© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ®
 
Up to the time Rosco Gordon first recorded ''Booted'', Billy Love had recorded just one song  for Sam Phillips but around November 2, 1951 he recorded three more songs, two of which  became his first record on Chess under his own name. Perhaps featuring the same band as  on the Juiced session, ''Drop Top'' was another stormer, an undisguised attempt to follow in  the slipstream of ''Rocket 88''. Billy's going to breeze around town keeping cool in his fantasy  convertible and he doesn't care who knows it. He boogies into this track singing after the  style of a Roy Brown before giving way to a crashing guitar solo from Calvin Newborn and a matching sax solo. The other side of the record was to be ''You're Gonna Cry'', a mid-paced  Niles about the perils of getting too high and mighty. There is a throaty sax solo twin an  unidentified player and good understated support from guitar and drums, possibly the  Newborns again. The third title recorded at this time was ''Ain't No More'' hut the tape or  acetate of this has never been found. Phillips paid Love an advance c l $70 on the disc on  November 2, and loaned him $15 on December 11, when he noted that Chess has masters on  ''Ain't No More'', ''You're Gonna Cry'' and ''Drop Top". However the disc was not issued  immediately and some months later on March 16, 1952 Phillips noted that he had sent  another master of ''Drop Top'' to Chess. The disc was finally issued as Chess 1508 on April 1,  1952. The record seems to hive been given little promotional support by Chess and it did not  show up significantly on regional sales charts.
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY LOVE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951
 
MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: POSSIBLY OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
01 - "DROP TOP" – B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F 1014
Recorded: - Possibly October/November 1951
Released: - April 1, 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm Chess 1508-A mono
DROP TOP / YOU'RE GONNA CRY
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-20 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958 
 
"Rocket 88", of course, inspired a great many sequels - a fair number of which emanated from Sam Phillips' studio, notably "My Real Gone Rocket", "T-Model Boogie", "Mr. Highway Man", "Ridin' The Boogie". Billy Love's song is a delightful eulogy to the long-gone, gas-guzzlin' convertibles of the early 1950s: a routine eight-to-the-bar boogie, driven along by Billy's rock-solid, dependable left hand and hugely confident vocal, the automobile evolves into a metaphor for nookie halfway through. Sam Phillips' later comments notwithstanding, Love appears to have possessed considerable talent, and clearly should have gone on to become a major player - and whilst his dept to Roy Brown is readily evident here, he remains his own man.
02 - "YOU'RE GONNA CRY" – B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - F 1015
Recorded: - Possibly October/November 1951
Released: - April 1, 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm Chess 1508-B mono
YOU'RE GONNA CRY / DROP TOP
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-1-21 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958 
 
''You're Gonna Cry'', a mid-paced blues about the perils of getting too high and mighty was the song backed ''Drop Top'' on Chess. There is a throaty sax solo, probably from Charles Walker, and good understated support from Calvin and Phineas Newborn, Sr, on guitar and drums. Phillips paid Love an advance of $70 on the disc on November 2, 1951 and loaned him $15 on December 11 when he noted that ''Chess has masters on ''Ain't No More'', ''You're Gonna Cry'' and ''Drop Top''. However the disc was not issued immediately and some months later on March 16, 1952 Phillips noted that he had sent another master of ''Drop Top'' to Chess. The disc was finally issued in April, but appears to have been given little promotional support and did not show up significantly on regional sales charts.
Apparently from the same session as ''Drop Top'' and ''You're Gonna Cry'', Sam Phillips shows that ''It Ain't No More'' was sent to Chess along with the other two titles. There was a delay of some months before a record was issued and in that time Chess decided to go for the other titles. At one point, Chess asked for another copy of the ''Drop Top'' master and somewhere along the line the tape of ''It Ain't No More'' was lost but, here an acetate copy from Steve LaVere who had kept it for over forty years. If it were not for the greater saleability of the ''Drop Top'' lyric, this recording would have been a real contender for release. It is a storming performance, from Love's opening piano chord and the pushing drumbeat of Phineas Newborn through the unison riffing of sax and guitar and on to the superior guitar solo from Carlvin Newborn. The song itself consists of Love telling his girl the reasons why she's got to pack everything and go and perhaps this downbeat message being delivered at such a rocking tempo weighed against the track when Chess 1508 was being planned. 
 
03 - "AIN'T NO MORE" – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Possibly November 1951
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-3-15 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958
 
Over the river in West Memphis, Arkansas there were other clubs and bars, like the Sixteenth Street grill where Sonny Boy Williamson, Willie Love and B. B. King played, the Be-Bop Hall, and also the Cotton Club that catered to a white audience.
 
Together Memphis and West Memphis provided a living to touring pianists like Roosevelt Sykes, Ivory Joe Hunter, or Fats Domino, to the pianists in local bands such as those led by Tuff Green or Bill Harvey, to the solo pianists and itinerant performers - Memphis keyboard legends like 'Struction' and 'Dishrag' - and to budding youngsters just starting out to learn. And then there was Phineas Newborn junior who played in a family band with his father Phineas, a well-known drummer, and his brother Calvin, a guitarist.
 
The Newborns came from around Jackson, Mississippi, originally but Phineas senior moved to Memphis in about 1930. His son joined him in the Tuff Green band in the mid-1940s and spent summers on the road with the popular Saunders King band when aged just 16. In 1948 the Newborn family show band was resident at Morris Berger's Plantation Inn in West Memphis, moving over the bridge to the Flamingo Room at Hernando and Beale in the early 1950s.
 
By the mid-1950s Phineas was being feted by jazz aficionados in New York and Los Angeles, and he remains a legendary name in jazz. Writing about musicians from Memphis in Rhythm Oil, Stanley Booth quoted one contemporary Memphis pianist saying that Phineas Newborn "had a boogie-woogie left hand, a bebop right hand, and this ... third hand." That's what pianist Billy Love was competing with when he was growing up.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Love - Vocal and Piano
Charles Walker - Saxophone
Calvin Newborn - Guitar
Phineas Newborn Sr – Drums
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ®