Don Hinton
"HONEY BEE'' – B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Don Hinton-Narvel Felts
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P-378
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3556-A mono
HONEY BEE / JO ANN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-13 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Hinton - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano


An ardent Elvis Presley devotee, Donald L. Hinton grew up in Carruthersville, Missouri wearing cool clothes, driving a slick car and singing the kind of rock and roll songs that he hoped the King would approve of. A taste of the real thing came when he opened for Carl Perkins, a move that gave him the concocted with Narvel Felts. His moment at the label came and went in a heartbeat but the peppy ''Honey Bee'' is a deserving lagacy.

Records like ''Honey Bee'' were not that hard to find in the 1960 pop marketplace. They came complete with quasi-Latin rhythms and Elvisy vocals, like Donnie Brooks' popular ''Mission Bell''. Hinton arrived at 639 Madison in March, 1960 and recorded four titles, two of which were released on May 10th. Not bad – a two-month delay for a kid obsessed with Sun Records. The record sold poorly, though, and Hinton's Sun career was over almost as quickly as it started. (HD)
PI 3556-A 45rpm


Don Hinton
"JO ANN'' - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Don Hinton-Wolf
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 377
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3556-B mono
JO ANN / HONEY BEE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-14 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Hinton - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano

Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus

The flipside, ''Jo Ann'', is pretty straightforward teen fare circa March 1960, that does little to bring out the best in Hinton's vocal chops. (HD)
PI 3556-B 45rpm


Jeb Stuart
"SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 1:53
Composer: - McHugh-Fields
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - P-379
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3557-A mono
SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET / TAKE A CHANCE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stewart - Vocal
More Details Unknown

Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus

Jeb Stuart is what they used to call a stylist. An entertainer. If you're looking for a straight reading, you won't get it from ''Mr. Emotions', as he billed himself. On ''Sunny Side Of The Street'', Stuart brings his frenetic energy to the lyrics. Like fellow stylist Billy Stewart (no relation), Jeb repeats words two or three times. He seems overcome by his own excitement; he just can't bear any pauses in his delivery. Empty space is wasted space. The effect is strange to say the least. How does one classify such an agitated style?

Is it rhythm and blues? Blues? Pop? Jazz? We can pretty much rule out country or gospel, but then what? The situation isn't helped by the new studio at 639 Madison, whose spacey echo only confuses matters more. When you've finished adding overdubs by the Gene Lowery Singers, the effects are beyond recognition. Things become a lot clearer on ''Take A Chance'', which is far more conventional urban rhythm and blues, circa 1960. Once again, though, Stuart is sabotaged by the out-of-control sonics of the new studio. (HD)(CE)
PI 3557-A 45rpm


Jeb Stuart
"TAKE A CHANCE'' - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Charles Underwood-Jeb Stewart
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 380
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3557-B mono
TAKE A CHANCE / SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stewart - Vocal
More Details Unknown

Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus

From the beginning of his career, Stuart seems to have oriented himself toward the white audience. It surely couldn't have been coincidence that a black Memphian named Charles Jones took the name of a Confederate cavalry general. Jones/Stuart claims to have been born on June 2, 1945, although one suspects that there's a birth certificate somewhere that tells a different story. He grew up idolising Billy Eckstine, Nat King Cole, Elvis, Fats Domino, and Little Richard, and left Memphis to study at the Chicago Conservatory of Music under Frank Lavere, one of the writers of Cole's hit ''Pretend''.


Back in Memphis, Stuart landed a gig at the Southern Club, and hired Isaac Hayes as his piano player. They were eventually displaced by Sam the Sham, but moved on to several other local venues. Hayes, incidentally, claims to have played piano and arranged one of Stuart's Phillips singles (although the Union logs tell a different story, as they often do).It was Rufus Thomas who suggested that Stuart contact Sam Phillips. Stuart was auditioned by Charles Underwood, who was sufficiently impressed to call Phillips down from the executive suite. Phillips liked what he heard. Stuart and Underwood co-wrote ''Take A Chance'', and, given the choice of signing with Phillips International or Sun, Stuart opted for Phillips because of its uptown image. (HD)(CE)
PI 3557-B 45rpm


Eddie Bush
"BABY I DON'T CARE" - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 381
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3558-A mono
BABY I DON'T CARE / VANISHED
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. Holland - Drums
Carl Mann - Acoustic Guitar

Overdubbed Unknown Date
The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt

If Eddie Bush's vocalizing had just a little of the manic energy or character of his guitar playing, this would have been one hell of a record! No such luck. Its not that these vocal performances are bad, its just that they really lack anything distinctive. That's particularly disappointing considering the energy and excitement Bush's guitar work had brought to Carl Mann's records. In truth, Bush was a pretty fair songwriter as some of his contributions to Mann's output attest. "Baby I Don't Care", a tune by Mann as well as Bush (Carl's version appeared on his Phillips International LP), works pretty well when things are kept simple. Unfortunately, Bush was barely out the door when the coral overdubs started. Ne never had a chance . (HD)
PI 3558-A 45rpm


Eddie Bush
"VANISHED" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 382
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3558-B mono
VANISHED / BABY I DON'T CARE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. Holland - Drums
Carl Mann – Vocal and Piano

Overdubbed Unknown Date
The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt

The flip-side, "Vanished" is actually a pretty interesting song, although it might have been a touch too unusual for the pop marketplace. Those acoustic guitar major-7ths are powerful, when you can hear them for all the echo, and the wood block percussion adds an atmospheric touch. Interestingly, it is Carl Mann who takes the lead vocal on the chorus of the Flamenco-styled tune. Along with these tracks, Bush left quite a few unissued titles in the Sun vaults. many were instrumentals, which suggested some exciting unknown performances. But the truth is that most of his solo efforts were mediocre at best. The verdict seems to be that Eddie Bush did his finest guitar work in the role of support player behind Carl Mann. (HD)
PI 3558-B 45rpm


The Hawk
''I GET THE BLUES WHEN IT RAINS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:06
Composer: - Klauser-Stoddard
Publisher: - Foster Music
Matrix number: - P 384 - Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3559-A mono
I GET THE BLUES WHEN IT RAIN / IN THE MOOD
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
W.S. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

In one of the worst kept secrets in music business history, Jerry Lee Lewis had these instrumental sides released under the pseudonym ''The Hawk''. Supposedly, all of Jerry's problems with the musicians union and the marketplace would go away if his identity were masked. The name was suggested by Sun's new general manager Bill Fitzgerald in a desperate attempt to kickstart Jerry's sagging career. There was certainly nothing wrong with these side, although their effect on the marketplace was considerably short of spectacular.

In an attempt to get Jerry some much-needed air-play, Sam Phillips in 1960 came up with the idea of releasing an instrumental single by Jerry under the name ‘The Hawk’, releasing it on the Phillips International label. The ruse failed miserably, but ‘I Get The Blues When It Rains’ was the B-side of the single (the A-side was the old Glen Miller hit ‘In The Mood’). A vocal version (albeit with a long instrumental passage) was finally recorded for the ''Country Music Hall Of Fame Hits Volume 2'' album in 1969.

''I Get The Blues When It Rain'' (a 1929 hit for Guy Lombardo and others), is done in a style not normally associated with Jerry Lee. It's got an old-timey, Del Wood feel with barely a dollop of blues or rock and roll. Nevertheless, Jerry must have liked the song because he recorded a vocal version about a decade later for Mercury.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
PI 3559-A 45rpm


The Hawk
''IN THE MOOD'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 3:00
Composer: - Andy Rauaf-Joe Garland
Publisher: - Louis Music - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - P 383 - Master
Recorded: - January 21-25, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3559-B mono
IN THE MOOD / I GET THE BLUES WHEN IN RAINS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
W.S. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

"In the Mood" is a big band era number 1 hit recorded by American bandleader Glenn Miller. Joe Garland and Andy Razaf arranged "In The Mood" in 1937-1939 using a previously existing main theme composed by Glenn Miller before the start of the 1930s. Miller's "In The Mood" did not top the charts until 1940 and one year later was featured in the movie Sun Valley Serenade.

"In The Mood" opens with a now-famous sax section theme based on repeated arpeggios that are rhythmically displaced; trumpets and trombones add accent riffs. The arrangement has two solo sections; a "tenor fight" solo, in the most famous recording, between Tex Beneke and Al Klink, and a 16-bar trumpet solo. The arrangement is also famous for its ending: a coda that climbs triumphantly, then sounds a simple sustained unison tonic pitch with a rim shot.

"In The Mood" was arranged by Joe Garland and Andy Razaf based on a pre-existing melody. The main theme, featuring repeated arpeggios rhythmically displaced, previously appeared under the title of "Tar Paper Stomp" credited to jazz trumpeter/bandleader Wingy Manone. Manone recorded "Tar Paper Stomp" which did not become popular until the middle of 1930, just months before Horace Henderson used the same tune in "Hot and Anxious", recorded by his brother's band, The Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, on 1931 March 19.

Under copyright rules of the day, a tune that had not been written down and registered with the copyright office could be appropriated by any musician with a good ear. A story says that after "In the Mood" became a hit, Manone was paid by Miller and his record company not to contest the copyright.

The original recording of Joe Garland's version was made by Edgar Hayes and his Orchestra in 1938, with Garland participating. In this recording there was a baritone sax duet rather than a tenor sax battle. Popular thought is that the melody had already become popular with Harlem bands (e.g. at the Savoy Ballroom) before being written down by Joe Garland. Before offering it to Glenn Miller, Garland sold the tune to Artie Shaw, who could not record it because the original arrangement was too long. The Hayes recording also bears signs of being a shortened arrangement. The tune was finally sold to Glenn Miller, who played around with its arrangement for a while. Although the arrangers of most of the Miller tunes are known, things are a bit uncertain for "In The Mood". It is often thought that Eddie Durham (who contributed other arrangements on the recording date of "In The Mood", August 1, 1939 as well), John Chalmers McGregor (Miller's pianist) and Miller himself contributed most to the final version.

Glenn Miller's "In the Mood", though undisputably a hit, represents an anomaly for chart purists. "In the Mood" was released in the period immediately prior to the inception of retail sales charts in Billboard magazine. While it led the Record Buying Guide (jukebox list) for 13 weeks and stayed on the Billboard charts for 30 weeks, it never made the top 15 on the sheet music charts, which were considered by many to be the true measure of popular song success. The popular Your Hit Parade program ranked the song no higher than ninth place, for one week only (1940).

The Glenn Miller 1939 recording on RCA Bluebird, B-10416-A, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1983. The recording by Glenn Miller is one of the most recognized and most popular instrumentals of the 20th century. The song even appeared in The Beatles "All You Need is Love" number 1 single in 1967 and in the Jive Bunny and the Mastermixers rendition in 1989, "Swing The Mood", a worldwide hit. The Glenn Miller RCA Bluebird recording was released as V-Disc 123B in February 1944 and a new version was released as V-Disc 842B in May 1948 by Glenn Miller and the Overseas Band by the U.S. War Department. 1939 sheet music cover, "Introduced by Glenn Miller", Shapiro, Bernstein, and Co., New York.

Notable artists who have recorded big-band versions of "In The Mood" include the Joe Loss Orchestra, Xavier Cugat, Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Lubo D'Orio, the Brian Setzer Orchestra, The Shadows and John Williams with the Boston Pops Orchestra.

Non-big-band renditions were recorded by the Andrews Sisters, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chet Atkins, Bill Haley & His Comets, Bad Manners, the Puppini Sisters. In addition, in 1959 Ernie Fields and his Orchestra peaked at number 4 on the pop chart and number 7 on the Rhythm & Blues charts. The song charted at number 16 in 1953 in a version by Johnny Maddox. Jonathan King scored a UK Top 50 hit with his version of the song in 1976. Bette Midler recorded the song in 1973 (on the album Bette Midler). The avant-garde synthpop act Art of Noise occasionally performed a rendition of the song on their live shows, in their trademark sampled style. The rock band Chicago added their version in 1995. An unusual version of the song was released on Maynard Ferguson's 'Lost Tapes Volume 2' album. The first 30 seconds are the traditional version, but the band then re-starts with the trumpets taking the lead.

A novelty version of the song was recorded by country/novelty artist Ray Stevens in 1977. Stevens' version consisted of him performing the song in chicken clucks, bar-for-bar. The performance was credited to the "Henhouse Five Plus Two". The single was a Top-40 hit in both America and the UK.

In 1951 a Ferranti Mark 1 computer at the University of Manchester played "In the Mood", one of the first songs to be played by a computer, and the oldest known recording of digitally generated music. Jive Bunny and the Mastermixers recorded a version of the song as part of a medley entitled "Swing the Mood" which went number 1 in the United Kingdom for 5 weeks. The record reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States where it also went gold. It was the 2nd best-selling single of 1989 in the United Kingdom.

Bluesman John Lee Hooker has said that "In The Mood" was the inspiration for "I'm In The Mood" which became a number 1 hit on the Rhythm & Blues Singles chart.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
PI 3559-B 45rpm


Charlie Rich with The Gene Lowery Singers
''GONNA BE WAITIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 387
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
and/of Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3560-A mono
GONNA BE WAITIN' / SCHOOL DAYS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Unknown Musicians

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

Another wasted opportunity. For all his genius, Sam Phillips was none too good at following up hit records. ''Gonna Be Waitin''' is basically an inferior clone of ''Lonely Weekend''. Marty Willis baritone solo has been replaced by a guitar break, but otherwise it's business as usual with little of the original passion or tension.  (HD)
PI 3560-A 45rpm


Charlie Rich with The Gene Lowery Singers
''SCHOOLDAYS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:30
Composer: - Cobb-Edwards
Publisher: - Mills Music - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - P 385
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3560-B mono
SCHOOLDAYS / GONNA BE WAITIN'
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Brad Suggs – Guitar
R.W. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

''School days'' is another matter. The idea of taking an ancient (we're talking 1907) tune like this and wrapping it in a modern, somewhat jazzy arrangement is novel, to say the least, but the excessive choral overdubs killed whatever promise the idea may have had. The final version seems ill-considered. It's odd to hear Charlie's soulful vocal punctuated by pseudo-hip Frank Sinatra-esque lines (''swingin' bunch of kids'') trying to make its way through gelatinous mounds of choral sweetening. Neither a pretty picture nor Charlie's finest hour at Sun. (HD)
PI 3560-B 45rpm


Danny Stewart
"SOMEWHERE ALONG THE LINE" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Don Padgett
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited - Copyright Control
Matrix Number: - P 388
Recorded: - Probably January 6, 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3561-A mono
SOMEWHERE ALONG THE LINE / I'LL CHANGE MY WAYS
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-23 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Danny Stewart - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Scotty Moore - Bass
Lee Cornello - Drums
James Terry - Piano
Charlie Rich - Piano

Baby-faced Danny K. Stewart, from Jackson, Tennessee, got his initial look in at 706 Union after Bill Justis spotted his band working the Memphis clubs behind Sun artist, Dickey Lee. In terms of influences it would be fair to say that Elvis figured big in Stewart's life, a fact borne out by the vocal mannerisms on his "Somewhere Along The Line". After a spell working in TV and radio he set up a highly lucrative real estate business, selling property in Shelby County.  (HD)
PI 3561-A 45rpm


Danny Stewart
"I'LL CHANGE MY WAYS" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Danny Stewart
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 389
Recorded: - Probably January 6, 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3561-B mono
I'LL CHANGE MY WAYS / SOMEWHERE ALONG THE LINE
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-2-24 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Danny Stewart - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Scotty Moore - Bass
Lee Cornello - Drums
James Terry - Piano
Bill Justis - Tenor Saxophone
Vernon Drane - Tenor Saxophone
Nelson Grill - Saxophone
Charlie Rich - Piano

"Somewhere Along The Line" sounds more like swamp pop than typical Memphis fare. On the flip-side "I'll Change My Ways", all that we're missing is the "Hold it fellas, that don't move me. Let's get real real gone for a change" line. The resemblance to vintage Elvis stops there, however, as this tune might have appeared in a film like "King Creole".  (HD)
PI 3561-B 45rpm


Charlie Rich
"STAY" - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 391 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
and/of Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 7, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3562-A mono
STAY / ON MY KNEES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Unknown Musicians

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

"Stay" was a beautiful country ballad, amazingly undoctored by the post production crew. The restraint that must have underlies this release truly ranks as one of Sun's finest hours. ("Oh, Sam, just let me put some strings and voices on there. I know I can sweeten this thing up like a dream. We'll really cross over with Charlie this time. You're gonna need strings on there to sell it. Its too bare this way"). But cooler heads prevailed. At least they kept the strings and voices away. What they didn't control was the echo. Its hard to know exactly what went wrong here, but this has got to be the most variable echo on any Sun release. Parts of Rich's performance (like the opening lines) are so swamped with echo that they are all but unintelligible. On the other hand, the release ("Many mistakes...") are virtually dry, revealing how truly wonderful this side might have been.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
PI 3562-A 45rpm


Charlie Rich
''ON MY KNEES'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 390
Recorded: - August 4, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 7, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3562-B mono
ON MY KNEES / STAY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-2 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Sidney Manker – Guitar
Billy Riley – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Martin Willis – Tenor Saxophone

