CONTAINS

Sun 271-280 Series
 
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Rudi Richardson
"WHY SHOULD I CRY" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Organ-Johnson-Walker
Publisher: - Golden West Music
Matrix number: - U 253
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably March 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 271-A mono
WHY SHOULD I CRY / FOOL'S HALL OF FAME
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-12 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rudi Richardson - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians
Vocal Chorus - Jimmy Hart, Steve Spear, Mike Gardner,
James Tarbutton, David Beaver

The first person to wonder what Memphis-born Rudolph Richardson Riles moved to Chicago and debuted on the Miracle label in 1946. He was back in Memphis a decade or so later, is doing in the middle of the Sun release schedule for Spring, 1957. This record is a total anomaly. Taken on its own merits, it is not a bad record. Smooth, modern black vocal harmony: a latter day Ink Spots or Four Knights with a slight doowopping nod toward 1950s rhythm and blues. This is the kind of backup singing that Roy Orbison might have achieved on "Devil Doll" had his singers not been so, well, white.

Whatever the charms of this recording, it is hard to understand what its doing rubbing shoulders with "Miss Froggie" on one side and "Red Hot" on the other. The redoubtable Sun session file offers only 'unknown' next to the date, backing group or location of these recording. It seems clear that Rudi Richardson was black, and that he, his quartet, and instrumental combo (piano, guitar, bass and drums) were tight. It also seems a safe bet that these sides were not recorded at 706 Union. Six months after Rudi's single was released, Rudi died of drug and alcohol abuse in a Memphis hotel room. (HD)
Rudi Richardson
"FOOL'S HALL OF FAME" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - J. Freeman-Danny Wolf
Publisher: - Golden West Music
Matrix number: - U 252
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably March 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 271-B mono
FOOL'S HALL OF FAME / WHY SHOULD I CRY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-11 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rudi Richardson - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians
Vocal Chorus - Jimmy Hart, Steve Spear, Mike Gardner,
James Tarbutton, David Beaver

To further complicate the puzzle, we also know that Johnny Cash, of all people, attempted a version of "Fool's Hall Of Fame" while at Sun, and so did Roy Orbison. After the Cash session, Sam Phillips wrote across the tape box "Never To Be Released", although his words later went unheeded. Even Elvis Presley wanted to record it.

Rudi Richardson remains an enigma to Sun Records fans. His 1957 release ("Fools Hall Of Fame") seemed stylistically out of place at the time, although 50plus years have allowed a more charitable view of Richardson's music. With some hindsight, it is easy to see how Sam Phillips was drawn to the slick professionalism and retro (1940s) sound he heard here.  (HD)(MH)
Ray Harris
"GREENBACK DOLLAR, WATCH AND CHAIN" - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Ray Marris
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 254
Recorded: - May 1957 or Probably April 7, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 272-A mono
GREENBACK DOLLAR, WATCH AND CHAIN / FOOLISH HEART
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-13 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Harris - Vocal and Guitar
Wayne Cogswell - Guitar
Joey Reisenberg - Drums
Unknown - Piano
Red Hensley - Vocal and Steel Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Wayne Cogswell, Red Hensley, Roy Orbison - Vocal Chorus

Casting around for material, Ray Harris lighted upon the old hill country ballad "Greenback Dollar", and he worked up a surprisingly commercial version of the song. There was a contagious party atmosphere on the record, highlighted by whistles and hollers during the instrumental breaks. "A lot of people though I was gonna have a big one", recalled Harris, "so I got carried away and went and bought a new Mercury. Ended up diggin' ditches for six months to pay for it".  Harris provides hos own epitaph on his Sun career: "I never did get a hit. Probably had too much country in my style. I tell everyone I sure had a good time trying', though".

Ray Harris' second single, "Greenback Dollar, Watch And Chain", comes from the folksy end of public domain and features a young Roy Orbison in the chorus.

