CONTAINS 1961 SESSIONS

Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, 1961 / Beat Records
Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, 1961 / Sonic Records
Studio Session for Nelson Ray, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jean Dee, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Shirley Sisk, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for George Klein, Early 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, February 9, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, February 11, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Teenangels, March 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Harold Dorman, April 14, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Smith, May 4, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bily Adams, Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961 / HOTB Records
Studio Session for Bill Yates, Unknown Date Summer 1961 / First Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, June 12, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, June 13, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, June 14, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Brad Suggs, August 6, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tony Rossini, August 6, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Memphis Willie B., August 12, 1961 (1) / Prestige Records
Studio Session for Memphis Willie B., August 12, 1961 (2) / Prestige Records
Studio Session for Mikki Wilcox, August 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Don Hosea, August 29, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Freddie North, Probably 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bobby Wood, September 15, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Harold Dorman, September 21, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, September 21, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, October 24, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jeb Stuart, Late 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Rayburn Anthony, Fall 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tony Austin, Unknown Date(s) 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, Fall 1961 / Zone Records
Studio Session for The Prisonaires, Various Dates Probably 1961 / Excello Records
Studio Session for Charlie Feathers, 1961/1962 / Holiday Inn Records

Biography of Artists (See: The Sun Biographies)





1961

The cold war continued to worsen with the USSR exploding some very large bombs during testing and then masterminding the building of the Berlin Wall separating East from West Berlin, America sent a battle group to Germany and Americans and Russians Glared at each other across the border, due to this uncertainty many Americans built backyard fallout shelters in case of nuclear war. To make matters worse the Americans financed anti-Castro Cubans for an invasion at the bay of pigs which was an unmitigated disaster. The Soviets put the first man in space on April 12, 1961 Yuri Gagarin followed by the US in May with Alan Shepard. Popular music included Chubby Checker's “Pony Time” and “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” by the Shirelles, and top movies included "West Side Story" and "The Parent Trap''.

1961

The extended plays, Sun EPA 115 ''Blue Suede Shoes'' by Carl Perkins and Sun EPA 116 ''Home Of The Blues'' by Johnny Cash issued.

Rock's second era begins in earnest with the debut of Del Shannon's "Runaway" which is the  first pure unadorned and uptempo rocker to hit number 1 on the Billboard Pop Charts in  almost a year. The song also introduces the "musitron", an early form of the synthesizer.

The Marvelettes "Please Mr. Postman" becomes the first number 1 Billboard Pop hit released  on a black owned and operated label, Motown.

A widespread revival of the mid-1950's vocal group sound results in the re-appearance on  the charts and airwaves of dozens of songs from 1954-1957 and the brief resurgence of  similarly styled newer groups.

"Frat Rock" begins to show up with Gary "US" Bonds hit "Quarter To Three" with its emphasis  on a frenzied atmosphere rather than on intricate production.

Soul music starts gaining a foothold with hits by Sam Cooke, James Brown, Solomon Burke  and former Drifters lead signer Ben E. King, who's "Stand By Me" is a number 1 rhythm and  blues record.

Elvis Presley gives his last live performance for eight years.

1961

A further Sun studio, this time on the site of the Cumberland Lodge building in Nashville,  opens in February and christened when Jerry Lee's rendering of "What'd I Say" (one of the  first sides recorded there) turns out to be his 'comeback' hit. Ex-rockabilly vocalist and  future country bigwig, Billy Sherrill, is taken on as an engineer and part-time producer.

Dick Dale uses the term "surfing" to describe his instrumental rock and roll.

Stax Records begins to produce soul records in Memphis, Tennessee.

The Peppermint Lounge opens in New York.

Roy Orbison has his first number 1 hit, "Running Scared" on the Billboard Top 100 chart.

Phil Spector and partner Lester Sill released the "Oh Yeah Maybe Baby" on their new label  Philles.

Columbia Records releases selections of Robert Johnson's recordings on LP. This release was  critical in the popularity of blues in England in years to come.

RCA France issued a  are 8-track 10-inch LP (130.252) contained both sides of Elvis's first four Sun Records releases. "Good Rockin' Tonight" is significant because it didn't have the echo that RCA added to all of the Sun material. What you have here is the basic Sun sound in all its glory.


Onie Wheeler with his daughter Karen Wheeler. >
1961

It was in St. Louis in 1961 that former Sun artist Onie Wheeler was contacted by Bob Neal  again. Since 1957, Neal had dissolved Stars Inc. and moved to California to manage Johnny  Cash. He then split from Cash and headed back east, bypassing Memphis and arriving in  Nashville. He proposed a deal to Onie, who moved his family to Nashville once more, but  the offer fell through, leaving Onie scrambling around for a job.


It was during this period  that he went back to see Don Law of Columbia and got a joint Epic session for himself and  his daughter Karen in April 1962. The result was ''Sandyland Farmer'', a not-too-successful  answerdisc to Frankie Miller's ''Blackland Farmer''.

Bob Neal eventually landed Onie a slot on George Jones' package show, and Onie recorded  for Jones's labels; United Artists in 1964 and Musicor the following year. Then they had the  inevitable rift and Onie went to work for Roy Acuff, holding down a fairly steady day job  with Sho-Bud guitars (one of the owners, Shot Jackson, also worked for Acuff as a steel  guitarist, so no-one lost their job for taking off work to play Acuff shows).

1961

During 1961 it seems that former Sun artist Billy Emerson was doing artist and repertoire  work for Lenard Allen of the United Artist label, working with artists like Junior Wells and  Willie Mabon. For parts of 1961 and 1962 he was living in New Jersey after his father died  there in Linden. Emerson played as a solo around the Newark area.

Sun SLP 1250 ''Million Sellers'' by Various Artists issued. Reissued with different jacket as ''Sun's Gold Hits, Volume 1''.

Sun SLP 1260 ''At The Rockhouse'' by Roy Orbison issued.

Sun SLP 1265 ''Jerry Lee's Greatest'' by Jerry Lee Lewis issued.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON
FOR BEAT RECORDS 1961

HALL RECORDING STUDIO
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

Shortly after the BEAT session, the guys at Hall studio connected Hayden with a man named Mike Oury who ran a label called Profile, formerly associated with Mel London's Chief Records. Profile had issued recordings by well though of bluesmen including Junior Wells, and some raw rock and roll by Mickey Hawks and others. The deal was that Hayden would take his own band into the studio and produce masters that Profile would buy from him.

01 – ''WHATCHA GONNA DO'' – B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Mike Oury Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 1426
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Profile Records (S) 45rpm standard single Profile 4015-A mono
WHATCHA GONNA DO / SUMMERS ALMOST OVER
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-30 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

''Whatcha Gonna Do'' is a good pop song, forcefully sung by Hayden with some interesting vocal tricks and an engaging Mexican guitar sound.

''Summers Almost Over'' is a calmer version of the same formula, and again Hayden's voice soars and falls in all the right places. The song, issued on August 1961, is aimed at the summer vacation crowd and could have been a real smash with the right promotion. It is obviously a theme Hayden had been kicking around for some time because he also recorded a demo of a song called ''It Won't Be Long Until The Summer''.

02 – ''SUMMERS ALMOST OVER'' – B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Mike Oury Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 1427
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Profile Records (S) 45rpm standard single Profile 4015-B mono
WHATCHA GONNA DO / SUMMERS ALMOST OVER
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-31 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson – Vocal & Acoustic Guitar
Travis Westmoreland – Guitar
Unknown – Bass
Bob Miller – Drums
Unknown - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON

SONIC RECORDING STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION : UNKNOWN DATE 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Moving to the Sonic studio in 1961, Roland Janes produced Hayden with a different sound altogether; ''I Wanna Get Home'' was an unashamed imitation of the Johnny Cash sound, complete with chunk chugga chunk rhythm impressively played Memphis's up and coming guitar wizard, Travis Wammack, and an overall lonesome sound. Hayden doesn't imitate Cash's voice directly but his vocal performance is impressive, suggesting Cash rather than being Cash, much as he was able to do with Presley.

01 – ''I WANNA GET HOME'' – B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15263-12 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – FAIRLANE ROCK
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-22 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Recorded on this session was ''Kansas City'', Hayden's second go at capturing the Leiber and Stoller song that has been revived several times over the years by bluesmen and rockers alike. This version is up-yo-date early 1960s Memphis blue eyed blues, its rhythm a mixture of blues and rock and roll, but topped off with a
creazed piano solo by the little-known Tommy Bennett and two cutting, space-age guitar solos by Travis Wammack. Hayden recorded the song on other occasions, but this is the finest.

02 – ''KANSAS CITY'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Jerry Leiber Music – Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15263-9 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – FAIRLANE ROCK
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-18 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 – ''THIS IS COUNTRY'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15263-11 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – FAIRLANE ROCK

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson – Vocal & Acoustic Guitar
Travis Wammack - Guitar
Prentiss McPhail – Bass
Danny Taylor – Drums
Tommy Bennett - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR NELSON RAY

UNKNOWN DATE AND STUDIO LOCATION PROBABLY 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

01 – "YOU'RE EVERYTHING" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Jack Toombs
Publisher: - Sure Fire Music Corporation
Matrix number: - P 400  - Master  - Promotion Copy
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3568-A mono
YOU'RE EVERYTHING / YOU'VE COME HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6



Nelson Ray >

Nelson Ray represents another question mark on the Phillips International roster. Once again, it's a cinch these sides were not recorded in a Memphis Sun studio and their source and personnel remain a mystery. The ballad ''You're Everything'' mines the country crossover territory worked to perfection by Jim Reeves. In fact the opening bars suggest that Ray is about to sing ''Put your sweet lips a little closer to the phone''.



The flip-side was probably the reason these sides were imported to Phillips International. ''You've Come Home'' features a strong Floyd Cramer sounding piano and a muted string guitar solo that might have come directly from Don Gibson's ''Oh Lonesome Me''.

The song's brief release borrows the chords directly from ''The Ways Of A Woman In Love'' has a mighty powerful hook. The title phrase, brief as it is, is stretched into four notes and repeated melodically and effectively to the point where this song could have had some serious impact with only a modicum of air play. Unfortunately few disc jockeys in April 1961 agreed with that assessment.

02 – "YOU'VE COME HOME" – B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Nelson Ray
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 401  - Master  - Promotion Copy
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3568-B mono
YOU'VE COME HOME / YOU'RE EVERYTHING
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Nelson Ray - Vocal
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JEAN DEE
UNKNOWN DATE AND STUDIO LOCATION PROBABLY 1961

SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

Doing business in Nashville meant that Sam Phillips would be exposed to more and more offers of product for lease than he would ever hear holed up with his buddies in Memphis. And so, we are one again faced with a mystery. Who is Jean Dee and where do these sides, released in July, 1961, come from? You'd have to go all the way back to June, 1956 to find a similar case. At that time, Jean Chapel, another very bluesy white lady, had her spartan Nashville-recorded sides brought in for release on Sun.

01 – ''NOTHING DOWN (99 YEARS TO PAY)'' - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Wolfe
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number: - P 405  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - July 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3570-A mono
NOTHING DOWN (99YEARS TO PAY) / MY GREATEST HURT
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

''Nothing Down'' is a surprisingly gritty song for a white gal, circa 1961. Even the recording is curiously unadorned – the piano is barely audible in the mix. Basically, this is a vocal/drums/electric bass date. There is a passing resemblance to ''Heartbreak Hotel'', although by comparison that arrangement seemed quite full! ''My Greatest Hurt'' is where the money was spent. We've got the same bass and drums here for sure, but what a difference a well-recorded chorus makes. Compare the impact of this restrained chorus with the usual wretched excess of choral overdubs in Memphis. Sometimes less is more – a sentiment that rarely dawned on the Gene Lowery Singers. Jean Dee went on to record for King in 1963 but seems to have left few traces thereafter.

02 – "MY GREATEST HURT" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Denning
Publisher: - Four Star
Matrix number: - P 404  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Firs appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3570-B mono
MY GREATEST HURT / NOTHING DOWN (99 YEARS TO PAY)
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jean Dee – Vocal
Unknown Vocal Chorus
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©



UPDATE - JEAN DEE - You might not recognize the name Jean Dee, but you still might have  heard her voice. She was born Yvonne McGowan on Christmas Day in Oklahoma and has  recorded and performed under a variety of many different names and genres. Some of the  different names she has used include Yvonne O'Day, Vonnie Taylor, Vonnie Mack, Jean Dee  and Yvonne DeVaney, which she still uses today.  At the age of two, she began singing and yodelling, and by 11 she won a contest playing  classical piano. She also played guitar and bass.


While still in high school, she teamed up  with her sister Mary, with Yvonne playing guitar and Mary on accordion, and had a duet song  and tap dancing act. They performed with Roy Rogers and Trigger once!

Some of the labels she's worked with include Capitol Records, Columbia Records, Decca  Records, Phillips International, Spar Records, King Records, Chart Records, Compo Records  and for her own YMD Music Group, which she founded. If that sounds like she really gets  around, she does! But, by recording for all those different labels, she got to perform with a  variety of artists. Some of those include Merle Lindsay's Western Swing Band, Red Foley, Pee  Wee King, Minnie Pearl, Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys, Tommy Duncan, The Anita Kerr  Singers and a former featured artist here on Music For Every Mood, The Jordanaires, who  back her on today's song. If you listen closely, you can tell it's their trademark sound!

Her biggest claim to fame would probably be her songwriting talents. She's written songs  that have been recorded by Dean Martin, Vic Dana, Pat Boone, Billy Walker, Dottie West,  Wanda Jackson, Bonnie Guitar, Hank Snow, The Hardin Trio, Carl and Pearl Butler, The  Wilburn Brothers and The Cheltenham Singers, out of England.

Some of the many songs she's recorded herself, under different names, include  ''Snowflakes'', ''I Just Want To Be With You'', ''Love Is A Gamble'', Does It Hurt You To  Remember'', ''I Live For You'', ''Please Forgive Me'', ''Blue Mountain Waltz'', ''Slowly I'm Losing  You'', ''Open Arms'', ''If You Don't Somebody Else Will'', ''Sweethearts On Parade'', ''My  Greatest Hurt'', ''Step Into My World'', ''Dim The Car Lights'', ''Pick Me Up On Your Way  Down'', ''Teach Me To Live Without You'' and ''Tell Me A Lie'', among countless others. She's  enjoyed a very full recording career!

She has received a BMI Citation of Achievement Award for her writing and holds the honorary  Commission Rank of Commodore in the Oklahoma Navy. Some of her latest releases include  The Yvonne DeVaney Collection of 2003.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SHIRLEY SISK
FOR SUN RECORDS 1962

PROBABLY ECHO RECORDING STUDIO
14 NORTH MANASSAS AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY STAN KESLER

Born Ernestine Brooks in Memphis. First recorded for Sam Phillips as a pianist and vocalist with her sisterin-  law Judy Dismukes on guitar. The session was on February 8, 1952 when ''Let Me Count The Curls'' and   ''Mean Old Memphis'' were recorded. Sam Phillips assigned Chess master numbers and shipped masters to   Chess and to local radio stations. However, Chess did not release the titles, but Acuff-Rose picked up the   publishing rights to the song ''Let Me Count The Curls''. By the late 1950s and early 1960s, Shirley Sisk was back in   Memphis, working out of the Echo studios as a pianist and organist. She was featured on a Phillips  International disc by the Memphis Bells and in her own right on Sun 365, recorded at the Echo studio on   Manassas Avenue in 1961. She owned Permanent Records in Memphis, which did not live up to its name. 

01 - ''I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET'' - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 449  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 365-A mono
I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET / OTHER SIDE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Echo Recording Studio, 14 North Manassas Avenue, Memphis. >

It's a long, long way from Elvis Presley's original version of this tune, issued on Sun 223 to this instrumental version by organist Shirley Sisk. There's no point making comparisons: Shirley is going to lose every time. This was recorded across town at the Echo studio, and issued in August 1961. It's easy to see why Sam might have been intrigued. First and foremost, he owned the publishing; second, the sound here had a strong commercial Billy Vaughn quality (albeit it with a far more potent backbeat).

Although it had been four years since Vaughn's hit ''Sail Along Silvery Moon'', the sound of Vaughn's music continued to sell respectable quantities of LPs, and seeing one of Sun's classic tunes turned into elevator music might have been a captivating thought.

The aptly named ''Other Side'' is a crisply recorded 12 bar blues. It's a safe bet this tune was recorded in one take either at the very end of the session or at the start, before the crew got down to any serious work.

02 – ''OTHER SIDE'' - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Stan Kesler-Shirley Sisk
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 450  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 365-B mono
OTHER SIDE / I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

03 – ''YOU DON'T LOVE ME''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961

04 – ''SINCE I MET YOU
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Wood - Guitar
Elbert Adair - Guitar
Eugene Keller - Drums
Bobby Wood - Piano
Charles Chalmers - Saxo

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JANUARY 1961

Jerry Lee Lewis buys new house on East Shore Drive in Memphis, Tennessee.

JANUARY 1, 1961 SUNDAY

Buzz Clifford begins tour to promote Baby Sittin' Boogie.

JANUARY 2, 1961 MONDAY

Aretha Franklin launches her switch to secular music at the Showboat in Philadelphia  tonight.

Capitol released Buck Owens' ''Foolin' Around''.

JANUARY 4, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Etta James is at the Counterpoint in Chicago. Bobby Rydell appears on the Perry Como Show.

JANUARY 5, 1961 THURSDAY

Iris DeMent is born in Paragould, Arkansas. Combinning folk and traditional country elements, she covers ''Big City'' on the Merle Haggard tribute album ''Tulare Dust''. He name inspires the title of The Goo Goo Dolls' Grammy-nominated rock song ''Iris''.

Singer and songwriter Mark Nesler is born in Beaumont, Taxes. He writes Tim NcCraw's ''Living And Living Well'', Josh Turner's ''Time Is Love'' and Keith Urban's ''You Look Good In My Shirt'', among others.

JANUARY 6, 1961 FRIDAY

Colonel Tom Parker negotiates a pay raise for Elvis Presley. Paramount agrees to pay $175,000 for each of its next three Presley pictures, and $200,000 for the two that will follow them.

Diana Trask marries Tom Ewen

George Hamilton IV recorded ''To You And Yours (From Me And Mine)'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Bill Doggett headlines the weekly revue at the Howard Theater in Washington, D.C. Also  appearing are the Drifters. Ruth Brown and Gary U.S. Bonds.

JANUARY 7, 1961 SATURDAY

Faron Young recorded ''Hello Walls'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio on Nashville's Music Row.

JANUARY 9, 1961 MONDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hit ''You Can Depend On Me'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio In Nashville, Tennessee.

The Johnny Horton classic ''North To Alaska'' goes on to number 1 in Billboard chart.

JANUARY 10, 1961 TUESDAY

Buzz Clifford sings "Baby Sittin' Boogieon American Bandstand.

JANUARY 11, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Frankie Avalon opens for Joey Bishop at the Dunes Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas.

Fats Domino begins a nine day tour of Texas and Oklahoma that grosses $50,000.

JANUARY 12, 1961 THURSDAY

Decca released Brenda Lee's pop hit ''Emotions;;.

JANUARY 13, 1961 FRIDAY

Warner Bros. released The Everly Brothers' pop hit ''Walk Right Back''. Anne Murray scores with a country remake in 1978.

Sam Cooke appears at New York's Apollo Theater with the Shells opening for him.

James Brown and the Fabulous Flames are at the Howard Theater in Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 14, 1961 SATURDAY

Saturday Prom features the Playmates and Johnny and the Hurricanes.

Mickey and Sylvia appear on American Bandstand.

It is reported that Jerry Lee Lewis and the American Federation of Musicians have reached  an agreement. Supposedly Lewis had owed the Union $10,000 in back dues. In retaliation  the A.F.M had banned Lewis from playing in Union controlled venues in Las Vegas.

''Town Hall Party'', an influential country radio/TV show in Los Angeles, comes to a conclusion after nine years, its regulars included Merle Travis, Tex Ritter, Freddie Hart and Joe Maphis.

JANUARY 16, 1961 MONDAY

Buck Owens and Rose Maddox recorded ''Mental Cruelty'' and ''Loose Talk'' at the Capitol Recording Studios in Los Angeles, California.

Capitol released The Louvin Brothers ''I Love You Best Of All''.

JANUARY 17, 1961 TUESDAY

Rose Maddox recorded ''Conscience, I'm Guilty'' at the Capitol Recording Studios in Hollywood, California.

JANUARY 19, 1961 THURSDAY

Rose Maddox recorded ''Lonely Street''. The song will become a country hit for Rex Allen Jr. in 1977.

JANUARY 20, 1961 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley finishes shooting ''Wild In The Country''.

Two weeks after signing a contract with Paramount Pictures, Colonel Tom Parker finishes negotiations with MGM on a deal that pays Elvis Presley $500,000 a piece for appearing in four movies.

''Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country''. John F. Kennedy is inaugurated as the 35th president of the Unites States in Washington, D.C. The next year, he is celebrated in Jimmy Dean's single ''P.T. 109''.

Jimmy C. Newman conducts his first Decca recording session, cutting ''Everybody's Dying For Love''.

Jerry Butler headlines the Regal Theater in Chicago. Also appearing are Dee Clark, the  Miracles, the Shirelles and LaVern Baker, Clyde McPhatter, Little Anthony, Ben E. King and  the Shells.

John F. Kennedy is inaugurated President of the United States, urging Americans to ''ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country'', and  Fidel Castro declares Cuba bans free elections.

JANUARY 21, 1961 SATERDAY

Dale Hawkins opens at the Rocket Room In Washington.

The Ventures perform on Saturday Prom.

JANUARY 22, 1961 SUNDAY

Patsy Cline has her second baby, Allen Dick.

JANUARY 23, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Lewis Pruit's ''Crazy Bullfrog''.

JANUARY 24, 1961 TUESDAY

Bob Dylan arrives in Manhattan, where he gains acclaim as a folk singer and songwriter. Inspired in part by Woody Guthrie, he is eventually inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of fame.

Johnny Burnette sings "Little Boy Sad" on American Bandstand.

JANUARY 25, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Ricky Nelson "Your the Only One" on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.

JANUARY 26, 1961 THURSDAY

Dodie Stevens, Bobby Rydell and Chubby Checker complete a tour of Australia.

Frankie Lymon sings Silhouttes in American Bandstand.

JANUARY 27, 1961 FRIDAY

Carla Thomas makes her television debut on American Bandstand and performs "Gee Whiz  (Look at His Eyes).

Gene Vincent plays The Gaiety Ballroom in Grimsby, Great Britain.

''Sing Along With Mitch'' debuts on NBC-TV with lyrics printed on the screen so the audience can participate at home. Host Mitch Miller is a former pop record executive who produced a number of Marty Robbins sessions.

Ernie Ashworth recorded ''Forever Gone''.

JANUARY 28, 1961 SATURDAY

Brook Benton ends his month long tour in Orlando, Florida.

Saturday Prom is broadcast from the Winter Carnival in St. Paul, Minnesota. Appearing are  Freddy Cannon, JoAnn Campbell, Buzz Clifford and the String-A-Longs.

JANUARY 29, 1961 SUNDAY

Bob Dylan meets the declining Woody Guthrie in a private residence in East Orange, New Jersey. Both singer and songwriters will eventually be enshrined in the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

JANUARY 30, 1961 MONDAY

Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller announce they'll form their own production company. Originally pop and rhythm and blues songwriters, several of their songs become country hits, including ''Stand By Me'', ''Hound Dog'' and ''Ruby Baby''.

Floyd Cramer recorded ''San Antonio Rose'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Decca released Patsy Cline's ''I Fall To Pieces''.

Capitol released Buck Owens' self-titled album, the first of 50 compiled for the company over the next 15 years.

Billy and Charlene Sherrill are married. The groom goes on to write such relationship songs as ''My Elusive Dreams'', ''The Most Beautiful Girl'' and ''Stand By Your Man''.

JANUARY 31, 1961 TUESDAY

Bobby Darin and Friends, an hour long special, airs on NBC-TV.

LATE JANUARY 1961

The Everly Brothers are reported to be in Hollywood taking acting classes.

Aretha Franklin is booked to play the Library portion of the Playboy Club in Chicago.

Bill Doggett is at Pep's Musical Lounge in Philadelphia.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR GEORGE KLEIN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: EARLY 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – CECIL SCAIFE
AND/OR GEORGE KLEIN

01 – ''U.T. PARTY PART I'' – B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Charles Underwood-Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 434  - Master
Recorded: Early 1961
Released: - March 10, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 358-A mono
U.T. PARTY PART I / U.T. PARTY PART II
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Local disc jockey and Elvis-hanger on George Klein makes his second appearance on a Sun label. He was last heard narrating the Jerry Lee career-disaster parody that appeared on Sun 301. Sun was willing to settle on a pretty limited market for this disc.

The ''U.T.'' in the title is the University of Tennessee, located in Knoxville, with a satellite campus in Memphis. Just to make sure the whole marketplace is covered, Klein makes reference to U.T. Football, basketball and baseball here.



George Klein delivers a copy of Elvis Presley's second album on Elvis' home at Audubon Drive in Memphis, Tennessee, 1956. >

Presumably, the chess club was left out of the lyric since those geeks didn't dance and drink beer, both of which are plainly prerequisites for deriving enjoyment from this disc. Why Sun got into this business is anybody's guess. Presumably, they expected to sell a bunch of these discs at fraternity parties. In any case, not many of them made it past the state line.

Klein offers an incredibly stilted narration here in a time honored style. Like rock and roll godfather Alan Freed, Klein talks to all those ''crazy cats'' and ''swinging chicks'' out there. Klein was barely older than his constituents, which made this patronizing blather barely tolerable. When Freed did it, it always sounded like somebody's uncle desperately trying to impress the kids.

02 – ''U.T. PARTY PART II'' – B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Charles Underwood-Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 434  - Master
Recorded: Early 1961
Released: - March 10, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 358-B mono
U.T. PARTY PART II / U.T. PARTY PART I
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
George Klein - Narration
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©



George Klein and Elvis Presley >


GEORGE KLEIN – Born on October 8, 1935 in Memphis, Tennessee, is a disc jockey and television host.   He met Elvis Presley in the eighth grade at Humes High School in North Memphis, and they became lifelong   friends, until Presley's death in 1977. Klein can be heard weekly on Sirius XM channel 19 Elvis Radio, and   on the George Klein Original Elvis Hour on WKQK FM and Sirius XM Elvis Radio.


George is an innovator and an ambassador to Memphis music. He has helped bring Memphis music to the   world and the world of music to Memphis. George Klein is much more than a friend of Elvis Presley. He was   one of the first disc jockeys in Memphis to play rock and roll on the radio, before Elvis.

That was just the   beginning of what George would do for Memphis music wise and he became one of the most famous disc   jockeys in Memphis history. He had the RKO ''Boss'' jock sound down when he was at WHBQ radio.   Klein and Elvis had a lot more in common than their careers, they thought a lot alike. Like Elvis, he doesn’t   have an unkind word to say about anyone. He is respectful, kind and caring.

In addition to his work at 56 WHBQ radio, George also had a TV show on WHBQ TV Channel 13 called   ''Talent Party''. ''Talent Party'' was always faithful to local talent. Every show featured at least one local act.   That show broke a lot of Memphis talent, like a group called Knowbody Else. You may know them better as   Black Oak Arkansas. He also helped launch Sandy Posey’s career (''Born A Woman'' and ''Single Girl'').   George broke some records on ''Talent Party'' that went on to be national hits. They were songs that couldn’t   get airplay on local stations. Songs by artist that George believed in like ''Keep On Dancing'' by the Gentrys   and Sam the Sham's ''Wooly Bully'' just to name a couple.

George Klein himself make several appearance on the Sun Records label, Klein performs probably in 1958 a traditional   southern Baptist hymn ''Lord Lead Me Home'' in the very style that served as nightly entertainment at Elvis' house. In all likelihood,   Klein has simply taken a bit of Graceland and transported it to 706 Union. Klein actually had two releases on   Sun Records, one the Jerry Lee Lewis novelty record "The Return Of Jerry Lee" (Sun 301) created to make light of   his 1958 British tour debacle. Klein's second Sun release was the forgettable March 1961 ''U.T. Party 1 and   2'' (Sun 358) in 1961.

Whenever a group wanted to be on the show George didn’t care what they had done, he cared about what   they sounded like. No tape? No problem. George worked out a deal with Roland Janes at Sonic Recording   Studios. For thirteen dollars a group could go in and cut one to four songs to lip synch on the show. Even   back then studio time was expensive and would run well over a hundred dollars.

George Klein watched to see what other music shows were doing at the time, he noticed that many of them   featured regulars. He decided to do the same. He picked two acts to feature every other week, Flash and the   Casuals (later Flash and the Board of Directors) and Sherry Grooms were who he decided on.

David ''Flash'' Fleischman (now co-owner of All Memphis Music, an internet station) says, ''I met George   Klein four days after turning sixteen and getting my drivers license. I Drove to WHBQ because I wanted to   meet this disc jockey. Not because I wanted to be in radio or was interested in radio, but because he booked   bands and I was in a band. That was the start of what's been a 48 year friendship. I'm proud to call George   Klein my friend and no matter what I do, I can never repay George for what's he's done for me. He's been   there and advised me all these years, every step of the way. And one of the things that makes George so   special, is that he has helped so many over all these years. As the title of the Tina Turner song says George   Klein is "Simply the Best''.

Klein not only discovered Memphis singing talent but other talent as well. During the annual Miss Teenage   Memphis Pageant, the Talent Party fashion coordinator spotted a standout beauty. She brought the girl to   George’s attention and they sent some pictures of her to a modeling agency in New York. The agency   accepted her. She became the model of the year and then Hollywood came calling on Cybill Shepherd.

Today, George Klein hosts a program on Sirius XM radio Elvis channel, Memphis Sounds for WYPL-18   TV , and the Elvis hour for WMC radio in Memphis, where he lives with his wife , Dara.