''On My Knees'' reflects a Latin style that Rich flirted with several times in unissued material at Sun. He also re-recorded the song as a duet with Janie Fricke at the end of his Epic glory days in 1978. The irony is that next to his early unissued rock and roll demos. ''On My Knees'' is about as lyrically trite as Rich ever got as a songwriter, yet the record works quite well in its lilting, melodic way. (HD)
PI 3562-B 45rpm


Brad Suggs
"SAM'S TUNE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 393
Recorded: - Unknown Date February 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - October 13, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm PI 3563-A mono
SAM'S TUNE / MY GYPSY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Memphis Symphony Orchestra
Unknown Female Voices
More Details Unknown


Brad Suggs just keeps paying homage to his employer and his place of work (''Sam never seemed to mind it'', Suggs recalls). First it was ''706 Union'' (Phillips International 3545). This time out, it's ''Sam's Tune'', dedicated to our esteemed label owner. Although it's a catchy little ditty in a singalong kind of way, this one  seems to have no more relevance to its source than ''706 Union'' did. Suggs recalls performing the lyrics with Sonny Haley and Jackie Boy Pennington, although there seems to be a pretty dominant female voice in the mix as well. (HD)
PI 3563-A 45rpm (DJ Promotion Copy)


Brad Suggs
''MY GYPSY'' - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 392
Recorded: - Unknown Date February 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - October 13, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3563-B mono
MY GYPSY / SAM'S TUNE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-4 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Memphis Symphony – Strings
Unknown Female Voices
More Details Unknown

Suggs' music continues to surprise us. What can one say about ''My Gypsy'', an utterly strange and lush record? ''I wrote that tune because I love fiddle music. I used to sit and listen to Sonny James play the violin and he used to remind me of a gypsy. That melody stayed in my head for years. I wanted to try to play a fiddle melody on the guitar. That's what this record was about. The musicians we used on there were from the Memphis Symphony. I wish we had been able to record it in Nashville. I think we could have gotten a really great record on it''.  In truth, the final results sound very much like an instrumental backing track that has mysteriously lost its vocal. Certainly, this is not a bad record, and it might even have entered the charts as a left-field item back in 1960. It's just that collectors who've come along for a digital copy of ''Sadie's Back In Town'' are going to have a tough time with this one. According to the session logs, these two titles were recorded in February, 1960. Somebody (probably Suggs, himself) wasn't satisfied and the lads were back in the studio on July 20th re-recording the same tunes. Curiously, though, it was the earlier versions that were selected for overdubbing (in August) and released in October. (HD)
PI 3563-B 45rpm (DJ Promotion Copy)


Carl Mann
''THE WAYWARD WIND" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Herb Newman-Stan Lebowsky
Publisher: - Warman Music
Matrix number: - P 394
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3564-A mono
THE WAYWARD WIND / BORN TO BE BAD
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-5 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

Overdubbed Session Unknown Date, Memphis, Tennessee
Gene Lowery - Leader and Vocal
A. Davis - Vocal
B. Gross- Vocal
D. Horton - Vocal
P. Jacobs - Vocal
C. Walker - Vocal
P. Walker - Vocal
Joan Gilbert - Violin
Noel Gilbert - Violin
Nino Ravarino - Violin

You simply need to listen to these two sides of "The Wayward Wind", as they were originally recorded. There is no way to estimate the damage done here in the name of "sweetening". We may not quite be working in the range of mainting a mustache on the "Mona Lisa", but there is no doubt that a lot has been lost here with the addition of strings, voices and echo. The overwrought productions that hit the marketplace are not a true measure of Mann's ability. More to the point, somebody named Charles Underwood, Scotty Moore, or Ernie Barton has a lot to answer for, even if they were only following orders or following trends.

It seems the effects were actually more devastating to "Wayward Wind", Gogi Grant's pop hit from 1956.  Carl's version was recorded in October 1959 and the group was well rehearsed and tightly recorded here on 706 Union. You'll to take that on faith since there is hardly a shred of evidence of these virtues on the issued single. (HD)
PI 3564-A 45rpm


Carl Mann
"BORN TO BE BAD" - B.M.I. - 3:37
Composer: - Carl Belew
Publisher: - Four Star
Matrix number: - P 395
Recorded: - August 3, 4, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm Standard single PI 3564-B mono
BORN TO BE BAD / WAYWARD WIND
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713 DI-1-18 mono digital
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal & Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
R.W. ''Willie'' Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

Unknown Date Overdubbed Session
Scotty Moore - Leader
Joan Gilbert - Violin
Noel Gilbert - Violin
Nino Ravarino - Violin

The only song from this session to see light of day was ''Born To Be Bad''. Scotty Moore, in his new role of production manager, took the basic track and embalmed it in strings and coupled it for release with ''Wayward Wind''. Heard here without the sweetening, ''Born To Be Bad'' still won't rank as anyone's favourite Carl Mann track, but it was an undeniably strong choice for a single release in the early 1960s. It had a powerful rhythmic hook which was quite in keeping with the banalities of pop music circa 1961, but it sold poorly – fewer than 5000 copies during its first months on the market. That alone was a bad portent for 1961.   (MH)(HD)(CE)
PI 3564-B 45rpm


Jimmy Louis
"GONE AND LEFT ME BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - No Jo Publisher Corporation
Matrix number: - E 101
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1960
Sonic Recording Studio
1692 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 11, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3565-A mono
GONE AND LEFT ME BLUES / YOUR FOOL
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-7 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Louis - Vocal
Probably Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

The information surrounding these sides is a tad sketchy although it is clear they were probably not recorded at Sun. The most likely scenario is that Louis initially leased them to Billy Riley's Nita Records, where assigned a release number as Nita 128. How, why, or when they were transferred to Phillips International remains unclear. Jimmy Louis was a disc jockey and a performer on live radio show. He, Ray Arlington, and Lewis Smith (the composer of Jerry Lee's "Baby, Baby Bye Bye") had a live music show on KWEM, West Memphis, Arkansas, and recorded around Memphis between 1957 and 1960. "We took these songs to a guy who had a studio", is all that Smith remembers. Beyond that, information is scant. (HD)
PI 3565-A 45rpm


Jimmy Louis
"YOUR FOOL" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Ray Arlington-Lewis Smith
Publisher: - Jack Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - E 100
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1960
Sonic Recording Studio
1692 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 11, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3565-B mono
YOUR FOOL / GONE AND LEFT ME BLUES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-8 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Louis - Vocal
Probably Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

''Gone And Left Me Blues'' is a fairly pedestrian country tune that was unlikely to garner much attention from record company owners or buyers. ''Your Fool'' is another matter. It's a highly contagious gospelstyled tune with traces of both the white and black churches.  (HD)
PI 3565-B 45rpm


Charlie Rich
''WHO WILL THE NEXT FOOL BE'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 396
Recorded: - February 11, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - February 24, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3566-A mono
WHO WILL THE NEXT FOOL BE / CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-9 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Kelton D. Kelso Herston - Guitar
Hank Garland - Guitar
Buddy Harmon - Drums
Jerry Tutle - Organ
Unknown - Saxophone
Unknown - Chorus & Strings

Many believe that ''Who Will The Next Foll Be'' is Charlie Rich's masterpiece at Sun. Certainly, it helped solidify his reputation as one of the finest white soul singers ever to grace a studio. The fact that he also wrote and played piano on the track didn't hurt matters either. And knowing that Bobby Blue Bland went right out and covered Rich's record hasn't done much to diminish Charlie's reputation. Interestingly, Bland was not simply covering the song for the black stations and stores.  Rich was already getting attention there. A lot of black buyers had no idea that Charlie Rich was a white man. Indeed, Charlie's best music really transcend race and category. All of which makes it hard to imagine that a man capable of such passion and soul could record the dreck he produced late in his career. (HD)
PI 3566-A 45rpm


Charlie Rich
''CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE'' – B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 397
Recorded: - February 11, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - February 24, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3566-B mono
CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE / WHO WILL THE NEXT FOOL BE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-10 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Kelton D. Kelso Herston - Guitar
Hank Garland - Guitar
Buddy Harmon - Drums
Jerry Tutle - Organ
Unknown - Saxophone
Unknown - Chorus & Strings

It is unclear whether Rich recorded these sides in Nashville or whether the Madison Avenue studio in Memphis was in the process of being tamed. Both logic and aural evidence suggests that Nashville was the birthplace. This flipside, ''Caught In The Middle'', is again a well constructed song and beautiful performance. The criticism most often levelled at this track is that the arrangement is a bit too cutesy. Musically, Rich is again on his game. The little 4-bar piano break is a gem and the key modulation at the end is deftly handled. (HD)
PI 3566-B 45rpm


Jeb Stuart
"COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Don Covay-Frank Berry
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - P 399 - Promotion Copy
Recorded: - Probably Late 1959
Probably Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
and/or Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3567-A mono
COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES / DREAM
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-11 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stuart - Vocal
More Details Unknown

"Coming Down With The Blues" is a very effective piece of early 1960s soul music that appears somewhat anomalous in the Phillips International release schedule. The song was written by Don Covay and his partner from the Rainbows, Frank Berry. Covay was the first to record it (as "I'm Coming Down With The Blues") for Big Top Records. Note its somewhat curious structure: three verses, no release. Stuart was really a very good vocalist who would have probably paid dividends if he had been well recorded and promoted. His vocal here could have been the blueprint for an early 1960s Presley record. This title is part of an interesting sub-genre of songs based on the "blues as disease" metaphor. earlier examples include Carl Perkins' "Boppin' The Blues", Huey Smith's "Rockin' Pneumonia And The Boogie Woogie Flu" and, at a stretch, venerable old Dr. Isiah Ross's "Boogie Disease". (HD)(CE)
PI 3567-A 45rpm (DJ Promotion Copy)


Jeb Stuart
"DREAM" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:39
Composer: - Johnny Mercer
Publisher: - Michael H. Goldsen Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 398
Recorded: - Probably Late 1959
Probably Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
and/or Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3567-B mono
DREAM / COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-12 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stuart - Vocal
More Details Unknown

"Dream" is likewise a fine piece of nascent soul, again revealing the commercial held by Stuart. A minor quible: this side would have been a lot more impressive if someone on the date had figured out the correct chords to the song, instead of constructing a new melody to fit the chords they did know. A lot of people from Etta James to Vaughn Monroe, from Dinah Washington to the Four Aces had recorded this Johnny Mercer tune and they all managed to get the chords right. Stuart's recitation is really effective, although somewhat unusual stylistically for the era. (HD)(CE)
PI 3567-B 45rpm (DJ Promotion Copy)


Nelson Ray
"YOU'RE EVERYTHING" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Jack Toombs
Publisher: - Sure Fire Music Corporation
Matrix number: - P 400 - Promotion Copy
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Unknown Studio Location
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3568-A mono
YOU'RE EVERYTHING / YOU'VE COME HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-13 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Nelson Ray - Vocal
More Details Unknown

Nelson Ray represents another question mark on the Phillips International roster. Once again, it's a cinch these sides were not recorded in a Memphis Sun studio and their source and personnel remain a mystery. The ballad ''You're Everything'' mines the country crossover territory worked to perfection by Jim Reeves. In fact the opening bars suggest that Ray is about to sing ''Put your sweet lips a little closer to the phone''. (HD)
PI 3568-A 45rpm (DJ Promotion Copy)


Nelson Ray
"YOU'VE COME HOME" – B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Nelson Ray
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 401 Promotion Copy
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Unknown Studio Location
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3568-B mono
YOU'VE COME HOME / YOU'RE EVERYTHING
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-14 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Nelson Ray - Vocal
More Details Unknown