"Greenback Dollar" is a loony tune, and no less lovable. And what a mixture of styles!. A doo wop chorus, and more of the wild and woolly guitar / drum sound from the flipside. Only this time around a piano and slap bass player have been added. A truly overproduced record by Sun's delightful 1957 standards. (HD)(MH)
Ray Harris
"FOOLISH HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Ray Harris-Wayne Cogswell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 255
Recorded: - May 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 272-B mono
FOOLISH HEART / GREENBACK DOLLAR, WATCH AND CHAIN
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-14 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Harris - Vocal and Guitar
Wayne Cogswell - Guitar
Joey Reisenberg - Drums
Unknown - Piano
Red Hensley - Vocal and Steel Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Wayne Cogswell, Red Hensley, Roy Orbison - Vocal Chorus

"Foolish Heart" is a wonderful loony tune of a record. A doowop chorus welded onto a minimalist bluesy ballad. Other than the voice, the sound is not appreciably different from Harris' previous outing (SUN 254), which was markedly under produced even by 1956 standards. Wayne Cogswell and Joey Reisenberg are all over this record. Every empty space is a personal challenge to be filled by guitar and drums. Their playing is so assertive that the missing bass player is hardly noticed.

Ray Harris contributes here on this session a fine vocal, even for a self-professed non-singer. The party atmosphere adds a delightful touch and enhances both instrumental breaks. The unknown piano player is suitably high spirited, although his style is notably un-Jerry Lee-like. If things weren't sufficiently off-the-wall, this record ends on a drum roll. Not exactly an everyday occurrence, made doubly bizarre by the studio fade. Precious few Sun record ended with fade-outs, despite how commonplace the practice was elsewhere. When we finally get a Sun fade, it focuses not on a repeated vocal or instrumental line, but on a drum roll. What a label!.

For many years it was thought that Elvis Presley played piano on both of Ray Harris Sun release. However, research has discovered that Charlie Rich was the piano player. The vocal backing was provided by Roy Orbison, Wayne Cogswell, and Red Hensley. (HD)
Mack Self
"EASY TO LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 256
Recorded: Unknown Date 1956
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 273-A mono
EASY TO LOVE / EVERYDAY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self - Vocal and Guitar
Thurlow Brown - Lead Guitar
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Jimmy Evans - Bass
Johnny Bernero – Drums

It is hard to listen to ''Easy To Love'', even a half century later, and not be struck by its sheer beauty. Surely Sam Phillips shared this view because something persuaded him to release it in 1957 when the record had little chance of commercial success.  Within the context of Sun's release schedule, ''Easy To Love'' fell smack in the middle of rockabilly items like Carl Perkins'''That's Right'' and Ray Harris's ''Greenback Dollar''. It was flanked by even less countrified rockers by Tommy Blake (''Lordy Hoody'') and Wade & Dick (''Bop Bop Baby''). In short, ''Easy To Love'' was pure country outing, the very thing from which Sun was progressively shying away. All of which underscores just how direct its impact must have been on Phillips for him to schedule its release. Commercialism aside, what has contributed to the beautiful of ''Easy To Love''? Self's vocal, while not powerful, is rather idiosyncratic. His line ''I'm tuning you loose'' is followed by wordless humming in the first verse. Two bars without a lyric. This tension is resolved in the last verse the same line is finally completed with ''I'm letting you go''. A nice touch, especially surrounded by the drama of the sustained 4-chord and cymbal at the finale.

Rhythmically, the song achieves a surprising momentum from the echoes drumming and acoustic guitar. In fact, if it can be said that a waltz is driving, then this one surely qualifies. The instrumental work seems serviceable, not flashy throughout, with its simple Luther Perkins-like lead guitar. Even the steel, an instrument often given to tasty riffs and virtuosity, is played in flawless, but rudimentary style. The record simply has an understated charm that assert itself almost immediately. For some reason, one throwaway feature (absent from the recently discovered alternate take) has always focused my memory of this song. The band hits a passing 2-minor chord between halves of the verse. It comes right after the lines ''Like they're brand new'' and ''between you and me''. One would expect a conventional 5-2-5 transitional sequence but instead there's that implied 2-minor chord. A mistake, maybe, but it's simply beautiful.  (HD)(MH)
Mack Self
"EVERYDAY" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 257
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - June 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 273-B mono
EVERYDAY / EASY TO LOVE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self - Vocal and Guitar
Therlow Brown - Lead Guitar
Jimmy Ray Paulman - Rhythm Guitar
Jimmy Evens - Bass and 2nd Vocal
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

