THEY CALL OUR LOVE A SIN
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Haggett - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
J.L. "Peed" Moody - Guitar
Billy Springer - Steel Guitar
J.G. "Gabby" McKinn - Bass
Bernie Gwatney - Fiddle
Euwin "Red" Mansfield – Drums

Jimmy Haggett drew his inspiration from different wellsprings than those that fed most of his contemporaries at Sun Records. His major influence was Jim Reeves and this is apparent in his phrasing. However, the backing on ''No More'' is pure, unadulterated hillbilly.  The guitarist J.L. ''Speedy'' Moody contributes some tasty fills and there is some very pleasant interplay between the steel guitar of Billy Springer and the fiddle of Bernie Gwatney. The long nights of working together obviously paid dividends here. The real mystery surrounding the song is its origin.  Haggett freely admitted that the song was not an original but denied all knowledge of a previous version by Luke McDaniel, recorded for Trumpet Records in 1952. The McDaniel version has some different lyrics and it would be easy to say that whoever gave Haggett this song simply ripped it off from McDaniel. However there is another wrinkle in the story provided by yet another out-take box where an unidentified artist sings McDaniel's lyrics to ''No More''. It is possible that this third version is indeed by McDaniel who may have auditioned at Sun earlier than had been thought.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 236-A 45rpm



Jimmy Haggett
"THEY CALL OUR LOVE A SIN" - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Jimmy Haggett
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 181
Recorded: - August 23, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 236-B mono
THEY CALL OUR LOVE A SIN / NO MORE, NO MORE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Haggett - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
J.L. "Peed" Moody - Guitar
Billy Springer - Steel Guitar
J.G. "Gabby" McKinn - Bass
Bernie Gwatney - Fiddle
Euwin "Red" Mansfield – Drums

Both this next song and ''No More'' were reportedly given to Haggett by a musician in his band. ''I can't remember his name now'', recalled Haggett. ''I changed a few words and the melody and he said that all he wanted was to get his songs on record. He told me that they were unpublished and he released them to me''. As it happened, these were not especially valuable copyrights. Sun 236 had sold 448 copies a year after release. It was the rockabilly sound of Carl Perkins that pointed the way into the future for Sun Record, and for Jimmy Haggett.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 236-B 45rpm



Rosco Gordon
"THE CHICKEN (DANCE WITH YOU)" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 182
Recorded: - Probably February 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 237-A mono
THE CHICKEN (DANCE WITH YOU) / LOVE FOR YOU, BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-1-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Billy Duncan - Alto Saxophone
Charles Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Sax
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Foree Wells - Guitar
Tuff Green - Bass
John Murry Daley – Drums

Although Sun collectors usually fail to give it much attention, Rosco Gordon claims that ''The Chicken'' was the biggest selling record of his Sun career. In a 1980 interview, Rosco repeatedly referred to it as his ''million seller''. According to Rosco, ''The Chicken'' was a ''spot record'', breaking in one regional rhythm and blues market after another, and taking a long time to run its course.

Although it never blazed a trail on national charts, the record stirred up enough regional attention to garner Rosco a movie deal (the notorious ''Rock Baby, Rock It!''). His performance of ''Chicken In The Rough'' is captured forever on celluloid, along with his trusty rooster dancing on the piano while Rosco pounded away on the ivories. ''They used to call me Rosco 'Chicken' Gordon. man, that record was so big!;; Rosco claimed that the rooster remained part of his act for quite a while, giving added credence to his version of the record's success.

For his part, Sam Phillips must have had an interesting view of ''The Chicken''. It was released on both the Sun and Flip labels, although the significance of that strategy remains unclear. Perhaps more tellingly, Phillips did not simply see this release an an rhythm and blues contender. Original versions of the ''Chicken's'' record label plainly say ''Rock & Roll Vocal''. In simple terms, that meant crossover potential. By 1956, Sam Phillips was not releasing much black music anymore. What little appeared on the Sun label had better have some potential to sell to white kids. (HD)
 

Sun 237-A 45rpm


 
Rosco Gordon
"THE CHICKEN (DANCE WITH YOU)" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 182
Recorded: - Probably February 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Flip Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Flip 237-A mono
THE CHICKEN (DANCE WITH YOU) / LOVE FOR YOU, BABY
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Billy Duncan - Alto Saxophone
Charles Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Sax
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Foree Wells - Guitar
Tuff Green - Bass
John Murry Daley – Drums

Although Sun collectors usually fail to give it much attention, Rosco Gordon claims that ''The Chicken'' was the biggest selling record of his Sun career. In a 1980 interview, Rosco repeatedly referred to it as his ''million seller''. According to Rosco, ''The Chicken'' was a ''spot record'', breaking in one regional rhythm and blues market after another, and taking a long time to run its course.

Although it never blazed a trail on national charts, the record stirred up enough regional attention to garner Rosco a movie deal (the notorious ''Rock Baby, Rock It!''). His performance of ''Chicken In The Rough'' is captured forever on celluloid, along with his trusty rooster dancing on the piano while Rosco pounded away on the ivories. ''They used to call me Rosco 'Chicken' Gordon. man, that record was so big!;; Rosco claimed that the rooster remained part of his act for quite a while, giving added credence to his version of the record's success.