The flip-side was probably the reason these sides were imported to Phillips International. ''You've Come Home'' features a strong Floyd Cramer sounding piano and a muted string guitar solo that might have come directly from Don Gibson's ''Oh Lonesome Me''.  The song's brief release borrows the chords directly from ''The Ways Of A Woman In Love'' has a mighty powerful hook. The title phrase, brief as it is, is stretched into four notes and repeated melodically and effectively to the point where this song could have had some serious impact with only a modicum of air play. Unfortunately few disc jockeys in April 1961 agreed with that assessment. (HD)
PI 3568-B 45rpm (DJ Promotion Copy)


Carl Mann
"AIN'T GOT NO HOME'' - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Clarence Frogman Henry
Publisher: - Folkways Music
Matrix number: - P 403
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - July 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3569-A mono
AIN'T GOT NO HOME / IF I COULD CHANGE YOU
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal, Piano and Guitar
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Kelton Kelso Herston - Guitar
Bob Moore - Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon - Drums
Hargus M. ''Pig'' Robbins - Piano

This Carl Mann record, his next-toast for Phillips, is worth special attention for several reasons. First, most listeners will notice that this is not the version of ''I Ain't Got No Home'' they are used to hearing Carl first recorded the song in October 1959 and it appeared on his original LP. The song had long been part of his stage repertoire and someone decided it might not be a bad idea to put it out as a single. What the hell, nothing else seemed to be selling. However, instead of releasing the album track, Carl journeyed east to Nashville to re-cut the song in the new Phillips studio. This time Carl left his trusty sideman home and used Nashville's finest pickers and grinners (Kelso Herston, Bob Moore, Buddy Harmon, Pig Robbins).

The session log from June, 1961 does not list Eddie Bush, but it's hard to believe that it's anybody but Bush on there. Bush was a transient (some would argue vagrant comes closer to truth) and it is unlikely he was a member of any musician union. It was one thing to bury that omission in Memphis; quite another in Nashville. And so the re-cut version of ''Home'' made its way on to the single. Most Sun collectors have long ago concluded that it is inferior to the original album cut although there is some undeniable energy here. Do you get the feeling that the band should have talked through the ending before starting to record this track? (HD)
PI 3569-A 45rpm


Carl Mann
"IF I COULD CHANGE YOU" - B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Carl Mann-Kelso Herston
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 402 - Master
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - July 1961
Firs appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3569-B mono
IF I COULD CHANGE YOU / I AIN'T GOT NO HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal, Piano and Guitar
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Kelton Kelso Herston - Guitar
Bob Moore - Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon - Drums
Hargus M. ''Pig'' Robbins - Piano

Anita Kerr Singers consisting of
Anita Kerr, Dottie Dillard, Gil Writh, and Louis Nunley- Vocal Chorus

''If I Could Change You'' is a really beautiful country song, written by Carl and Eddie Bush. Unfortunately, Bush was broke as usual and managed to sell his rights to picker Kelso Herston. Business transactions of this nature were hardly new to Nashville. Just ask Willie Nelson. There is a vaguely Faron Young-ish quality to Mann's voice on this track but the biggest news for his fans is that there was nothing formulaic about either side of this record. For the first time Carl Mann was free to make his own music.

Finally, listen to the quality of these recording, made at Phillips' Nashville studio, compared with the untamed spaciness that still characterized Madison Avenue. It was comparisons like this that ultimately help to Sam Phillips to bite the bullet and bring in technical help to correct the acoustic problems at his Memphis  studio. (HD)
PI 3569-B 45rpm


Jean Dee
''NOTHING DOWN (99 YEARS TO PAY)'' - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Wolfe
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number: - P 405
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Unknown Studio Location
Released: - July 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3570-A mono
NOTHING DOWN (99 YEARS TO PAY) / MY GREATEST HURT
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jean Dee – Vocal
Unknown Vocal Chorus
More Details Unknown

Doing business in Nashville meant that Sam Phillips would be exposed to more and more offers of product for lease than he would ever hear holed up with his buddies in Memphis. And so, we are one again faced with a mystery. Who is Jean Dee and where do these sides, released in July, 1961, come from? You'd have to go all the way back to June, 1956 to find a similar case. At that time, Jean Chapel, another very bluesy white lady, had her spartan Nashville-recorded sides brought in for release on Sun.

''Nothing Down'' is a surprisingly gritty song for a white gal, circa 1961. Even the recording is curiously unadorned – the piano is barely audible in the mix. Basically, this is a vocal/drums/electric bass date. There is a passing resemblance to ''Heartbreak Hotel'', although by comparison that arrangement seemed quite full! (HD)
PI 3570-A 45rpm


Jean Dee
"MY GREATEST HURT" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Denning
Publisher: - Four Star
Matrix number: - P 404
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Unknown Studio Location
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3570-B mono
MY GREATES HURT / NOTHING DOWN 999 YEARS TO PAY)
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jean Dee – Vocal
Unknown Vocal Chorus
More Details Unknown

''My Greatest Hurt'' is where the money was spent. We've got the same bass and drums here for sure, but what a difference a well-recorded chorus makes. Compare the impact of this restrained chorus with the usual wretched excess of choral overdubs in Memphis. Sometimes less is more – a sentiment that rarely dawned on the Gene Lowery Singers. Jean Dee went on to record for King in 1963 but seems to have left few traces thereafter. (HD)
PI 3570-B 45rpm


Brad Suggs
''ELEPHANT WALK'' - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Scotty Moore-Vinnie Trauth
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 406
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3571-A mono
ELEPHANT WALK / LIKE, CATCHIN' UP
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Larry Mohoberac – Organ & Piano
John Ace Cannon – Tenor Saxophone
Al Jackson - Drums

This is Brad Suggs' final opus on Phillips International, released in November 1961. The truth is, it's a pretty damn good record! ''Elephant Walk'' stood a real chance of success in the pop marketplace nearly 40 years ago. There was a 1950s movie by this tittle starring Elizabeth Taylor, and releases bearing this title appeared  on RCA in 1959 by the Kings, and in 1963 on Cortland by Donald Jenkins and the Delighters. It will require some deeper archeology to determine whether they are the same elephants.