"Everyday", for too long has this track been overshadowed by its gorgeous flipside, "Easy To Love". "Everyday" is a fine country song in its own right. It reveals Mack as a songwriter with a penchant for country waltzes as well as a deft melodic touch and a gift for imagery. In addition to the release version, we  have two previously unissued alternate takes that are quite different from each other. Serious listening is rewarded here. Jimmy Evans (or perhaps Stan Kesler on steel) provides a highly unusual bass figure, sliding up to the target note. Either Van Eaton or Holland provides some interesting drum work, accenting on the cymbal during the guitar break. This is a simple country song with relatively few musicians in the studio. But  Lord, Lord, there sure is a lot going on here. (HD)(MH)
Carl Perkins
"FOREVER YOURS" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 258
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 274-A mono
FOREVER YOURS / THAT'S RIGHT
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

Back In March l 957, George Hamilton IV's hit record ''A Rose And A Baby Ruth'' was stall on the charts when Carl recorded this. If this was the era for candy-bar inspired love songs, Carl wanted a piece of the action. ''Forever Your'' bars may be all but forgotten now, but these ''vanilla Milky Way'' bars were once quite popular. They disappeared from the candy counters of America abut 20 years later in 1979, but this was Carl Perkins attempt to continue the candy bar trend in American popular music. Commercial tie-in or not, this is a damn fine ballad and, needless to say, light years away from the ballad style we've heard previously on ''Turn Around'' or ''I'm Not Sorry''. One aside about the original single record: When original released on Sun 274, ''Forever Yours'' was coupled with that nasty little opus called ''That's Right''. It was an odd paring to say the least.

We're going to go out on a limb here and say that ''Forever Yours'' is the most beautiful song Carl Perkins recorded for Sun. It's true that most of what fans value about Perkins' work isn't tied up in ballads, but this one is a stunner. Arguably, the big selling point is that flatted VI chord (C in the key of E) in the release. It's beautiful and unexpected. According to his bio, Carl nearly had a mutiny on his hands when he taught the song to brother Jay. It's also not the first time Carl worked that territory. The same chord change appeared in ''Honey Don't'', when Carl was in his more accustomed rockabilly mode. But here, in a ballads he adds a 4-note to the chord making it a little softer and warmer than the straight version of the chord that appeared in the uptempo ''Honey Don't''.

Another feature that takes ''Forever Yours'' into a very special realm is the recording mix. For this, we have Sam to thank. The slap bass is miked so prominently, it's almost shocking. Forget the drums; this one is driven by Clayton's bass. When is the last time you heard a ballad recorded like this? It was one thing on ''Blue Suede Shoes''. But a percussive bass on a ballad? You betcha, and it works like a charm. (HD)(MH)
Carl Perkins
"THAT'S RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 259
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 274-B mono
THAT'S RIGHT / FOREVER YOURS
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

Anybody who thought "That's Right" was going to be a teen hit was in serious need of a reality check. Not since "Dixie Fried" had Carl Perkins come through with such a slice of southern lowlife. Precious few urban white teens were going to connect with the sentiments and moods of this ol' disc. In truth, its a menacing, rather mean spirited lament delivered in a slurred, palpably drunken style. How many 16 year olds could identify with the singer's life?. A mean, short tempered guy, suspicious of cheating, both at cards and love. And then there was that word "booger" which was just a little too close to "bugger" for comfort in Canada (where the line was excised) and in England (where the entire verse ended up on the cutting room floor). This has made British and Canadian pressings of this record perversely collectable. (HD)
Ernie Chaffin
"I'M LONESOME" – B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Murphy Maddux
Publisher: - Singing River Music
Matrix number: - U 260
Recorded: - January 29, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 275-A mono
I'M LONESOME / LAUGHIN' AND JOKIN'
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal and Guitar
Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux - Acoustic Guitar
Ernie Harvey - Steel Guitar
Leo Ladner – Bass

Once again, the success of this record is built upon the unusual 1 - flatted 7 chords sequence and Chaffin and company (and what a company!) deftly mine these changes for all they're worth. As we learn, they are worth a lot, at both dirge-like and mid-tempos. The first 8 bars of "I'm Lonesome" are particularly powerful. The instrumental intro has an almost dreamlike quality; it is literally difficult to become oriented and know what key the song is in. Chaffin's voice is a sheer delight here. What a fine country singer the man was! And not since Luther Perkins adorned Cash's best work has there been such a simple solo on a Sun record. Only this single note picking is done on a steel guitar! And finally, there's the fade. Not many Sun records feature studio fades, but this is the best ever. The simple instrumental work as those slide back and forth is a moment to cherish.  It is not clear what marketplace this record was originally slated for but, categories be dammed, this is one of the undeniable gems in the entire Sun catalogue. (HD)(MH)
Ernie Chaffin
"LAUGHIN' AND JOKIN'" – B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Murphy Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 261
Recorded: - January 29, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 275-B mono
LAUGHIN' AND JOKIN' / I'M LONESOME
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal and Guitar
Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux - Acoustic Guitar
Ernie Harvey - Steel Guitar
Leo Ladner – Bass