For his part, Sam Phillips must have had an interesting view of ''The Chicken''. It was released on both the Sun and Flip labels, although the significance of that strategy remains unclear. Perhaps more tellingly, Phillips did not simply see this release an an rhythm and blues contender. Original versions of the ''Chicken's'' record label plainly say ''Rock & Roll Vocal''. In simple terms, that meant crossover potential. By 1956, Sam Phillips was not releasing much black music anymore. What little appeared on the Sun label had better have some potential to sell to white kids. (HD)
 

Flip 237-A 45rpm



Rosco Gordon
"LOVE FOR YOU BABY" - B.M.I. – 2:59
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 183
Recorded: - Probably February 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 237-B mono
LOVE FOR YOU, BABY / THE CHICKEN (DANCE WITH YOU)
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801 DI-1-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Billy Duncan - Alto Saxophone
Charles Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Sax
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Foree Wells - Guitar
Tuff Green - Bass
John Murry Daley – Drums

There is a final sidebar to the tale of ''The Chicken''. According to Rosco, the song ultimately got him into more trouble with Sam Phillips than it was worth. He claims that when he and his band were practising the song at the Club Handy, Bill Harvey (who represented Duke Records) got the song on tape and delivered it to Don Robey. Robey offered Rosco $450 for the publishing rights, which the singer gladly accepted. According to Rosco, Robey waited for the song to run its long and successful course before threatening legal action against Sun yet again. Rosco believes that this event helped sour Phillips on further business dealings with him. It's a fascinating tale, but it remains somewhat suspect in light of two further Sun singles by Rosco issued in 1957 and 1958, as well as a mountain of unissued tapes dating from this same period in the Sun archives. (HD)
 

Sun 237-B 45rpm


 
Rosco Gordon
"LOVE FOR YOU BABY" - B.M.I. – 2:59
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 183
Recorded: - Probably February 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - December 1955
First appearance: - Flip Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Flip 237-B mono
LOVE FOR YOU, BABY / THE CHICKEN (DANCE WITH YOU)
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Billy Duncan - Alto Saxophone
Charles Taylor - Alto Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Sax
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Foree Wells - Guitar
Tuff Green - Bass
John Murry Daley – Drums

There is a final sidebar to the tale of ''The Chicken''. According to Rosco, the song ultimately got him into more trouble with Sam Phillips than it was worth. He claims that when he and his band were practising the song at the Club Handy, Bill Harvey (who represented Duke Records) got the song on tape and delivered it to Don Robey. Robey offered Rosco $450 for the publishing rights, which the singer gladly accepted. According to Rosco, Robey waited for the song to run its long and successful course before threatening legal action against Sun yet again. Rosco believes that this event helped sour Phillips on further business dealings with him. It's a fascinating tale, but it remains somewhat suspect in light of two further Sun singles by Rosco issued in 1957 and 1958, as well as a mountain of unissued tapes dating from this same period in the Sun archives. (HD)
 

Flip 237-B 45rpm



Slim Rhodes
"GONNA ROMP AND STOMP" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Dot Rhodes-Dusty Rhodes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 188 - Vocal Dusty and Dot Rhodes
Recorded: - February 2, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 238-A mono
GONNA ROMP AND STOMP / BAD GIRL
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Slim Rhodes - Guitar
Dusty Rhodes - Vocal and Fiddle
Dottie Rhodes Moore - Vocal and Guitar
John Hughey - Steel Guitar
Speck Rhodes - Bass
Brad Suggs - Vocal and Guitar
W.S. Holland – Drums

Dusty and Dot came back into the spotlight here on a side that reflects the changing times. All of the lead instruments take spirited breaks and there is a rockabilly consciousness underpinning the hillbilly harmonies. Clearly, by early 1956 Slim had grudgingly accepted the fact that Elvis and the rockabillie were a force to be reckoned with. There is some fire on this side and it has helped ''Romp And Stomp'' to survive better than some of the country sermonettes. (CE)(HD)(MH) 
 

Sun 238-A 45rpm



Slim Rhodes
"BAD GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Slim Rhodes
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 189 - Vocal Brad Suggs
Recorded: - February 2, 1956
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 238-B mono
BAD GIRL / GONNA ROMP AND STUMP
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Slim Rhodes - Guitar
Dusty Rhodes - Fiddle
Dottie Rhodes Moore - Guitar
John Hughey - Steel Guitar
Speck Rhodes - Bass
Brad Suggs - Vocal and Guitar
W.S. Holland – Drums

Singer/guitarist/composer Brad Suggs recently listened to ''Bad Girl'' for the first time in over 50 years. It stirred some memories, not the least of which was the source of the strange, underwater-sounding instrumental break that occurs right after John Hughey's steel solo. This was no small mystery! In fact, we'd be hard pressed to find another piece of recorded music featuring this odd sound. After a moment's reflection, Brad laughed and reported that it was Dusty Rhodes fiddle played through a vibrato. ''I think Sam liked it. It sounded different to him''. Suggs emphasised that this was a song about a girl with a reputation. He was quick to add that reputations were sometimes pretty far from the truth. Suggs recalled that some folks misread the point of the song. ''Slim Rhodes told me that, disc jockey. Eddie Hill wouldn't play the record because he was convinced it was about a prostitute. I guess he thought he was saving his listeners''. A half a century later, Suggs could laugh at that. (CE)(HD)(MH)
 