Charlie Rich at home, 1962, with Margaret Ann and the kids. >

FEBRUARY 1961

It turned about that success that had shocked the, was only a fleeting visitor to the Rich  home during the next few years. The reasons for Charlie's lack of substained commercial  success at Sun have little to do with the quality of his records. Perhaps the worst marketing  decision was selecting ''Gonna Be Waiting'' as the follow-up to ''Lonely Weekend''. The song  was simple an inferior clone of ''Lonely Weekends''.


In truth, the decision wasn't hard to  understand. Nobody had a clue what to do with Charlie from the very first. Having tasted  success on only his third record, they weren't about to tamper with the formula.

And so, for  all intents and purposes, they simply reissued his with slightly different lyrics. It couldn't  have helped Charlie's confidence to watch the record sink without a trace. Charlie and  Magaret Ann learned a lesson, and the first change they had to apply it – which was  approximately six years later – the result were no less disastrous. For the follow-up to  Charlie's next hit record, ''Mohair Sam'', recorded for Smash in 1965, he switched gears  completely and selected a beautiful ballad written by Margaret Ann called ''Field Of Yellow  Daisies''. Again, the record buying public deserted him in droves, hammering home the  message that fame is fleeting and fickle.

Charlie continued to record some powerful and memorable sides for Sun, but none of them  dented the pop marketplace. Part of the problem was undoubtedly the fact that Charlie had  never written teen-oriented material. He was, in every sense, an adult artist. His concerns  and priorities just did not resonate with adolescents. ''Lonely Weekend'' had been a freak  occurrence – one of those rare instances where kids and adults shared a problem: being  alone on a weekend. But from then on, Charlie spoke to people with mortgages, drinking  problems and ex-lovers.

And why should he apologize or disguise who he was? Charlie Rich had a wife, three kids,  prematurely greying hair, and a severe drinking problem. If he couldn't write from his own  experience, what was the point? And so he produced some excellent music over the next  three years, none of which sold particularly well. ''Stay'' and ''On My Knees'' dealt with  relationship and abandonment issues. Both were beautiful songs, which continue to be  recorded by other artists. Indeed, both were re-recorded by Rich during his later tenure at  Epic Records. In fact, ''On My Knees'' finally achieved hit status when Charlie's duet version  with Janie Fricke was released in 1978, more than 15 years after his first recording of the  song had appeared.


FEBRUARY 1961

A year or so after opening his new Memphis studio, Sam Phillips had launched a custom   studio in Nashville in a blaze of publicity. Sneak previews were held on November 5, 1960   and the first official session was held on February 9, 1961 when Jerry Lee Lewis breezed   into town and revived ''What'd I Say'', the song that began his rehabilitation.

Judd Phillips becomes full-time promotion manager for Jerry Lee Lewis, and Ray Brown of National Artists is conferred bookings.

The Soviet Union launches the Venera 1 space probe during February of 1961. The unmanned probe was the first spacecraft to fly by Venus. The Venera 1’s mission returned some data back to Earth verifying the presence of plasma in space, but it was ultimately a failure as contact with the probe was lost within about a week of its launch. It did not transmit any data back about Venus when it passed by the planet. The Soviet Union launched a total of 16 Venera probes and many succeeded in providing detailed data and images of Venus.

FEBRUARY 1, 1961 WEDNESDAY

The Belmonta are American Bandstand's musical guests.

FEBRUARY 2, 1961 THURSDAY

Little Jimmy Dickens recorded ''Farewell Party'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

FEBRUARY 3, 1961 FRIDAY

Tex Ritter recorded ''I Dreamed Of A Hill-Billy Heaven'', namechecking late country stars Carson Robison, Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers. Also reference, Red Foley, Ernest Tubb, Eddy Arnold, Gene Autry and Eddie Dean, among others.

The Show of Stars Bobby Rydell, Chubby Checker and Dodie Stevens swing through Oahu,   Hawaii.

Brook Benton, the Shirelles, Maxine Brown and the Dynamics are at the Howard Theater.

FEBRUARY 4, 1961 SATURDAY

Johnny Burnette under goes an appendectomy at Hollywood Hospital. This will cause the   postponement of his European tour and an estimated lose of $10,000 in bookings.

Roger Miller recorded ''When Two Worlds Collide'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

Rockabilly artist Johnny Burnette has an emergency appendectomy in Hollywood, California.

Nineteen years away from appearing on a country hit with Merle Haggard, Clint Eastwood makes the cover of TV Guide.

FEBRUARY 6, 1961 MONDAY

Don Reno, of Reno and Smiley, has a son, Dale Reno, in Roanoke, Virginia. The lad joins his older brothers, Ronnie and Don Wayne, to form The Reno Brothers following their dad's 1984 death.

Columbia released Ray Price's double-sided single, ''Heart Over Mind'' with ''The Twenty-Fourth Hour''.

Dion is a guest on American Bandstand.

FEBRUARY 7, 1961 TUESDAY

Bobby Rydell in his hometown of Philadelphia receives 1960s Outstanding Entertainer Award   from the Sons of Italy at Palumbo's restaurant.

RCA Victor released the single ''Surrender'', a number 1 song recorded by Elvis Presley and published by Elvis Presley Music in 1961. It is an adaptation by Doc Pomus and Mort Schuman of the music of a 1902 Neapolitan ballad by Giambattista and Ernesto de Curtis entitled "Torna a Surriento" ("Come Back to Sorrento"). It hit number one in the United States and United Kingdom in 1961 and eventually became one of the best selling singles of all time. This was one of 25 songs Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman wrote for Presley. It has been recorded by many other artists.

FEBRUARY 8, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Hank Snow recorded ''Beggar To A King'' and ''The Restless One'' during the afternoon at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Ricky Nelson performs ''You Are The Only One'' for the second time in six weeks on ABC's ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

George Jones recorded ''Tender Years'' in Nashville at the Bradley Recording Studio.

EARLY FEBRUARY 1961

Johnny Tillotson begins a three week tour of Ohio, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Illinois.

Fabian is at the Arenta Coliseum in Manilla, Philippines.

Gene Vincent begins tour in London to begin a tour of England.

Bill Haley and His Comets are touring Mexico, but also visit Chile, Peru and Ecuador.

FEBRUARY 8, 1961 WEDNESDAY

The Ramrods perform (Ghost) Riders in the Sky" on American Bandstand.

FEBRUARY 9, 1960 THURSDAY

Sam Phillips open his Nashville studio. Billy Sherrill is retained as production engineer. Jerry Lee Lewis records his comeback hit, ''What'd I Say'', at the first session.

The Louvin Brothers recorded ''Keep Your Eyes On Jesus''. Pam Tillis and Johnny Cash will remake the song with The Jordanaires for the 2003 tribute ''Livin'. Lovin', Losin'', Songs Of The Louvin Brothers''.

Studio session for Jerry Lee Lewis at the Sam Phillips Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY FEBRUARY 9, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OF TOM SPARKMAN

Having spent 1960 getting asquainted with the new facilities in Memphis, throughout 1961 Jerry Lee Lewis made several visits to Nashville to record at another studio Sam Phillips had taken on in his attempt to broaden Sun's commercial appeal. Yet as we have already heard, by something of the essence of Sun Records. The products of Jerry Lee's first session at the other end of Tennessee did, however, show much promise, including as they did the masterful ''What'd I Say'', which briefly offered hope of a return to pop music's upper echelons when issued as a single, Sun 356). The Ray Charles cover was backed with ''Livin' Lovin' Wreck'', a catchy pop song but arguably one of the less memorable accomplishments in Otis Blackwell's canon. The same date also gave rise to a very much more polished version of ''Cold Cold Heart'' that sounds light years away from Jerry Lee's earlier recording of the song. (*)



On February 9, 1961, Jerry Lee Lewis breezed into Sam Phillips' new studio in Nashville and laid down the inaugural session. The last song recorded that night was a revival of ''What'd I Say''. The song had been written by Ray Charles in 1959 and recorded by Jerry Lee in January 1960 and again in June 1960. However, the Nashville version was a much fuller production and Phillips had such confidence in it that he released it three weeks after the session. Billboard said, ''Lewis pumping piano work is tops and the vocal matches it. This can go''. And it did.


''I Forgot To Remember To Forget" is a country song written by Stan Kesler and Charlie Feathers. It was recorded at Sun Studio on July 11, 1955, by Elvis Presley, Scotty Moore, Bill Black, and Johnny Bernero on drums, and released on August 20, 1955, along with "Mystery Train" (Sun 223).

It was rereleased by RCA Victor (47-6357) in December 1955. Moore's guitar had a Nashville steel guitar sound, and Black played a clip-clop rhythm. Elvis sang a brooding vocal. This is the closest the trio came to a traditional country song while at Sun.

The song reached the Billboard national country music chart number 1 position on February 25, 1956 on the Billboard Country &Western Best Sellers in Stores chart, and remained there at number 1 for 2 weeks, and spent 5 weeks at number 1 on the Billboard Country &Western Most Played in Juke Boxes chart. The record reached number 4 on the Billboard Most Played by Jockeys chart. It was the first recording to make Elvis Presley a national known country music star. The song remained on the country charts for 39 weeks. The flip side of this release, "Mystery Train", peaked at the number 11 position on the national Billboard Country Chart.

Jerry Lee Lewis recorded the song probably on August 21, 1957 and on this session on February 9, 1961. Composer Charlie Feathers has also recorded it. The Beatles covered this song once for the BBC radio show, ''From Us To You'', on 1 May 1964, which was included on the Live at the BBC compilation in 1994. Johnny Cash covered and released this song in 1959 on the Sun LP ''Greatest!'' and on the album The Survivors Live in 1981. Chuck Jackson, Ral Donner, Robert Gordon, Johnny Hallyday, The Deighton Family, Hicksville Bombers, and Wanda Jackson recorded this song as well. Chris Isaak also covered this song on his 2011 album, Beyond the Sun.

The song is referenced in the Modest Mouse song "A Different City", on their 2000 album The Moon & Antarctica. The name of this song also appears as a quest in the video game Fallout: New Vegas where the Courier and Boone defend a small settlement from a full-scale attack while dealing with Boone's regret over a massacre that took place at that same settlement.

1(2) – ''I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET'' - B.M.I. - 3:02
Composer: - Charlie Feathers-Stanley Kesler
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - February 9, 1960 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - December 1974
First appearance: - Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 856-B2 stereo
VARIOUS ARTISTS - KINGS OF COUNTRY, VOLUME 1
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-10 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Several takes of ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' were attempted during a August 1957 session, though none of them are totally successful, with Jerry and he band attempting to find the right key, rhythm and tempo. All takes remained unissued until at least the 1980s. Far superior is this February 1961 version, recorded in Nashville at the same session that produced the hit versions of ''What’d I Say'' and ''Cold Cold Heart''. Surprisingly this wasn’t released until 1974, via Charly's ''Rare Jerry Lee Lewis Volume 2'' compilation. Incidentally, this has never been issued in true stereo on CD, though it was available on the Sun International ''Roots'' LP in 1981 (but not the CD reissue!). 

In case one of the kiddies buying Sun 364 checking the flipside, they found a real surprise: an artfully produced contemporary country record. This is one of Jerry’s finest performances in the genre that would ultimately recharge his career. While Jerry's vocal is sensitive and confident, it is really his piano work that elevates this record to brilliance. Rarely has he, or anyone for that matter, played with such urgency and fervor on a ballad. The piano fills often border on ''possessed'', and provide counter rhythms and energy that might have caught Hank Williams' attention from across the Great Divide. The top side failed to attract the attention of the very kids for whom it had been manufactured, but ''Cold Cold Heart'' got to number 22 on the country charts. There was a lesson there; it just took another seven years for anyone he heed it.

2(2) – ''COLD COLD HEART'' - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 5 - Stereo Master
Recorded: - February 9, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-9 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-7 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(2) – ''COLD COLD HEART'' - B.M.I. - 3:02
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 447 - Take 5 - Master
Recorded: - February 9, 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 364-B mono
COLD COLD HEART / IT WON'T HAPPEN WITH ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Surprisingly for a 1950s Sun recording, the 1957 version is the slowest. It’s not bad, but it’s perhaps a bit too plodding, and Jerry’s 1950s Sun country recordings at 706 Union Avenue usually worked better with a bit more bounce. The classic 1961 cut here is far superior though, and (as the flip side to the pop-rock  ''It Won’t Happen With Me'') was even a top 30 United States country hit during the otherwise barren early 1960s era. The 1969 version from ''Country Music Hall Of Fame Hits Vol. 2'' is quite similar, except Jerry plays around with the vocal melody a little more. 

"Cold Cold Heart" here recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis, is a country song, written by Hank Williams. This blues ballad is both a classic of honky-tonk and an entry in the Great American Songbook.

Williams adapted the melody for the song from T. Texas Tyler's 1945 recording of "You'll Still Be In My Heart," written by Ted West in 1943. The song achingly and artfully describes frustration that the singer's love and trust is unreciprocated due to a prior bad experience in the other's past. Stories of the song's origins vary. In the Williams episode of American Masters, country music historian Colin Escott states that Williams was moved to write the song after visiting his wife Audrey in the hospital, who was suffering from an infection brought on by an abortion she had carried out at their home unbeknownst to Hank. Escott also speculates that Audrey, who carried on extramarital affairs as Hank did on the road, may have suspected the baby was not her husband's. Florida bandleader Pappy Neil McCormick claims to have witnessed the encounter: "According to McCormick, Hank went to the hospital and bent down to kiss Audrey, but she wouldn't let him. 'You sorry son of a bitch,' she is supposed to have said, 'it was you that caused me to suffer like this'. Hank went home and told the children's governess, Miss Ragland, that Audrey had a 'cold, cold heart,' and then, as so often in the past, realized the bitterness in his heart held commercial promise''.

The first draft of the song is dated November 23, 1950 and was recorded with an unknown band on May 5, 1951. Like his earlier masterpiece "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry'', it was released as the B-side (MGM10904B) to "Dear John" (MGM-10904A), since it was an unwritten rule in the country music industry that the faster numbers sold best. "Dear John" peaked at number 8 after only a brief four-week run on Billboard magazine's country music charts, but "Cold Cold Heart" proved to be a favorite of disc jockeys and jukebox listeners, whose enthusiasm for the song catapulted it to number 1 on the country music charts. Williams featured the song on his Mother's Best radio shows at the time of its release and performed the song on the Kate Smith Evening Hour on April 23, 1952, which ran from September 1951 to June 1952; the appearance remains one of the few existing film clips of the singer performing live. He is introduced by his idol Roy Acuff. Although a notorious binge drinker, Williams appears remarkably at ease on front of the cameras, with one critic noting, "He stared at the camera during his performance of ''Cold Cold Heart'' with a cockiness and self-confidence that bordered on arrogance''.

The song would become a pop hit for Tony Bennett, paving the way for country songs to make inroads into the lucrative pop market. In the liner notes to the 1990 Polygram compilation Hank Williams: The Original Single Collection, Fred Rose's son Wesley states, "Hank earned two major distinctions as a songwriter: he was the first writer on a regular basis to make country music national music; and he was the first country songwriter accepted by pop artists, and pop A&R men''.

That same year, it was recorded in a pop version by Tony Bennett with a light orchestral arrangement from Percy Faith. This recording was released by Columbia Records as catalog number 39449. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on July 20, 1951 and lasted 27 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 1. The popularity of Bennett's version has been credited with helping to expose both Williams and country music to a wider national audience. Allmusic writer Bill Janovitz discusses this unlikely combination: "That a young Italian singing waiter from Queens could find common ground with a country singer from Alabama's backwoods is testament both to Williams' skills as a writer and to Bennett's imagination and artist's ear''.

Williams subsequently telephoned Bennett to say, "Tony, why did you ruin my song''? But that was a prank,  in fact, Williams liked Bennett's version and played it on jukeboxes whenever he could. In his autobiography ''The Good Life'', Bennett described playing "Cold Cold Heart" at the Grand Ole Opry later in the 1950s. He had brought his usual arrangement charts to give to the house musicians who would be backing him, but their instrumentation was different and they declined the charts. "You sing and we'll follow you'', they said, and Bennett says they did so beautifully, once again recreating an unlikely artistic merger.

The story of the Williams-Bennett telephone conversation is often related with mirth by Bennett in interviews and on stage; he still performs the song in concert. In 1997, the first installment of A&E's Live By Request featuring Bennett (who was also the show's creator), special guest Clint Black performed the song, after which Bennett recounted it. A Google Doodle featured Bennett's recording of the song on its Valentine's Day doodle in February 2012.

Other siginificant recordings there are including Louis Armstrong recorded "Cold Cold Heart" on September 17, 1951, and released it on Decca Records; Donald Peers recorded it on October 5, 1951, released EMI via His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 10158; Dinah Washington recorded it in 1951; Petula Clark and Gene Autry sang the song in the 1952 movie Apache Country; Jerry Lee Lewis released the song as a single on Sun Records in 1961 and included another version on the 1969 LP ''Sings the Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 2''; Jazz singer Norah Jones included a sultry swing version on her 2002 album ''Come Away With Me'', which was seen as "reintroducing" modern audiences to the song.


Even without such overt sexuality, this record took Jerry Lee back on the pop charts, peaking at number 30, a neighborhood he hadn't visited in over two years. There was little competition from this side. ''Livin' Lovin' Wreck'' from the pen of Otis Blackwell is easily the weakest of the four tracks recorded that day in Nashville. Like many of Jerry's teen-oriented songs, this one has not weathered the ravages of time and style too well. Jerry seems constrained by the chord changes, although guitarist Hank Garland seems to fare a bit better. In fact, this is one of the few times that Jerry's piano solo is outclassed by the guitar break.

3 – ''LIVIN' LOVIN' WRECK'' - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Sito Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Stereo Master
Recorded: - February 9, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-7 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-13-3 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

3 – ''LIVIN' LOVIN' WRECK'' - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Sito Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 430 - Master
Recorded: - February 9, 1961
Released: - February 27, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 356-B mono
LOVIN' LOVIN' WRECK / WHAT'D I SAY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Jerry Lee Lewis has spent a lot of time preaching about resurrections but the truth is that the release of Sun 356 was a resurrection almost comparable to his 1968 rebirth as a country singer. By any measure, it was a resounding success. Things were looking pretty bleak for the Killer before ''What'd I Say'' appeared in February 1961.

Yes, it's true that Jerry had been turning his attention to rhythm and blues of late, and had done more than his share or listening to (and copying) instrumental riffs from Ray Charles, but here is where it finally came together from him.


This track reveals that Jerry's affinity for Charles's music was more than a commercial aspiration. Charles's style meshes well with Jerry's talent.   In Jerry's hands, ''What'd I Say'' is a fine vocal and piano workout. The backup instrumental work is ideal and even the chorus sounds a bit shrill (as in ''White'') when they echo Jerry's vocal lines. Conspicuously absent from the arrangement is the lascivious ''Don't stop, baby'' portion of Ray Charles' original. (More information about ''What'd I Say'' see Jerry's sessions June 1960).


4(4) – ''WHAT'D I SAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Ray Charles
Publisher: - Progressive Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Stereo Master
Recorded: - February 9, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-8 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-8 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

4(4) – ''WHAT'D I SAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Ray Charles
Publisher: - Progressive Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 429 - Master
Recorded: - February 9, 1961
Released: - February 27, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 356-A mono
WHAT'D I SAY / LOVE MADE A FOOL OF ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Hank Sugarfoot Garland - Guitar
Kelton Kelso Herston – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon – Drums
Unknown Vocal Group

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


FEBRUARY 10, 1961 FRIDAY

Gene Pitney appears in Montreal for two days.

Flatt and Scruggs recorded The Carter Family classic ''You Are My Flower'' at Nashville's Bradley Studios with Mother Maybelle Carter backing them on autoharp. A live version of the song becomes a hit three years later.

FEBRUARY 11, 1961 SATURDAY

Gene Pitney and the Shirelles guest on Saturday Prom.

Studio session for Charlie Rich at Sam Phillips Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.


Charlie Rich and Sam Phillips at Nashville studio, February 11, 1961 >

FEBRUARY 1961

Charlie Rich's next single contrasted a rather light-hearted love triangle tune, ''Caught In The  Middle'' with what has proved to be one of his most enduring compositions. ''Who Will The  Next Fool Be'' was almost immediately covered by Bobby Blue Bland, which should have  convinced anyone that this song had a depth of bluesy soul that could be mined almost  indefinitely.

It is a fine statement to his artistry that Rich's version remains definitive. It is  perhaps this single record more than any other, that made clear that Rich had an astonishing  capacity to write and perform black music.

In fact, if one factors out the seemingly endless middle of the road dross of his latter career,  Charlie Rich may have been the best white soul singer ever to record. What makes this  doubly astounding is his considerable background performing Frank Sinatra/Mel Torme/Tony  Bennett songs, his penchant for big band jazz, and his utter facility writing and performing  country music.

Other than his own bluesy compositions, Rich was obviously affected by the work of Chuck  Willis. Two tunes (recorded in 1960) associated with Willis, ''C.C. Rider'' and ''Juanita''  appeared on Rich's LP, issued in 1960. in addition, Willis's ''Too Late'' appeared as one of  Rich's next singles in 1961.

But, if there was a recording that embodied Rich's musical values, it was surely ''Who Will  The Next Fool Be''. It was not strictly a pop, country, or rhythm and blues record, but it  borrowed from all three idioms. Using the piano as an extension of his vocal lines, Rich  molded a performance that was agonized and intense. Many performers have tried to  recapture the magic that Rich drew from within himself on that February evening in  Nashville when he first recorded the song, but is stands as a truly definitive performance.  After the session, the master was embalmed with a vocal chorus; when it was finally  stripped and the original cut reissued twenty-five years later, an intensity that had been  partially hidden all that time was finally revealed.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY FEBRUARY 11, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OF TOM SPARKMAN

Many believe that ''Who Will The Next Foll Be'' is Charlie Rich's masterpiece at Sun. Certainly, it helped solidify his reputation as one of the finest white soul singers ever to grace a studio. The fact that he also wrote and played piano on the track didn't hurt matters either. And knowing that Bobby Blue Bland went right out and covered Rich's record hasn't done much to diminish Charlie's reputation. Interestingly, Bland was not simply covering the song for the black stations and stores.

Rich was already getting attention there. A lot of black buyers had no idea that Charlie Rich was a white man. Indeed, Charlie's best music really transcend race and category. All of which makes it hard to imagine that a man capable of such passion and soul could record the dreck he produced late in his career.

01 - ''WHO WILL THE NEXT FOOL BE'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 396   - Master
Recorded: - February 11, 1961
Released: - February 24, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3566-A mono
WHO WILL THE NEXT FOOL BE / CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

It is unclear whether Rich recorded these sides in Nashville or whether the Madison Avenue studio in Memphis was in the process of being tamed. Both logic and aural evidence suggests that Nashville was the birthplace. This flipside, ''Caught In The Middle'', is again a well constructed song and beautiful performance. The criticism most often levelled at this track is that the arrangement is a bit too cutesy. Musically, Rich is again on his game. The little 4-bar piano break is a gem and the key modulation at the end is deftly handled.

02 - ''CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE'' – B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 397   - Master
Recorded: - February 11, 1961
Released: - February 24, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3566-B mono
CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE / WHO WILL THE NEXT FOOL BE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

''Just A Little Bit Sweet'' seems almost like a trite pop/country song. But that judgement is superficial. There are vintage Richisms here – the little two-bar instrumental fills at the vocal line, the gospelly diminished chords and the fine churchy finale after ''Come on, come on, come on...''.

03 - ''JUST A LITTLE BIT SWEET'' – 2:18
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 408   - Master
Recorded: - February 11, 1961
Released: - September 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3572-B mono
JUST A LITTLE BIT SWEET / IT'S TOO LATE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

04 - ''THE NEXT TIME''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - February 11, 1961
Released: - Sun Unissued/Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Kelton D. Kelso Herston - Guitar
Hank Garland - Guitar
Buddy Harmon - Drums
Jerry Tutle - Organ
Unknown - Saxophone
Unknown - Chorus & Strings

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


FEBRUARY 12, 1961 SUNDAY

Bobby Rydell begins a six week European tour.

Paul Anka is on CBS-TV's Ed Sullivan Show.

FEBRUARY 13, 1961 MONDAY

Frank Sinatra creates Reprise Records. Purchased by Warner Bros., the label eventually develops country hits for such acts as Dwight Yoakam, Blake Shelton, Kenny Rogers, Gordon Lightfood and Carlene Carter.

Clarence White and Roland White appear as member of The Country Boys on an episode of the CBS sitcom ''The Andy Griffith Show''.

FEBRUARY 15, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Burl Ives recorded ''A Little Bitty Tear'' in an afternoon session at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

While relaxing Jackie Wilson is shot by a female fan who then attempts suicide. Wilson   claims he was trying to take the gun when it went off. The bullet hits him in the stomach. He   is taken to Roosevelt Hospital. The bullet is in a position where it can't be removed and is   left lodged in his back.

Billy Ward and the His Dominoes are at Miami's Eden Roc Hotel.

FEBRUARY 16, 1961 THURSDAY

The Miracles' "Shop Around" (Tamla #54034) reaches number one, remaining three weeks. It   was Motown's first major hit.

MID FEBRUARY 1961

The Bombers, formerly the Jive Bombers, are at the Pillow Talk in New York City.

FEBRUARY 17, 1961 FRIDAY

The Coasters, Ike and Tina Turner Chuck Jackson and the Capris are at Washington's Howard   Theater.

FEBRUARY 19, 1961 SUNDAY

Bill Black's Combo performs an instrumental medley on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The medley includes a version of ''Don't Be Cruel'', a song on which Black played bass for his former employer, Elvis Presley.

In London, Bobby Rydell appears on British TV's Sunday Night at the Palladium.

Dave Cortez is at the Randolph Social Club in Philadelphia.

FEBRUARY 21, 1961 TUESDAY

The Shirelles sing ''Will You still Love Me Tomorrow'' and ''Dedicated To the One I Love'', on   American Bandstand.

FEBRUARY 22, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Ray Charles sings ''Georgia On My Mind'' on NBC-TV's Perry Como Show.

You can tell it's a single, Ricky Nelson sings, ''You Are The Only One'' for the third time in two months on ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''. It's a single, but not a hit.

FEBRUARY 23, 1961 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley headlines two shows at the Ellis Auditorium in Memphis. These are his first   concerts since 1957 and raise $50,00 for charities in Memphis and Tupelo.

FEBRUARY 24, 1961 FRIDAY

PI 3566 ''Who Will The Next Fool Be'' b/w Caught In The Middle'' by Charlie Rich issued.

Sun 356 ''What'd I Say'' b/w ''Livin' Lovin' Wreck'' by Jerry Lee Lewis issued.  Billboard reviews in a March 11, 1961 article that ''What'd I Say'', ''Rock songster, pianist offers a contagious driving look at the familiar Ray Charles number. String sound that could make noise'' and that ''Livin' Lovin' Wreck'' is another persuasive sock affair from the performer''.

Sam Cooke is at the Apollo for a week. Opening acts are Little Anthony and the Imperials and   Aretha Franklin.

Brook Benton begins a sixteen day tour of England.

Bobby Rydell is the headliner at France's first annual rock and roll festival Festival du Rock.

FEBRUARY 25, 1961 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley performs his first concert at Ellis Auditorium since returning from the Army, and a charity event in Memphis. Tennessee Governor Buford Ellington and Memphis mayor Henry Loeb both declare 'Elvis Presley Day'. At a special luncheon at the Hotel Claridge, Elvis is presented by RCA with a diamond-studded watch to honor record sales of more than 75 million. Buford Ellington the Governor of Tennessee makes Elvis an honorary Colonel by giving him the title 'Colonel, Aide de Camp on the Governor's Staff'.

Prior to the shows, a luncheon was held in Elvis' honor at the Claridge Hotel in downtown Memphis. The $100-per-plate event raised $17,000, thanks in part to the donation of food and service by the Claridge. RCA presented Elvis with a diamond watch, and a plaque, marking his achievement of selling over 75 million records.

FEBRUARY 27, 1961 MONDAY

Capitol released Faron Young's ''Hello Walls''.

Marty Robbins' ''Don't Worry'', featuring a signature fuzz guitar solo, hits number 1 on the Billboard country chart.

Fats Domino begins a week at Sciolla's Club in Philadelphia.

FEBRUARY 28, 1961 TUESDAY

Carl Mann perform at the Delta Club located at Old Highway 18 in Blytheville, Arkansas. Also on the bill Jimmy Hagget, and the Daydreamers. Showtime 9:00 p.m.


MARCH 1, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Davis Daniel is born in Arlington, Illinois. With a voice compared to Keith Whitley and Lefty Frizzell, he notches one minor hit in 1991 with ''For Crying Out Loud''.

MARCH 3, 1961 FRIDAY

Bobby Rydell ens European Tour In England.

James Brown is at the Apollo in New York.

Sam Cooke at the Royal Theater in Baltimore.

Jimmy Charles Headlines the Howard Theater. Also on the bill are the Bobettes, the Clovers, the Vibrations and Jimmy Jones.

MARCH 4, 1961 SATURDAY

Burl Ives guests on an episode of the NBC music series ''The Bell Telephone Hour''.

MARCH 7, 1961 TUESDAY

Buck Owens takes a whack at recording ''Save The Last Dance For Me'' at the Capitol Recording Studio in Los Angeles. The track is unreleased, but a subsequent version will become a hit.

MARCH 8, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley is lauded by the Tennessee State Legislature in Nashville for ''bringing fame to Memphis and Tennessee throughout the nation''.

Billy ''Crash'' Craddock holds his first session in a recording contract with Mercury at the Bradley Studio in Nashville, California.

MARCH 10, 1961 FRIDAY

Marty Robbins recorded ''It's Your World'' during an overnight session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Jeff Barry signs his first songwriting contract, with Trinity Music. He goes on to author such country hits as Jody Miller's ''Be My Baby'', The Bellamy Brothers' ''Lie To You For Your Love'' and Olivia Newton-John's ''I Honestly Love You''.

EARLY MARCH 1961

Chuck Berry id touring around Jamaica in the British west Indies. 

Gene Pitney is touring the West Coast.

Freddie Bell and the Bellboys are at Riverside Hotel in Reno.

The Pono-Tails are appearing at the Holiday Inn and Casino in Reno.