Once again, Ernie Chaffin contributes a 1-flatted 7 chord pattern to good effect, this time turning it into an uptempo, almost jaunty mood. Of Ernie's first four sides for Sun, this was probably the most conventionally country. The song has a wonderfully rhythmic drive, abetted by the percussive strumming of Pee Wee Maddux. Ernie Harvey helps himself to two-bar steel solos, played in a style that was reproducible by non-steel players. A thoughtful gesture! (HD)(MH)
Edwin Bruce
"MORE THAN YESTERDAY" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 262
Recorded: - May 8, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 276-A mono
MORE THAN YESTERDAY / ROCK BOPPIN' BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Edwin Bruce - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Smith - Piano

Like Jerry Lee Lewis, Edwin Bruce sings the praises of a woman who manages to bop around without leaving her spot. A true Memphis goddess. 

Ed's echo-laden vocal on the flipside "More Than Yesterday", was appropriately sexy and restrained, but its the rocker that has grabbed just about all the collector attention over the years. (HD)
Edwin Bruce
"ROCK BOPPIN' BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Edwin Bruce
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 263
Recorded: - May 8, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - August 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 276-B mono
ROCK BOPPIN' BABY / MORE THAN YESTERDAY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Edwin Bruce - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Smith - Piano

Out of nowhere came Memphis teenager Edwin Bruce with this minor key rocker. "Rock Boppin' Baby" is a highly effective record, although it owes precious little to the country traditions that feuled most of Sun's best rockabilly. Nevertheless, the arrangement builds considerable tension with its muted string verses, before letting it fly during the release, which transforms the song back into a major key.

In Sam Phillips' words, the young Mr. Bruce has "the sincere pleading quality which can switch to fire and  volume to sock up the tempo for contrast". A bit wordy, but you get the idea. (HD)
Billy Riley & His Little Green Men
"RED HOT" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 265 - Featured Overdub Handclaps
Recorded: - January 30, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 277-A mono
RED HOT / PEARLY LEE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-23 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
John "Ace" Cannon – Saxophone

Riley returned to the studio to start work on a rockabilly version of an old Sun copyright, Billy "The Kid" Emerson's "Red Hot". As always, the rhythm section, featuring Roland Janes and drummer James M. Van Eaton, played with teletathic cohesion. Win, lose, or draw, Riley always had one of the hottest working bands in the Mid-South. By the end of 1957, "Red Hot" had sold only thirty-seven thousand copies, and Riley was furious.

Billy Riley's third instance in the studio represents one of the last times when Jerry Lee Lewis would muster as a sideman.  This incandescent recording reading of Billy "The Kid" Emerson's "Red Hot" based on a cheerleaders' chant, "Our team is red hot..."). It was the closest Riley came to scoring a hit in the 1950s. The band was essentially the same, except that Jimmy Wilson had become the permanent pianist and Johnny "Ace" Cannon had been added on saxophone. The song was suggested by Sam Phillips (the fact that he owned the publishing probably accounted for some of his enthusiasm). The original version had appeared on Sun Records in June 1955.

Billy Riley is absolutely frantic. Whether his gal is "red hot" or not becomes a matter of life and death. He sounds as though he is pushing the recording needle well into the red as he does permanent damage to his larynx. "That's what the song needed - and that's what I gave it", Riley asserted.

James M. Van Eaton and Jimmy Wilson are extremely prominent, the former nearly maniacal, continually walloping the backbeat and thundering through bars three and four of each verse, creating a much heightened sense of tension. All the instruments are pushing, playing slightly ahead of the beat. The song actually has a relatively complex structure as Emerson mixes 6/4 and 4/4 bars in the chorus. Riley smiles, "That's what makes it happen. Most bands get it wrong". The whole song verged on hedonistic, almost violent chaos but Billy Riley and his band had crafted a truly definitive rockabilly performance. (HD)(MH)
Billy Riley & His Little Green Men
"PEARLY LEE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 265 - Master - Featured Overdub Handclaps
Recorded: - January 30, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 277 mono
PEARLY LEE / RED HOT
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-24 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
John "Ace" Cannon – Saxophone
 
"Pearly Lee" meanwhile, was furnished with handclaps and a chorus overdub to  arrive at the kind of gloss normally lavished on a A-side. That distinction went to  "Red Hot".