Sun 238-B 45rpm



Warren Smith
"ROCK 'N' ROLL RUBY" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 186
Recorded: - February 5, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 239-A mono
ROCK AND ROLL RUBY / I'D RATHER BE SAFE THAN SORRY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Buddy Holobauch - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Smokey Joe Bauch – Piano

''Johnny Cash and Sam Phillips came in one night when I was playing with Clyde Leoppard'', recalled  Warren Smith. ''They invited me to come back to their table and sit down. To begin with, I thought it was  some kind of fluke, then Sam Phillips asked me to come over to Sun the next day, and Johnny Cash said he  might have a song for me''. Smith's performance of ''Rock 'N' Roll Ruby'' belies his lack of professional  experience. It is a supremely confident debut. Sun 239 was released in March 1956 and entered the Memphis  charts on May 1. It reached the number 1 slot on May 26. By that point it had climbed onto some other local  charts and there was a surprising number of cover versions considering that the record never hit the Hot 100.  Among the most notable were Johnny Caroll's Decca version, Lawrence Welk and Dave Burton's big band
versions. Even a black vocal group, the Saints on Salem Records, covered the song. There was also a  Canadian cover version.

It appears as though the song was not actually from the pen of Johnny Cash, but was bought by Cash from  George Jones for $40. A solid investment, as it transpired. Despite all of the activity surrounding the song,  Smith's national breakthrough was still over a year away. However, this did not impede him from acquiring  the attitudes and demeanour of one whose place in the pantheon of rock and roll was already assured. The  portents were extraordinarily good. Neither Carl Perkins nor Elvis Presley had done so well with their debut  release.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 239-A 45rpm



Warren Smith
"I'D RATHER BE SAFE THAN SORRY" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Stan Kesler-W.E. Taylor
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 187
Recorded: - February 5, 1956
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 239-B mono
I'D RATHER BE SAFE THAN SORRY / ROCK AND ROLL RUBY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Buddy Holobauch - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Smokey Joe Bauch – Piano

"I'd Rather Be Safe Than Sorry", is one of Smith's finest outings.  The presence of this out-and-out hillbilly weeper on the flip side of Warren Smith's debut single shows how uncertainly Sam Phillips was feeling his way through the confusion in the early months of 1956. Perhaps he was hoping for airplay on the country stations in case the whole rock and roll craze went the way of other crazes, like the calypso craze a year or so later. Perhaps he simply did not appreciate that the mass audience beyond Memphis would have preferred a pop ballad to a slice of unadulterated hillbilly music. However, the mass audience's loss is our gain. This is very pure country music, and astonishingly beautiful. Smith's vocal is perfectly pitched and it allows us to eavesdrop on the way that he sounded before Elvis Presley turned his head around. Stan Kesler said that Smith was supposed to be the front man for Clyde Leoppard's Snearly Ranch Boys, and it's certainly the Ranch Boys backing him on his first single, possibly with Johnny Bernero replacing Leoppard. According to Kesler, Smith was housed with the Ranch Boys in West Memphis and they paid him money to live on. After ''Rock 'N' Roll Ruby'' took off, Smith quickly reneged on the deal, and went solo.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 239-B 45rpm



Jack Earls
"SLOW DOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Jack Earls
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 184
Recorded: - April 14, 1956
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 240-A mono
SLOW DOWN / A FOOL FOR LOVING YOU
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-23 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Earls - Vocal and Guitar
Johnny Black - Bass
Danny Walker - Drums
Warren Gregory - Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar

Is it possible for a Sun fan not to like this record? ''Slow Down'', indeed Jack Earls himself, embody the very heart of Sun's appeal. This is a sparse, tense, minimalist, brooding record. It may also be the only rockabilly record with a 12 bar bass solo. (HD)
 

Sun 240-A 45rpm



Jack Earls
"A FOOL FOR LOVING YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Jack Earls
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 185
Recorded: - October 15, 1955
Memphis Recording  Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 240-B mono
A FOOL FOR LOVING YOU / SLOW DOWN
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-24 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Earls - Vocal & Guitar
Warren Gregory - Guitar
Johnny Black - Bass
Danny Rehnquist - Drums

Jack Earls was a baker who lived in Memphis and, for all his time in the studio, saw only this disc released by Sun. His life and music are recounted in detail on Bear Family BFX 15273. Earl possessed a nasal tenor voice with almost no range; in short, it was perfectly suited for the music he made. His sidemen would have been comfortable jamming with Luther Perkins, whose lack of instrumental prowess was legendary. If Sun 240 improved tenfold it would not be a slick record. But there is much to love here. Not quite as stinging and electrified as the wildest of Sun's rockabilly, there is drive and energy to savor here.

As a historical document, the portents of this record were good. Released immediately following ''Rock And Roll Ruby'' and coming at the start of the 240 series, it literally ushered in the golden era of rockabilly at Sun. (HD)
 

Sun 240-B 45rpm



Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"I WALK THE LINE" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 191 - Take 2
Recorded: - April 2, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 241-A mono
I WALK THE LINE / GET RHYTHM
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-2 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal, Guitar
(paper woven between the strings to simulate the sound of
brushes on a snare drum, and possibly Washboard)
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

Johnny Cash's third Sun single established him as a major country artist, capable of breaking through into the pop marketplace. As well, ''I Walk The Line'' became Sun's second major crossover hit in its last seven releases. There must have been a moment in mid-1956 when, after all his years of scuffling, Sam Phillips must have thought, ''Hell, this is easy''!.