''Scotty Moore and I put that thing together'', Brad Suggs recalls. Suggs' minimal five note guitar figure is very catchy and that lord-of-the-jungle french horn provides some real atmosphere. Larry Mohoberac contributes the organ sound and Ace Cannon comes up with a wonderful growling solo he would use again exactly a month later on Harold Dorman's ''Uncle Jonah's Place'' (Sun 370). Nothing like recycling your own best work. If you peel away a few layers here, you can hear the rudiments of the sound the Mar-Keys and Booker T. and the MGs would shortly take to the bank. Not surprisingly, Al Jackson, the stalwart drummer of that group, was the session man here on Suggs' date. He should get an award for his performance on this track and whoever miked his drums should share the award with him. In fact, this whole track sounds more like a Stax record than just about anything issued on Sun or Phillips International. (HD)
PI 35-71-A 45rpm


Brad Suggs
''LIKE, CATCHIN' UP'' - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 407
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Firs appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3571-B mono
LIKE, CATCHIN' UP / ELEPHANT WALK
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Larry Mohoberac – Organ & Piano
John Ace Cannon – Tenor Saxophone
Al Jackson - Drums
Unknown - High Voices

''Like, Catching Up'' is a perfect flipside. The comma that originally appeared after the word ''Like'' is quite important, because it conveys the hipster phrase associated with jazz. And make no mistake, this was a jazz tune. Sort of a one-take jazz tune at that. The unidentified shrieking chick is good at what she does, which is to scat her way thru some familiar jazz changes. ''I wish I could remember the name of that woman'', Suggs admitted recently (1998). ''I'm pretty sure her first name was Millie. What I do recall is she was very pregnant. Looks like she was due any second. I kept thinking she'd never make it through the take before we'd have to rush her off to the hospital''. If these sides had been recorded in Nashville one would have no hesitation in saying that it was Millie Kirkham (who contributed the wordless echo to on ''My Wish Came True'' and Millie was pregnant on ''Blue Christmas''. These sounds were a long way from the jungle of the flipside, but they did their job – which was to focus everyone's attention on the Elephant.

As noted, this was Brad Suggs's final single. Ten instrumental sides. Can you identify his style? After five or so singles, you knew almost everything you ever needed to know about Perkins, Cash, Presley, Jerry Lee. But, musically speaking, who was Brad Suggs? (HD)
PI 3571-B 45rpm


Charlie Rich
''IT'S TOO LATE'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Tidelands Music
Matrix number: P 409
Recorded: - May 27, 1960
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3572-A mono
IT'S TOO LATE / JUST A LITTLE BIT SWEET
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Billy Riley – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Martin Willis – Tenor Saxophone
Unknown – Vocal Chorus & Strings

It is unclear whether Rich recorded these sides in Nashville or whether the Madison Avenue studio in Memphis was in the process of being tamed. Both logic and aural evidence suggests that Nashville was the birthplace. This flipside, ''Caught In The Middle'', is again a well constructed song and beautiful performance. The criticism most often levelled at this track is that the arrangement is a bit too cutesy. Musically, Rich is again on his game. The little 4-bar piano break is a gem and the key modulation at the end is deftly handled. (HD)
PI 3572-A 45rpm


Charlie Rich
''JUST A LITTLE BIT SWEET'' – 2:18
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 408
Recorded: - February 11, 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Released: - September 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3572-B mono
JUST A LITTLE BIT SWEET / IT'S TOO LATE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Kelton D. Kelso Herston - Guitar
Hank Garland - Guitar
Buddy Harmon - Drums
Jerry Tutle - Organ
Unknown - Saxophone
Unknown - Chorus & Strings

''Just A Little Bit Sweet'' seems almost like a trite pop/country song. But that judgement is superficial. There are vintage Richisms here – the little two-bar instrumental fills at the vocal line, the gospelly diminished chords and the fine churchy finale after ''Come on, come on, come on...''. (HD)
PI 3572-B 45rpm


Mikki Wilcox
''I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: P 410
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3573-A mono
I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS / WILLING AND WAITING
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-23 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mikki Wilcox – Vocal
Strings & Arrangements by Vinnie Trauth
More Details Unknown

It's time to correct a mistake that has hounded Sun discographers over the years (1998) Contrary to earlier impressions it now appears certain that Mickey Milan (Phillips International 3533) and Mikki Wilcox, who performs these session, are not the same person. Our most obvious error was to include the photo of Wilcox (that appears here) next to the listing for Milan in Sun Single Collection Volume 5. This error, which is also reflected in the Escott/Hawkins Sun Records Discography, was prompted in part by the fact that tapes from the two singers are stored together in the Sun vaults. At some point, someone must have stuck everything together after asking, ''What are the odds of having two female singers named Mikki/Mickey record for Phillips International in a short period of time? The answer, unfortunately, was ''Quite High''.  There are two telling pieces of evidence for the ''Two Mikki/Mickey Theory''. The first is, if you look closely at the inscription on the Wilcox photo, you will see a thank you note to arranger Vinnie Trauth for his arrangement on her first record. The message is dated August, 1961. Indeed, Trauth provided the arrangement for this track by Mikki Wilcox which was released on September 1, 1961. If we assume that Ms. Wilcox had her wits about her, she would have remembered whether she already had a September, 1958 release on the Phillips International label. If she were the same Mickey/Mikki, she might have thanked Vinnie by saying something like ''Tanks for your arrangement on my record. It's s damn sight better than the first''.