Pearly Lee is probably better known as the flip side of Red Hot than as a great record in its own right. Nevertheless, those listeners who are familiar with its released version on Sun 277 are in for some surprises and some treats as they hear the alternate versions included here.

One inspiration for Pearly Lee is obviously Little Richard's record, ''The Girl Can't Help It'' (Specialty 591) which broke into the Billboard Top 100 just about the time that ''Pearly Lee'' was recorded.

On both, the lead vocalist sings a line and several voices respond in unison to remind him of the song's title. The responding voices do not appear on the four all versions here, but they are part of Sun 277. Riley also adopted a word from ''The Girl Can't Help It''. Little Richard begins, "If she walks by the menfolks get engrossed". On all the alternates (but not  Sun 277), Riley sings, "When she walks by the menfolks stop and look'. Are there any other rock and roll songs that include the word, 'menfolks'? Luckily, Riley didn't decide to use the word ''engrossed''. (HD)(MH)
Tommy Blake & The Rhythm Rebels
"FLAT FOOT SAM" - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Oscar Clara Wills
Publisher: - Hiphill Music
Matrix number: - U 266
Recorded: - August 18, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 278-A mono
FLAT FOOT SAM / LORDY HOODY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-25 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tommy Blake - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Bailey Adams - Guitar
Edward "Eddie Hall" Dettenheim - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
The Singing Sons
Elijan Franklin - Vocal Chorus
John Franklin - Vocal Chorus
Andre Mitchell - Vocal Chorus
Johnny Pryor - Vocal Chorus

Tommy Blake's first Sun single "Flat Foot Sam", wasn't one of his songs. A Shreveport-area TV repairman named Oscar Wills (dubbed T.V. Slim by local music honcho Stan Lewis) wrote and first recorded it for the local Cliff Records, a label associated with Ram Records. The song was published by Ram's Hip Hill Music, and sold well enough for Chess Records to take an interest. Chess purchased the Cliff master and issued it on Checker Records before deciding that it was too ragged. They told Slim to re-record it in New Orleans and the new version was issued on their Argo label. It was a measure of Sun president Sam Phillips' faith in it that he issued Blake's version despite the fact that he didn't own the music publishing. In the studio, he paired Blake with session drummer Jimmy M, Van Eaton and a vocal group. For his part, Blake easily related to a song about a scam artist who can't win for losing: "Flat Foot Sam stole a ten dollar bill. Told the judge he did it for a thrill...". ''Flat Foot Sam" sold well enough for Sun to keep the faith. (HD)(MH)
Tommy Blake & The Rhythm Rebels
"LORDY HOODY" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Johnny Blake-Eddie Hall-Carl Bailey Adams
Publisher: - Tree Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 267
Recorded: - August 18, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 278-B mono
LODY HOODY / FLAT FOOT SAM
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-4-26 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments )
Tommy Blake - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Bailey Adams - Guitar
Edward "Eddie Hall" Dettenheim - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
The Singing Sons
Elijan Franklin - Vocal Chorus
John Franklin - Vocal Chorus
Andre Mitchell - Vocal Chorus
Johnny Pryor - Vocal Chorus

"Lordy Hoody" is not a particularly good record. Recorded originally for RCA Victor (under the title "All Night Long") and relegated to the unreleased pile, Blake re-recorded the tune in slightly modified version for Sam Phillips. Ironically, the ballad side RCA Victor did release, an acoustic gem titled "Freedom", remains Blake's best recorded work. For some reason, Phillips or his studio disciples envisioned Blake as a rocker. It may have been a mistake. If you can discern the lyrics to "Lordy Hoody", you find a tale of a square old man who is at best mildly bemused by the young uns' wild music and carrying on.