''I Walk The Line'' virtually defines minimalist production. There was no sparser arrangement on the pop or, for that matter, country charts in 1956. There is no telling how this song might have fared with the standard Nashville treatment. In an interview with Billboard Phillips mused, ''Can you hear 'I Walk The Line' with a steel guitar''? It's not a pretty picture. (HD)
 

Sun 241-A 45rpm



Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"GET RHYTHM" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 190
Recorded: - April 2, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 241-B mono
GET RHYTHM / I WALK THE LINE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal, Guitar
(paper woven between the strings to simulate the sound of
brushes on a snare drum, and possibly Washboard)
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

Superficially, all he was doing was turning these country boys loose in his tiny studio and letting them do it on their own terms. Of course, there was a lot more to it than that. For one thing, Sam Phillips had hand-picked these artists. For every Johnny Cash, there were ten others whose records weren't selling, and dozens whose efforts had not been recorded or released. In addition, Phillips created an ambiance that allowed, even nurtured their creativity. Then, he had to select the best samples of their work for release. Phillips was, as he readily admits, a genius at all three stages. (HD)
 

Sun 241-B 45rpm



Roy Orbison
"OOBY DOOBY" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: – Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U-192
Recorded: - March 27, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 242-A mono
OOBY DOOBY / GO! GO! GO!
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Johnny Wilson - Guitar
James Morrow - Electric Mandolin
Jack Kennelly - Bass
Billy Pat Ellis - Drums

This is Roy Orbison's first Sun record and, years later, one in which he took no particular pride. This is Orbison the rocker, the electric guitar player. There is no trace of the sensitive balladeer who would emerge barely four years later.

Despite Orbi's misgivings, ''Ooby Dooby'' is a fine record. True, it is not high poetry, but as a driving southern rocker, it is a standout. There is an almost unprecedented degree of crispness in the recording balance. The snare drum is tightly tuned, the guitar work stresses the high strings and treble pickup, and the clicking bass is prominently miked. Aspiring rockabilly guitarists memorized every note of Orbi's piercing solo as if it were the holy grail. In case they missed it the first time, Orbi obliged with a repeat performance a minute or so later. The ending of ''Ooby Dooby'' is a moment to be reckoned with. The bass walks down of five note sequence after all the other instruments have gone silent. Planned or unplanned, this is a sweet moment in Sun music history.
 
From a point of view, the song is simply there to bracket the guitar solos. The solos, which are essentially identical, are two full choruses long (solos were usually only one verse long back then) and the record is built around them. The solo's first three lines follow the song's melody and then Orbison breaks free. He bends notes creating tension that gets resolved quickly; he attacks staccato chords; he runs up and down; and he closes with a satisfying final chord that leads back into the vocal. It's a well-crafted journey. In later years, Orbison did all he could to disavow his Sun recordings. But the evidence is clear: He was one hell of a guitar player. (HD)(SP)
 

Sun 242-A 45rpm



Roy Orbison
"GO! GO! GO!" - B.M.I. – 2:08
Composer: - Roy Orbison-Billy Pat Ellis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U-193
Recorded: – March 27, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 242-B mono
GO! GO! GO! / OOBY DOOBY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-4 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Johnny Wilson - Guitar
James Morrow - Electric Mandolin
Jack Kennelly - Bass
Billy Pat Ellis - Drums

The flipside, ''Go! Go! Go!'' soon to be known as ''Down The Line'', made its first appearance on disc here. Written by Orbison and his drummer, Billy Pat Ellis (who mysteriously disappeared from the credits before the first pressing hit the streets), it may not be Orbison's strongest concoction, but the song has attracted its share of attention over the years. Jerry Lee Lewis would further establish the song's pedigree two years later when it appeared on the flipside of ''Breathless''. (HD)
 

Sun 242-B 45rpm



Carl Perkins
"BOPPIN' THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 196
Recorded: - March 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 243-A mono
BOPPIN' THE BLUES / ALL MAMA'S CHILDREN
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-5 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

What we casually refer to today as ''rockabilly'' or the ''Sun sound'' was new music back in early 1956. In fact, nobody knew what to call it. Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins were still being described as performing ''hillbilly pop'' when this record came out. Billboard rightly described it as ''loaded with flavor and with potential for all three markets''. The Memphis regional chart in May 1956 showed that Sam Phillips' vision had literally dominated the city's  taste. ''Boppin' The Blues'' sat at number 3, bettered only by ''I Walk The Line'' and ''Blue Suede Shoes'' (at number 1 and 2, respectively). The number 4-6 chart positions were filled by ''Heartbreak Hotel'', ''Ooby Dooby'' and ''Rock And Roll Ruby''. These were magic times to cruise down Union Avenue in your Chevy convertible with the radio blaring. (HD)

The notion that Carl's music was an irresistible and life-changing force (''I still love you baby, but I'll never be the same'') was a clever and powerful image. In fact, Carl took that idea one step further in ''Boppin' The Blues''. Like Doctor Ross (''The Boogie Disease'') before him and Huey Piano Smith (''Rockin' Pneumonia'' and ''The Boogie Woogie Flu'') after him, Carl likened his music to an infectious disease. One exposure and you've had it, whether you like it or not. Ironically, this was just the kind of perverse thinking that fueled anti-rock and roll boycots by the White Citizen's Council! (HD)
 