Sam Cooke is at the Howard Theater along with the Rochelles and the Candles.

LaVern Baker headlines the Apollo in Harlem, New York.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE TEENANGELS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

ROGERS MELOTONE RECORDING STUDIO
MOBILE, ALABAMA
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE MARCH 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – PROBABLY OTTO ROGERS

01 – ''AIN'T GONNA LET YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Jimmy Otto Rogers
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated – Stairway Music
Matrix number: - U 497   - Master   – D.J. Copy
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1961
Released: - Only Issued As Promo – Leased April 1963
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 388-A mono
AIN'T GONNA LET YOU / TELL ME MY LOVE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-1-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5


The Teenangels, Patricia Patrick, Terry Everett, and Bonnie Daugherty. >

Now here's an anomalous release – in fact, not even a release. In 1956, Jimmie Otto Rogers ( born on August 17, 1928 and died on October 26, 1997) was the  son of Bluebird country star Jesse Rogers and cousin of yodelin' Jimmie Rogers, came to Sun with Luke McDaniel. They'd already written one rockabilly classic, ''Midnight Shift'' (which Rogers had written under his mother's name, Ainsworth), and they had several more they wanted to get recorded.


They feisty McDaniel recognized that Sun was the place to be, but he and Sam Phillips fell out before anything was released. Rogers and McDaniel went on to write the honky tonk classic ''You're Still On My Mind'', and then they fell out.

In 1958, Rogers went back to Mobile, Alabama to work as a songwriter and independent producer. He sold masters to Top Rank, Roulette, Dot, and other labels, and in April 1963 he sold two acts to Sun, the Teenangels and the Quintones. The Teenangels consisted of Patricia Patrick, Terry Everett, and Bonnie Daugherty, and they recorded these two songs in March 1961 at Roger's Melotone Studio. The record wasn't officially released. Sun pressed promo copies, but Rogers was dissatisfied the the promotional effort Sun was putting into it and grabbed the masters back. We have no idea what happened to the group, although the congressman for the Mobile area is a Terry Everett. An ex-Teenangel perhaps?

The Teenagels were clearly fashioned after The Fleetwood's, a best-selling act in 1961. In fact, the Teenangels even look like the Fleetwoods. By late 1963, when the disc would have appeared, the Fleetwoods sound was well past its prime and Sun's promotional efforts were best described as minimal. Indeed, the label only issued six singles in all of 1964. Nevertheless, there is an engaging, almost homemade quality to this sides which recalls not only the Fleedwoods, but the minimal production used on Thomas Wayne's 1959 Fernwood record ''Tragedy''.

02 – ''TELL ME MY LOVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Jimmy Otto Rogers
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated – Stairway Music
Matrix number: - U 498  - Master  – D.J. Copy
Recorded: - Unknown Date March 1961
Released: - Only Issued As Promo – Leased April 1963
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 388-B mono
TELL ME MY LOVE / AIN'T GONNA LET YOU
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-1-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Teenangels consisting of
Patricia Patrick – Vocal
Terry Everett – Vocal
Bonnie Daugherty – Vocals
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


MARCH 10, 1961 FRIDAY

Sun 358 ''U.T. Party Part I'' b/w ''U.T. Party Part II'' by George Klein issued.

MARCH 11, 1961 SATURDAY

Ray Price's driver steers his bus off Highway 90 south of Valentine, Texas, to avoid a pickup truck when it pulls up onto the pavement from the side of the road. The driver's maneuver likely saves lives, though the bus breaks in two.

Percussionist Randy Hardison is born. He plays on several Darryl Worley hits, ''A Good Day To Run'', ''Second Wind'' and ''When You Need My Love''.

MARCH 12, 1961 SUNDAY

After giving him a two-week tryout, Gene Autry's expansion Los Angeles Angels drop hopeful baseball player Charley Pride during spring training in Palm Springs.

Elvis Presley recorded ''I Feel So Bad'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee. The song was originally written and originally recorded by Chuck Willis in 1953. Presley recorded this version of the song following the arrangements by Willis and his singing style. Presley's version reached number 5 on the United States Billboard Hot 100 in 1961 and number 15 on Billboard's Top 20 rhythm and blues singles chart the same year. The song, which was released on a AA-sided single in the United Kingdon backed with ''Wild In The Country'', reached number 4 on the singles chart, also in 1961.

MARCH 13, 1961 MONDAY

Chuck Berry, the author of ''Johnny B. Goode'', is tried in St. Louis, Missouri, for the third time in 13 months for violating the Mann Act, a federal statute designed to combat prostitution. He is ultimately found guilty and given a three-year sentence.

Ricky Nelson recorded his pop hit ''Travelin' Man'' with Glen Campbell playing guitar.

The Capris sing ''There's A Moon Out Tonight'' on American Bandstand.

MID MARCH 1961

Danny and the Juniors begin European Tour.

The Coasters are appearing at the Summit in Hollywood.

MARCH 14, 1961 TUESDAY

Hank Locklin recorded ''You're The Reason'' and ''Happy Birthday To Me'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

MARCH 15, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Ray Charles refuses to play segregated concert in Augusta, Georgia, costing him $757 for breach of contract. The next year, Charles crosses the seemingly segregated worlds of country and rhythm and blues with ''Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music''.

George Hamilton IV recorded ''Three Steps To The Phone (Millions Of Miles)'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

MARCH 15, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Eddie Bond performed at the Delta Club located at Old Highway 18, Blythville, Arkansas. Also on the bill were Jimmy Hagget and The Daydreamers, and John Hughey, and local Caprock recording artists from KBOA.

Gene McDaniels performs ''A Hundred Pounds Of Clay'' on American Bandstand.

MARCH 16, 1961 THURSDAY

The Echoes sing ''Baby Blue'' on American Bandstand.

The 15-minute Walt Disney cartoon ''The Saga Of Windwagon Smith'' appears in theaters, with Rex Allen narrating.

MARCH 17, 1961 FRIDAY

''Five Star Jubilee'' debuts on NBC, with five rotating stars hosting the country music variety show from Springfield, Missouri. The hosts, Rex Allen, Snooky Lanson, Tex Ritter, Carl Smith and Jimmy Wakely.

Chubby Checker headlines Chicago's Regal theater. Also on the bill are Joe Jones, the   Drifters, Maxine Brown, Chuck Jackson, Jimmy Charles and the Blue Notes.

Sam Cooke goes to the British west Indies for concerts in Jamaica, Kingston, Trinidad and   Montego Bay. Ticket sales are estimated at $45,000

MARCH 20, 1961 MONDAY

Ray Charles severs a tendon and an artery in his left hand and requires four pints of blood. The following year he makes an unlikely impact on country music with the release of ''Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music''.

MARCH 21, 1961 TUESDAY

Spade Cooley, married for 15 years, proposes to singer Anita Aros while she recovers from a concussion at Los Angeles' Good Samaritan Hospital. In the summer, during his trail for the murder of his wife, Aros will testify she thought he was joking.

MARCH 23, 1961 THURSDAY

A major rock and roll show at the Paramount in Newark, New Jersey features the Shirelles,   the Olympics, Shep and the Limelites and Lenny Miles.

Elvis Presley recorded ''Can't Help Falling In Love'' on the 29th take at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

MARCH 24, 1961 FRIDAY

Bobby Rydell is playing the Lotus Club in Washington, D.C.

MARCH 25, 1961 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley performs at Block Arena in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, his last concert for nearly wight years. He donates $5,000 to the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial Fund  to the sailors when the USS Arizona was sunk at Pearl Harbor on December   7, 1941. This will be Presley's last live concert and raises $52,000, also joins on the appearance by Minnie Pearl.

''Slipping Around'' singer Margaret Whiting secures a divorce from Panavision movie executive John Richard Moore in Santa Monica, California.

MARCH 27, 1961 MONDAY

Elvis Presley begins three weeks of shooting in Hawaii for the movie ''Blue Hawaii''.

Reprise Records released its first album, Frank Sinatra's ''Ring-a-Ding Ding!''. The label goes on to success in country music, with such artists as Dwight Yoakam, Emmylou Harris, Blake Sheldon and Michael Peterson.

''Gotta Travel On'' songwriter Pete Seeger goes on trail in New York for contempt of Congress. His attorney argues his rights were violated during a 1956investication by the House Un-American Activities Committee.

MARCH 28, 1961 TUESDAY

The Larks and Chuck Jackson are guests on American Bandstand.

MARCH 29, 1961 WEDNESDAY

March 29 is declared Brenda Lee Day by Decca Records and Governor Ernest Vandiver   of Georgia. A 125,000 copies are sold today.

MARCH 31, 1961 FRIDAY

Bill and Bettye Anderson have their first child, daughter Terri Lee Anderson.

Jocko's Rocketship Revue at the Apollo Theater features Clyde McPhatter. The Blue Note,   Baby Washington, Shep and the Limelites, Bobby Freeman and the Larks.

Bob Luman is discharged from the Army, April 2 The Biggest Show of Stars for 61 begins at   the Uline Arena in Washington, DC. The tour includes headliners Fats Domino, the Shirelles,   and Chubby Checker. Also the Drifters, Bo Diddley, Ben E. King, the Shells and Chuck   Jackson.

MARCH/MAY 1961

Jerry Lee Lewis plays in Memphis, St. Louis, Fall River, Massachusetts, and Providence, Rhode Island.


APRIL 1961

Harold Dorman, a native of Sledge, Mississippi, had come to Memphis in 1955 and auditioned   at Sun in 1957. Both his songs and his performances were undistinguished, but Roland Janes   heard something he liked the singer, and when he and Billy Riley started Rita Records in the   fall of 1959 they brought a much-improved Dorman into the studio.

With Jack Clement at   the board, they cut ''Mountain Of Love'', which became a one-off hit comparable to   ''Tragedy'' the previous spring.

Like Thomas Wayne, Dorman was unable to sustain the momentum, and Rita Records soon   folded. Dorman hurried back to Sun, where he recorded three singles, none of which   reignited his career. He then turned to songwriting and submitted one of his songs,   ''Mississippi Cotton Picking Delta Town'', to Charley Pride, another native of Sledge who had   also auditioned at Sun in the late 1950s. It became one of Pride's biggest hits and   encouraged him to revive ''Mountain Of Love'' in 1981.

APRIL 1, 1961 SATURDAY

Jerry Kennedy goes to work at Mercury Records in Nashville as an assistant to label president Shelby Singleton. He goes on to produce hits for Mercury and Smah acts as The Staler Brothers, Tom T. Hall, Jerry Lee Lewis (1963), and Roger Miller.

''Tomboy And The Champ'', a movie that honors 4-H, appears in theaters, with Rex Allen in a subordinate role.

APRIL 2, 1961 SUNDAY

Connie Francis recorded the pop hit ''Don't Break The Heart That Loves You'' in New York. Margo Smith revives it for the country audience in 1977.

Buddy Jewell is born in Osceola, Arkansas. After singing on demos for a number of years in Music City, he wins the first ''Nashville Star'' TV competition in 2003, leading to a recording contract and a gold album.

APRIL 3, 1961 MONDAY

American western swing musician, big band leader, actor, and television persona, Spade Cooley beats his wife, Ella Mae, at his home in Kern County, California, and threatens to kill his 14-year-old daughter, Melody, if she tells anyone. Ella Mae is pronounced dead after midnight, and he receives a life sentence for the crime.

On April 26, 1961, Cooley was indicted by a Kern County grand jury for the murder of his wife on April 3 at the couple's Willow Springs ranch home. Cooley's 14-year-old daughter, Melody, reportedly told the jury she watched in terror as her father beat her mother's head against the floor, stomped on her stomach, then crushed a lit cigarette against her skin to see whether she was dead. Cooley claimed his wife had been injured by falling in the shower.

He was unsuccessfully defended by prominent attorney P. Basil Lambros in what was the longest case in county history at the time; and was convicted of first-degree murder by a Kern County jury on August 21, 1961 after unexpectedly withdrawing an insanity plea. He was spared death in the gas chamber and sentenced to life in prison.

Decca released Brenda Lee's pop hit, ''You Can Depend On Me''.

Folk figure Peter Seeger is sentenced in New York to 10 one-year prison terms for contempt of Congress, after a lengthy investigation into Communist activities. The conviction is overturned in 1962. Two years earlier, Seeger's ''Gotta Travel On'' became a country hit for Billy Grammer.

Decca released Ernie Ashworth's ''Forever Gone'', and Columbia released Johnny Cash's ''The Rebel - Johnny Tuma''.

Jimmy Jones performs at the Asbury Park Convention Hall, in New Jersey.

Jerry Lee Lewis re-entered the Hot 100 for the first time in three years with ''What'd I   Say''.By the middle of May ''What'd I Say'' had reached number 30 where it pegged out. Jerry   was signed to bigger paying venues and his new booking agent, Ray Brown at National Artists   Attractions, booked him onto a Battle Of The Century tour with Jackie Wilson.

APRIL 4, 1961 TUESDAY

Fabian returns to South Side High in Philadelphia to receive his high school diploma. He   graduates with a B+ average.

APRIL 5, 1961 WEDNESDAY

The Paris Sisters sing ''Be My Boy'' on American Bandstand.

Don Gibson recorded ''Sea Of Heartbreak'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

APRIL 6, 1961 THURSDAY

Spade Cooley suffers a heart attack, three days after strangling and beating his wife death. As a result, he's transferred from Bakersfield's Kern County Jail to Kern County General Hospital.

Atlantic Records founder Ahmet Ertegun marries Ioana Maria Banu. Ten years earlier, he earned a hit as a songwriter for Big Joe Turner on ''Chains Of Love'', destined to become a country hit for Mickey Gilley.

APRIL 7, 1961 FRIDAY

The Poni-Tails are at the Twin Coaches Lounge in Pittsburgh.

Gene Pitney is on American Bandstand.

APRIL 8, 1961 SATURDAY

Ray Charles begins a twenty stop tour at the McCormick Place in Chicago. His two days in   Chicago gross $34,000 with tickets costing up to $4.00.

APRIL 10, 1961 MONDAY

Del Shannon performs ''Runaway'' on American Bandstand.

Capitol released Buck Owens and Rose Maddox's ''Loose Talk'' and ''Mental Cruelty''.

APRIL 11, 1961 TUESDAY

Bob Dylan becomes a pro, opening for John Lee Hooker at New York's Gerde's Folk City. A number of Dylan's songs becomes country successes, including ''It Ain't Me, Babe'', ''You Ain't Going Nowhere'' and ''To Make You Feel My Love''.

The fledgling Los Aneles Angeles, owned by cowboy singer Gene Autry, play their first regular season baseball game at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. The Angels defeat the Orioles, 7-2.

Jerry Butler, Dee Clark, Maxine Brown, and the Marcels are at the Howard Theater.

APRIL 12, 1961 WEDNESDAY

James Darren appears on Bob Hope's NBC-TV special Darren sings ''Gidget Goes Hawaiian''   and ''Wild About That Girl''.

Freddy Cannon is on American Bandstand.

Soviet Union Yuri Gagarin First Man in Space. The Soviet Union successfully launched the first man into space today taking the prize for "The First Man In Space". Yuri Gagarin , a 27-year-old air force major. He orbited the Earth in 1hr 40 minutes. The next target is to put a man on the moon which the US achieves before the end of the decade. Gagarin completing a full orbit of the planet in under two hours.

The Marty Robbins recording ''El Paso'' wins Best Country and Western Performance during the third annual Grammy Awards.

APRIL 13, 1961 THURSDAY

Tammy Stephens is born in Arlington, Texas. After performing at Opryland, she joins The Girls Next Door, contributing to one Top 10 hit, ''Slow Boat To China'', on Mary Tyler Moore's MTM label.

The Everly Brothers make a guest appearance on NBC-TV's ''The Ford Show'' featuring Tennessee Ernie Ford.

APRIL 14, 1961 FRIDAY

Claude Gray recorded ''My Ears Should Burn (When Fools Are Talked About)'' at the Bradley Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Review in Billboard says that, ''What'd I Say'' by Jerry Lee Lewis; ''Breatin' In A Brand New Broken Heart'' by Connie Francis; ''Runnin' Scared'' by Roy Orbison; ''I Fall To Pieces'' by Patsy Cline, and ''Some Kind Of Wonderful'' by The Drifters that ''These records, of all those on the Hot 100, have begun to show National sales breakout action this week for the first time. They are recommended to dealers and all other readers as having the greatest potential to go all the way. Previous Billboard Spotlight Picks are marked.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAROLD DORMAN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY APRIL 14, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OF TOM SPARKMAN

01 – ''THERE THEY GO'' – B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Gando Music – Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 444   - Master
Recorded: - April 14, 1961
Released: - May 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 362-B mono
THERE THEY GO / I'LL STICK BY YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

This is the first of three Sun releases by Harold Dorman following his success the previous year with ''Mountain Of Love'' on Roland Janes's Rita Records. What a marvellous voice Dorman had! So expressive and so southern.


''There They Go'' stems from an session featuring some Music City heavyweights. Hank Garland, Junior Huskey, Buddy Harmon, Floyd Cramer, all the gang were there and the result is a competently produced pop record. The mix is just right, with Dorman's vocal in the foreground and the chorus in a restrained supportive role.

If only more Memphis productions featuring Gene Lowery and his buddies had followed this model.  ''I'll Stick By You'' is perhaps a bit more poppish with a more ''produced'' sound, although even here good sence seems to have prevailed.


Buddy Harmon's drumming adds interest to both sides of the record. There is little doubt that had these same sides been produced elsewhere, say New York, the arrangement might have gotten a tad overblow.

It's clear that that rhythmic hook in the release might have featured some strings, but thankfully, no one thought to invite the Memphis symphony to an overdubbing party.

02 – ''I'LL STICK BY YOU'' – B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Gando Music – Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 443  - Master
Recorded: - April 14, 1961
Released: - May 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 362-A mono
I'LL STICK BY YOU / THERE THEY GO
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

03 – ''WAIT 'TIL SATURDAY NIGHT'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: Harold Dorman-Gann
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 14, 1961
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30101-B-8 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 1 - CATALYST
Reissued: 2000 SAAR Records (CD) 500/200rpm Saar RR1 mono
THE BEST OF SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL - VOLUME 1

04 – ''LET ÉM TALK'' – B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - April 14, 1961
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8277-9 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Harold Dorman – Vocal
Hank Garland – Guitar
Kelton Herston - Guitar
Junior Huskey - Bass
Buddy Harmon – Drums
Floyd Cramer – Piano

Mildred Kirkham, Dorothy Ann Dillard,
Gordon Stoker, Louis Dean Nunley - Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


APRIL 15, 1961 SATURDAY

The Ray Charles revues stops at Detroit's Music Hall and then Cleveland Music Hall grosses   $22,000 on $4.00 tickets.

Former Marty Robbins producer Mitch Miller graces the cover of TV Guide.

APRIL 16, 1961 SUNDAY

After making recordings for smaller labels, Claude King has his first session for Columbia Records at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee. He takes his first swipe at ''Big River, Big Man'', which he re-recorded a month later.

MID APRIL 1961

Duane Eddy is on location in Tuscon, Arizona filming ''Thunder of Drums''.

APRIL 17, 1961 MONDAY

Dion appears at the Casino Royal in Washington.

Neil Sedaka is at the Blinstrub's Club in Philadelphia.

JoAnn Campbell is on American Bandstand.

The Bay of Pigs invasion ends in a defeat for the Cuban exiles who had attempted to invade Cuba and overthrow Castro's regime. 118 are killed and 1,202 are captured by Cuban forces.

West Side Story, the film version of the musical, is released. The film features Natalie Wood and Rita Moreno, and a choreographed by Jerome Robbins.

Location shooting for Elvis Presley's movie ''Blue Hawaii'' concludes in the Pacific.

Wanda Jackson recorded ''I May Never Get To Heaven'' and ''Brown Eyed Handsome Man'' in Nashville. The former becomes a Conway Twitty hit in 1979, while the latter Chuck Berry song earns country hit status for Waylon Jennings in 1969.

APRIL 19, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Ricky Nelson sings ''Hello Mary Lou'' on ABC-s ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

APRIL 20, 1961 THURSDAY

Wanda Jackson recorded ''In The Middle Of A Heartache'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

Paul Evans and Johnny Preston open for six days at the Armata Coliseum in Manila,   Philippines, that will draw 36,000 fans A brief swing through Australia follows. In all, they   are seen by 1000,000.

Pat Boone's TV special features Fabian.

APRIL 21, 1961 FRIDAY

Ernie-K-Doe, Jimmy Jones and Freddie Scott appear at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Music Hall. The   Flamingos, the Olympics and the Dells are at Chicago's Regal Theater for a week.

Bobby Lord holds what proves to be his final Columbia recording session.

APRIL 22, 1961 SATURDAY

Patsy Cline makes out her will, leaving to husband Charlie Dick only their furniture, the family car and their record collection.

APRIL 24, 1961 MONDAY

Red Foley is found not guilty in his second trial for tax evasion in the last six months.

Bill Anderson recorded ''Po' Folks''.

Capitol Records released Hank Thompson's version of Jack Guthrie's ''Oklahoma Hills''.

APRIL 25, 1961 TUESDAY

The singles Sun 359 ''Belle Of The Suwanee'' b/w ''Eternally'' by Tracy Pendarvis and Sun 360 ''Groovy Train'' b/w ''Highland Rock'' by Wade Cagle and The Escorts issued.

Johnny Maestro sings ''Model Girl'' on American Bandstand.

Faron Young performs ''Hello Walls'' during a guest stint on Dick Clark's ABC-TV show ''American Bandstand''.

APRIL 27, 1961 THURSDAY

The Roomates sing ''Glory of Love'' on American Bandstand.

The city of Los Angeles issues a resolution offering ''the first cheer'' for the Los Angeles Angels, newly formed by Gene Autry.

APRIL 28, 1961 FRIDAY

The singles, PI 3567 ''Dream'' b/w ''Coming Down With The Blues'' by Jeb Stuart and PI 3568 ''You're Everything'' b/w ''You've Gome Home'' by Nelson Ray issued.

The Biggest Show of Stars for 61 stops in St. Louis and the next day at Chicago's McCormick   Place. The two dates brings in $25,000.

The Flamingos, Jerry Butler, the Miracles, Maxine Brown, the Vibrations and Shep and the   Limelites are at the Uptown Theater in Philadelphia.

APRIL 29, 1961 SATURDAY

Gilbert ''Cisco'' Houston dies of cancer in San Bernardino, California. A longtime drinking buddy and singing partner of Woody Guthrie, he co-wrote ''Cocaine Blues'', a hit for Roy Hogsed in 11948.

LATE APRIL 1961

Sam Cooke appears for a week at the Flame Show Bar in Detroit.

MAY 1, 1961 MONDAY

Bobby Rydell makes his debut as a nightclub performer at Sciolla's Club in Philadelphia.

Danny and the Juniors are at Casino Royal in Washington, DC for a week.

Neil Sedaka sings ''Little Devil'' on American Bandstand.

Johnny Preston is in Philadelphia to begin a 30 day tour to promote ''I Feel Good''.

MAY 1, 1961 MONDAY

Decca Records released Webb Pierce's ''Sweet Lips''

Roland White and Clarence White appear as members of the fictitious band The Country Boys in an episode of ''The Andy Griffith Show'' on CBS.

MARCH 2, 1961 TUESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''I Feel So Bad'' backed with ''Wild In The Country'' (RCA Victor 47-7880). "I Feel So Bad" is a song written and originally recorded by Chuck Willis  in 1953. Elvis version was recorded on March 12, 1961 in RCA Studio B, in Nashville, Tennessee. Presley recorded a version of the song following the arrangements by Willis and his singing style. Presley's version reached to number 5 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in 1961 and number 15 on Billboard's Top 20 Rhythm And Blues Singles chart the same year. The song, which was released on a AA-sided single in the UK backed with ""Wild In The Country'', reached to number 4 on the UK singles chart, also in 1961.

MAY 3, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Songwriter Harlan Howard recorded the original version of ''She Called Me Baby''. The song becomes a hit for Charlie Rich in 1974.

Fats Domino plays the Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh.

MAY 4, 1961 THURSDAY

Neil Sedaka begins a tour of the Philippines and Australia.

Paul Revere and the Raiders make their national TV debut on American Bandstand and sing   ''Like Long Hair''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE SMITH
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MAY 4, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR CECIL SCAIFE

Jerry Lee "Smoochy" Smith, as a studio piano player for Sun Records from 1957 to 1959, Jerry Lee Smoochy Smith was instrumental in creating the Great Memphis Pumping Piano Sound.  He played on numerous recording sessions at Sun Records as part of the house band that backed up rockabilly legends such as Billy Lee Riley, Ace Cannon, Warren Smith, and others.  Smoochy said, "I'm not listed as piano player many times, 'cause I was young and I wasn't in the Musicians Union.  Sam Phillips gave me a dollar for each year of my age to cut those records, and when he listed the session with the Musicians Union, he listed Jerry Lee Lewis as piano player or sometimes Jimmy Wilson".  At Stax,  Smoochy  Smith recorded with the Mar-Keys and was co-writer of their 1961 million-seller hit "Last Night". He also played on Carla Thomas' first album, "Gee Whiz".  In 2008 Smoochy Smith chronicled the life and times of his career in ''The Real Me'' published in 2008.  One of the tidbits from this book was about the origin of his nickname Smoochy. At 15 he was playing with a band between features in a Texas movie theatre.  While watching the first movie, he met a cute little girl and took her backstage to meet the other band members.  As the movie was ending, they looked up and saw a couple kissing in the movie.  Jerry asked the girl if she would like to do that, and she said yes.  When the band began to perform bandleader Kenny Parchman introduced him to the audience as Smoochy. The name has stuck ever since.

01 - ''DRUNKEN GAMBLER''
Composer: Roosenvelt Sykes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued

02 - ''TO EACH HIS OWN'' – B.M.I.
Composer: Jay Livingston-Ray Evans
Publisher: - Paramount Music
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Smith - Vocal & Piano
Brad Suggs - Guitar
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
Chips Moman - Drums
Ronnie Capone - Saxophone
Huey Jeffries - Steel Guitar

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


EARLY MAY 1961

Bobby Darin is touring Japan.

MAY 5, 1961 FRIDAY

Ral Donner is on American Bandstand.

The United States launches it's first man in space Alan Shepard on the Freedom 7. President Kennedy asks Congress for $531 million to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade. If you look at the timeline for space travel up to this point the The Soviet Union was consistently one step ahead of the United States, but following the speech by President Kennedy on May 25, 1961 the United States was determined to be the first to put a man on the moon which they achieved on July 20, 1969 when Apollo 11 landed Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr, who became the first human beings to walk on the Moon's surface.

MAY 6, 1961 SATURDAY

Dick Clark, the future producer of the academy of Country Music awards, is officially divorced from his first wife, Barbara.

MAY 8, 1961 MONDAY

As he turns 21, Ricky Nelson officially changes his stage name to Rick Nelson.

Faron Young's version of the Willie Nelson-penned ''Hello Walls'' hits number 1 in Billboard.

For his 21st birthday Ricky Nelson is granted his wish to be called professionally Rick.

Fat Domino is performing at the Showboat in Philadelphia.

Gene McDaniels begins a tour in Minneapolis to promote his new album.

MAY 9, 1961 TUESDAY

An-Margret recorded the pop hit ''I Just Don't Understand'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee. Among the ace musicians on the session, pianist Floyd Cramer, bass player Bob Moore, harmonica man Charlie McCoy and The Jordanaires.

MAY 10, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Danny and the Juniors are on American Bandstand.

MAY 12, 1961 FRIDAY

Gene McDaniels opens at the Village Vanguard in New York City.

Leroy Van Dyke recorded ''Walk On By'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

MAY 13, 1961 SATURDAY

The Louvin Brothers recorded the Chet Atkins-penned ''How's The World Treating You''. The song eventually is remake by Alison Kraus and James Taylor, who earn a Grammy nomination for their performance.

Sam Cooke has a SRO for his show at the Keil Auditorium. Also appearing are Hank Ballard   and the Midnighters, Clyde McPhatter, Aretha Franklin and the Olympics.

Gene Vincent returns to England. He becomes the first American to appear on the British   variety television program Thank Your Lucky Stars.

MID MAY 1961

Jerry Lee Lewis is performing every Sunday at Lil' Rebel Room in Memphis while he is   on vacation at his home in Hernando, just across the state line in Mississippi.

Freddy Cannon is recuperating from tonsillectomy.

Jackie Wilson is leaving the hospital after recovering from the gunshot wound he suffered on   February 15, 1961.

MAY 15, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Kitty Wells' ''Heartbreak Hotel''.

MAY 16, 1961 TUESDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''Air Mail'' and ''Kisses Never Lie''.

MAY 17, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Dion is at the International Club in New York City.

MAY 18, 1961 THURSDAY

Claude King recorded the definitive version of his first hit ''Big River, Big Man'', during an evening session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Country Music Association begins its quarterly board meetings at the Deauville Hotel in Miami Beach. During the two-day gathering, the board votes to establish a Country Music Hall of Fame.

MAY 19, 1961 FRIDAY

Chet Atkins performs for president John F. Kennedy at the annual White House news photographer dinner at a Washington, D.C. With Atkins are bassist Bob Moore, pianist Bill Purcell and drummer Buddy Harmon.

Jerry Lee Lewis is at the Regal theater in Chicago.

MIDDLE MAY 1961

Jerry Lee Lewis's ''What'd I Say'' reached number 30 on the charts, where it pegged out. It   wasn't 1958 and ''Great Balls Of Fire'' all over again, but the response was strong enough that   a feeling of new life came over Sun's approach to Lewis. In the next few years, Jerry's   records took on a soulful cast. It may be that they would have anyway, as Jerry's own ear   had led him to Ray Charles in the first place, but the list of releases Sam Phillips put out on   Jerry in the months, that followed showed just how hard he was working to color his boy as  an rhythm and blues-based artist.

MAY 20, 1961 SATURDAY

Singer and songwriter Dan Wilson is born in Minneapolis. After establishing himself with the pop band Semisonic, he co-writes The Dixie Chiks' Grammy-winning ''Not Ready To Make Nice'' and Dierks Bentley's ''Home''.

MAY 21, 1961 SUNDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hit ''Dum Dum'' in Nashville at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

The singles, Sun 362 ''I'll Stick By You'' b/w ''There They Go'' by Harold Dorman and Sun 363 ''Sugartime'' b/w ''My Treasure'' by Johnny Cash issued.

Gene Vincent begins an eight day tour through South Africa.

MAY 22, 1961 MONDAY

Bass player Dana Williams is born in Dayton, Ohio. He joins Diamond Rio, a band that wins the Country Music Association's Vocal Group award three times. Members of the Grand Ole Opry, the band thrives on tight instrumentation and strong harmonies.

Mary Sue Everly sues for divorce from her husband, The Everly Brothers' Don Everly. He allegedly tells her, ''Babe, you just ain't Hollywood''.

RCA Records released Don Gibson's ''Sea Of Heartbreak''.

MAY 23, 1961 TUESDAY 

Little Caesar and the Romans sing ''Those Oldies But Goodies'' on American Bandstand.

Flatt and Scruggs recorded ''Go Home''

Five weeks after location shooting ended in Hawaii, filming for the Elvis Presley movie ''Blue Hawaii'' in Los Angeles, California.

Gene Autry is arrested in North Hollywood and charged with drunk driving after failing a field sobriety test. He's released on $263 bail.

MAY 24, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''Under The Influence Of Love'' in an afternoon session at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood, California.

MAY 25, 1961 THURSDAY

Roy Drusky recorded ''I Went Out Of My Way (To Make You Happy)''.

Rex Allen recorded the theme to the movie ''Marines, Let's Go'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

President Kennedy asks Congress for $531 million to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade.

MAY 26, 1961 FRIDAY

Following an association with Capitol Records, Jerry Reed holds the first of six recording sessions in a new deal with Columbia. He'll move along to RCA before finally reaching his commercial peak.

Ray Stevens recorded a minor pop hit, ''Jeremiah Peabody's Poly Unsaturated Quick Dissolving Fast Acting Pleasant Tasting Green And Purple Pills'', in his first Mercury session, at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

MAY 27, 1961 SATURDAY

Johnny Cash has a guest acting part on NBC's ''The Deputy'', featuring Henry Fonda.

MAY 28, 1961 SUNDAY

Ernest Tubb recorded ''Though That Door'' during an evening session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

MAY 29, 1961 MONDAY

Rock singer and songwriter Melissa Etheridge is born in Leavenworth, Kansas. A gritty powerful vocalist, she finds her way into the country charts when Trisha Yearwood scores a minor hit with her song ''You Can Sleep While I Drive'' in 1995.

Decca released The Wilburn Brothers' ''Blue Blue Day''.

Mel Tillis holds his last Columbia recording session. Two of the songs become hits for him when he remakes them in the 1970s, ''Heart Over Mind'' and ''I Ain't Never''.

MAY 31, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Chuck Berry, the author of such country hits as ''Mabellene'', ''Johnny B. Goode'' and ''Brown Eyed Handsome Man'', opens a new family shopping and entertainment site, called Berry Park in Wentzville, Missouri.


Bill Yates (left) and Billy Adams >

There are other artists named Billy Adams in the rock and roll history books, principally a guitarist from  Kentucky who recorded for Quincy and Nau-Voo and who has appeared in rocking revival shows at home  and abroad. But in Memphis, there was only ever one Billy Adams.

Billy Adams and his recording associate Bill Yates had more singles issued on Sun Records than many of the  major names associated with the label. 


Because they recorded in the early 1960s rather than the rockabilly  1950s their music has tended to be overshadowed by the soulful developments in black music and the blues  tradition that were coming out of Hi, Stax, and other Memphis labels.

Nevertheless, they were important  white musicians spearheading Sun's part in the musical convergence in the city some years before the civil  rights movement took hold. Adams and Yates frequently worked at the same clubs as the rhythm and blues  bands of Willie Mitchell and Gene ''Bowlegs'' Miller. Unlike the British beat groups who were invading with  America with recycled versions of black music,Adams and Yates were part of Memphis's evolving musical  scene, black and white.

Billy Adams was the band-leader and organiser, a drummer of some note, and a decent singer. Bill Yates was  less organised, a pianist of some note, and a really good singer in a range of styles. Often he played as part of  Adams's band, but he would regularly disappear to follow other opportunities.


In 1960, Scotty Moore was hired by Sam Phillips to be Production Manager for Sun Records at the Phillips  studio on Madison Avenue. He took with him the link to HOTB that he had only just set up at Fernwood, and  Cherry's Billy Adams and Bill Yates tapes were mastered for release at Phillips studio at 639 Madison  Avenue. They were not recorded at Sun, though. Jesse Carter remembered: ''Adams sang and played drums  on a session at Hi Records studio. The first record he made, ''Lookin' For My Baby'', was one song we  recorded there, and we made some instrumentals there too''. The Hi studio was named Royal Recording and  
was a converted movie theater at 1320 South Lauderdale in south Memphis.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY ADAMS
FOR HOTB RECORDS 1961

ROYAL RECORDING STUDIO
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE STREET, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HOTB SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) SUMMER 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY RUBEN CHERRY
AND/OF WILLIE MITCHELL

It is probably that Billy Adams made one session for Home Of The Blues Records, from which came two discs, and   another session backing Bill Yates. Both he and Yates had a single issued by Ruben Cherry in the fall of 1961, and   both saw a second release more than six months later.

01 - ''HAD THE BLUES (TWIST)'' - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Billy Adams
Publisher: - Delta Haze Music
Matrix number: - 2571
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - Fall 1961
First appearance: - Home Of The Blues Records (S) 45rpm HOTB 239 mono
HAD THE BLUES (TWIST) / LOOKING FOR MY BABY (MARY ANN)
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-1 mono
BILLY ADAMS – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Billy Adam's debut disc coupled ''Looking For My Baby (Mary Ann)'' with ''Had The Blues )Twist)'', HOTB   239. It was a disc that pretty much ignored the Twist dance craze despite the bracketed attempt to imply that   was the beat in the grooves. It was far more Adams unleasing his long-held love for rocking rhythm and   blues music. ''Looking For My Baby'' was an original song first drafted by bass player Jesse Carter about his   wife May Ann. At about the same time, Bill Yates made his debut on the sister label, First Records, with ''All I   Need Is You'' and ''Mojo'', backed by Adams band.

02 – ''LOOKING FOR MY BABY (MARY ANN) – B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Billy Adams-Jesse Carter
Publisher: - Delta Haze Music
Matrix number - 2572
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - Fall 1961
First appearance: - Home Of The Blues Records (S) 45rpm HOTB 239 mono
LOOKING FOR MY BABY (MARY ANN) / HAD THE BLUES (TWIST)
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-2 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03(1) - ''MEMPHIS TWIST'' – 1 – B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-16 mono
BILLY ADAMS – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Here are two versions of ''Memphis Twist'', a really promising recording that was possibly mixed as a single   when the Twist craze tailed off or when HOTB died.

03(2) - ''MEMPHIS TWIST'' - 2 - B.M.I. - 2:02
|Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-30 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04 - ''SEND ME SOME LOVIN''' - B.M.I. - 3:09
Composer: - John Marascalco-Loyd Price
Publisher: - Venice Music
Matrix number: None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-17 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

There were a number of unissued songs left over from the HOTB sessions, mainly featuring Bill Yates, but   Billy Adams did leave two more instrumentals, ''Fee Bee'' and ''Send Me Some Loving'', both included here.

05 - ''FEE BEE'' - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-15 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

06 - ''BIG M'' - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Billy Adams
Publisher: - Delta Haze Music
Matrix number: - 2578
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - Late 1962
First appearance: - Home Of The Blues Records (S) 45rpm HOTB 242 mono
BIG M / MY HAPPINESS
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-3 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

In the late spring of 1962, Billy Adams' second disc appeared, ''My Happiness'' and ''Big Me'', HOTB 242.   Both sides were instrumentals, picking up the then-current theme in Memphis for tough, bluesy sax-led   sounds. Adam and his band members had worked often with Bill Black and Ace Cannon and the members of  Booker T. and the MGs, and theirs was almost a communal Memphis sound, Billboard gave ''Big M'' a rating   of 3 stars (Moderate sales potential) on May 5, 1962. Despite this, a royalty statement for the first half of   1962 shows that Adams' discs did not get too far out of Memphis, with his first selling 400 copies, his second   just 275 to date, and that Adams was $38 short of making any money. However, the second disc was reissued   on Apt as part of the deal with ABC and it was listed in Billboard on October 27, 1962 as a new release.  There was no detailed review but both sides were again given 3 stars. Bill Yates also saw a second disc   issued at this time when HOTB licensed two titles to Bethlehem Records.

07 - ''MY HAPPINESS'' – B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Betty Peterson-Borney Bergantine - Written in 1933
Publisher: - Chappell Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 2577
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - Late 1962
First appearance: - Home Of The Blues Records (S) 45rpm HOTB 242 mono
MY HAPPINESS / BIG M
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-4 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Adam - Vocal
Billy Yates - Piano & Organ
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter - Bass
Gene Parker - Drums
Russ Carlton - Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


SUMMER 1961

Ruben Cherry and Celia Camp diversified in mid 1961 by setting up subsidiary labels to issue music   produced and bankrolled by independent producers. The Zab, Rufus, Six-O-Six (named after the store   address where Cherry lived as a child), and First Records labels were an effort to ring the changes. Mrs.   Camp was wheeling and dealing in more than records: Billboard reported on May 22, 1961: ''Memphis: Mrs.   Celia G. Camp has purchased the majority of the stock in Southern Amusement Company from her exhusband...   the largest phonograph and game operation in the mid-South... Camp began his coin machine   empire in 1938, with Mrs. Camp's help. They founded Southern Distributing Company with Kenneth Wilson.   Wilson has long since left the field and is now a multi-millionaire builder and president of Holiday Inns Inc...   Mrs. Camp owns Music Systems Inc, 407 Madison Avenue, where her office is, a background music  operation. Mrs. Camp also owns oil wells in Kentucky, Illinois, and Arkansas. A year ago she helped found   HOTB record company and is secretary-treasurer of it. She has put up the money for its operation. They are   hoping to become a hit-producing record company, have great hopes for the Five Royales they are  recording''. These hopes soon met the reality of average sales figures, and Camp brought in her nephew, Wolf   Lebowitz, a Memphis-born journalist and photographer, who hawked the label around the northern record   business. By November 1961 Billboard was reporting: ''Chicago – Vee Jay president Ewart Abner has   worked out an agreement with Ruben Cherry's label HOTB to distribute the latter's records. Future HOTB   releases will be issued on Vee Jay with an additional emblem of HOTB''. Soon, the label would transfer this  arrangement to ABC-Paramount Records and their Apt subsidiary.


There are other artists named Bill Yates in the Southern music history books, principally an Appalachian bass   player who led bluegrass bands for many years, and a modern-day-country singer. But, in Memphis music,   there was only one Bill Yates .

Bill Yates and his recording partner Billy Adams had more singles issued on Sun Records than many of the   major names associated with the label. Because they recorded in the early 1960s rather than the rockabilly   1950s their music has tended to be overshadowed by the soulful developments in black music and the blues   tradition that were coming out of Hi, Stax, and other Memphis labels. Nevertheless, they were important   white musicians spearheading Sun's part in the musical convergence in the city some years before the civil   rights movement took hold. Adams and Yates frequently worked at the same clubs as the rhythm and blues   bands of Willie Mitchell and Gene ''Bowlegs'' Miller. Unlike the British beat groups who were invading with   America with recycled versions of black music, Adams and Yates were part of Memphis's evolving musical   scene, black and white.

Billy Adams was the band-leader and organiser, a drummer of some note, and a decent singer. Bill Yates was   less organised, a pianist of some note, and a really good singer. He played as part of Adams's band and on his   own account. He was comfortable with almost any style of music and many have been seen at Sun as the   new white hope after the loss of Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich.

It is probably that Bill Yates made at least two vocal sessions for Home Of The Blues, one led by John   Osborne at Pepper and another for Ruben Cherry at the Royal studio, as well as the session(s) backing Billy   Adams as vocalist. Both singers had a single issued by Cherry in the fall of 1961, and both saw a second  release more than six months later.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILL YATES
FOR FIRST RECORDS 1961

PEPPER RECORDING STUDIO
62 DIANA STREET, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
FIRST SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SUMMER 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOHN OSBORNE

Although Bill Yates played keyboards on Adams first session, it seems that his own vocal debut was made at   the Pepper studio and funded by a local entertainment entrepreneur, John Osborne. Pepper Records, located   in midtown at the junction of Diana Street and Union Avenue , was owned by John Pepper, one of the   original stakeholders in radio WDIA, and whose main business was in producing advertising jingles. The   record label was dropped when the ads business expanded as Pepper-Tanner with new partners. John  Osborne was part of Elvis Presley's entourage at the time he met and recorded Bill Yates, according to   reports in the Memphis Press-Scimitar.

01 - ''ALL I NEED IS YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Bill Yates-John Osborne
Publisher: - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - F 102
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: First Records (S) 45rpm First 101 mono
ALL I NEED IS YOU / MOJO
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-2 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

While Billy Adams' discs both appeared on HOTB, Bill Yates made his debut, as Billy Yates, on the sister   label, First Records, funded by Osborne, with ''All I Need Is You'' and ''Mojo''. Yates provides a full-on   account of how he's got his ''Mojo'' working, with enough lyric changes and asides to go some way to justify  Osborne giving himself and Billy the composer credit for this well-known blues theme popularized by   Muddy Waters. ''All I Need Is You'' is an impassioned ballad of considerable quality and real soulfulness.   Yates overdubbed bluesy harmonica parts on both songs. His disc appeared around December 1961 when  Cherry and Camp formed First Records and issued three discs; the other two being by Mary Miller and Del   Monte. Yates' disc label credited John Osborne as producer and publisher of the songs and it is possible he   was acting Yates' manager at the time. He had managed various acts in Memphis, including the Lazenby   Twins who had a small hit with ''Wondering'' on Pepper Records late in 1958, and Osborne has issued discs   by the twins on his ABO label, a Division of Osborne Shows Inc. in the 1950s. Osborne was managing Mary   Miller at the time of her First disc in 1961. He had big hopes for the young teenager, Billboard reporting on   May 18, 1963: ''Songstress Mary Miller of Memphis, sweet 16 and very pretty, was a big hit at her recent   night club debut at Desert Inn, Las Vegas. Was signed to appear at Harrah's, Lake Tahoe, and may get a film   contract''. The high hopes didn't last long though, Billboard taking up the story six months later on October   19: ''Ward Hodge, Memphis investor, sued John Osborne, 38, in circuit court for $1 million, changing breach   of contract. Osborne is managing up and coming singer Mary Miller. Hodge's bill said Osborne brought the   singer to him, he took them to Hollywood, met producers, record officials, got her started, and had by   contract half interest in the agent's fee of 30%''. It is possible that Bill Yates was also promoted in Hollywood   at this time. Hid nephew remembers him having bit parts in western movies.

02 - ''MOJO'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Bill Yates-John Osborne
Publisher: - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - F 103
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: First Records (S) 45rpm First 101 mono
MOJO / ALL I NEED IS YOU
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-1 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03(1) - ''FOOL AROUND WITH LOVE'' - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - B 6665
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - November 1962
First appearance: - Bethlehem Records (S) 45rpm Bethlehem 3039 mono
FOOL AROUND WITH LOVE / BLUES LIKE MIDNIGHT
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-4 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

After the initial three discs on First, the label was folded and Cherry and Camp started to look to other outlets   for Bill Yates. In the summer of fall of 1962 they leased two of his sides to King Records of Cincinnati for   issue on their Bethlehem subsidiary. ''Fool Around With Love'' was a strong song, written by Carl Perkins,   and picked up by Yates when they played shows together. The flipside of Bethlehem 3039 was the   atmospheric ''Blues Like Midnight'', a song credited to Celia Camp and possibly even written by her. The   HOITB master tape of these two titles bears the date June 24, 1962 but this could be when a copy was made   to send to Bethlehem. The Bethlehem sessions and release schedules show that Yates' disc was issued around   November 1962.

03(2) - ''(I'LL NEVER) FOOL AROUND WITH LOVE (NO MORE)'' - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - None - HOTB Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-14 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04(1) - ''BLUES LIKE MIDNIGHT'' - 1 - B.M.I - 2:12
Composer: - Celia G. Camp
Publisher: - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - B 6666
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - November 1962
First appearance: - Bethlehem Records (S) 45rpm Bethlehem 3039 mono
BLUES LIKE MIDNIGHT / FOOL AROUND WITH LOVE
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-3 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04(1) - ''BLUES LIKE MIDNIGHT'' - 2 - B.M.I - 1”38
Composer: - Celia G. Camp
Publisher: - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - None - HOTB Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-13 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Yates - Vocal, Piano, Organ, Harmonica
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Vance Yates or Donald Dunn - Bass
Billy Adams - Drums
Russ Carlton – Saxophone

An updated sales statement for the first 6 months of Yates disc on First Records showed that 724 copies had   been sold, but that after session costs and advances Billy was still $457 away from making any money. A   statement to Osborne Music covering the first half of 1962 showed that a further 651 copies had been sold,   making less than 1400 copies in the first year.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JUNE 1, 1961 THURSDAY

Tex Ritter throws a party for the Los Angeles Dodgers at his home in Toluca Lake, California. The guests include first baseman Gil Hodges and pitchers Don Drysdale and Ron Perranoski.

JUNE 4, 1961 SUNDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''What Would You Do?'' and ''Stand At The Window'' in the afternoon at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

JUNE 5, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Bill Anderson's ''Po' Folks'', and Bill Anderson recorded ''Mama Sang A Song''.

JUNE 10, 1961 SATURDAY

Mel and Mary McDaniel get married.

JUNE 12, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Don Winter's only country hit, ''Too Many Times''.

Columbia released Claude King's debut single, ''Big River, Big Man'', and also released Carl Smith's ''Kisses Never Lie''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

''I Love You Because'' was likewise rejuvenated in a pop-country vein at a second Nashville date on June 12. This session saw Lewis record the ''A'' sides of two attempts to repeat the success of ''What'd I Say'' with material aimed squarely at the pop market, ''It Won't Happen With Me'', which was coupled with the aforementioned ''Cold Cold heart'' on Sun 364, and ''Save The Last Dance For Me'', paired for a release, Sun 367), with one of numerous recordings of ''As Long As I Live'', the latter having been taped eighteen months earlier in Memphis. Notwithstanding the very strong qualities of Jerrty Lee's interpretation of ''Save The Last Dance For Me'', which surely deserved widespread recognition, its chances of success were blighted by the song's familiarity in the wake of The Drifters' version; though might it have fared better if the exuberant ''I Love You Because'' had been selected for the flip? And despite Jerry Lee's spirited approach, ''It Won't Happen With Me'' suffered from being exactly what it was; a rather silly pop song. Neither release made an impression in terms of the hoped-for chart action. (*)


STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 12, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OF TOM SPARKMAN

1(1) – ''IT WON'T HAPPEN WITH ME'' - B.M.I. - 3:09
Composer: - Ray Evans
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30116-B3 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 9  MORE REBEL ROCKABILLY
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-13-5 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

''It Won't Happen With Me'' chosen as the follow up to ''What'd I Say'', this song stems from Jerry's second Nashville session and was released almost immediately after he recorded it in June, 1961. There was a lot of momentum in Jerry's career and no one wanted to squander it. Hopes must have been high for this one. Certainly, it was as commercial selfconscious as anything Jerry had ever recorded. In truth, the song was a fine vehicle for our man; it gave him a chance to trash the competition while extolling his own virtues. The song begins in true pop-gospel fashion, shuttling between 1 and 6-minor chords, with some simulated Raelets along for the ride. The lyrics is a Who's Who of pop stars of the day, from Fabian to Jackie Wilson. Not even Elvis is safe. There are also references to pop hits, like Ricky Nelson's ''Traveling Man'' from April, 1961. Yet, there is something really bizarre about the lyric. If you listen closely, what Jerry seems to be saying is ''Look, honey, why mess around with all those other guys? Sure they'll have casual sex with you and treat you like a groupie. But ''me'', I'll take you seriously. I'll even marry' you''. The truth is, given Jerry's matrimonial history, this song is more than an empty promise.

1(2) – ''IT WON'T HAPPEN WITH ME'' - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Ray Evans
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Stereo Master
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-11 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015  -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-10 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(2) – ''IT WON'T HAPPEN WITH ME'' - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Ray Evans
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 448 - Master
Recorded: - June 12, 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 364-A mono
IT WON'T HAPPEN WITH ME / COLD COLD HEART
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

2(2) – ''C.C. RIDER'' - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Progressive Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-11-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS – THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-12 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

"I Love You Because" is a 1949 song written and originally recorded by Leon Payne. The single went to number four on the Billboard Country & Western Best Seller lists and spent two weeks at number one on the Country & Western Disk Jockey List, spending a total of thirty-two weeks on the chart. "I Love You Because" was Payne's only song to make the country charts. "I Love You Because" has been covered by several artists throughout the years like Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Hank Locklin and many more.

In 1950, Ernest Tubb a number 2 and Clyde Moody each recorded their own version both making the Top 10 on the Country & Western charts. In 1963, Al Martino recorded the most successful version of the song peaking at number three on the Hot 100 and number one on the Middle-Road (or Easy Listening) chart for two weeks in May that year.

In 1964, Jim Reeves took the song to number five in the United Kingdom. In 1976, the song was the title track of a posthumous Jim Reeves album, which peaked at number 24 on the Billboard Country chart. The single version reached to number 54 in the United States that year. In 1983, Roger Whittaker got the song "into the lower reaches of the country chart''.

The 1956/1957 version of ''I Love You Because'' is performed at a very slow and plodding tempo, though it’s not without its charm and features some nice piano. This remained unissued until the 1983 ''The Sun Years'' box-set. Far better is this faster June 1961 version (though the backing singers are a bit annoying), first released on ''Original Golden Hits Volume Three'' in 1971. Lastly is the beautiful 1969 version, released on ''Country Music Hall Of Fame Hits Vollume 1''.

3(2) – ''I LOVE YOU BECAUSE'' - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Leon Payne
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None – Fast - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - December 1971
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 128-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - ORIGINAL GOLDEN HITS VOLUME 3
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-13 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

When ''It Won't Happen With Me'' didn't sustain any chart action, Sun came quickly with another single. Jerry again had one finger on the pulse of teen America with his reprise of the Drifters' ''Save The Last Dance For Me''. With its notably brief running time, the record is a consummate pop record, aimed directly at the AM radio playlists. The song, of course, is excellent. Its pedigree had been well established in the Fall of 1960. Jerry's version sports some crisp and lively drumwork and memorable pounding piano. To its detriment was the overpowering choral work. But, then, there had been similar complains about the  excessive violins on the Drifters original record.

4 – ''SAVE THE LAST DANCE WITH ME'' - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Doc Pomus-Mort Schuman
Publisher: - Rumbalero Music
Matrix number: - None - Stereo Master
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-14 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-13 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

4 – ''SAVE THE LAST DANCE WITH ME'' - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Doc Pomus-Mort Schuman
Publisher: - Rumbalero Music
Matrix number: - U 453 - Master
Recorded: - June 12, 1961
Released: - September 1, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 367-A mono
SAVE THE LAST DANCE FOR ME / AS LONG AS I LIVE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-1 stereo
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

"Save The Last Dance For Me" is the title of a popular song written by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman, first recorded in 1960 by The Drifters, with Ben E. King on lead vocals. In a 1990 interview songwriter Doc Pomus tells the story of the song being recorded by the Drifters and originally designated as the B-side of the record. He credits Dick Clark with turning the record over and realizing ''Save The Last Dance'' was the stronger song.

The Drifters' version of the song would go on to spend three non-consecutive weeks at  number 1 on the U.S. pop chart, in addition to logging one week atop the U.S. Rhythm and Blues chart.In the UK, the Drifters' recording reached number 2 in December 1960. This single was produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, two noted American music producers who at the time had an apprentice relationship with a then-unknown Phil Spector. Although he was working with Leiber and Stoller at the time, it is unknown whether Spector assisted with the production of this record; however, many Spector fans have noticed similarities between this record and other music he would eventually produce on his own.

Damita Jo had a hit with one of the answer songs of this era called "I'll Save The Last Dance For You". In the song, the narrator tells his lover she is free to mingle and socialize throughout the evening, but to make sure to save him the dance at the end of the night. During an interview on Elvis Costello's show ''Spectacle'', Lou Reed, who worked with Pomus, said the song was written on the day of Pomus' wedding while the wheelchair-bound groom watched his bride dancing with their guests. Pomus had polio and at times used crutches to get around. His wife, Willi Burke, however, was a Broadway actress and dancer. The song gives his perspective of telling his wife to have fun dancing, but reminds her who will be taking her home and "in whose arms you're gonna be''. Musicians on the Drifters' recording were: Bucky Pizzarelli, Allen Hanlon (guitar), Lloyd Trotman (bass), and Gary Chester (drums).

Emmylou Harris covered the song in a country/bluegrass style in 1979, including it on her ''Blue Kentucky Girl'' album. Also released as a single, her version reached the top-ten on the U.S. country singles chart in mid-1979. In late 1983, Dolly Parton recorded "Save The Last Dance for Me", releasing it as a single in late December; the song subsequently appeared on Parton's album of 1950s and 1960s covers ''The Great Pretender'', released in January 1984. Reaching the top ten on the country singles chart in late February, the single also crossed over, reaching  number45 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States.

Save The Last Dance For Me" was later covered by Canadian crooner Michael Bublé, and released as the third and final single from his second major-label studio album, ''It's Time''. The song was heavily remixed for its release as a single. For its release as a single, the song was heavily remixed, with mixes from producers including Ralphi Rosario and Eddie Baez. All of the chart positions for the single are for each of the remixed versions of the song respectively. The single first peaked at number 22 on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play Chart in September 2005. After Bublé performed the album version of the song during the closing credits of the film ''The Wedding Date'', this version was released to radio, peaking at number 5 on the Billboard adult contemporary chart, as well as reaching number 99 on the Billboard Hot 100. The music video for the track was once again directed by Noble Jones, who directed the videos for both of the album's previous singles, ''Home'' and ''Feeling Good''. The music video was choreographed by Raymondo Chan, a Salsa Latin dance coach and performer. It was shot in Vancouver, Canada.

Other significant recordings, Jay and the Americans released a cover version of the song on their 1962 album, ''She Cried''. In 1960 Polydor Records published a German cover version with lyrics by Kurt Schwabach and singer Ivo Robić and the German text is no translation. In 1961 Ivo Robic did a German song to this tune called "Mit 17 Fangt Das Leben Erst An" (Live begins at 17). Buck Owens released a cover version in 1962; it peaked at number 11 on the US country charts and appeared on the album ''Together Again.'' The Swinging Blue Jeans recorded a version in 1964 for their first UK studio album ''Blue Jeans A Swinging'' on HMV 1802. Ike and Tina Turner recorded and released a cover version of the song on their 1966 album, ''River Deep - Mountain High''. Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a two different versions of the song during his later years on Sun Records on June 12, 1961, in Nashville's Sam Phillips's studio. The Swedish group the Spotnicks had an instrumental version of the song, called "Valentina" on their 1964 album ''The Spotnicks In Spain''. Billy Joe Royal released a version of the song on his 1967 for his album, ''Billy Joe Royal Featuring Hush''.

During the Get Back/Let It Be sessions of January 1969, the Beatles played a short, impromptu variation of this song. It was in the original lineup of songs to be included on the album that would become ''Let It Be'', although it was later scrapped. However, their version has appeared on many bootleg releases, including 2 LP set "The Black Album" (not to be confused with their official released ''The White Album'' issued before). In 1969, John Rowles recorded a version arranged and conducted by British arranger, bandleader, Johnny Arthey, released on 7" vinyl by MCA-UK the following year. Harry Nilsson covered the song, in a rather dark fashion, on his 1974 album, ''Pussy Cats'', which was produced by his friend and drinking buddy John Lennon. The Walkmen did a cover of ''Pussy Cats'' which included "Save The Last Dance For Me". Also in 1974, the Canadian group the DeFranco Family reached number 18 on the Billboard pop chart with their version of "Save The Last Dance For Me", with lead vocals sung by the 14-year-old group member Tony DeFranco.

Patti LaBelle included a disco-flavored cover of the song as the lead track on her 1978 album, T''asty''. In 1978, country music singer-songwriter Ron Shaw recorded the song on Pacific Challenger Records; this version reached the Top 40 on the Billboard country music chart. In 1979, Marcia Hines covered the song for her album, ''Ooh Child''. The Forgotten Rebels recorded the song on their 1981 album ''This Ain't Hollywood''. The song was covered by Mud in 1982. In 1983 Herbie Armstrong included a haunting version of the song on his solo album ''Back Against The Wall''. Mort Shuman himself endorsed it, certain it would be a hit. Sadly the distribution company went bust and only 800 copies of the CD were ever distributed. The song was translated into French by André Salvet and François Llenas and recorded by, among others, Petula Clark, Dalida, and Mort Shuman himself.

Geno Delafose recorded the song as a zydeco version on the CD ''LaChason Perdu'' in 1998 on Rounder Records. Bruce Willis released a version which appears on his 1989 album, ''If It Don't Kill You, It Just Makes You Stronger''. ''An Intimate Evening With Anne Murray'' is a live album by Canadian singer Anne Murray, recorded December 18, 1986 performed on MTV, released in 1997 and features the song. In 2000, Japanese band The Neatbeats recorded the song for their album ''Everybody Need!''. Irish singer Daniel O'Donnell recorded it on his 2003 album, ''Daniel In Blue Jeans''. In the 2000s, UK musician and ex-band member of Fox, Herbie Armstrong, recorded a slower, minor version of the song and released it as a single from his album, ''Last Dance''. In 2003, the Troggs recorded their version of this song on an album with rerecorded songs, called "Wild Thing". In 2010, Jerry Lawson and Talk of the Town performed this song on the second season of the album ''Sing Off''. In 2012 Leonard Cohen performed this song as a part of his Old Ideas World tour. In 2010, Matchbox 20 lead singer Rob Thomas performed a live acoustic version at the 2010 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony. In 2012, the Bally Ramblers recorded it for their debut album, and in 2012, American composer and producer Kramer covered the song and included it on his sixth album ''The Brill Building''.


Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis – Vocal & Piano
Wayne Moss - Guitar
Kelton Kelso Herston – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon – Drums
Marvin Hughes - Possibly Piano on some tracks
Unknown Vocal Group

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JUNE 1961

Carl Mann recorded at Phillips's Nashville studio in June 1961, as his success slowly ebbed. Like  most of Sun's diminishing roster, he preferred the sound at the Nashville studio to the  Madison Avenue studio. Carl also hoped that he'd be allowed to cut more country music.

''Deep down I wanted to do country music'', he says. ''Every time I went to record I'd do some  country songs for Sam and he'd say, Naw, that's too country', but I slipped a few in there. ''Í  Can't Forget You'' was a song Carl Belew wrote for Patsy Cline. We put it on the back of  ''Some Enchanted Evening'', a song I did not want to.

At some point there was a convict between Phillips and Eddie Bush. The details are fuzzy,  but it probably centered around Phillips's unwillingness to pay Musicians Union scale on  sessions that went nowhere, or the lack of promotion accorded Bush's solo single. At some  point, Phillips expended quite a lot of tape on Bush and got as far as issuing a single, and its  lack of success might have accounted for some of Bush's pique. He appears to have a gone  back to the Louisiana Hayride for a while to play with Carl Belew, but the dates, as always,  are hazy.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

For the first session of 1961, Carl Mann headed east to Nashville rather then west to Memphis from his home near Jackson. He arrived at Sam's new studio on 7th Avenue North in Nashville to find Jud Phillips slumped over drunk in the secretary's chair.  Jud had apparently been told by someone that Carl didn't arrive sufficiently prepared for session work and he woke up long enough to chew him out. Sam arrived a little later and acted as nominal producer. Billy Sherrill, the resident engineer, was behind the board.


It is a matter of some curiosity why Carl opted to re-cut ''Ain't Got No Home'' and ''Blueberry Hill''. The entire band was comprised of Nashville session men plus Eddie Bush, and they seem intent on recapturing the feel of Carl's earlier versions. They were largely successful, but as Phillips already had the first version  nestled away in a tape box, what was the point of re-cutting them? With twenty-five years separating him from Sam's inscrutable logic, Carl could only venture that ''Sam may have wanted to try out his new studio, maybe compare it to something he had previously done in Memphis''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY JUNE 13, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OF TOM SPARKMAN

01 - "LONG BLACK VEIL''- B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Marijohn Wilkin-Danny Dill
Publisher: - Cedarwood Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-14 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-19 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

02 – "IF I COULD CHANGE YOU" - B.M.I. - 3:11
Composer: - Carl Mann-Kelso Herston
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-18 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

''If I Could Change You'' is a really beautiful country song, written by Carl and Eddie Bush. Unfortunately, Bush was broke as usual and managed to sell his rights to picker Kelso Herston. Business transactions of this nature were hardly new to Nashville. Just ask Willie Nelson. There is a vaguely Faron Young-ish quality to Mann's voice on this track but the biggest news for his fans is that there was nothing formulaic about either side of this record. For the first time Carl Mann was free to make his own music.

Finally, listen to the quality of these recording, made at Phillips' Nashville studio, compared with the untamed spaciness that still characterized Madison Avenue. It was comparisons like this that ultimately help to Sam Phillips to bite the bullet and bring in technical help to correct the acoustic problems at his Memphis
studio.

03 – "IF I COULD CHANGE YOU" - B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Carl Mann-Kelso Herston
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 402 - Master
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - July 1961
Firs appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3569-B mono
IF I COULD CHANGE YOU / I AIN'T GOT NO HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This Carl Mann record, his next-toast for Phillips, is worth special attention for several reasons. First, most listeners will notice that this is not the version of ''I Ain't Got No Home'' they are used to hearing Carl first recorded the song in October 1959 and it appeared on his original LP. The song had long been part of his stage repertoire and someone decided it might not be a bad idea to put it out as a single. What the hell, nothing else seemed to be selling. However, instead of releasing the album track, Carl journeyed east to Nashville to re-cut the song in the new Phillips studio. This time Carl left his trusty sideman home and used Nashville's finest pickers and grinners (Kelso Herston, Bob Moore, Buddy Harmon, Pig Robbins).

The session log from June, 1961 does not list Eddie Bush, but it's hard to believe that it's anybody but Bush on there. Bush was a transient (some would argue vagrant comes closer to truth) and it is unlikely he was a member of any musician union. It was one thing to bury that omission in Memphis; quite another in Nashville. And so the re-cut version of ''Home'' made its way on to the single. Most Sun collectors have long ago concluded that it is inferior to the original album cut although there is some undeniable energy here. Do you get the feeling that the band should have talked through the ending before starting to record this track?

04 - "AIN'T GOT NO HOME'' - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Clarence Frogman Henry
Publisher: - Folkways Music
Matrix number: - P 403  - Master
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - July 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3569-A mono
AIN'T GOT NO HOME / IF I COULD CHANGE YOU
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Carl Mann recorded the previously ''Blueberry Hill'' and Carl was happy with the sound of the new studio and he thought the single that coupled ''Ain't Got No Home'' with ''If I Could Change You'' held some promise, but once again it failed to recapture the magic he had sparked so effortlessly with ''Mona Lisa''.

05 - "BLUEBERRY HILL''- B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Al Lewis-Larry Stock-Vincent Rose
Publisher: - Chappell Music Publishers
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Spotlight Records (LP) 33rpm SPO-131 mono
CARL MANN - THE SUN STORY - VOLUME 6
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-21 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

''Blueberry Hill'' was originally recorded by Gene Autry in 1940 for the film ''The Singing Hill'' but was soon picked up by other artists and producers who realised the simple little song had the makings of a classic. Countless artists have put their own stamp on the song but it is the version of Fats Domino, released in 1956, which had best stood the test of time. Domino's influential oeuvre has compassed pianobased rhythm and blues, rock and roll, zydeco, Cajun and boogie woogie. It was almost certainly his version - lilting rock and roll which the quartet was best acquainted with. According to several reports, Elvis started the session with this song. Needless to say the piano parts would have been put in Jerry Lee's hands. ''Blueberry Hill'' has been recorded by numerous acts over the years, from the Glenn Miller Orchestra in 1940 to Led Zeppelin, who performed it live at the Los Angeles Forum in 1970 at a concert from which a bootleg album called ''Live At Blueberry Hill'' subsequently appeared.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal, Piano and Guitar
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Kelton Kelso Herston - Guitar
Bob Moore - Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon - Drums
Hargus M. ''Pig'' Robbins - Piano

Anita Kerr Singers consisting of
Anita Kerr, Dottie Dillard, Gil Writh, and Louis Nunley- Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JUNE 14, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR SCOTTY MOORE OR UNKNOWN

In the meantime, Jerry Lee's only registered day of work in 1961 at the Madison Avenue studio, on June 14, saw him getting the measure of a couple of numbers associated with Fats Domino, at least two more readings of ''My Blue Monday'' adding to those recorded back at 706 Union in 1959, together with a single take of Fat's own ''My Girl Josephine''. The latter was the sole product of this session to be released during the currency of Lewis's contract at Sun, when included on ''Jerry Lee's Greatest''. Both this song and a rival candidate for that exercise, his first attempt at Chuck Berry's ''Sweet Little Sixteen'', would be returned to a year or so later. At one stage Jerry Lee takes something of a back seat to allow sax player Ace Cannon to lead on a ''jam'' instrumental which, since its first outing in 1975, has been graced with the rather unimaginative title ''Lewis Workout''. On its first release in 1983 this anonymous tape was attributed to a session at the 706 Union Avenue studio in 1959. However, on the strength of the similarity of the arrangement both to the intro of ''High Powered Woman'' and the fade-out of ''Hello Josephine'', it is believed that its rightful place in the continuum is alongside these titles. (*)


1(1) – ''LEWIS WORKOUT'' - B.M.I. - 3:15
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Instrumental - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 14, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1980
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30006-B7
RARE JERRY LEE LEWIS - VOLUME 1
Reissued:  - September 1989  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-2 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

My Girl Josephine" is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino recorded the song on Imperial records (Imperial 5704) in 1960, and it charted number 7 on the Billboard Rhythm & Blues charts and number 14 on the Billboard pop charts.  According to Allmusic, the song has also been performed by The Bill Black Combo, Curley Bridges, Van Broussard, Snooks Eaglin, Chris Farlowe, The Flamin' Groovies, Michael Herman, The Holmes Brothers, Jerry Jaye, Jerry Lee Lewis, Sandy Nelson, Tracy Pendarvis, Queen Ida & Her Zydeco Band, Noel Redding, Warren Storm, Super Cat, and Billy Vera, among others.

2(1) – ''HELLO JOSEPHINE (MY GIRL JOSEPHINE'' - B.M.I. - 1:45
Composer: -Dave Bartholomew-Antoine ''Fats'' Domino
Publisher: - Bartholomew Music
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 10 - LP Stereo Master
Recorded: - June 14, 1961
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1265-B6 mono
JERRY LEE'S GREATEST!
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-15 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Only two albums were issued during Jerry’s 1956-1963 stay at Sun, ''Jerry Lee Lewis'' in 1958 and ''Jerry Lee’s Greatest'' in late 1961, the latter of which featured this song ''Hello Josephine'', driven along by some very fine sax playing from Johnny ‘Ace’ Cannon. For some reason Jerry recorded the song again 12 months later, this time with some fine guitar work by Roland Janes (or was it Scotty Moore?) replacing Johnny’s sax, though this wasn’t issued until the 1969 ''Rockin’, Rhythm & Blues'' album (a 3rd version was cut at a session a week after the 2nd one, but this sounds like little more than a rough session warm-up so isn't included in this analysis). It’s difficult to choose between the two, though the 1962 cut features a more expressive vocal.

"My Girl Josephine" is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino recorded the song on Imperial Records (Imperial 5704) in 1960, and it charted number 7 on the Billboard Rhythm And Blues charts and number 14 on the Billboard pop charts. The song is also listed and recorded as "Josephine" and "Hello Josephine" in various cover versions. According to AllMusic, the song has also been performed by Bill Black's Combo, Curley Bridges, Van Broussard, Snooks Eaglin, Chris Farlowe, the Flamin' Groovies, Michael Herman, the Holmes Brothers, Jerry Jaye, Jerry Lee Lewis, Sandy Nelson, Tracy Pendarvis, Queen Ida & Her Zydeco Band, Noel Redding, Warren Storm, Super Cat, Them, and Billy Vera, among others.


3(1) – ''HIGH POWERED WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Sonny Terry
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Take 5
Recorded: - June 14, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - August 1977
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1000-B1 mono
GOLDEN ROCK 'N' ROLL
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-16 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Two very different recordings of ''High Powered Woman'' were recorded at Sun, though none were released until well into the 1970s. This 1961 version features a ‘Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On’ intro and some very fine saxophone, and wasn’t released until the Sun International ''Golden Rock And Roll'' collection in 1977. The January 4, 1962 cut features a strong Ray Charles influence right down to the ''What’d I Say'' inspired intro, though at around 1 minute and 43 seconds it’s even shorter than the 2 minute version from a year earlier.

4(1) – ''MY BLUE HEAVEN - 1'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Walter Donaldson-George Whiting
Publisher: - George Whiting Music - Donaldson Music.
Matrix number: - None – Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 14, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-1-B2 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60'S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-17 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

My Blue Heaven" is a popular song written by Walter Donaldson with lyrics by George A. Whiting. It has become part of various fake book collections. In 1928, "My Blue Heaven" became a huge hit on Victor 20964-A for crooner Gene Austin, accompanied by the Victor Orchestra as directed by Nat Shilkret; it charted for 26 weeks, stayed at number 1 and sold over five million copies becoming one of the best selling singles of all time. In 1928, Blue Amberol Records released an instrumental piano version by Muriel Pollock (issue number 5471). The music for "My Blue Heaven" was written in 1924.

Donaldson wrote it one afternoon at the Friars Club in New York while waiting for his turn at the billiard table. The song was written while Donaldson was under contract to Irving Berlin, working for Berlin's publishing company, Irving Berlin Inc. George Whiting wrote lyrics adapted for Donaldson's music, and for a while, performed it in his vaudeville act; three years later, Tommy Lyman started singing it on the radio as his theme song.

Donaldson established his own publishing company in 1928, and his rights in the song were apparently assigned to his company at that time, with the song listed as having been published by George Whiting Music and Donaldson Music. The song was subject to copyright in 1925 and 1927. These copyrights were renewed in 1953 and 1955, after the death of both composers, at which time the rights in the song were owned by Leo Feist, Inc.. The rights were thereafter assigned to the EMI Catalogue Partnership, controlled and administered by EMI Feist Catalog Inc.

The song has become a standard. Hit versions were also recorded by Jimmie Lunceford in 1935 and Fats Domino in 1956. The Fats Domino version was a two sided hit, with, "I'm In Love Again" and reached number nineteen on the Billboard magazine charts and number five on the Rhythm & Blues Best Sellers chart. Mary Lou Williams recording a version for her 1964 Folkways Records album Mary Lou Williams Presents (F 2843); Smithsonian Folkways re-issued the recording as part of its 2004 album Mary Lou Williams Presents Black Christ of the Andes (SFW40816).

4(2) – ''MY BLUE HEAVEN - 2'' - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Walter Donaldson-George Whiting
Publisher: - George Whiting Music - Donaldson Music.
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Slow Take 4
Recorded: - June 14, 1961  - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-1-B2 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-18 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963


The Killer >

"Sweet Little Sixteen" is a rock and roll song written and originally performed by Chuck Berry (Chess), who released it as a single in January 1958. It reached number 2 on the Billboard charts, Berry's highest position ever on the charts, with the exception of the suggestive number one hit "My Ding-A-Ling" in 1972. "Sweet Little Sixteen" also reached number one on the Rhythm & Blues Best Sellers chart. Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song number 272 on their list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time in 2004.


Eddie Cochran performed a live version in 1960 which was released posthumously on his ''On The Air'' album. There is a cover version by Joe Brown and the Bruvvers on their 1962 album ''Pictures Of You''.

The Beach Boys' 1963 song "Surfin' USA" has virtually the same melody, with new lyrics that focus on the Beach Boys' ongoing theme of surfing. Following litigation by Chuck Berry the song is credited to Chuck Berry and Brian Wilson.

Between 1963 and 1965 the Beatles performed the song on BBC radio. It can be heard on the compilation album Live at the BBC. John Lennon recorded the song again for his album Rock 'n' Roll. The Animals' version is available on their 1966 album Animalisms. Ten Years After released a live version of this song on their 1970 album Watt. Jesse Colin Young also covered it on his 1972 album Together. Fictional synth pop band Silicon Teens recorded a version of the song for their 1980 album Music For Parties released on Mute Records.

Rock and roll artist Jerry Lee Lewis also covered this song for Sun Records and later with Beatles drummer Ringo Starr; this version appeared on Lewis's 2006 duet album ''Last Man Standing''. The Rolling Stones covered this song on their 1978 US Tour.

5(1) -''SWEET LITTLE SIXTEEN'' - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Chuck Berry
Publisher: - Arc Music
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Take 2
Recorded: - June 14, 1961  - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-19 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-13-15 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Backed by a band that includes Ace Cannon’s honking sax and drummer Gene Chrisman (who incidentally also played drums on the 1982 ''My Fingers Do The Talkin'' album), it’s surprisingly that Sam Phillips didn’t see the potential of this great version. 12 months later he cut another 4 takes, of which the slowest of these was selected as a single soon afterwards. Though the tempo drags a bit, it has a great vocal & a memorable bass guitar intro from session man R.W. McGhee. The fastest alternate take from this session was chosen for the ''Rockin’, Rhythm & Blues'' album in 1969, while the other two takes weren’t released until the late 1980s/early 1990s. The 1977 version would potentially be the ultimate cut if it weren’t for the backing vocalists’ “oohs” and “ahhs”, but this was still one of the stronger tracks on his final Mercury album, 1978’s ''Keeps Rockin''. The 2005 version is a duet with Ringo Starr, and although he isn’t the greatest of singers, he’s perfect for this (as is his drumming style). The fact that they were actually in the studio together at the time makes this one of the most enjoyable and spontaneous-sounding tracks on the 2006 ‘Last Man Standing’ album.

Other recordings of ''Sweet Little Sixteen'' are John Lennon (Capitol; Bill Black's Combo (Hi); Bobby Vee (Liberty); Jesse Colin Young (Warner Bross.); The Beatles (Bellaphon); The Animals (MGM). Also available on early live recordings of The Beatles (Poludor), and on the United Artists release of a Britsh TV soundtrack featuring Eddie Cochran.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis – Vocal & Piano
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Jay W. Brown – Bass
Gene Chrisman – Drums
John Ace Cannon - Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


JUNE 14, 1961 FRIDAY

Patsy Cline is seriously injured in a head-on collision in Nashville. Two passengers in the other car die, while Cline receives a dislocated hip and a cut across her forehead.

JUNE 15, 1961 SATURDAY

20th Century-Fox offers a sneak preview of Elvis Presley's ''Wild In The Country'' in Memphis. Viewers can choose between two endings, deciding whether Hope Land dies at the end. The viewers choose for her to live.

JUNE 17, 1961 MONDAY

With Patsy Cline in the hospital from a car accident, Loretta Lynn dedicates ''I Fall To Pieces'' to Cline on Ernest Tubb's ''Midnite Jamboree'' radio show. Cline's husband, Charlie Dick, asks Lynn to come meet Cline in the hospital the next day.

Lawrence Welk, who appeared on the country charts with Red Foley, makes the cover of TV Guide.

JUNE 22, 1961 SATURDAY

''Wild In The Country'' opens, with Elvis Presley, Hope Lang, and Tuesday Weld.

JUNE 24, 1961 SUNDAY

Rollin ''Oscar'' Sullivan, of Lonzo and Oscar, marries Geneva Busby.

JUNE 25, 1961 FRIDAY

Sun 361 ''I'll Wait Forever'' b/w ''I Can't Show How I Feel'' by Anita Wood issued.

JUNE 26, 1961 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Little Sister'' ( RCA Victor 37-7908)  at Nashville's RCA Studio B. ''Little Sister" is a rock and roll roll song written by Doc Pomus and Mort Schuman, who enjoyed a number 5 hit with it on the Billboard Hot 100. The single (as a double A-side with "(Marie's The Name) His Latest Flame'' also reached number 1 in the United Kingdon Singles Chart. Lead guitar was played by Hank Garland, with backing vocals by the The Jordanaires featuring the distinctive bass voice of Ray Walker.

Presley performs the song as part of a medley with "Get Back" in the 1970 rockumentary film ''Elvis: That's the Way It Is''. The song would later be covered by such artists as Dwight Yoakam, Robert Plant, The Nighthawks, The Staggers, Pearl Jam, Ry Cooder and Jesse and the Rippers. The song lyric makes mention of "Jim Dandy" which was the title of a 1956 song "Jim Dandy" by LaVern Baker. An answer song to "Little Sister", with the same melody but different lyrics, was recorded and released under the title "Hey, Memphis" by Baker on Atlantic Records (Atlantic 2119-A) in September 1961.

Decca released Brenda Lee's pop hit ''Dum Dum'', and The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''Trouble's Back In Town''.

JUNE 29, 1961 THURSDAY

Skeeter Davis recorded ''Optimistic''.

''The Ford Show'' an NBC variety program starring Tennessee Ernie Ford and Molly Bee, ends its run in prime-time.


JULY 1961

The singles, PI 3569 ''If I Could Change You'' b/w ''I Ain't Got No Home'' by Carl Mann and PI 3570 ''My Greatest Hurt'' b/w ''Nothing Down (99 Years To Pay)'' by Jean Dee issued.

Jerry Lee Lewis plays in Florida and Tennessee.

JULY 1, 1961 SATURDAY

''Buffalo Gun'' debuts in movie theaters. The picture stars Marty Robbins, Webb Pierce and Carl Smith.

Michelle Wright is born in Chatham, Ontario. She nets a Top 10 single in 1992 with ''Take It Like A Man''.

Elvis Presley's friend Red West marries Pat Boyd in Memphis, Tennessee. Presley is to late to the wedding, and Joe Esposito has to fill in as best man.

JULY 2, 1961 SUNDAY

Ernest Hemingway commits suicide.

Acclaimed author Ernest Hemingway dies of a self-inflicted gun shot at his home in Ketchum, Idaho. He's namechecked 44 years later in the Brad Paisley hit ''Alcohol'' and again in Keith Urban's 2015 single, ''John Gougar, John Deere, John 3:16''.

JULY 4, 1961 TUESDAY

''Don't Fence Me In'' songwriter Cole Porter ends an eight-month stay at New York's Columbia Presbyterian Hospital.

A semi-private feud becomes public when Carter Stanley tells a crowd in Luray, Virginia, that Flatt and Scruggs refused to play the All Day Bluegrass Festival because The Stanley Brothers and Bill Monroe were there.

Seven-year-old Larry Franklin plays his first fiddle concert. He goes on to become a Nashville studio musician appearing on hits by Shania Twain, Deana Carter, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride and Gretchen Wilson, among others.

JULY 7, 1961 FRIDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''Day Into Night'' and ''Unloved Unwanted''.

JULY 8, 1961 SATURDAY

Toby Keith is born in Clinton, Oklahoma. The former semi=pro football player emerges in 1993 with ''Should've Been A Cowboy'', becoming a brash hitmaker, label owner and entrepreneur. He also joins the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2015.

Ray Charles is arrested in Chicago during a heroin bust. The following year, he connects country and rhythm and blues through the landmark album ''Modern Sounds In Country And Western''.

JULY 9, 1961 SUNDAY

Bluegrass vocalist and bass player Ronnie Bowman is born in North Carolina. After a stint in The Lonesome River Band, he co-writes Brooks and Dunn's country hit ''It's Getting Better All The Time'' and Kenny Chesney's ''Never Wanted Nothing More''.

JULY 10, 1961 MONDAY

Spade Cooley's murder trial, in which he's accused of killing his wife, begins in Kern County, California. He's sentenced to prison the following month.

JULY 11, 1961 TUESDAY

While watching baseball's annual All-Star Game on television, Bill Anderson gets a phone call asking him to join the Grand Ole Opry. Anderson, of course, whispers yes. The National League, meanwhile, beats the American League, 5-4.

Elvis Presley begins filming ''Follow That Dream'' in Crystal River, Florida. During the next month of shooting, he meets an 11-year-old named Tom Petty.

Chet Atkins plays a concert in the rain in Nashville's Centennial Park without telling the audience of 10,000 that very time he touches the guitar, he gets shocked. The closest he comes to letting on is telling the audience ''I'm real brave tonight''.

JULY 12, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Ferlin Husky recorded pop star Wayne King's ''The Waltz You Saved For Me''.

JULY 13, 1961 THURSDAY

Ray Price recorded ''Soft Rain''.

JULY 15, 1961 SATURDAY

Bill Anderson joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

JULY 17, 1961 MONDAY

More than a month after she was injured in a car accident, Patsy Cline is released from the hospital.

Capitol released Buck Owens' ''Under The Influence Of Love''.

JULY 18, 1961 TUESDAY

Bill Anderson recorded the Fred Rose song ''Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain'' some 14 years before Willie Nelson turns it into a hit.

JULY 19, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Johnny Cash recorded ''Tennessee Flat-Top Box'' in Hollywood at the Columbia Studios.

Faron Young recorded ''Backtrack'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

JULY 22, 1961 SATURDAY

Patsy Cline comes on stage at the Grand Ole Opry in a wheelchair to assure fans she'll return to performing soon, following her June car accident.

Webb Pierce recorded ''How Do You Talk To A Baby'' and ''Walking The Streets''.

JULY 24, 1961 MONDAY

Capitol released Rose Maddox' ''Conscience, I'm Guilty''.

JULY 27, 1961 THURSDAY

Spade Cooley suffers a heart attack in his holding cell at the Kern County Jail in Bakersfield, California, after his 14-year-old daughter, Melody, testified against him in a trial for the murder of his wife. He is transferred to Kern County General.

JULY 28, 1961 FRIDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''It's Your World''.

Patsy Cline returns to the concert trail at the Cimarron Ballroom in Tulsa, Oklahoma, six weeks after a serious car accident. Cline uses crutches to make it on stage and sits on a stool for the entire show.

JULY 30, 1961 SUNDAY

Brenda Lee sings the national anthem at the opening of the Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee. Jack Smith wins the Volunteer 500.

JULY 31, 1961 MONDAY

Capitol released Hank Thompson's ''Hangover Tavern''.

AUGUST 3, 1961 THURSDAY

Mary Carlisle, the mother of Bill and Cliff Carlisle, dies.

AUGUST 4, 1961 FRIDAY

Merle Travis gives away the bride as his daughter, Pat Travis, marries Gene Eatherly.

Spade Cooley, who has already suffered two heart attacks since April, is taken to Bakersfield's Kern County General Hospital, suffering from chest pains. It causes a delay in his trial for the murder of Wife Ella Mae Cooley.

Barack Obama is born in Honolulu, Hawaii. During his presidency, he gets White House visits from Clarley Pride, Dierks Bently and Brad Paisley, whose ''Welcome To The Future'' is inspired by Obama's election.

AUGUST 5, 1961 SATURDAY

Fiddler Mark O'Connor is born in Seattle, Washington. He wins the Country Music Association's Musician of the Year award six times, appearing on more than 450 country recordings, and wins a Grammy for ''Restless''.

Jackie Phelps debuts as a guitarist with Roy Acuff's Smokey Mountain Boys during a show in Altamont, Illinois, remaining with the band for nine years.

Comedian Tim Wilson is born in Columbus, Georgia. In addition to doing stand-up, he co-writes Toby Keith's 2007 hit ''High Maintenance Woman''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BRAD SUGGS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SUNDAY AUGUST 6, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR SCOTTY MOORE OR UNKNOWN

This is Brad Suggs' final opus on Phillips International, released in November 1961. The truth is, it's a pretty damn good record! ''Elephant Walk'' stood a real chance of success in the pop marketplace nearly 40 years ago. There was a 1950s movie by this tittle starring Elizabeth Taylor, and releases bearing this title appeared  on RCA in 1959 by the Kings, and in 1963 on Cortland by Donald Jenkins and the Delighters. It will require some deeper archeology to determine whether they are the same elephants.

01 – ''ELEPHANT WALK'' - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Scotty Moore-Vinnie Trauth
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 406  - Master
Recorded: - August 6, 1961
Released: - November 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3571-A mono
ELEPHANT WALK / LIKE, CATCHIN' UP
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

''Scotty Moore and I put that thing together'', Brad Suggs recalls. Suggs' minimal five note guitar figure is very catchy and that lord-of-the-jungle french horn provides some real atmosphere. Larry Mohoberac contributes the organ sound and Ace Cannon comes up with a wonderful growling solo he would use again exactly a month later on Harold Dorman's ''Uncle Jonah's Place'' (Sun 370). Nothing like recycling your own best work. If you peel away a few layers here, you can hear the rudiments of the sound the Mar-Keys and Booker T. and the MGs would shortly take to the bank. Not surprisingly, Al Jackson, the stalwart drummer of that group, was the session man here on Suggs' date. He should get an award for his performance on this track and whoever miked his drums should share the award with him. In fact, this whole track sounds more like a Stax record than just about anything issued on Sun or Phillips International.

''Like, Catching Up'' is a perfect flipside. The comma that originally appeared after the word ''Like'' is quite important, because it conveys the hipster phrase associated with jazz. And make no mistake, this was a jazz tune. Sort of a one-take jazz tune at that. The unidentified shrieking chick is good at what she does, which is to scat her way thru some familiar jazz changes. ''I wish I could remember the name of that woman'', Suggs admitted recently (1998). ''I'm pretty sure her first name was Millie. What I do recall is she was very pregnant. Looks like she was due any second. I kept thinking she'd never make it through the take before we'd have to rush her off to the hospital''. If these sides had been recorded in Nashville one would have no hesitation in saying that it was Millie Kirkham (who contributed the wordless echo to on ''My Wish Came True'' and Millie was pregnant on ''Blue Christmas''. These sounds were a long way from the jungle of the flipside, but they did their job – which was to focus everyone's attention on the Elephant.

As noted, this was Brad Suggs's final single. Ten instrumental sides. Can you identify his style? After five or so singles, you knew almost everything you ever needed to know about Perkins, Cash, Presley, Jerry Lee. But, musically speaking, who was Brad Suggs?

02 – ''LIKE, CATCHIN' UP'' - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 407  - Master
Recorded: - August 6, 1961
Firs appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3571-B mono
LIKE, CATCHIN' UP / ELEPHANT WALK
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Larry Mohoberac – Organ & Piano
John Ace Cannon – Tenor Saxophone
Vinnie Trauth - Saxophone
Al Jackson - Drums
Unknown - High Voices

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR TONY ROSSINI
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY SUNDAY AUGUST 6, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR SCOTTY MOORE

01 – ''WELL I ASK YA'' - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Vandyke
Publisher: - Hollis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 451 - Master
Recorded: - Probably August 6, 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 366-A mono
WELL I ASK YA / DARLENA
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Young Tony on stage. >

On August 3, 1961 Eden Kane hit number 1 in England with ''Well I Ask You'', three days later, Tony Rossini arrived at Sun to cut it. ''Sam liked that song'', said Tony. ''He really liked that song. He thought it was going to break''. Eden Kane never made much of an impression in the United States (although Americans unaccountably embraced his brother, Peter Sarstedt, singing ''Where Do You Go To, My Lovely'') Tony's record didn't make many waves, either, but it could have been a big hit in 1961.


It had the right sound for the time; it wasn't the Sun Sound, but it was very much in keeping with what was selling. Tony remembers Jud Phillips arguing with Sam over the skipsy promotional budget, and this might have been one to sink a little money into. The flip side, ''Darlena'', was by onetime Memphis rockabilly, Fuller Todd, who had recorded at Hi Records and elsewhere.