Which gets us to the second bit of evidence. Quite simply, all you need to do is listen to the two records. It would be close to miraculous if these sides were recorded by the same person. One is, as previously noted, a rather shrill country pop singer and the others is, well, what we have here. Mikki Wilcox knew her way around the blues and is a lot closer to the contrallo of Mavis Staples than the higher range of, say, Kay Starr.

Forgetting the intrigue surrounding the artist, both sides of this record are actually quite good. The simplest way to describe the sound might be ''LaVerne Baker meets Floyd Cramer''. An odd pairing, to be sure, but stranger things have happened at Sun. (HD)
PI 3573-A 45rpm


Mikki Wilcox
''WILLING AND WAITING'' – 2:34
Composer: - Hager-Glasgow
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 411
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 1, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3573-B mono
WILLING AND WAITING / I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-3-24 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mikki Wilcox – Vocal
Strings & Arrangements by Vinnie Trauth
More Details Unknown


''Willing And Waiting'', the side for which arranger Trauth had to be thanked, is a fine bluesy, melodic song which is actually enhanced by strings. The flipside, ''I Know What It Means'' cuts closer to the bone. Would you have been at all surprised to learn that this vocalist was black? Either side of this record might have broken through with just a little sustained promotion. Unfortunately, Sam's well documented philosophy at this point was to release them and, if lightning struck, reap the profits. Unfortunately for Ms. Wilcox, it didn't. (HD)
PI 3573-B 45rpm


Freddie North
''SOMEDAY SHE'LL COME ALONG'' - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Rick Hall
Publisher: - Fame Music – Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: P 413
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Studio Location Unknown
Released: - October 16, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3574-A mono
SOMEDAY SHE'LL COME ALONG / DON'T MAKE ME CRY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-4-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Freddie North - Vocal
More Details Unknown


This October 16, 1961 release is quite a stylistic departure from much of the Phillips International release schedule. ''Someday She'll Come Along'' is performed in a dramatic, quasi-bolero style popularized by Roy Orbison's records of the day (''Running Scared'', ''Crying''). There is a tremendous intimacy to North's performance, reflected in both his warm style and the manner in which it is recorded. It's likely that he did a lot of listening to Brook Benton and, going back a few years, it wouldn't be surprising to learn that Roy Hamilton was a hero. North's voice and indeed, this material recall inspirational classics like ''You'll Never Walk Alone''. Indeed it wouldn't have been surprising if the opening lines of this record had been ''Oh, my love...'' as North launched into his own version of ''Unchained Melody''. (HD)
PI 3574-A 45rpm


Freddie North
''DON'T MAKE ME CRY'' – B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Ray Stevens
Publisher: - Bill Lowery Music
Matrix number: - P 412
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Studio Location Unknown
Released: - October 16, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3574-B mono
DON'T MAKE ME CRY / SOMEDAY SHE'LL COME ALONG
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-4-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Freddie North - Vocal
More Details Unknown

The flipside reveals that there is more to North than overwrought intensity. ''Don't Make Me Cry'' reveals a tough of Jackie Wilson and when that falsetto kicks in, it's hard not to think about Jimmy Jones. In fact, the opening notes of the falsetto section are a nearly direct quote from Maurice Williams' ''Stay'' (''Oh won't tou Sta – yay''). Perhaps it is fair to say that Freddie North was simply a composite of the most effective black music style of the late 1950s and early 1960s. He could do them all and managed to roll most of them into this record. (HD)
PI 3574-B 45rpm


Jeb Stuart
''I BETCHA GONNA LIKE IT'' - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Buddy Killen-Robert Riley
Publisher: - Tree Music
Matrix number: P 414
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 1962
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3575-A mono
I BETCHA GONNA LIKE IT / LITTLE MISS LOVE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-4-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stuart – Vocal
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Al Jackson – Drums
Larry Muhoberac – Piano
Robert Oldham – Tenor Saxophone
William Maherry – Tenor Saxophone


Like Freddie North, Jeb Stuart was another artist who did his share of listening to the radio. This may be the best of Stuart's four Phillips International releases. Old Jeb knew how to be commercial, if nothing else. The A-side features a tribute to some obscure juke joint that lies out there beyond the city limits. Singing the praises of joints like this is a time-honored tradition. At the time Jeb's record appeared, Chris Kenner was doing it with ''I Liked It Like That'', but the tradition was far older. Amos Milburn's ''Chicken Shack Boogie'', and Freddie Slack's ''House Of Blue Lights'' take it back at least 15 years and, more recently on Sun, Harold Dorman tried his hand with ''Uncle Jonah's Place''.  Jeb's tune features the glorious and memorable line ''The drum and the bass, they kick like a mule''. There was a vaguely Sun-related postscript to ''I Betcha Gonna Like It''. In 1964, with his career deeply in the doldrums, Jerry Lee Lewis recorded the song, although it was held back for the dreadful ''Soul My Way'' album. The song itself was written by Tree Music boss Buddy Killen, and 9wait for yet another tenuous Sun connection), Robert Riley, the co-writer of ''Just Walkin' In The Rain''. (HD)(CE)
PI 3575-A 45rpm


Jeb Stuart
''LITTLE MISS LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Percy Mayfield
Publisher: - Curtom Publishers – Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 412
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - October 16, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3575-B mono
DON'T MAKE ME CRY / SOMEDAY SHE'LL COME ALONG
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806 DI-4-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stuart – Vocal
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Al Jackson – Drums
Larry Muhoberac – Piano
Robert Oldham – Tenor Saxophone
William Maherry – Tenor Saxophone

Never a unidimensional artist, Jeb gets into his Sam Cooke bag for the flipside ''Little Miss Love''. If Sun couldn't sell records like this in February 1962, there was something wrong with their promotion department. (HD)(CE)
PI 3575-B 45rpm




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