Sun 243-A 45rpm



Carl Perkins
"ALL MAMA CHILDREN" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Carl Perkins-John R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 195
Recorded: - March 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 243-B mono
ALL MAMA'S CHILDREN / BOPPIN' THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-6 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

Sun 243 is a fine two-sided record, although a note on the instrumental work on ''All mama's Children'' is in order. W.S.'s drums and Clayton's slapped bass sound great, but Carl's guitar has never sounded cheesier. The problem seems to be that this side was cut in the Key of ''C'', thereby forcing Carl into some awkward chord inversions. This is odd because most pickers know that the Eleventh Commandment states, ''Thou shalt never play rockabilly in ''C''. The blurring of racial lines that is essential to Carl's deep south patois has never been clearer than on these sides. Although the disc did not achieve the commercial success of ''Blue Suede Shoes'', it did solidify Carl's reputation as a solid southern rocker - both as a vocalist and an inventive guitarist. (HD) 
 

Sun 243-B 45rpm



Jean Chapel
"WELCOME TO THE CLUB" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Mea Boren Axton
Publisher: - Murray Nash Association Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 196 SUN
Recorded: - April 1956
Music City Recording
804 16th Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - June 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 244-A mono
WELCOME TO THE CLUB / I WON'T BE ROCKIN' TONIGHT
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-7 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jean Chapel - Vocal
Possible Grady Martin - Guitar
Unknown Musicians

There's still some mystery surrounding these sides by Jean Chapel, whose list of aliases would fill this page. Sun collectors have tried to like this record over the years. many have concluded that it just doesn't sound like a Sun record, and with a good reason - it isn't. It was produced by Chapel's manager, veteran country A&R man, Murray Nash, who had worked for RCA, Mercury and Hickory before striking out on his own. He produced these sides in Nashville, and sold them to Sun in April or May 1956. Then, in a bizarre twist, the record re-emerged on RCA Victor in October. In between, Ms. Chapel appeared at the Apollo, and was holding down a club job in Montreal when the record was switched. Nash hyped her to the press at the Female Elvis. That RCA Victor would pick up this record was odd because it already had Charline Arthur's  recording of ''Welcome To The Club'' on the shelves.

It's a record that sits uncomfortably with other Sun records from mid-1956. To stretch a pun, it doesn't really belong in the club. There is some truth to Billboard's claim that ''Classification may be difficult in Miss Chapel's case''. It is also true that she owed as much of a debt to 1940s Hollywood as to 1950s Beale Street. (HD)
 

Sun 244-A 45rpm



Jean Chapel
"WELCOME TO THE CLUB" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Mea Boren Axton
Publisher: - Murray Nash Association Incorporated
Matrix number: - G2WW-7278 RCA
Recorded: - April 1956
Music City Recording
804 16th Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - October 1956
First appearance: - RCA Victor (S) 45rpm 47-6681-A mono
WELCOME TO THE CLUB / I WON'T BE ROCKIN' TONIGHT

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jean Chapel - Vocal
Possible Grady Martin - Guitar
Unknown Musicians
 

RCA Victor 47-6681-A 45rpm



Jean Chapel
"I WON'T BE ROCKIN' TONIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Mea Boren Axton-Tommy Durden
Publisher: - Murray Nash Association Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 197 SUN
Recorded: - April 1956
Music City Recording
804 16th Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - June 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 244-B mono
I WON'T BE ROCKIN' TONIGHT / WELCOME TO THE CLUB
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-8 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jean Chapel - Vocal
Possible Grady Martin - Guitar
 
Unknown Musicians

Here Jean Chapel recorded an answer to Elvis Presley's ''Good Rockin' Tonight'' titled ''I Won't Be Rockin' Tonight''. Two songs by Jean Chapel on side 2 of a 1956 disc jockey promotional EP (RCA DJ-7) that featured Elvis Presley's ''Good Rockin' Tonight'' on side 1. When she after divorce in 1956, she moved for good to Nashville and devoted herself primarily to songwriting. (HD)
 

Sun 244-B 45rpm



Jean Chapel
"I WON'T BE ROCKIN' TONIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Mea Boren Axton-Tommy Durden
Publisher: - Murray Nash Association Incorporated
Matrix number: - G2WW-7279 RCA
Recorded: - October 1956
Music City Recording
804 16th Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - June 1956
First appearance: -RCA Victor (S) 45rpm 47-6681-B mono
I WON'T BE ROCKIN' TONIGHT / WELCOME TO THE CLUB

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jean Chapel - Vocal
Possible Grady Martin - Guitar
Unknown Musicians
 

RCA Victor 47-6681-B 45rpm



Billy Riley
"ROCK WITH ME BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Billy Riley-Roland Wallace-Jack Clement
Publiser: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - F 11
Recorded: - April 1956
WMPS Studio
112 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 245-A mono
ROCK WITH ME BABY / TROUBLE BOUND
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-10 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
Roland Janes - Lead Guitar
Ruble Shaw - Guitar
Slim Wallace - Bass
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums

The top side of Riley's first Sun record, and a gem. This one comes pretty close to defining what rockabilly  is all about It's tense, edgy, sexy and driving. This is not mindless, teen dance music. It can send shivers  down your spine. There's not a wasted note here. The vocal is perfect. The band work is stellar, not overly  complex, but perfectly orchestrated. When the guitar solos take off, you just have to stand back. Those  beautiful singlestroke drum rolls by Johnny Bernero let you know when to take cover as the two guitars  played by Ruble Shaw and Roland Janes, just soar. One slides into the chord while the second hits just the  right notes to maintain that bluesy countryish feel. Some critics tell you that real rockabilly needs a standup  bass, the kind Bill Black used to slap behind Elvis back in 1954. If that's true, then this record contains a  double dose of rockabilly drive. One slap bass was played by Slim Wallace, the second by Jan Ledbetter.

''Rock With Me Baby'' was recorded at the studios of WMPS. Sadly, having explored every inch of Billy  Riley recording tape known to exist at Sun, it seems thru second tide from this session - the countryish  ''Think Before You Go'' - is irretrievably lost.

"Rock With Me Baby" is likewise a standout track, with its guitar interplay between Billy Riley and Roland  Janes, and soaring drumwork during the solos. SUN 245 clearly promised that Billy Riley was capable of  producing memorable work within the tense and impassioned style Sun Records was beginning to forge.  (HD)
 

Sun 245-A 45rpm



Billy Riley
"TROUBLE BOUND" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Billy Riley-Roland Wallace-Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - F 10
Recorded: - Early 1956
Fernwood Recording Studio
158 Fernwood Drive, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 245-B mono
TROUBLE BOUND /ROCK WITH ME BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-9 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
Roland Janes - Lead Guitar
Roland "Slim" Wallace - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Bob Deckelman - Steel Guitar

According to Roland Janes, once Sam Phillips decided to release ''Rock With Me Baby'', he wanted a flipside that came closer to the rock music that was selling around Memphis at the time. Putting the tapes for ''Think Bare You Go'' aside, he turned Jack Clement loose in the studio at 706 Union Avenue to come up with a second recording. The result was this classic side.

Good luck finding a category for this music. Country? Blues? Rockabilly? It's hybrid music at us finest. The beat is incessant. The sound is bluest' The vocal is vaguely country. Just when you think you've got the arrangement figured out, it does something to confound you. The vocal is backed by a driving shuffle beat, courtesy of drummer Johnny Bernero. But don't get too comfortable with it. All of a sudden, it turns into a hard 4/4 backbeat during the instrumental solos. And the guitar fills around Riley's vocal are also hard to pin down. Everything is bluesy enough so you'd expect some flatted 7s chords (flatted 7s are the heart of the blues.
 

You may not know them by name, but you'd recognize them in a heartbeat). Instead the fills consist largely of 6s, which don't sound very bluely, and undercut some of the tension in the song. Listen for them, for example, after lines like ''Drinkin'wine together... "or Laughin' and havingfun...''.

This track features Riley on that prominently miked rhythm guitar, with Roland Janes on lead guitar. We've found three alternates and a false start. They're not massively different, but if you listen closely, you'll hear the differences. They show up in the singing and playing. There's always the possibility in situations like these that you'll hear an alt take and think, "Why wasn't that one released? I like it better" There seems little chance of that happening here.
 
Johnny Bernero does essentially the same thing here (changing from shuffle beat in the verses to 4/4 in the guitar solo) that he did on Elvis' ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget''.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 245-B 45rpm



Malcolm Yelvington
"ROCKIN' WITH MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Malcolm Yelvington-Jones
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 206
Recorded: - February 2, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 246-A mono
ROCKIN' WITH MY BABY / IT'S MY BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-11 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Malcolm Yelvington - Vocal and Guitar
Reece Fleming or Frank Tolley - Piano
Gordon Mashburn - Guitar
Billy Weir - Drums
Jack Ryles - Upright Bass

''Yelvington is one of the more recent of Sun's string of talented rockabillies'', said Billboard in September 1956, unaware that the man had been recording for the label since 1954. However, they were unfortunately correct when they concluded that ''Jumper... may not break out of the territories''. ''Rockin' With My Baby'' went on to sell approximately 8,500 copies, a respectable but unspectacular sale considering that Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins could move 20,000 or more copies a day. Yelvington, his false teeth removed, seems to be slightly ill at ease with the tempo but turns in a supercharged vocal performance. The song, of course, is a collage of song titles from across the eras: ''Birth Of The Blues'', ''Rootie Tootie'', ''Sixteen Tons'', ''Blue Suede Shoes'', etc. It's fun, if a little contrived, and makes an interesting comparison with an earlier version, ''Have Myself A Ball''. The guys had worked at shaking off their honky tonk-western swing-cowboy harmony roots and acquiring a harder-edged sound. Change or die, it seems.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 246-A 45rpm



Malcolm Yelvington
"IT'S MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Reece Fleming
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 207
Recorded: - February 2, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 246-B mono
IT'S MY BABY / ROCKIN' WITH MY BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-12-B mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Malcolm Yelvington - Vocal and Guitar
Reece Fleming or Frank Tolley - Piano
Gordon Mashburn - Guitar
Billy Weir - Drums
Jack Ryles - Upright Bass

Yelvington does a better job on this side, an unpretentious blues featuring Frank Tolley's rolling piano. Yelvington continued to record at Sun, including the superb "Trumpet", but never again saw his name on a little yellow record.