02 - ''DARLENA'' - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Todd
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 452  - Master
Recorded: - Probably August 6, 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 366-B mono
DARLENA / WELL I ASK YA
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3-24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

03 - ''JUST AROUND THE CORNER'' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Padgett
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 476
Recorded: - Probably August 6, 1961
Released: - April 4, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 378-A mono
JUST AROUND THE CORNER / (MEET ME) AFTER SCHOOL
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Dancing under control. >

''Just Around The Corner'' is not typical Tony Rossini fare. Whereas ''(Meet Me) After School'' fairly bristles with teenage angst (note the references to the soda shop and angry teachers), ''Just Around The Corner'' is a totally adult song, with a Forties sensibility to the lyrics. It hints at the career as a lounge singer that Tony enjoyed.  ''Sam was there for the mixing on those sessions'', Tony remembers. ''Sam and Scotty would bring me in late at night sometimes to re-do parts. Even as a kid, I knew there was something special about going to Sun.

Sam had the most beguiling personality. It was like you were going to see the King of the Mountain. Seeing Jerry Lee Lewis, even Elvis was no big deal. Elvis used to pull my sister's ponytails, but there was something about Sam''.

04 - ''(MEET ME) AFTER SCHOOL'' - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Davidson
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 475 - Master
Recorded: - Probably August 6, 1961
Released: - April 4, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 378-B mono
JUST AROUND THE CORNER / (MEET ME) AFTER SCHOOL
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

05 - ''LOVE YOU WITH ALL MY HEART''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably August 6, 1961

06 - ''VACATION TIME''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably August 6, 1961

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tony Rossini – Vocal
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Scotty Moore - Guitar
Al Jackson - Bass
Robert McGhee - Bass
Robert Alexius - Drums
John Ace Cannon - Saxophone
Terry James - Saxophone
Larry Mohoburac - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


AUGUST 1961

American music historian, writer, record producer, musician, and poet, Samuel Charters recorded in  Memphis, Willie Borum through the help of Will Shade. 

"Usually I stop by Will's whenever I'm in Memphis,  and over the years he's led me to other singers like Gus Cannon, Charlie Burse and Furry Lewis... I stopped  by in April 1961 …he mentioned that one of the blues singers he's known in the 1930s has stopped by his  place a few weeks before'', Chaters said.

At Izzy Young's Folklore Center, MacDougal Street, New York City, (from left) Sam Charters, Izzy Young,    Memphis Willie B., Furry Lewis, and Gus Cannon, 1964. >

Charters recorded Borum at a session at the Sun studios at Madison Avenue for Prestige's Bluesville label,  with one more session to follow. The albums were issued as ''Introducing Memphis Willie B'', and ''Hard  Working Man Blues''. Borum, was a mainstay of the Memphis blues and jug band circuit. He took to the  guitar early in his childhood, being principally taught by his father and Memphis medicine show star Jim  Jackson. By his late teens, he was working with Jack Kelly's Jug Busters. This didn't last long, as Borum  joined up with the Memphis Jug Band. Sometime in the 1930s he learned to play harmonica, being taught by  Noah Lewis, the best harp blower in Memphis and mainstay of Gus Cannon's Jug Stompers. Willie B. began  working on and off with various traveling Delta bluesmen, performing at various functions with Rice Miller,  Willie Brown, Garfield Akers, and Robert Johnson. He finally got to make some records in 1934 for  Vocalion backing Hattie Hart and Allen Shaw, but quickly moved back into playing juke joints and gambling  houses with Son Joe, Joe Hill Louis and Will Shade until around 1943, when he became a member of the U .S. Army.

AUGUST 1961

The single, Sun 364 'It Won't Happen With Me'' b/w Cold, Cold, Heart'' by Jerry Lee Lewis issued. Billboard's review says that ''Jerry Lee Lewis handles the top side, peppy teen-slanted rocker, with his usual verve, supported by his pumping piano. He sings the fine Hank Williams tune on the flip with style. Two strong sides''.

Sun 365 ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' b/w ''Other Side'' by Shirley Sisk; Sun 366 ''Well I Ask Ya'' b/w ''Darlena'' by Tony Rossini issued.

Jerry Lee Lewis plays at the Hollywood Bowl in Hollywood, California, with The Shirelles, emceed by Alan Freed, he also performs that month at the Brooklyn Paramount in New York City, with disc jockey Murray ''The K'' Kaufman, and Jackie Wilson topping the bill.

AUGUST 7, 1961 MONDAY

Patsy Cline's ''I Fall To Pieces'' reaches number 1 on the Billboard country singles chart.

AUGUST 8, 1961 TUESDAY

ROCA Victor released Elvis Presley's double-sided rock hit ''Marie's The Name) His Latest Flame'' backed with ''Little Sister''  ( RCA Victor 37-7908).

AUGUST 11, 1961 FRIDAY

One month to the day after it began, location filming for Elvis Presley's movie ''Follow That Dream'' comes to an end in Crystal River, Florida.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
FOR PRESTIGE BLUESVILLY RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
PRESTIGE SESSION: AUGUST 12, 1961 (1)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
RECORDING ENGINEER – SCOTTY MOORE
PRODUCER - KENNETH S. GOLDSTEIN
AND/OF SAMUEL B. CHARTERS

01 - ''BROWNSVILLE BLUES - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

02 - COUNTRY GIRL BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Arc Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

03 - ''HIGHWAY 61'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

04 - ''BAD GIRL BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

05 - ''THE STUFF IS HERE'' - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

06 - ''OVERSEAS BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

07 - ''STOP CRYIN' BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

08 - ''WORRIED MAN BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:22
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

09 - ''MAILMAN BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

10 - ''EVERYDAY I HAVE THE BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Peter Chatman
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

11 - ''MATTIE MAE'' - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

12 - ''GRIEF WILL KILL YOU'' - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1034 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
Reissued: - 1994 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-573-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B - INTRODUCING MEMPHIS WILLIE B.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Memphis Willie Borun - Vocals, Guitar, Mouth Harp

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©



Young Memphis Willie B. >

THE STORY TOLD BY SAMUEL B. CHARTERS - Will Shade, of the old Memphis Jug Band, still lives in  a ramshackle house behind Beale Street, and most of the older musicians in town drop around to see Will and  talk for a moment when they're down on Beale Street shopping. Usually I stop by Will's whenever I'm in  Memphis, and over the years he'd led me to other singers like Gus Cannon, Charlie Burse, and Furry Lewis.



He was in poor health when I stopped by in April 1961, recovering from a serious operation, but after we'd  talked for a moments he mentioned that one of the blues singers he'd known in the 1930s had stopped by his  place a few weeks before.

''His name's Willie B., I don't know what all his name is, but that's what we call him, Willie B.'He's one of  those real hard blues singers like you're always asking about''. He sat on his rumpled bed fumbling with the  papers jammed into hos wallet. ''I put his number down somewhere''. Finally Will's wife, Jennie Mae  Clayton, who sang with him on the old recordings, found the piece of paper with Willie B.'s number on it  folded into one of the wallet flaps. Will held it out. ''He's sing the real old hard blues for you''.

I called Willie B. over the weekend and asked him if he could come around to Shade's on the following  Monday night. Some people were coming over to sing and I wanted to hear some of Willie B.'s blues. It was  already noisy when O got there, the room crowded and heavy with smoke. Charlie Burse was sitting on one  of the beds trying to tune his tenor guitar with Will's harmonica, and three or four people standing around the  grimy iron stove were shouting an incoherent blues to the accompaniment of a broken ukelele that one of the  women was playing. Willie B. arrived a half hour later, a short, well built man in a light sport shirt and ripper  jacket. He tuned his guitar to the harmonica, then to the noise of shouted arguments, heavy dancing, and  shrill singing. Charlie, Will, and Willie B. began playing a fast blues. At first I just sat in an unsteady chair  listening. Willie seemed to be filling out the music with sudden runs or emphasizing the rhythm with sharp,  percussive notes on the lower strings of the guitar. There was an unmistakeable presence in his playing. After  three or four numbers Burse broke a string and Will began arguing with a man from the room next to his  about a note he was making on the harmonica. I leaned over and asked Willie B. to sing a blues. He picked  up his guitar again and began singing in a low voice. Even with the noise around him I could hear the  intensity and emotional richness of his singing. It was as Will Shade had said, the ''…. real, old hard blues''.

Although Willie B. was born in Memphis on November 4, 1911, and raised in the city, his roots are in the  blues tradition of the rural South. His father, from Pocahontas, Tennessee, still plays the old bottle neck style,  and Willie B. (the family name is Borum) learned some of his father's tunings, some of his songs, and much  of his feeling for the blues. He began playing the harmonica in the early 1930s, and his first teacher was the  great Memphis harmonica player Noah Lewis. Lewis was recording regularly with Sleepy John Estes, and  Willie B. still remembers some of his old numbers. After Lewis, Willie met Sonny Boy Williamson and the  two of them toured Arkansas with small blues groups working out of Memphis. From Sonny Boy he learned  some of his singing style, and there is still some of Williamson's shouted exuberance in Willie's singing. He  worked with other blues singers in Memphis, and even played with the Memphis Jug Band for some of its  engagements. Frank Stokes, who was recording regularly for Paramount and Victor, took Willie out with him  on trips down into Mississippi when Frank want to visit his family.

About 1937 Willie decided he'd have more chance as a musician if he learned the guitar and he has been  playing both guitar and harmonica ever since. He recorded for the first time a year or so later. He and another  guitar player named Alan Shaw traveled to New York with a Memphis singer named Hattie Hart, and  accompanied her on some recordings for the American Recording Corporation. Neither of them sang on the  session. The second World War interrupted Willie's musical career, and in January, 1942, he went into the  service. In December, 1942, he took part in the first North Africa invasion; then went into the later landings  in Sicily and Italy. As the war's end he was with a Quartermaster unit in the Italy mountains, and in 1946 he  returned to Memphis and took a job with the Buckeye Soys Bean Oil Company. Except for a three year  interval from 1950 to 1952, when he studied radio and television repair on the G.I. Bill, he has been at the  same job. He married two years ago and lives in a new home he and his brother have built on the outskirts of  Memphis, working his day job during the week, and doing repair work on the weekends.

Although Willie made the decision to take another job when he left the Army, he has never stopped playing  and singing the blues. Even in the Army, he spent his last year as a Colonel's driver, spending most of his  time singing for parties. Since then he has been working picnics, dances, and occasional club jobs, usually  with three or four piece blues bands, but sometimes just by himself. He hasn't been playing as much since his  marriage, but he still works on new blues, and whenever there's a family party he usually sings. Sometimes  his father will join in, playing one of his old bottleneck blues. During the afternoons that we worked together  selecting numbers for his recording session neighbors would often stop to listen to Willie's playing and  singing. They'd sit for a minute or two; then they'd turn to me and say, ''He really can sing them old blues''.

During a long session one afternoon Willie stopped singing for a moment and began talking about the blues.  He said, ''A blues is about something that's real it's about what a man feels when his wife leaves him that he  can't do anything about. That's why none of these young boys can really sing the blues. They don't know  about the things that go into a blues''. His blues like ''Mailman Blues, ''Country Girl Blues'' and ''Stop Cryin'  Blues'' have an emotional sincerity that reflects this attitude. One of his best numbers in his own ''Overseas  Blues'', written in the early summer of 1945. There was a rumor that troops from Italy would be sent to the  far East to finish the war against Japan. ''Overseas Blues'' is his unhappy comments on the situation. Two of  his most exciting performance were ''Brownsville Blues'' and ''Worried Man Blues''. For these blues, he  returned the guitar to his father's old tuning and used an improvised astinato rhythm on the bass strings with  much of the feeling of the older blues styles. These two blues, with their fusion of musical elements from  different periods of blues development, express the rich variety of his musical background. ''The Stuff Is  Here'', with its harmonica introduction, has some of the style of the old Memphis Jug band.

One of the most surprising aspects of Willie B's style is his technical virtuosity. He is a brilliant  instrumentalist on either guitar and harmonica and plays the two of them together with the same excitement.  He is able to play the harmonica with the same ''choking'' and slurring that other players need both hands for  and his guitar is a driving. Insistent counter voice to both his harmonica and his strong singing. He is an  intense, moving singer in the greatest blues tradition.

Even Willie B. was surprised at the sound of his performances when he listened to the first playbacks. He  shook his head, ''I was kind of nervous, you know, but that's really the blues. That's the blues just like we  were talking about''.


During the summer months the soya bean oil plant where Memphis Willie B. has a day job goes on to double  shift haring back the men that have been laid off over the spring, putting on some extra crews, and giving  everybody a chance to get in a little extra work. When I stopped by his house on a close, oppressive morning  in August he was sitting back in the work shop behind his house, his guitar on the couch beside him, sitting  back in a tired slump. He shook his head, ''I've been working a little extra time, you know, going in the  afternoon and working until we get everything in at night. We didn't get done until two thirty this morning.  After a while, working like that for a week or so, you begin to get a little tired''. There were some sheets of  paper scattered on the couch underneath the guitar, and a notebook left open on the work table in the center  of the room,It was a hot sticky morning, the air slack and unmoving. Willie got up to turn on a noisy fan at  one end of the room and there was a flurry of loose papers from the couch. The pages of the notebook  fluttered across the table. As we picket them up, putting them under the weight of the guitar I noticed that  they were blues. I asked Willie about them, ''They're just some blues I been working on'' he answered.

''How do you have time to write anything when you're working?'', I asked him.

He smiled. ''It's working that gives me my ideas. I walk around the plant at night, when if's quiet you know,  and I can hear men talking. Some of them is crying that their wife has left them or that she isn't doing them  right, and somebody else is saying that his girl's took up with somebody else. I hear all that and that's what I  put into my blues. I come back here and write down the things, rhymed up, of course. I make the verse and  things right when I'm still there walking around at the job''.

One of the qualities that immediately sets apart the singing of a major blues artist, like Memphis Willie B., is  the intensity of the emotional experience which is communicated and sustained by the verbal poetry of his  performance. Although the blues has been developed and exploded into an often than and repetitive popular  music idiom the original function of the blues, which was the expression of personal emotion, or the  description of personal experience and attitude, is still live and vital. In developing a blues there is this a  quality of ''hearing man talk'' and there is mechanical process of making the verse and developing the verse  around the central idea. The subject matter the blues is limited, usually the theme is of some aspect of love,  just as is the theme of most American popular music, and over the years there have been built up a number of  verses which fit almost any situation. For many singers the creation of a blues is limited to a hurried  selection of the standard verses to suit the mood without consideration of a personal expression, or attitude.  Since the form of the blues is rather rigid usually the standard three line rhyme with similar rhythmic stress  and length for each verse, the repertoire of conventional verses can be used almost without alteration or  development. As a result most blues are disappointed in their lack of originality or individuality Often the  singers are not entirely at fault certainly. An ambitious singer must produce an unceasing flow of new  material, and usually he is forced to begin using whatever he can find lying around to put a blues together.  Although Willie B. uses many of the conventional blues verses, as do all blues singers, he is unlike most  singers in that he uses the conventions to develop ideas which have an immediacy of emotional expression.

In ''Lonesome Home Blues'' he begins,

''It's lonesome in my home, just me, and myself alone,
Lonesome in my home, just me and myself alone
I ain't got nobody to love me, Lord, and my baby gone''.

It is a statement of a popular blues theme is the second verse he develops the idea with a particular example,  touchingly personal.

''Oh in my sleep, I could hear her call my name
In my sleep, I could hear me call my name
Lord, when I feel over beside me, I couldn't see
a doggone thing''.

In the third verse he turns from his own unhappiness to a general statement of his situation.

''A room without a woman is like a car
without a steering wheel
A room without a woman is like a car
without a steering wheel
And if you ever been mistreated, Lord,
you know just how I feel''.

From this general reflection, part of the store of conventional blues verses, he turns again to his own feelings,  almost as though he had stood up and walked across his empty room to stare unhappily out of the window.

''I wake up early every morning and my pillow
be soaking wet.
I wake up early every morning and my pillow
be soaking wet.
And I be looking for my baby and she ain't
even come home yet''.

With his last verse he returns to the general mood with which he began the blues, ending with a final  defeated shrug.

''Lonesome, Lord, I'm lonesome as I can be.
Lonesome, Lord, I'm lonesome as I can be.
Lord, I wonder why my baby, why she don't
come back to me''.

Using the attitudes of a blues convention with a personal emotionalism, and developing the attitudes with a  careful pattern of general statement and particular as example, Willie B. has created a blues of considerable  strength and vividness.

Often Willie B is able to catch with a line or phrase an almost unforgettable picture. In a few words in  ''Funny Caper Blues'' he describes the scene a man finds when he visit his unfaithful woman.

''Everytime I see you I catch you in your gown
Your hair all mussed up your window shade
pulled down''.

On the can picture an unsatisfactory relationship in a wry verse in ''Hard Working Man Blues'' he sings,

''Every morning before payday, you treat me
like a queen trest a king.
Every morning before payday, you treat me
like a queen treat a king.
And when I get my money in your hand you treat
me like somebody you never seen''.

These are the classic qualities of the blues, and in blues like these Willie B. shows his complete mastery of  idiom. There is, however, a development of the blues style into a personal almost narrative statement of some  particular event. In his first album ''Introducing Memphis Willie B.'' (Bluesville 1034) Willie sang one of  these blues, an account of his experiences in the army in Italy called ''Overseas Blues''. In his second album  ''Hardworking Man Blues'' (Bluesville 1048) he has included a blues about his induction into the army, ''Uncle Sam Blues''. It is in blues of this distinctive type that Willie B.'s singing becomes most personal,  while still remaining part of the blues idiom, and they are perhaps among his most interesting performances.  As he sings in ''Uncle Sam Blues'',

''Lord I got bad news, I'm gong to tell you
what it's all about.
I got bad news for you baby, I'm going to tell you
what's it's all about.
You know Uncle Sam's having trouble overseas
and he want's me to help me out''.

''You know the doctor Ok'd me, and I'm glad
there was nothing wrong.
You know the doctor Ok'd me, and I'm glad
there was nothing wrong.
But only thing I hate, I've got to leave you
here all alone''.

''I get up early in the morning
I've got to check with my local board.
I get up early in the morning
I've got to check with my local board.
It's going to be so lonesome without you
going down that lonesome road''.

'' Hold on Baby, I'll be back someday.
Hold on baby, I'll be back someday.
Lord don't let nobody drive my little girl astray''.

''You hear that train blowing,
calling little Willie I know.
''You hear that train blowing,
calling little Willie I know.
Baby you know the condition,
I'm booked out and bound to go.
So bye, bye, little girl, don't forget to write
So bye, bye, little girl, don't forget to write
Lord, I'll be thinking of you both day and night''.

I would be difficult to express emotion with a more tersely honest simplicity and directness, and in each of  Willie B.'s blues there is much of this same quality.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MEMPHIS WILLIE B.
FOR PRESTIGE BLUESVILLY RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
PRESTIGE SESSION: AUGUST 12, 1961 (2)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
RECORDING ENGINEER – SCOTTY MOORE
PRODUCER - KENNETH S. GOLDSTEIN
AND/OF SAMUEL B. CHARTERS

01 - ''LONESOME HOME BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:21
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

02 - ''L&N BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:31
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

03 - ''HARD WORKING MAN BLUES'' - 3:24
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

04 - ''DYING MOTHER BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:38
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

05 - ''HONEY MAKER BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

06 - ''P38 BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:27
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

07 - ''FUNNY CAPER BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:10
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

08 - ''GOOD POTATOES'' - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

09 - ''I HAVE FOUND SOMEBODY NEW'' - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

10 - ''UNCLE SAM BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:37
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

11 - ''WINE DRINKING WOMAN'' - B.M.I. - 3:34
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

12 - ''CAR MACHINE BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 3:18
Composer: - Willie Borum
Publisher: - Prestige Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - August 12, 1961
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Prestige Bluesville (LP) 33rpm BVLP 1048 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN
Reissued: - May 3, 1995 Prestige Bluesville (CD) 500/200rpm OBCCD-578-2 mono
MEMPHIS WILLIE B. - HARD WORKING MAN

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Memphis Willie Borum - Vocals, Guitar, Mouth Harp

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


AUGUST 13, 1961 SUNDAY

The border between East and West Germany is closed and construction on the Berlin Wall begins. The German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany) closes the border with West Germany and install barbed wire entanglements and fences. On August 17, 1961 first concrete elements and large blocks being put in place to create the Berlin Wall. 1961–1975 Concrete wall 87 miles long built separating East and West Germany. Nine border crossing points between East and West Berlin including Checkpoint Charlie at the corner of Friedrichstraße and Zimmerstraße, which was restricted to Allied personnel and foreigners. 1989 The separation of East and West Germany ends as the Berlin Wall is taken down leading to eventual German reunification on October 3, 1990. The Berlin Wall was a good example how society was effected by the Cold War which existed between the East and West following the end of World War II up to the nineties. 

Van Morrison forms the group, Them.

Dr. No, the first James Bond movie starring Sean Connery opens.

AUGUST 15, 1961 TUESDAY

Singer and songwriter Paul Jefferson is born in Woodside, California. After a brief solo career in the mid-1990s, he scores a hit as the writer of Aaron Tippin's ''That's As Close As I'll Get To Loving You''.

The military comedy ''Marines, Let's Go'' premieres in New York City, with Rex Allen singing the theme song.

AUGUST 18, 1961 FRIDAY

Jimmy Dean recorded the recitation ''Big Bad John'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Columbia released Lester Flatt and Earl Scrugg's ''Go Home''.

AUGUST 20, 1961 SUNDAY

Sheb Wooley recorded ''That's My Pa'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

AUGUST 21, 1961 MONDAY

Patsy Cline recorded ''Crazy'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Columbia released Ray Price's ''Soft Rain''.

AUGUST 22, 1961 TUESDAY

Spade Cooley is sentenced to life in prison for killing his wife in April. He's sent to Vacaville Medical Center.

Willie Nelson holds his first recording session for Libertry Records, yielding his first solo hit, ''Touch Me''.

Conway Twitty and three band member escape injury when they run their car on an Iowa highway just before the vehicle exploded. They lose $15,000 in clothing and equipment, plus a briefcase full of money from their Midwest tour.

AUGUST 24, 1961 THURSDAY

Johnny and Vivian Cash have their fourth daughter, Tara Cash, in Encino, California.

Patsy Cline recorded ''have You Ever Been Lonely (Have You Ever Been Blue)''. Twenty years later, her vocal part is technologically combined with the voice of the late Jim Reeves, who also recorded the song, for a posthumous duet.

AUGUST 25, 1961 FRIDAY

Billy Ray Cyrus is born in Flatwoods, Kentucky. The novelty hit ''Achy Breaky Heart'' brings him instant fame in 1992. He maintains an avid core audience even when the hits slow down and turns to acting on the TV series ''Doc'' and ''Hannah Montana''.

Patsy Cline recorded ''Strange'', written by Mel Tillis, and ''You're Stronger Than Me'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee. Michelle Branch covers the former song and Rebecca Lynn Howard remakes the latter one 40 years later on the tribute album ''Remembering Patsy Cline''.

AUGUST 26, 1961 SATURDAY

Guitarist Jimmy Olander is born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He becomes a member of Diamond Rio, whose crisp harmonies and instrumental prowess net such melodic hits as ''Meet In The Middle'', ''One More Day'' and ''How Your Love Makes Me Feel''.

Ray Pillow makes his first appearance on the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Merle Haggard and his first wife, the former Leona Hobbs, have a daughter, Keli Haggard. She receives credit as a co-writer on ''It's All In The Movies'', though it's merely a gift from her dad.

AUGUST 26, 1961 SATURDAY

The Mar-Keys' "Last Night" becomes the first Stax production to reach number one. Stax--and   later in the decade, the Muscle Shoals, Alabama, studio headed by Rick Hall--both offered a   rawer, more spontaneous, gospel-influenced alternative to the Motown Sound. The Mar-Keys   (whose rhythm section also recorded as Booker T. & the MGs) backed most of the label's   artists, including Sam and Dave, Otis Redding, Eddie Floyd, Rufus Thomas, Carla Thomas, and  Johnnie Taylor.

AUGUST 27, 1961 SUNDAY

Jeffrey Steele is born in Burbank, California. He helps found the band Boy Hawdy piling up hits as a songwriter, including Keith Urban and Eric Church's ''Raise 'Em Up'', Rascal Flatts'''What Hurts The Most'', Montgomery Gentry's ''My Town'' and Tim McGraw's ''Meanwhile Back At Mama's'' featuring Faith Hill.

AUGUST 28, 1961 MONDAY

Filming for Elvis Presley's movie ''Follow That Dream'' is completed in Los Angeles.

Decca released Roy Drusky's ''I Went Out Of My Wat (To Make You Happy)''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MIKKI WILCOX
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE AUGUST 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – CECIL SCAIFE
AND/OR STAN KESLER


It's time to correct a mistake that has hounded Sun discographers over the years (1998) Contrary to earlier impressions it now appears certain that Mickey Milan (Phillips International 3533) and Mikki Wilcox, who performs these session, are not the same person. Our most obvious error was to include the photo of Wilcox (that appears here) next to the listing for Milan in Sun Single Collection Volume 5. This error, which is also reflected in the Escott/Hawkins Sun Records Discography, was prompted in part by the fact that tapes from the two singers are stored together in the Sun vaults.


At some point, someone must have stuck everything together after asking, ''What are the odds of having two female singers named Mikki/Mickey record for Phillips International in a short period of time? The answer, unfortunately, was ''Quite High''.

There are two telling pieces of evidence for the ''Two Mikki/Mickey Theory''. The first is, if you look closely at the inscription on the Wilcox photo, you will see a thank you note to arranger Vinnie Trauth for his arrangement on her first record. The message is dated August, 1961. Indeed, Trauth provided the arrangement for this track by Mikki Wilcox which was released on September 1, 1961. If we assume that Ms. Wilcox had her wits about her, she would have remembered whether she already had a September, 1958 release on the Phillips International label. If she were the same Mickey/Mikki, she might have thanked Vinnie by saying something like ''Tanks for your arrangement on my record. It's s damn sight better than the first''.

Forgetting the intrigue surrounding the artist, both sides of this record are actually quite good. The simplest way to describe the sound might be ''LaVerne Baker meets Floyd Cramer''. An odd pairing, to be sure, but stranger things have happened at Sun.

01(1) - ''I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS'' - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-4-8 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

01(2) - ''I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: P 410  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Released: - September 1, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3573-A mono
I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS / WILLING AND WAITING
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

''Willing And Waiting'', the side for which arranger Trauth had to be thanked, is a fine bluesy, melodic song which is actually enhanced by strings. The flipside, ''I Know What It Means'' cuts closer to the bone. Would you have been at all surprised to learn that this vocalist was black? Either side of this record might have broken through with just a little sustained promotion. Unfortunately, Sam's well documented philosophy at this point was to release them and, if lightning struck, reap the profits. Unfortunately for Ms. Wilcox, it didn't.

02 – ''WILLING AND WAITING'' – 2:34
Composer: - Hager-Glasgow
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 411  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Released: - September 1, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3573-B mono
WILLING AND WAITING / I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Which gets us to the second bit of evidence. Quite simply, all you need to do is listen to the two records. It would be close to miraculous if these sides were recorded by the same person. One is, as previously noted, a rather shrill country pop singer and the others is, well, what we have here. Mikki Wilcox knew her way around the blues and is a lot closer to the contrallo of Mavis Staples than the higher range of, say, Kay Starr.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mikki Wilcox – Vocal
Strings & Arrangements by Vinnie Trauth
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR DON HOSEA
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

PROBABLY ECHO RECORDING STUDIO
14 NORTH MANASSAS AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: AUGUST 29, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER –  STAN KESLER

01 – ''SINCE I MET YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Stacy Davidson
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 455   - Master
Recorded: - August 29, 1961
Released: - October 9, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 368-A mono
SINCE I MET YOU / U HUH HUH
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Don Hosea had recorded some unissued material for Sun Records back in 1958, but it was his regional hit of ''John Henry'' on Roland Janes's Rita Records had re-captured Sun's attention. Hosea is obviously quite comfortable in the white soul bag, as shown by his treatment of ''Since I Met You'', complete with its gospelly 1-6 minor shuttle. It is ''Uh Huh Huh'' that usually draws all the attention, though. The original version of the tune was recorded by Willie Cobbs for Billy Riley's Mojo label. When Cobb's single started drawing attention, the maters were sold to Home Of The Blues Records, also of Memphis. As the momentum continued, Cobbs' masters found their way even further up the food chain and finally saw release on the Vee Jay label.

There is an undeniable power to Cobb's composition. It is catchy, memorable and melodic, three features not normally associated with the blues. Hosea does a fine job here on one of those tunes that can't decide if it's in a major or a minor key. For one, it's unusual to feature a sax break after just one verse. In any case, this would be Hosea's first and only outing on the Sun label and it was certainly among Sun's more interesting contributions to the Memphis music scene in 1961. As codas to this saga, Riley recorded ''Uh Huh Huh'' (properly titled ''You Don't Love Me'') for his ''Whiskeya-Go-Go'' LP on Mercury barely three years later, and Stan Kesler produced yet another version by Hi artist, Tommy Tucker (recorded as Tommy Raye) for his X-L Records.

02 – ''UH HUH HUH'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Willie Cobbs
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 456   - Master
Recorded: - August 29, 1961
Released: - October 9, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 368-B mono
UH HUH HUH / SINCE I MET YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Hosea - Vocal
Elbert Adair - Guitar
Billy Wood - Bass
Eugene Ben Keller - Drums
Bobby Wood - Piano
Charles Chalmers - Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©



DON HOSEA - UNTOLD SUN STORIES – Don Hosea left his hometown, Cape Girardeau, Missouri,  in late 1956, bound for Memphis. He started at the Cotton Club in West Memphis, and  became friends with Stan Kesler. 

''I still had my clothes in my car when I went to the Cotton  Club'', Hosea recalls, ''and Stan was playing there with the Snearly Ranch Boys. They offered  me a job. Then Clyde went over to the Gables and I formed a band with Bobbie Wood, Chips  Moman, and Reggie Young.


When Elvis was off the road, Scotty Moore and D.J. Fontana  would come over. I'd hang out at Sun when Elvis would come by. Warren Smith was there  then, he wanted to be Elvis so bad.

If Elvis wore a certain outfit, next day Warren would be  wearin' it. One time Elvis parked his Cadillac on the sidewalk outside Sun, and the next day  Warren parked on the sidewalk outside Sun. A cop gave him a ticket. Warren says, You didn't  ticket Elvis'. Cop doesn't even look up. Just says, 'You ain't Elvis'''.

Don Hosea started recording for Crystal Records, a label owned by bottling king Drew Canale  and run by Stan Kesler, and then went with Rita Records. After Rita folded, Hosea sang with  the Bill Black Combo on the road for a while, then turned up again at Sun. ''Stan and I was in  the studio when Willie Cobbs come in and demo'd ''You Don't Love Me'', remembered Don. ''I  had a rhythm and blues sound, and I covered it. Stan produced me at Echo studios. I think  Sam had a problem with the Union, so he said to Stan that he should set up Echo as a nonunion  studio. They'd cut over there, and if it panned out they'd run a dummy session with  the Union and release it on Sun. Sam had a stake in Echo, but no one knew it at the time.  We got a lot of airplay on that ''Uh Huh Huh'', but I never was too much into the recording  side of things – I was more into performing. Right around that time I went on the road with  Roy Orbison. I was the one who'd jump off the stage and do all the crazy stuff''.

In 1967, Don Hosea moved to Nashville. He wrote songs, some of which were recorded as  album tracks by George Jones, Faron Young and Charlie Pride, and then ran Young's  recording studio for a while. ''The Memphis days were the best of all'', he concludes. ''We  weren't out for money, we were out to entertain. Now it's all business. It was fun then. We'd  get in an old limo, have the best time in the world. I remember one time I woke up seven  o’clock in the morning. Someone was talking outside my hotel window. It was Smokey Joe  talking to his whiskey bottle, 'Sometime I hate you, sometimes I love you'. Stan was always  after me to record more, but I never did like the sound of my recorded voice. I was a  perfectionist a long ways from being perfect. I'd rather get on the road and entertain''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR FREDDIE NORTH
UNKNOWN DATE AND STUDIO LOCATION PROBABLY 1961

SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

01 - ''SOMEDAY SHE'LL COME ALONG'' - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Rick Hall
Publisher: - Fame Music – Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: P 413   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Released: - October 16, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3574-A mono
SOMEDAY SHE'LL COME ALONG / DON'T MAKE ME CRY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-4-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This October 16, 1961 release is quite a stylistic departure from much of the Phillips International release schedule. ''Someday She'll Come Along'' is performed in a dramatic, quasi-bolero style popularized by Roy Orbison's records of the day (''Running Scared'', ''Crying''). There is a tremendous intimacy to North's performance, reflected in both his warm style and the manner in which it is recorded. It's likely that he did a lot of listening to Brook Benton and, going back a few years, it wouldn't be surprising to learn that Roy Hamilton was a hero. North's voice and indeed, this material recall inspirational classics like ''You'll Never Walk Alone''. Indeed it wouldn't have been surprising if the opening lines of this record had been ''Oh, my love...'' as North launched into his own version of ''Unchained Melody''.

The flipside reveals that there is more to North than overwrought intensity. ''Don't Make Me Cry'' reveals a tough of Jackie Wilson and when that falsetto kicks in, it's hard not to think about Jimmy Jones. In fact, the opening notes of the falsetto section are a nearly direct quote from Maurice Williams' ''Stay'' (''Oh won't tou Sta – yay''). Perhaps it is fair to say that Freddie North was simply a composite of the most effective black music style of the late 1950s and early 1960s. He could do them all and managed to roll most of them into this record.

02 – ''DON'T MAKE ME CRY'' – B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Ray Stevens
Publisher: - Bill Lowery Music
Matrix number: - P 412   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Released: - October 16, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3574-B mono
DON'T MAKE ME CRY / SOMEDAY SHE'LL COME ALONG
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-4-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

03 – ''BLUE SKIES'' - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Released: May 29, 2012
First appearance: - Music Group (MP3) Internet Sample mono
SUN RECORDS - DOO WOP

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Freddie North - Vocal
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©



UNTOLD SUN STORIES – FREDDIE NORTH – was a Nashville rhythm and blues singer, born as  Freddie Carpenter on May 28, 1939 in Nashville, Tennessee. His father was a gospel singer,  and by the time North entered Cameron High School in the mid-1950s, he had a good idea  that he wanted to be a singer.

He was in a group called the Rookies, and told the 'Nashville  Tennessean' in 1972 that they made a record for Federal, although the King/Federal files tell  a different story.


''I got out of high school in 1957'', North reported, ''and a little while after that I made a  record on my way for University Records on a deal Buddy Killen set up for me I on American  Bandstand in January of 1960 but wound up not selling, so the University deal fell through''.

It was after parting company from University that North did his solitary session for Phillips  (a session that could well have been purchased or leased as this was the time when Phillips  was dabbling in leased Nashville productions). After Phillips, North signed with Capitol  Records, all the while working as a singing waiter at Executive Club at 17th Avenue and  Broadway in Nashville, and recording country and rhythm and blues demos. ''Half the  recording companies in Nashville could release albums on me from the demos they've got'',  North said in 1972. After Capitol deal fell through, North continued to work at local clubs,  and was holding down a regular gig at the Modern Era Club in west Nashville when he joined  Nashboro/Excello, first as a stockroom clerk, then as a promo man, and then as a recording  artist.

''After I came to Nashboro'', North told 'The Tennessean', ''I did some more recordings. I  guess I had a release out about once a year. We just never could seem to get the right  combination of songs or arrangement. In 1970 I did a thing called ''Thank That Woman''  which sold a few copies''.

After the experience as a disc jockey at WLAC-Nashville and in promotion for Nashboro  Records, who released gospel music. Then in 1971, he recorded ''She's All Got'', a song that  had been written by Jerry Williams (''Swamp Dogg'') and Gary U.S. Bond. It reached number  10 on the Rhythm And Blues charts, and was promptly covered for the country market by  Johnny Paycheck, who took it to number 2. Freddie North released an album, Friend, on  Mankind Records (U.S. Number 179, U.S. Black Albums number 41). The disc yielded two hit  singles, "She's All I Got" (U.S. Number 39, U.S. Black Singles number 10) and "You and Me  Together Forever". Freddie North remains a one-hit wonder.

By this point, North had decided to quit the performing end of the business to concentrate  on his desk job at Nashboro, but the success of ''All I Got'' persuaded him to hang in a little  longer. Some of his recordings for Excello's affiliated labels have been made available on  Ace, although North's current whereabouts are something of a mystery.


AUGUST 30, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hits ''Break It To Me Gently'' and ''Fool Number 1'' at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

AUGUST 31, 1961 THURSDAY

Songwriter and producer Wayne Kirkpatrick is born in Greenville, Mississippi. Raised in Louisiana, he authors Eric Clapton's ''Change The World'', Little Big Town's ''Boondocks'', The Wreckers' ''My, Oh My'' and Garth Brooks' ''Wrapped Up In You''.

SEPTEMBER 1961

The singles, PI 3572 ''Just A Little bit'' b/w ''It's Too Late'' by Charlie Rich and PI 3573 ''I Know What It Means'' b/w ''Willing And Waiting'' by Mikki Wilcox issued.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) was officially founded and opened its first office during September of 1961. The World Wildlife Fund was created by the world’s top conservationists as a means to organize and collaborate on conservation fundraising throughout the globe. The WWF used its influence and resources to bring public awareness to conservation issues with the goal of lessening humanity’s impact on natural wildlife habitats and preserving endangered species. Since its founding, the WWF has become the world’s largest conservation organization.

SEPTEMBER 1, 1961 FRIDAY

Sun 367 ''Save The Last Dance For Me'' b/w ''As Long As I Live'' by Jerry Lee Lewis released.

Claude King recorded the final version of ''The Comancheros'' in an overnight session at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

SEPTEMBER 3, 1961 SUNDAY

Loretta Lynn signs with Decca Records.

SEPTEMBER 4, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Webb Pierce's two-sided hit, ''Walking The Streets'' backed with ''How To You Talk To A Baby''.

SEPTEMBER 5, 1961 TUESDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''(How Can I Write On Paper) What I Feel In My Heart'' and ''Losing Your Love'' during a midday session at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

SEPTEMBER 6, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Stonewall Jackson recorded ''A Wound Time Can't Erase'' and ''Leona''.

Webb Pierce recorded ''Sands Of Gold'' and the Tex Ritter-written ''Cow Town''.

SEPTEMBER 7, 1961 THURSDAY

Jimmy Elledge recorded the Willie Nelson-penned country hit ''Funny How Time Slips Away'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1961 FRIDAY

Loretta Lynn recorded ''Success'' in the afternoon at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio on Music Row in Nashville, Tennessee.

''A-team'' guitarist Hank Garland goes into a coma after a car accident near Springfield, Tennessee. Noted for his work with such acts as Elvis Presley, Faron Young and The Everly Brothers, Garland never plays on another recording session.

Webb Pierce recorded the Mel Tillis-written ''Take Time''.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1961 SUNDAY

Lester Wilburn becomes the first of the four Wilburn Brothers to get married, taking beautiful Linda Todd as his bride.

SEPTEMBER 11, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Ernest Tubb's ''Through That Door''.

Banjo player Richard Bailey is born in Memphis, Tennessee. He becomes a member of the bluegrass band The Steel Drivers, nominees for a country Grammy in 2009.

SEPTEMBER 13, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Bobbie Cryner is born in Woodland, California. The smokey-voiced singer has a recording deal in the 1990s, but has her biggest success as the songwriter of Trisha Yearwood's single ''Real Live Woman''.

Cissy Houston is a vocalist on a New York session for Ronnie Hawkins and The Hawks, later to become The Band, for producer Henry Glover. It's a major stepping stone on her way to working with Elvis Presley in The Sweet Inspirations backing group.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1961 THURSDAY

''The Porter Wagoner Show'', a syndicated TV program, debuts on 18 stations. It runs until 1981, airing on Nearly 100 stations at its peak.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BOBBY WOOD
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 15, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – STAN KESLER

01 – ''HUMAN EMOTIONS'' - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Stacy Davidson
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 458   - Master   - Commercially Unissued
Recorded: - September 15, 1961
Released: - October 9, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 369-A mono
SINCE I MET YOU / U HUH HUH
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


Billy Wood (bass), Bobby Wood at the piano, Charlie Chalmers, (saxophone), Elbert Adair (guitar), and Gene Chrisman (drums),  Stan Kesler is behind the glass,  Echo Recording Studio, 14 North Manassas Street, Memphis, Tennessee.

Session pianist Bobby Wood recorded these sides in September 1961. ''Everybody's Searching'' is from the tradition of white gospel songs that have been crafted for the pop marketplace. The release on this particular outing borrows heavily from Stephen Foster's ''Old Folks At Home''. Sun had its share of entries in this field, ranging from Ray Smith's ''Hay Boss Man'' to Charlie Rich's ''Gonna be Waitin'''.

Like both of those tunes, this opus features plenty of 1-4-1 chord changes and a happy pointedly shrill chorus echoing the lyrics. True to form there is no mention of a deity here. It's one thing to bring the church to the juke box; it's quite another to ask God to sit in a Wurlitzer.

Music like this is usually pretty watered down for pop sensibilities, but Bobby Wood brings even less of an edge to his approach than most of the vocalists who tackle such material. He fares even worse on the flipside. There is a theory that one can guess simply from the title of a song how likeable the music will be. It isn't a perfect system but titles like ''Honky Tonk Blues'' or ''Down The Line'' bode well. On the other hand, it's hard to imagine that a Sun record called ''Human Emotions'' would come to much. The theory has never looked better.

For reasons probably unconnected with music, this single was never commercially released. It was a Stan Kesler production, and Wood believes that Stan had him under contract to another label at the time. In 1964, Wood finally scored a hit on Joy Records, and one of the follow-ups was yet another version of ''Human Emotions''. In October 1964, Wood was on tour with Gene Simmons, Murray Kellum, Travis Wammack and J. Frank Wilson when he was involved in a car wreck that cost him an eye. Wilson was badly injured and his road manager was killed. By the late 1960s, Wood had drifted into session work and can be heard on Elvis Presley's ''From Elvis In Memphis'' and ''Raised On Rock'' sessions among many others. He than made the familiar pilgrimage to Nashville and has worked on literally thousands of sessions since.

02 – ''EVERYBODY'S SEARCHING'' - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Stacy Davidson
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 457  - Master  - Commercially Unissued
Recorded: - September 15, 1961
Released: - October 9, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 369-B mono
UH HUH HUH / SINCE I MET YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bobby Wood – Vocal and Piano
Scotty Moore - Guitar
Elbert Aldair - Guitar
Billy Wood - Bass
Eugene Keller - Drums
Johnny Ace Cannon – Saxophone

Unknown Chorus

A regular Sun release of this record has yet to surface. Apparently it was withdrawn from marketing due to a contractual dispute. The side, ''Everybody's Searchin'', was released on at least two different labels. The Pen label is the most interesting, because it has been produced at the same pressing plant as Sun was using at the time, and has indeed Phillips' stamped in the vinyl trailoff. The GA Challenge promo and commercial issues are from different stampers and has slightly different playing time.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


SEPTEMBER 16, 1961 SATURDAY

Hank Locklin recorded ''happy Journey'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

SEPTEMBER 17, 1961 SUNDAY

Charlie Walker organizes a benefit concert in San Antonio for Jimmie Rosgers' ailing widow. Ernest Tubb, Hank Snow, Hawkshaw Hawkins, The Wilburn Brothers, Johnny Cash, Jimmy C. Newman and Bill Anderson help raise $6,000.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Karl Farr, of the Sons Of The Pioneers, dies of a heart attack on stage at the Eastern Exposition Coliseum in West Springfield, Massachusetts. Known for ''Tumbling Tumbleweeds'', the western harmony group later joins the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Tex Ritter stars in his first theatrical production in almost three decades. ''The Stovepipe Hat'', as it opens at the Music Box Theater in Los Angeles, California. The show closes three nights later.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1961 THURSDAY

Porter Wagoner recorded ''Misery Loves Company'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville during an afternoon session.

The landing gear fails on an airplane carrying Rose Maddox to Boston's Logan Airport. The plane spins into Boston Harbor, only one passenger dies.

Charlie Phillips recorded his only hit, ''I Guess I'll Never Learn''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAROLD DORMAN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 21, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CECIL SCAIFE

Harold Dorman's calling card was ''Mountain Of Love'', a beat ballad that went on to see a great many revamps, most notably by Johnny Rivers, David Houston, and Charley Pride (who, like the songs's composer, hailed from the tiny town of Sledge, Mississippi). Dorman's twelve months as a Sun artist brought forth some quality sides, the strongest of which is this derivitive of Gary U.S. Bond's double-track style. Not too long after, the bright lights had faded and he was earning a living repairing typewriters.


Harrold Dorman >

Harold Dorman's second Sun release of 1961 was pretty potent and might well have reclaimed the national audience he earned with ''Mountain Of Love''. To his credit, ''Uncle Jonah's Place'' owes no musical debt whatsoever to ''Mountain''. Dorman is swimming in entirely different waters here and acquits himself in fine style. The truth is, the only debt apparent on ''Jonah's'' is to Gary 'U.S.' Bonds, whose barely intelligible multitracked hits were sweeping the charts in 1961.


Dorman has taken the essence of this style but applied it to a much funkier, more southern target. As on the best of Dorman's work, racial identity is blurred. There's just no way to know whether the artist, or even ''Uncle Jonah'' is black or white. The only thing clear is that he's ''southern''.

One of the sweetest elements of this record is the heavy pulsing bass drum, alternating single and double strokes in a style best known from Charlie Rich's ''Lonely Weekends''. Like most work in this gospel-sounding genre, there are so many flatted thirds that it is hard to be sure whether the song is in a major or minor key. So powerful is this material that it might have worked as an instrumental. But fortunately we have Dorman's vocal and its wonderful tag line ''i lost my faith in the human race / Till I finally found Jonah's place''. Now ''that's'' poetry!

At one minute and 45 seconds, the AM radio programmers must have loved ''Just One Step''. It left them lots of time for the Clearasil commercials before and after. On this side, Dorman does his version of Fats Domino meets Ivory Joe Hunter. It's a smooth insubstantial effort that provided little competition for airplay and sales attention. 

01 - ''UNCLE JONAH'S PLACE'' - B.M.I. - 1:45
Composer: Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Gando Music
Matrix number: - U 459  - Master
Recorded: - September 21, 1961
Released: - November 7, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 370-A mono
UNCLE JONAH'S PLACE / JUST ONE STEP
Reissued: -  1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

02 - ''JUST ONE STEP'' - B.M.I. - 1:45
Composer: Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated - Gando Music
Matrix number: - U 460 - Master
Recorded: - September 21, 1961
Released: - November 7, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 370-5 mono
UNCLE JONAH'S PLACE / JUST ONE STEP
Reissued: -  1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Harold Dorman – Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Scotty Moore - Guitar
O.T. Shaw - Bass
Al Jackson - Drums
Bobby Wood - Piano
Martin Willis - Tenor Saxophone
Vinnie Trauth - Tenor Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 21, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OF TOM SPARKMAN

''Ramblin' Rose'' has been identified in some earlier discographies as having been recorded three times, once more than the evidence to hand indicates, a misconception now shown to be the result of the post-production manipulation of tape speeds. The good news is that this makes available an extension to take 1 serving up more than twenty extra seconds of the cut to add to what has hitherto been made widely available. These recordings date from this session in September 1961 when Sam Phillips pushed out the boat in trying to find a new sound. An eight piece horn section was in attendance to help generate the big brass sound, as Sam described it in the liner notes of the second LP (Sun LP 1265), on Jerry Lee's version of ''Money''. As we can hear in the concluding moments of the complete performance, greatly extended beyond the original fade out point at 2:22, in the end it all fell apart. But the suitably truncated ''Money'' was nonetheless good enough for a single release, (Sun 371), coupled with the best of the six takes of ''Bonnie B'' held over from January 1960. (*)


1(1) – ''RAMBLIN' ROSE'' - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Fred B. Burch-Marijohn Wilkin
Publisher: - Cedar Wood Music
Matrix number: - U 468 - Master
Recorded: - September 21, 1961
Released: - January 19, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 374-B mono
RAMBLIN' ROSE / I'VE BEEN TWISTIN'
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

''Ramblin' Rose'', while not typical Jerry Lee fare, is a powerful, bluesy effort that holds a surprising amount of tension throughout its nearly three minutes running time. You know you're listening to something special within that first four bars of instrumental work. The performance is very sexy, without any of the overt gurgles Jerry used to insert gratuitously into his material. The track, not to be confused with the insipid Nat Cole of the same name, features powerful drumming and piano work. Not even the chorus can diminish this one. Sam Phillips' Nashville connection probably acquired the song; it was by Fred Burch (who had co-written ''Tragedy'') and Marijohn Wilkin, together they would go on to write Jimmy Dean's hits, ''PT 109'' and ''Big Bad John''. This, a finer song in every way, stiffed.

1(1) – ''RAMBLIN' ROSE'' - B.M.I. - 3:28
Composer: - Fred B. Burch-Marijohn Wilkin
Publisher: - Cedar Wood Music
Matrix number: - None - Extended Stereo Master
Recorded: - September 21, 1961   - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-20 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-20 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(2) – ''RAMBLIN' ROSE'' - B.M.I. - 3:02
Composer: - Fred B. Burch-Marijohn Wilkin
Publisher: - Cedar Wood Music
Matrix number: - None – Unknown Take
Recorded: - September 21, 1961   - Not Originally Issued
Released: - December 1969
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun 108-A3 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE GOLDEN CREAM OF COUNTRY
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-23 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-21 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Jerry's credentials as an rhythm and blues artist were deepening with every release. Here, he takes on the Motown catalogue with his version of ''Money'', written by Barrett Strong the previous year. In truth, the song was not yet considered a 'classic' when the decision was made for Jerry to record it.

Even the Beatles may not yet have discovered it. This Nashville session from September, 1961 is notable in one important way. Never before had Jerry worked with more horn players. The Union logs list six of them which, along with the usual rhythm session, meant that Sun was paying some serious front money for this date.

Sam C. Phillips was not to be cheated. What he paid for, he heard! Even the liner notes to Jerry's second album, which featured this track, touted Jerry working with ''a big brass sound'', adding ''See if you don't feel he's perfectly at home and in facts shows off the brass to great advantage''. Jerry reads the now famous lyric   against Indian wardrums and his piano manages to hold its own against the blazing horns. The trumpets really cut loose during the final twelve bars and there are times when it's difficult to know where the shrill horns stop and the shrieking chorus starts.

In stripped-down form this was a  1960’s live favourite (check out the powerful version from Hamburg 1964 as well as the weaker version from Fort Worth 1966). The 2010 cut is Jerry’s most recently-released recording, being a bonus track on an exclusive edition of ‘Mean Old Man’ sold at the Million Dollar Quartet stage show in New York during mid September of this year. It’s possibly the most recently recorded too, as it certainly wasn’t amongst the bulk of “raw” ‘Mean Old Man’ recordings from late 2008 and early 2009, nor is there any record of it being recorded during any of the ‘Last Man Standing’ sessions during 2002-2005. Whenever it was recorded, the playing, the inspiration and the production is better than pretty much anything on the main album (and even the vocals aren’t too bad), though the one down-side is the over-dubbed duet vocal by Levi Kreis, the guy who plays Jerry in the stage show. 

2 – ''MONEY'' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Janie Bradford-Berry Gordy Jr.
Publisher: - Jobett Music
Matrix number: - U 461 - Master
Recorded: - September 21, 1961
Released: - November 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 371-A mono
MONEY / BONNIE B
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

02 – ''MONEY'' - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Janie Bradford-Berry Gordy Jr.
Publisher: - Jobett Music
Matrix number: - None - Extended Stereo Master
Recorded: - September 21, 1961   - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-21 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-22 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

"Money (That's What I Want)" is a song written by Tamla founder Berry Gordy Jr. and Janie Bradford that became the first hit record for Gordy's Motown enterprise. The song was recorded in 1959 by Barrett Strong for the Tamla label, distributed nationally on Anna Records. It went on to be covered by many artists, including the Beatles in 1963 and the Flying Lizards in 1979.

The song was originally recorded by Barrett Strong and released on Tamla in August 1959. Anna Records was operated by Gwen Gordy, Anna Gordy and Roquel "Billy" Davis. Gwen and Anna's brother Berry Gordy had just established his Tamla label (soon Motown would follow) and licensed the song to the Anna label in 1960, which was distributed nationwide by Chicago-based Chess Records in order to meet demand; the Tamla record was a resounding success in the Midwest. The song has Strong curtly insisting that money is what he needs, more than anything else.

In the US, the single became Motown's first hit in June 1960, making it to number 2 on the Hot Rhythm and Blues Sides chart and number 23 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was listed as number 288 on Rolling Stone's "The 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time''. Greil Marcus has pointed out that "Money" was the only song that brought Strong's name near the top of the national music charts, "but that one time has kept him on the radio all his life''. Piano and lead vocals were supplied by Barrett. Guitar on the track was played by Eugene Grew. Virtually all of the records issued were 45's, the 10" 78 format, issued by Anna, is described as "extremely rare''.

Singer Barrett Strong claims that he co-wrote the song with Berry Gordy and Janie Bradford. His name was removed from the copyright registration three years after the song was written, restored in 1987 when the copyright was renewed, and then excised again the following year. Gordy has stated that Strong's name was only included because of a clerical error.

Jerry Lee Lewis recorded in September 1961 ''Money'' for his Sun single (Sun 371), backed with ''Bonnie B'' and released on November 21, 1961, but didn't the charts. Even the Beatles recorded "Money" in seven takes on July 18, 1963, with their usual lineup. A series of piano overdubs was later added by producer George Martin. The song was released in November 1963 as the final track on their second UK album, ''With The Beatles''. According to George Harrison, the group discovered Strong's version in Brian Epstein's NEMS record store (though not a hit in the UK, it had been issued on London Records in 1960). They had previously performed it during their audition at Decca Records on January 1, 1962, with Pete Best still on drums at the time. They also recorded it six times for BBC radio. A live version, taped at a concert date in Stockholm, Sweden in October 1963, was included on ''Anthology 1''.

In July 1979 British band the Flying Lizards released a new wave version of the song. An unexpected hit, this version peaked at number 5 in the UK chart and at number 50 on the Billboard Hot 100. It also peaked at number 22 on the US dance charts.

The song has been covered by many artists, with several of the versions appearing in a variety of charts. For example, the Kingsmen reached number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 6 in the US Rhythm and Blues charts in 1964. Jennell Hawkins hit number 17 in the Rhythm and Blues charts with her recording in 1962. Junior Walker and The All Stars reached number 52 on the Hot 100 and number 35 on the Rhythm and Blues charts in 1966 and Bern Elliott and the Fenmen reached number 14 on the UK Singles Chart in November 1963.

The song was a staple for British beat bands, including the Searchers, the Undertakers, Kingsize Taylor and the Dominoes and the Rolling Stones. It was also covered by Freddie and the Dreamers and John Lee Hooker. The song was covered during live performances by the Doors and appears twice on their 2009 released album ''Live In New York'', which covers four sets from January 1970. It also appears on their live album Live in Vancouver 1970 and the bootleg album ''Boot Yer Butt: The Doors Bootlegs''.


3 – ''ROCKIN' THE BOAT OF LOVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None – Unknown Take
Recorded: - September 21, 1961   - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm NY-6-A4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - COLLECTORS EDITON
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-22 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Wayne Moss - Guitar
Jerry Kennedy - Guitar
Bob Moore - Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon - Drums
Jerry Tuttle - Organ
Jim Hall - Saxophone
Homer Boots Randolph - Saxophone
Karl Gavin - Saxophone
John Wilkin - Horn
Donald Sheffield - Horn
Cameron Mullis - Horn
William Bill McElhiney - Horn
Unknown - Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


SEPTEMBER 22, 1961 FRIDAY

''Five Star Jubilee'' ends a six-month run on NBC. The country variety series, telecast from Springfield, Missoury, rotated five hosts, Rex Allen, Snooky Lanson, Tex Ritter, Carl Smith and Jimmy Wakely. 

Columbia released Jimmy Dean's ''Big Bad John''.

Hawkshaw Hawkins conducts his final recording session with Columbia Records. Shortly thereafter, he returns to the King label, with whom he'd previously amassed a half-dozen hits.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1961 SATERDAY

Mitch Miller, the host of NBC-TV's ''Sing Along With Mitch'', makes the cover of TV Guide. The former pop record executive produced several hits for Marty Robbins, including ''The Hanging Tree'' and ''A White Sport Coat (And A Pink Carnation)''.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1961 SUNDAY

Clark McEntire, Reba's father, wins the National Steer Roping Championship in Laramie, Wyoming.

SEPTEMBER 25, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Brenda Lee's pop hit ''Fool Number 1''.

Jackie Gleason stars as pool legend Minnesota Fats in the movie debut of ''The Hustler''. Within six months, Gleason is also successful country songwriter, thanks to Jimmy Dean's recording of ''To A Sleeping Beauty''.

Ray Price recorded ''San Antonio Rose'', the first tribute album to honor Bob Wills. The band includes Willie Nelson.

Actress Heather Locklear is born in Westwood, California. She is married to Bon Jovi guitarist Richie Sambora at the time the band recorded its country hit, ''Who Says You Can't Go Home''.

Leroy Van Dyke's ''Walk On By'' spends the first of 19 weeks at number 1 on the Billboard country singles chart.

SEPTEMBER 26, 1961 TUESDAY

Nat ''King'' Cole and his wife, Marie, have twin daughters. Timolin and Casey Cole. Dad appeared twice in 1944 on the Billboard folk charts, destined to become the magazine's country list.

Buck Owens recorded ''You've For Me'' at the Capitol Tower in Los Angeles, California.

SEPTEMBER 29, 1961 FRIDAY

Don Gibson recorded ''Lonesome Number One'' during a late-morning session at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

SEPTEMBER 29 SATURDAY /OCTOBER 1961

Jerry Lee Lewis plays a 30-day tour with Jackie Wilson for black promoter Henry Winn. Gene Chrisman plays drums and Jay W. Brown is on bass.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1961 SATURDAY

Bob Dylan signs with Columbia Records. The folk singer and songwriter writes a number of songs which find success in country music, including ''To Make You Feel My Love'', ''It Ain't Me, Babe'' and ''You Ain't Going Nowhere''.


OCTOBER 1961

PI 3574 ''Don't Make Me Cry'' b/w ''Someday She'll Come Along'' by Freddie North issued.

OCTOBER 1, 1961 SUNDAY

RCA Victor released the soundtrack to the Elvis Presley movie ''Blue Hawaii''( RCA Victor LPM-2426).

OCTOBER 2, 1961 MONDAY

Joy Lynn White is born in Turrell, Arkansas. A highly regarded vocalist with a powerful voice, she never quite attains mainstream success during her tenure with Columbia Records in the 1990s, though she contributes to the ''Maverick'' soundtrack.

OCTOBER 3, 1961 TUESDAY

CBS debuts ''The Dick Van Dyke Show''. The cast includes Morey Amsterdam, who wrote Dick Jurgens' 1947 country hit ''(Oh Why, Did I Ever Leave) Wyoming'', and Mary Tyler Moore, who founds the 1980s country label MTM Records.

OCTOBER 4, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Bob Dylan, destined to write a number of country hits, appears at New York's prestigious Carnegie Hall for the first time. His audience numbers just 50 people.

Syndicated journalist Dorothy Kilgallen reports Hank Snow has sued Colonel Tom Parker, insisting he was the person who discovered Elvis Presley. Both sides hope to settle the dispute out of court.

OCTOBER 6, 1961 FRIDAY

Columbia Records released Johnny Cash's ''Tennessee Flat-Top Box'', and Claude King's ''The Comancheros''.