Not much to get excited about here, except for Carl Adams' stinging Fender guitar work, which pushed the limits of 45rom reproduction and is pretty intense even for rockabilly fans. (HD)(MH)
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"HOME OF THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Johnny Cash-Glenn Douglas-Lily McAlpin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 268 - Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - July 1, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 279-A mono
HOME OF THE BLUES / GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass

Overdub Session July 31, and August 1, 1957
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Sid Manker - Guitar
Jimmy Smith - Piano

This ''Home Of The Blues'' marked Jack Clement behind the glass and Clement has said that he found the original Cash sound a little ''tubby'' and there is already one subtle addition here, a second electric guitarist. Sid Manker plays the treble strings while Luther sticks to safer ground after his 'guitar manual' intro. By the time the song was released in 1957, Clement had taken a different version and overdubbed a piano and subdued chorus which themselves produced a curiously muddy sound. This overdubbed version finds Cash singing marinally higher than he often did and there may be a slight loss of intensity, but it is a pleasure to hear the song without the piano and vocal additions after all this time. The song itself may have been inspired by the record shop of owner Reuben Cherry of the same name which was a feature on Beale Street of downtown Memphis until urban renewal took its toll. (HD)(MH)
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 269 - Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - July 1, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 279-B mono
GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE / HOME OF THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802 DI-1-2 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass

Overdub Session July 31, and August 1, 1957
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Sid Manker - Guitar
Jimmy Smith - Piano

"Give My Love To Rose" is more minimalist than ever. A western ballad, it represents the first time that Cash's infatuation with the Old West (which would later consume entire albums) intruded itself onto disc. "Rose" is a mournful tale of a dying man's wishes told to the minimalist accompaniment. The slight change in direction brought forth some reward when the single rose quickly to number 5 in the country charts and number 88 in the pop listing before dying away. That showing encouraged Jack Clement to persevere in his attempt at sweetening Cash's sound. Billboard was correct when they described this as a "very strong reading of an unusual piece of country material". (HD)(MH)
Dickey Lee & The Collegiates
"GOOD LOVIN'" - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Kirkland-Taylor-Jesmet
Publisher: - Barnhill Music Corporation
Matrix number: - U 271
Recorded: - August 10, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - October 12, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 280-A mono
GOOD LOVIN' / MEMORIES NEVER GROW OLD
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-1-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Dickey Lee - Vocal and Guitar
Allen Reynolds - Vocal and Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Vocal Chorus
Bill Talmadge, Eddie Well, Daved Morris,
J.L. Jerden, David Glenn

Ever wonder what rockabilly sound like when it meets doo wop? Wonder no more. Singer Dickey Lipscomb in his pre-Patches Sun mode reveals all on these sides.

More power to Lee and company for even knowing the Clovers' original version of "Good Lovin'" which appeared on Atlantic in 1953. Not surprisingly, the original black version of the tune was much more explicithly sexual; this is, after all, a song about a guy who is just overwhelmed by the boundless sexual energy of his girlfriend. In Lee's version, things are a tad more discreet. Musically speaking, doo-wop and rockabilly are not oil and water, as Buddy Holly was busy proving. In fact, it is Holly's shadow more than the Clovers that hangs over these sides. Sam Phillips continued to schedule sessions with Dickey Lee and a date early in the following year produced one more Sun single. (HD)(MH)
Dickey Lee & The Collegiates
''MEMORIES NEVER GROW OLD" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Dickey Lee-Camp-Staley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 270
Recorded: - August 10, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - October 12, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 280-B mono
MEMORIES NEVER GROW OLD / GOOD LOVIN'
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-1-4 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Dickey Lee - Vocal and Guitar
Allen Reynolds - Vocal and Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Vocal Chorus
Bill Talmadge, Eddie Well, Daved Morris,
J.L. Jerden, David Glenn

Dickey Lee made one more record at Sun Records in 1963, but the results were destined for the Dot label, where they were no doubt more at home. By that time, Lee had moved on to Jack Clement's little musical frontier in Beaumont, where he wrote "She Thinks I Still Care". ("I think of Jack Clement as Moses in another life because he led us all over the place", Lee once said). As a pop, then country singer, Dickey Lee charted consistently from the early 1960s until the early 1980s. At last sighting, he was Professional Manager at Polygram Music in Nashville, and had just written a charted song for MCA's Tracy Byrd - the latest in a long line of custom-written hits. Hus buddy in the Collegiates, Allen Reynolds, also went to Nashville, and became the producer of Garth Brooks. (HD)(MH)
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