"It's Me Baby" is so downhome, it rates as a thirteen bar blues. Equally intriguing is the stanza that bears a striking resemblance to Jay McShann's "Confessin' The Blues" - not that anyone was paying anything like that much attention to detail. The song's creator was Malcolm's longstanding piano player, Reece Fleming, a musician who covered his 88 keys in the stride fashion of a previous generation. The mastertrack emerged as a B-side in August 1956.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 246-B 45rpm



Sonny Burgess
"RED HEADED WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 198
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 247-A mono
RED HEADED WOMAN / WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-13 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
Joe Lewis - Guitar
Johnny Ray Hubbard - Bass
Russell Smith - Drums
Ray Kern Kennedy - Piano
Jack Nance - Trumpet

It is doubtful that any record exudes more unfettered energy and joyous enthusiasm than Sonny Burgess' debut single on Sun Records. Burgess was a true wildman, a free spirit whose allegiance to rhythm and blues was in better evidence than his hillbilly roots.

"We Wanna Boogie" and "Red Headed Woman" stand among the rawest recordings released during the first flowering of rock and roll. The lyrics were almost unintelligible (although they repay close attention with some very funny couplets), and the instrumentation teetered on the edge of atonality. It was a record that sported an air of total abandon, sounding as if it had been created under the heavy burden of alcohol, although Sonny Burgess remembers that everyone was stone cold sober, and nervous to the point of apprehension. Despite  being almost unmarketable according to established precept, "Red Headed Woman" reportedly sold over 90,000 copies. It did especially well in Boston, although Burgess was unaware of that fact until Jack Nance and Joe Lewis toured there a few years later with Conway Twitty.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 247-A 45rpm



Sonny Burgess
"WE WANNE BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 199
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 247-B mono
WE WANNE BOOGIE / RED HEADED WOMAN
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-14 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
Joe Lewis - Guitar
Johnny Ray Hubbard - Bass
Russell Smith - Drums
Ray Kern Kennedy - Piano
Jack Nance - Trumpet

It wasn't too long ago that folks out to have a good time would refer to a night on the town as - "cuttin' a rug". When the rock and roll generation came into being, particularly south of the Mason Dixon line, the lingo got a tad more boisterous and mutated into "climbin' the wall". Growing up in Newport, Arkansas, Sonny Burgess understood such parlance and when the chance came to record at Sun, he conjured up in the mood perfectly with his all-pervading "We Wanna Boogie".

There is nothing particularly original about Burgess' work and his lyrics here are barely intelligible. Nevertheless, the first 12 bars of "We Wanna Boogie" establish an irresistible groove that elevates this record to greatness, although "Red Headed Woman" was the designated A-side. Once again, Sam Phillips knew what he was doing when he chose these sides to unleash on an unsuspecting world. Billboard commented that the record was "shouted and worked with plenty of spirit". Right they were.
 
But what it lacks in melodic construction and dazzling fretwork on ''We Wanna Boogie'', it makes up in aggression. Sonny Burgess might as well have been hitting his guitar with a piece of wood as a flat pick. This style is from a different universe than, say, finger picking. The results are percussive, not melodic. It's raw and attention-getting: two qualities that serve a band well when the hall is full and the juice is flowing. Sonny simply took what worked well at the clubs and brought it to the tiny confines of 706 Union. Bless his heart. (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 247-B 45rpm



The Rhythm Rockers
"FIDDLE BOP" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Sidney Gunter
Publisher: - Tannen Music
Matrix number: - U 208 - Vocal Buddy Durham
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably June 1956
Studio 56, Wheeling, West Virginia
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 248-A mono
FIDDLE BOP / JUKE BOX, HELP ME FIND MY BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sidney "Hardrock" Gunter - Guitar
Buddy Durham - Vocal and Fiddle
Robert "Bob" Tyston – Bass

In its way, ''Fiddle Bop'' has as much disarming appeal as ''Jukebox Help Me Find My Baby''. Old time fiddler Buddy Durham, whose act was a staple of WWVA, was obviously trying to bring his music into line with prevailing trends. Straddling two camps, he may have succeeded in getting neither pop nor country airplay. In any event, his efforts were destined to be overshadowed by Gunter's. Despite the presence of the magic buzzword 'bop', this tune really succeed as a charming country novelty. It was probably pieced together as a primitive exercise in overdubbing at the WWVA studios.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 248-A 45rpm



The Rhythm Rockers
"JUKE BOX, HELP ME FIND MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Sidney Louis Gunter
Publisher: - Tannen Music
Matrix number: - U 209 - Vocal Hardrock Gunter
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably June 1956
Studio 56, Wheeling, West Virginia
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 248-B mono
JUKE BOX, HELP ME FIND MY BABY / FIDDLE BOP
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sidney "Hardrock" Gunter - Vocal and Guitar
Buddy Durham - Percussion
Robert "Bob" Tyston – Bass

"Juke Box, Help Me Find My Baby" is a fine recording was essentially a home-made record that, for a short period, looked set to break and then unaccountably died. Hardrock Gunter, Bobby Durham and Bill Tustin (of the Wilma Lee & Stoney Cooper Band) recorded the song in the WWVA studio in early 1956. Gunter laid down the basic track with vocal and guitar and then Gunter, Durham (who is beating on a cardboard box with a letter opener) and Tustin added the rhythm track before the finished tape was fed through an echo chamber. They employed a number of novel effects, especially during the second chorus in which Gunter imitates a bass. At some point, Gunter contended that the lyrics referred to drug addiction (presumably by virtue of the line ''some monkey's got my baby...'') but if that is indeed the case, then it was his only journey into the murky water of double entendre. The completed tape was leased to Cross Country Records, a label formed in New Jersey by James Frishione, although the A&R guy, Eddie McMullen, pulled most of his acts from WWVA. The Rhythm Rockers' song was picked up by Bill Randle on WERE (Cleveland, Ohio). It looked set to break when Sam Phillips made some enquiries through Nat Tannen (the publisher) about the possibility of acquiring the record. While the deal was done, the momentum of the record was lost. Phillips also edited out about twenty seconds of bass thumping. Perhaps he thought that the single was too long or perhaps he thought that the cheap speakers on most radios would not be able to pick up the bass playing which would give the illusion that the record had died for 20 seconds. There was a cover version (by Tommy Michell on Mercury) but, to all intents and purposes, the record flopped after it was picket up by Sun. The Midas touch had worked in reverse.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 248-B 45rpm



Carl Perkins
''I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 210
Recorded: - March 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 249-A mono
I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY / DIXIE FRIED
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
Thomas E. Cisco (Eddie Star) - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums
Jimmy Smith – Piano

To begin with, Sam had no idea what to do with Carl Perkins at this point. Perkins had come to him as a hillbilly singer in the Hank Williams mold. There was no denying Carl's talent as both a singer and songwriter, but Williams had been dead for over three years and his grip on country music was fading. Carl had shown a flair for songwriting, and his comic ode to a pair of shoes had made them both a lot of money. But the follow-up to ''Blue Suede Shoes'' had failed to sustain the momentum. Sam had better do something fast, or Perkins might become just another one-hit wonder.
 

On one side of Sun 249, Sam placed the clever but commercially untenable ''Dixie Fried''. On the other side he force-fed Carl a piece of late 1950s pop balladry, complete with piano triplets and hiccuppy vocal gimmicks. Was this the stylistic path Carl might follow? Luckily for us, it wasn't a hit, although at this point, anytime seemed possible. Certainly buyers who came to the party for this song would wonder what hit them when they flipped the record over. But the same can be said for buyers who came to hear ''Dixie Fried''.

For the first time, Carl's record featured material admittedly composed by somebody else. The song had been written by Wanda Bellman, an aspiring, singer/songwriter from Jonesboro, Arkansas. She submitted the song via demo to Sam and went from being an unknown to a professional almost overnight when her copyright appeared on one side of a Carl Perkins record. Pretty impressive stuff. We do know that Wanda engaged in an extended correspondence with Sam throughout this period. He stoked Wanda's fires even higher when he had her come to Memphis in 1957 and record five sides. None were released at the time although they continue to be resurrected on Sun reissues internationally. It is possible that Sam, being Sam, made the most of Wanda Ballman's enthusiasm when he acted as her a new found benefactor and champion. In later years, Wanda persevered and had her material recorded by main stream artists like Loretta Lynn and Charley Pride.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 249-A 45rpm



Carl Perkins
"DIXIE FRIED" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard "Curly" Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 211
Recorded: - March 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 249-B mono
DIXIE FRIED / I'M SORRY I'M NOT SORRY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-2-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
Thomas E. Cisco (Eddie Star) - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums
Jimmy Smith – Piano

Anyone who doubts Carl Perkins' status as a folk poet of the rural south hasn't heard "Dixie Fried". This  song may be an utter delight to fans of redneck rockabilly, but it stood as much chance of denting the  national charts in October, 1956 as a Bach chorale.

"Dixie Fried" was perhaps the high point of Perkins' career on record and probably the best song he had a  hand in writing. It was so determinedly rural in content and execution that it was inconceivable that Sam  Phillips could have entertained serious hopes for it in the pop market. Gogi Grant was sitting atop the pop  charts with "Wayward Wind" on the day that "Dixie Fried" was released. The two songs could have come  from different planets.

"Dixie Fried" was a slice of life from the Jackson honky tonks. Talking to Ronnie Weiser, Carl Perkins gave  a little background on the environment that had spawned the song: "The light from the jukebox was all we  had. They had chicken wire around us and the jukebox to keep the bottles from hitting us.

(The bartender) had an axe handle behind the bar and about four or five inches on the big end of the axe  handle was bored out and poured full of hot lead. When he said, 'That's it. That's enough. Get out!' you had  just enough time to do it or they'd swing". In "Dixie Fried", Carl Perkins wrote: "On the outskirts of town,  there's a little nitespot". Dan dropped in about "Five o'clock". He pulled off his coat, said "The night is
short".

Reached in his pocket and he flashed a quart, hollerin', "Rave on, children I'm with you, rave on cats", he  cried. "Its almost dawn and the cops are gone, Let's all get Dixie Fried". Dan got happy and he started  ravin. He jerked out a razor - but he wasn't shavin'. All the cats knew to jump and hop "Cause he was  borned and raised in a butcher shop...".   (MH)(HD)(CE)
 

Sun 249-B 45rpm


 
 
 
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