OCTOBER 7, 1961 SATURDAY

Songwriter Tommy Barnes is born. He creates Tim McGraw's first hit, ''Indian Outlaw''.

Wanda Jackson marries Wendell Goodman.

OCTOBER 8, 1961 SUNDAY

Glen and Billie Jean Campbell have a daughter, Keli Glen Campbell.

OCTOBER 9, 1961 MONDAY

The singles, Sun 368 ''Since I Met You'' b/w ''U Huh Unh'' by Don Hosea and Sun 369 ''Human Emotions'' b/w ''Everybody's Searchin'' by Bobby Wood issued.

Decca released Kitty Well's ''Day Into Night''.

OCTOBER 10, 1961 TUESDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford picks up his second gold album, for ''Spirituals''. It includes a version of ''(There'll Be) Peace In The Valley (For Me)''.

OCTOBER 11, 1961 WEDNESDAY

As a member of the club band The Apollos, Lee Greenwood is invited for the first time to participate in a    United Service Organizations  trip, performing for serviceman in Alaska.

OCTOBER 15, 1961 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Good Luck Charm'' at the RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

OCTOBER 16, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Patsy Cline's ''Crazy''.

Guitarist Wanda Vick is born in Montevallo, Alabama. She joins the all-female band Wild Rose, which nets a minor hit in 1989 with ''Breaking New Ground''.

OCTOBER 17, 1961 TUESDAY

''Elvis' Golden Records'' is the fifth album by Elvis Presley issued by RCA Victor, LPM 1707, and his second gold album, in March recorded mostly at Radio Recorders in Hollywood, with one session at RCA Studios in New York on January 30, one at 20th Century-Fox Stage One in Hollywood on August 24, and three at RCA Studios in Nashville in January and April 1956. It is a compilation of hit singles released in 1956 and 1957, and is widely believed to be the first greatest hits album in rock and roll history. It is the first of five ''Elvis' Golden/Gold Records'' compilations, four of which would be released during Presley's lifetime. It peaked at number three on the Billboard Top Pop Albums chart. It was certified Gold on October 17, 1961, Platinum on May 20, 1988, 5x Platinum on March 27, 1992 and 6x Platinum on August 17, 1999 by the Recording Industry Association of America.

OCTOBER 20, 1961 FRIDAY

Bob Dylan recorded his self-titled debut album. It begins a lengthy career in which he writes such country hits as Johnny Cash's ''It Ain't Me, Babe'', Garth Brooks' ''To Make You Feel My Love'' and Judy Rodman's ''I'll Be Your Baby Tonight''.

OCTOBER 21, 1961 SATURDAY

Jimmy Dean recorded ''To A Sleeping Beauty'', written by comedian Jackie Gleason.

OCTOBER 21, 1961 SATURDAY

Sun SLP 1255 ''Now Here's...'' by Johnny Cash issued.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Ray Smith found a potentially big deal in March 1961 with Infinity Records, based in California and part of the Howard Hughes empire. Bill Justis produced two Nashville sessions for the label but the promises of a big promotional push for Ray never came to fruition and soon Charlie Terrell was again looking for a new deal.

He found one in the summer of 1961, Ray Smith was back at Sun Records for a second time. Probably he was not displeased to have a crack at being on Sun in its new Nashville phase. When asked once what he remembered most about being on Sun, he replied, simply, ''Happiness, parties, etc''. On October 24, 1961 at ten in the evening he went into Sam Phillips' Nashville studio and worked all night, recording four songs that appeared on his last two Sun singles. Charlie Terrell remembered it well: ''When Ray went back to Sun records after Judd, we used the new studio in Nashville. Sam owned and built the studio, and Sam was there at the session, though we still had Bill Justis producing and engineering. He had Bill Sherrill as his electrician and helper. It was a good session with a lot of fine musicians. Pig Robbins was the pianist, and Bob Moore was the bass player''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY OCTOBER 24, 1961
SESSION HOURS: 22:00-01:00
PRODUCER – BILL JUSTIS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OF TOM SPARKMAN

01 – ''TRAVLIN' SALESMAN'' - B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Nelson-Crutchfield
Publisher: - Champion Music – Tree Music
Matrix number: - U 463   - Master
Recorded: - October 24, 1961
Released: - November 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 372-A mono
TRAVLIN' SALESMAN – I WON'T MISS YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4



If anyone could cope with changing times in the record business, it was Ray Smith. The man was a veritable chameleon. As his personal appearances of the day confirmed, he could offer convincing efforts in styles ranging from Elvis Presley and Fran Sinatra. What was a little bluesy funk to a man like that?  The Ray Smith who recorded the next single and one more released in early 1962, was quite different from the rockabilly pretender Sun fans had come to adore during his 1958 stint with the label.



This gravelly voiced midtempo blues shouter was a perfect fit for the late 1961 marketplace. There's a mandatory funky tempo and backup white chicks singing like they're in black church.

The material here is anything but ordinary. Smith has taken all the old 'traveling salesman' jokes and turned them inside out. He's the 'husband' of the traveling salesman's girl, and he's sick of all the crap she's buying from her salesman boyfriend. You had to have a taste for the bizarre to connect with, much less understand this storyline! Smith uses his emotive voice well, phrasing adventurously against the foursquare rhythm. He even tries some rather grating bass growls during the instrumental solo and again at the fade. One way or another this song was likely to garner some radio play, although it stopped very short of chart status.

''I Won't Miss You'' is a soul ballad from the practiced pen of Stan Kesler, who had placed similar material (''Playing For Keeps'', ''The Thrill Of Your Love'') with Elvis for the past five years.

02 - ''I WON'T MISS YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Katrina Music
Matrix number: - U 464  - Master
Recorded: - October 24, 1961
Released: - November 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 372-B mono
I WON'T MISS YOU / TRAVLIN' SALESMAN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

03 – ''CANDY DOLL'' - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Marijohn Wilkin-Fred Burch
Publisher: - Cedar Wood
Matrix number: - U 469 - Master
Recorded: - October 24, 1961
Released: - February 9, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 375-A mono
I WON'T MISS YOU / TRAVLIN' SALESMAN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4


''Candy Doll'', this was Ray Smith's second and final Sun release from his post-rockabilly period. As on ''Travlin' Salesman'', Smith is in his white soul bag here with both sides of this outing. ''Hey Boss Mann'' is the standard working man's complaint. For all intents and purposes, this is a Charlie Rich record. The material, instrumental sound and even vocal are not far from the material Rich would be recorded for RCA within a year or two.

Original pressings of this disc revealed how powerful the Twist had become in dictating the music marketplace. The label was printed as ''Hey Boss Man (Twist)''. How bizarre had things become when an essentially black song about an unfair bossman was written, performed and marketed by white men, and sold as the basis of a dance craze!. Chubby Checker had a lot to answer for.

''Candy Doll'' is a tougher record to figure out. Smith was drawing material from Nashville's top publishers and composers – these were hardly homegrown efforts in Memphis. Yet, it's hard to see the hook in this purposefully crafted pop record. Was it the repeated phrasing of the title? Or the growling horn solo? The wailing chorus? It didn't sell and, sadly, marked the end of Smith's recording career for the Sun label.

04 – ''HEY BOSS MAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Benny Joy
Publisher: - Champion Music
Matrix number: - U 470   - Master
Recorded: - October 24, 1961
Released: - February 9, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 375-B mono
HEY BOSS MAN / CANDY DOLL
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Hargus ''Pig'' Robbins – Piano
Stanley Walker – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Unknown – Guitar
Unknown – Drums
Unknown – Brass Section
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

Neither of Ray's last two Sun discs fared very well in the marketplace and Charlie Terrell was soon back out there looking for another recording deal. He found a small one, with Roland Janes Rita Records in Memphis, and a potentially bigger one with Vee Jay in Chicago. Neither worked out well, and Ray next did the rounds, to Warner Bros., Smash, Tollie, Celebrity Circle, and Diamond. Around 1966 the options dried up and Smith made three singles for BC, a label owned by Charlie Terrell himself. By now, Smith had long since lost his guitarist, Stanley Walker, who went to work for singer Jean Shepard appearing on the Grand Ole Opry and the 'Hee Haw' TV show.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©



Ray with his family >

Ray Smith decided to move his family to Burlington, Ontario to play the club circuit in  southeastern Canada. He was disillusioned with recording and found Ontario a better base  for touring in the northern part of the USA.

He said that it gave him better media exposure  too: ''I had TV shows all over Canada, on Channel 9, Toronto, Channel 11 Hamilton, and  Ottawa Channel 12''.


His music was now moving back towards country. He recorded into the 1970s on another  string of labels, from Caravan to Corona, and on to Zirkon and Celebrity Circle. In 1972 he  had a small hit on Nashville's hot label, Cinnamon, but it was then that his long association  with Charlie Terrell ended.

According to Terrell: ''Ray was making good money, playing good  clubs and venues, and he was driving Cadillacs - but his biggest fault was that he didn't want  to get out and do any promotional work''.

''I continued to manage him even after he moved home to Canada but I was unable to get  him to follow up on the good opportunities we had. I was busy with other things and couldn't  chase him all round the country, and we just had to drop out of that arrangement. Ray was  always a drinker - but it got more and more as time went on''. Ray's step brother, Don  Hindman, said: ''Ray had talent, but he just wouldn't leave the booze alone''.

Ray Smith ended his recording career several years later on small Canadian labels like Wix  and Boot. By then, he was recording for the rock and roll revival market and combining his  own songs with interpretations of songs by Presley, Lewis, and the other big leaguers.  Originally a rhythm guitarist on stage, Ray had always played piano too, though not on  records, and he now started to make the piano more of a feature in his act. Reviewing an  album on Wix, writer Bill Millar found: ''Smith pounds the piano with a ferociousness fit to  upset the Richter Scale, and his under-developed sense of accuracy – on a par with Esquerita  – simply adds to the fun''.

In 1978 and 1979, Smith toured the revival scene in England and other counties in Europe. It  was to mixed reviews. In London, too much beer consumed before a show found Bill Millar  among an audience suffering ''fluffed words, unexpected screams and general ineptness...  he tried to kick the piano stool and missed... a unique theatrical experience''. Yet other  shows from the period were a resounding success and, on his more sober days, it was still  easy in the late 1970s to see through the years and back to the real Ray Smith – the man  who had so impressed Charlie Terrell and Sam and Jud Phillips. The man with one of the best and most adept voices in popular music, the man with the ability to sell a song both on  record and on stage, the showman who was at home with the piano or the guitar, and with  the music of the million dollar quartet or the ratpack. The man with the a line in witty or  sarcastic quips, and with a desire to succeed.

Success in Ray Smith's personal life came and went the same way it did in his career. On  November 29, 1979, he went to visit his estranged wife, Lillie, apparently to talk about him  coming back home. The conversation didn't go well. According to Charlie Terrell: ''After he  was in Canada, Ray was eating pills as well as drinking. He committed suicide after he came  back from a tour. He'd been on prozac from a doctor, and he had these personal problems.  He'd been messing around with a secretary near Hamilton, Ontario and he came off tour to  see his wife to get her back. She took him back many times before, but this time she  wouldn't do it. He was depressed – he couldn't stand and any kind of rejection. He took a gun  from the drawer and shot himself. Their son was right there in the house''. Terrel was one of  the pallbearers at Ray Smith's funeral on December 2, 1979. The Phillips brothers, Sam and  Judd, survived Ray Smith by over one and two decades respectively. Jud Phillips died on  July 20, 1992 in Memphis, from throat cancer. He had continued in some aspects of artist  promotion for many years after giving up Judd Records as well as running a number of other  business including a bottling plant in his home town of Florence, Alabama. Sam Phillips died  in July 2003 in Memphis. Bill Lowery died in Atlanta in 2004.

The last link to Ray Smith and the Rock And Roll boys manager Charlie Terrell, and the last  active member was Stanley Walker, whose band still advertised in the Paducah Sun in 2006,  playing local fairs and old peoples tea dances. Not a fate that Ray Smith would have aspired  to, and not one the highly talented, highly strung, and intermittently focused singer was  ever likely to have achieved.

OCTOBER 27, 1961 FRIDAY

Former country Grammy winners The Kingston Trio make a guest appearance on ''The Bell Telephone Hour''. The NBC-TV show also features The Benny Goodman Trio and The McGuire Sisters.

OCTOBER 29, 1961 SUNDAY

Bing and Kathy Crosby have a son, Nathaniel Crosby, in Los Angeles. Bing hit the country charts in 1944 with The Andrews Sisters on ''Pistol Packin' Mama''.

The Everly Brothers appear on ''The Ed Sullivan Show'', along with comedian George Gobel and Broadway star Robert Goulet.

OCTOBER 30, 1961 MONDAY

The John Wayne western ''The Comancheros'' opens in theaters. It inspires the Caude King hit with the same title.

OCTOBER 31, 1961 TUESDAY

Drummer Larry Mullen Jr. is born in Dublin, Ireland. He joins the rock band U2, entering the Rock And Roll Hall of fame in 2005. He also backs up Bono on ''Dreaming With Tears In My Eyes'' for the album, ''The Songs Of Jimmie Rodgers - A Tribute''.


NOVEMBER 1961

PI 3571 ''Elephant Walk'' b/w ''Catching Up'' by Brad Suggs issued.

NOVEMBER 1, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Skeeter Davis recorded ''Where I Ought To Be''.

NOVEMBER 2, 1961 THURSDAY

Singer k.d. lang is born in Consort, Alberta. Debuting as a Patsy Cline-influenced artist in the 1980s, she earns two Grammy awards in the country field, then expands into wider stylistic waters.

NOVEMBER 3, 1961 FRIDAY

Hank Williams, music publisher Fred Rose and Jimmie Rodgers are the first inductees in the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Air Mail To Heaven''.

NOVEMBER 4, 1961 SATURDAY

Filming begins in Idyllwild, California, for the Elvis Presley boxing movie, ''Kid Galahad''.

NOVEMBER 5, 1961 SUNDAY

Jimmy Dean performs ''Big Bad John'' in New York for CBS's ''The Ed Sullivan Show''.

NOVEMBER 7, 1961 TUESDAY

Sun 370 ''Uncle Jonah's Place'' b/w ''Just One Step'' by Harold Dorman issued.

NOVEMBER 8, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Marty Robbins recorded ''Sometimes I'm Tempted''.

NOVEMBER 9, 1961 THURSDAY

Brian Epstein first sees The Beatles, whom he is destined to manage, at The Cavern in Liverpool, England. The Fab Four will write several songs that become country hits, including ''I Feel Tine'', ''Something'' and ''I Don't Want To Spoil The Party''.

NOVEMBER 10, 1961 FRIDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''When Two Worlds Collide'', ''I Won't Forget You'' and ''Blue Side Of Lonesome'' during the evening at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Columbia released Stonewall Jackson's ''A Wound Time Can't Erase''.

Singer and songwriter Brian Henningsen is born in Jarman Hospital in Tuscola, Illinois. He forms The Henningsens with his children, Aaron and Clara Henningsen, and co-writes The Band Perry hits ''You Lie'' and ''All Your Life''.

NOVEMBER 11, 1961 SATURDAY

Doyle Wilburn marries Margie Bowes.

NOVEMBER 12, 1961 SUNDAY

Brenda Lee sings ''Fool Number 1'' on CBS's variety series ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Also on the broadcast from New York, The Ames Brothers and Pearl Bailey.

NOVEMBER 13, 1961 MONDAY

Decca Records released Burl Ives ''A Little Bitty Tear''.

NOVEMBER 14, 1961 TUESDAY

Ray Charles is arrested in Indianapolis on drug charges, after buying marijuana and heroin two days earlier. Within months, Charles will recorded the album ''Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music''.

The Everly Brothers recorded ''Crying In The Rain'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee. Tammy Wynette has a minor country hit with the song in 1981.

Wynn Stewart and businessman Don Spafford open a Las Vegas club, Nashville Nevada. They call attention to the club's hours, it's open 24-hours-a-day, by dropping the key to the front door from an airplane into the desert.

Johnny Cash is jailed in Nashville for public intoxication after trying to kick in the door of a nightclub that was closed near Printers Alley.

NOVEMBER 15, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Patti Page recorded ''Go On Home''.

NOVEMBER 20, 1961 MONDAY

Little Jimmy Dickens recorded ''The Violet And A Rose'' during an afternoon session at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

Billy Walker recorded ''Charlie's Shoes'' and ''Funny How Time Slips Away'' during an evening session at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

Jim Reeves recorded ''Welcome To My World'' during the evening at Nashville's RCA Studio B. He also recorded ''Have You Ever Been Lonely (Have You Ever Been Blue)'', which becomes a hit 20 years later when his vocals are paired with Patsy Cline.

Pop piano player Jim Brickman is born in Cleveland, Ohio. He archives a country hit when Martina McBride provides the vocals for his recording ''Valentine'' in 1996.

At the top of this list stands a big, big man, ''Big Bad John'' takes Jimmy Dean to number 1 on the Billboard country chart.

NOVEMBER 21, 1961 TUESDAY

The singles Sun 371 ''Bonnie B'' b/w ''Money'' by Jerry Lee Lewis; and Sun 372 ''Travelin' Salesman'' b/w ''Won't Miss You (Til You Go)'' by Ray Smith issued.

Jim Reeves recorded ''Adios Amigo'' and ''Am I That Easy To Forget'' in the evening at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''Can't Help Falling In Love'' and is a pop ballad and published by Gladys Music, Elvis Presley's publishing company It was written by Hugo Peretti, Luigi Creatore and George David Weiss The melody is based on "Plaisir dámour'' (1784), a popular romance by Jean Paul Egide Martini (1741–1816). It was featured in Elvis Presley's 1961 film, ''Blue Hawaii''. During the following four decades, it was recorded by numerous other artists, including British reggae group UB40, whose 1993 version topped the U.S. and UK charts, and Swedish pop group A-Teens.

Elvis Presley's version of the song, which topped the British charts in 1962, has appeared in numerous other films, including the 2000 film Coyote Ugly and the 2002 Disney film Lilo & Stitch. The single is certified by the RIAA as a Platinum record, for US sales in excess of one million copies. In the United States, the Elvis Presley version of the song peaked at number two on the pop chart and went to number one on the Easy Listening chart for six weeks.

During Presley's late 1960s and 1970s live performances, the song was performed as the show's finale. Most notably, it was also sung in the live segment of his 1968 NBC television special, and as the closer for his 1973 Global telecast, Aloha From Hawaii. A version with a faster arrangement was used as the closing for Presley's final TV special, ''Elvis In Concert''.

NOVEMBER 22, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Paramount released Elvis Presley's movie ''Blue Hawaii''.

With 250,000 people watching from the sidewalk, Gene Autry serves as grand marshall of the Santa Claus Lane parade in Hollywood. Others taking part include Shelley Fabares, Robert Stack and Kris Kringle.

NOVEMBER 24, 1961 FRIDAY

The Everly Brothers are officially enlisted in the military for six months. They report to Camp Pendleton, California.

Columbia released Marty Robbins '''Sometimes I'm Tempted''.

Gene Autry pleads guilty in Los Angeles to driving drunk, receiving a 30-day suspended sentence, a $500 fine and three years probation.

NOVEMBER 25, 1961 SATURDAY

Disc jockey Eddie Stubbs is born in Bethesda, Maryland. A musician with the bluegrass group The Johnson Mountain Boys, he works with Nashville's WSM Radio, where he announces the Grand Ole Opry and becomes a voice for the genre's heritage artists.

After The New York Journal American's Dorothy Kilgallen referred to a Carnegie Hall lineup of country stars as ''Carnegie Hillbillies'', Patsy Cline shoots back on a stage in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, referring to her as ''the wicked witch of the east''.

NOVEMBER 28, 1961 TUESDAY

Jimmie Rodgers' widow, Carrie, dies of cancer in San Antonio, Texas, 25 days after his induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame''.

NOVEMBER 29, 1961 WEDNESDAY

The Grand Ole Opry comes to Carnegie Hall, with Patsy Cline, Grandpa Jones, Bill Monroe, Minnie Pearl, Marty Robbins, Jim Reeves, Faron Young and The Jordanaires. The performance benefits the Musicians' Aid Society. In the crowd, Jimmy Dean and comic Jack Benny.

Guitarist Duke Levine is born in Worcester, Massachusetts. He works with Mary Chapin Carpenter, backing her on ''Somewhere Down Below The Mason Dixon Line'', her contribution to the 1997 album ''The Songs Of Jimmie Rodgers - A Tribute''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Charles Jones led an rhythm and blues combo in his hometown of Memphis alongside a teenaged Isaac Hayes. In a highly implausible move, Jones adopted the name of Jeb Stewart (after a General who'd fought in the Civil War) before setting out to find a record deal. Thanks to a good word from Rufus Thomas, Phillips International unfurled the red carpet in 1960 and this Joe Tex-styled stomper very nearly became a national breakout. As Jeb Stuart, he later recorded for Kent, King and San Wayne Records.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JEB STUART
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS 
AND/OR KNOX PHILLIPS

01(1) - ''I BETCHA GONNA LIKE IT'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Buddy Killen-Robert Riley
Publisher: - Tree Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1961
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30106 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 6 - SUNSET SOUL

01(2) - ''I BETCHA GONNA LIKE IT'' - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Buddy Killen-Robert Riley
Publisher: - Tree Music
Matrix number: P 414   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1961
Released: - February 1962
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3575-A mono
I BETCHA GONNA LIKE IT / LITTLE MISS LOVE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-4-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6


Like Freddie North, Jeb Stuart was another artist who did his share of listening to the radio. This may be the best of Stuart's four Phillips International releases. Old Jeb knew how to be commercial, if nothing else. The A-side features a tribute to some obscure juke joint that lies out there beyond the city limits. Singing the praises of joints like this is a time-honored tradition. At the time Jeb's record appeared, Chris Kenner was doing it with ''I Liked It Like That'', but the tradition was far older. Amos Milburn's ''Chicken Shack Boogie'', and Freddie Slack's ''House Of Blue Lights'' take it back at least 15 years and, more recently on Sun, Harold Dorman tried his hand with ''Uncle Jonah's Place''.

The Great Jeb Stuart ^

Jeb's tune features the glorious and memorable line ''The drum and the bass, they kick like a mule''. There was a vaguely Sun-related postscript to ''I Betcha Gonna Like It''. In 1964, with his career deeply in the doldrums, Jerry Lee Lewis recorded the song, although it was held back for the dreadful ''Soul My Way'' album. The song itself was written by Tree Music boss Buddy Killen, and 9wait for yet another tenuous Sun connection), Robert Riley, the co-writer of ''Just Walkin' In The Rain''.

Never a unidimensional artist, Jeb gets into his Sam Cooke bag for the flipside ''Little Miss Love''. If Sun couldn't sell records like this in February 1962, there was something wrong with their promotion department.

02 – ''LITTLE MISS LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Percy Mayfield
Publisher: - Curtom Publishers – Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 412  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1961
Studio Location Unknown
Released: - October 16, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3574-B mono
DON'T MAKE ME CRY / SOMEDAY SHE'LL COME ALONG
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-4-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

03 - "JUST WALKIN' IN THE RAIN"* - B.M.I. 2:42
Composer: - Robert Riley-Johnny Bragg-Buddy Killen
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1961
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30106-B-5 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 6 - SUNSET SOUL
Reissued: - April 1989 Charly Records (L) 33rpm Sunbox 109-5-9 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - BETCHA GONNA LIKE IT

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stuart – Vocal
Scotty Moore – Guitar
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Al Jackson – Drums
Larry Muhoberac – Piano
Robert Oldham – Tenor Saxophone
William Maherry – Tenor Saxophone

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAYBURN ANTHONY
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE FALL 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR SCOTTY MOORE OR UNKNOWN

01 - ''HOW WELL I KNOW''' - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Buddy Killen-Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Tree Publishing
Matrix number: - U 465   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1962
Released: - January 19, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 373-A mono
HOW WILL I KNOW / BIG DREAM
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4



This is a really unusual record. ''How Well I Know'' is a fairly conventional and highly competent Nashville ballad that gives us a deeper look at Anthony's crackling baritone voice. In his own rather limited way, the man was a stylist Groaner to be sure.

This was undeniably a country pop record, but, even so, it's worth mentioning that most country crossover records in 1962 did not feature mellow saxophones in place of steel guitars.


''Big Dream'' is where things start to get interesting. Anthony's connection to Carl Mann and the Jackson, Tennessee sound is quite apparent. There's almost no difference between the sound of ''Big Dream'' and the opening to Mann's ''Rockin' Love''.

Whereas Mann broke free and turned his song into a rocker, Anthony maintains this taut little rhythmic riff lead by sticks on a closed hi-hat. Those alternating choruses (''Big dreams sometimes fall apart...'') break some of the tension, but certainly not all of it. And just when you think you're clear, Wham! You're back into that talk-sing ''Yeh, once I Had a big dream'' part of the cycle. In truth, this record is a tape loop. It could have ended after one run through, gone through a second or third, or faded after a fourth try. It doesn't matter. Nothing changes and nothing develops lyrically or musically. But for some reason, this works really well, and when we start the final fade midway into cycle number 3, it feels like, ''yeh, old Rayburn is 'really' stuck. He really 'did' have a big dream that went nowhere''. You've got to love Ray's voicing on the word broken. There's no telling what this guy might have done during Sun's golden era.

02 - ''BIG DREAM'' - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Tony Austin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 466  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1961
Released: - January 19, 1962
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 373-B mono
RAMBLIN' ROSE / I'VE BEEN TWISTIN'
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rayburn Anthony – Vocal
Carl Mann - Piano
Probably Musicians
Eddie Bush – Guitar
R.W. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson – Bass
Tony Austin - Drums
Tony Austin probably recorded here on this day his own session.

Vinnie Trout – Strings Arranged
Unknown – Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR TONY AUSTIN
FOR SUN RECORDS

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CECIL SCAIFE

Tony Austin was a drummer and vocalist with Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash, also from the Jackson,   Tennessee area, Austin recorded with the Carl Mann band in a surprising white-soul style. The band is   country rock and the song rockabilly, but the era was that of soul and the result is dominated by the new bass   line and vocal phrasing of the latter. Tony Austin will be inducted into the International Rockabilly Hall of   Fame. "Back in the day, rockabilly was the hottest thing going", Austin said. "People still like it, especially   here in the south''. Born in Jackson and still a resident, Austin says he appreciates all the work that has gone   into the museum. "I enjoy coming here and seeing all the artifacts and old recordings and instruments that   were used back then. Rockabilly kids love coming and seeing it for the first time''.

01 - ''BLUE SUEDE SHOES'' - B.M.I. 2:51
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably Fall 1961
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30106 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 6 - SUNSET SOUL
Reissued: - April 1989 Charly Records (LP) Sunbox 109-2-7 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - THE JACKSON CONNECTION

02 - ''I WALK THE LINE'' – B.M.I. - 1:46
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: August 20, 2013
First appearance: - Sun Records X5 Music Group (MP3) Internet Sample-3 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - CLASSIC COUNTRY BALLADS

03 - ''I WANT TO BELONG TO YOU''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

04 – ''MISSOURI LOU''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

05 – ''NIGHT LIFE'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - September 4, 2012
First appearance: - Sun Records X5 Music Group (MP3) Internet Sample-16 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - SUN RECORDS - COUNTRY ARCHIVE

06 – ''SEA OF HEARBREAK'' - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Hal David-Paul Hampton
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - October 22, 2013
First appearance: Sun Records X5 Music Group (MP3) Internet Sample-14 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - COUNTRY HITS OF THE 60S

07 - ''SHE'S GONE'' - B.M.I. - 4"22
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - September 17, 2013
First appearance: - Sun Records X5 Music Group (MP3) Internet Sample-3 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - BROKEN HEARTED

08 – ''SUSIE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

09 – ''TONY'S INSTRUMENTAL''
Composer: - Tony Austin
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

10 – ''STUDIO TALK SAM PHILLIPS/WILD DUCK'' - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Records X5 Music Group (MP3) Internet Sample-11 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - SILLY COUNTRY

11 – ''BETTY SUE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

12 – ''DON'T INVITE US TO THE SAME PARTY''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

13 – PARTY DOLL''
Composer: - James Bowen-Buddy Knox
Publisher: - Windswept Pacific Music
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

14 – ''SCHOOL FOR A FOOL''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

15 – ''IT'S GOOD AND I LIKE IT''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tony Austin - Vocal & Drums
Wes Beavers - Bass
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Probably Carl Mann - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sometime around 1960-1961 Mack Self decided ''that Sam wasn't going to do anything for me''. He moved on to the Zone label and has recorded for a number of small, independent labels since, including a number of selfproduced projects.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF
FOR ZONE RECORDS 1961

AMERICAN SOUND STUDIO
827 THOMAS AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
ZONE SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE FALL 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – CHIPS MOMAN

01 – ''THAT MEXICAN LIMBO'' – B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - M. E. Ellis Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1961
Released: - November 1962
First appearance: - Zone Records (S) 45rpm standard single Zone 1062-A mono
THAT MEXICAN LIMBO / YOU PUT THESE TEARS IN MY EYES
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-27 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

''Mexican Limbo'', entering Mack's post-Sun era, this record was released on M.E. Elli's Zone label, Mack recalls, ''I was driving in my truck near a place called Elaine (pronounced E-lane) Arkansas. It's cotton country down there and full of very small towns. I saw these Mexican people out there in the field picking cotton and they inspired me to write the song. I cut it at American Sound in Memphis in 1961. I didn't have that the originally. When I started singing it I called it the ''Mexican Cha Cha''. Chips Moman said, 'Mack, change that to ''Mexican Limbo'''. He was right about the title''.

''You Put These Tears In My Eyes'', this is a very pretty ballad, taking us back to the country waltz genre where Mack thrives as a composer and performer. You underestimate or ignore tracks like this surprised if you have the song running through your head three days later when you least expect it. Towards the end of the recording, Mack opts for one of those wordless chant that helped make his early ''Easy To Love'' so special.

01 – ''YOU PUT THESE TEARS IN MY EYES'' – B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - M. E. Ellis Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1961
Released: - November 1962
First appearance: - Zone Records (S) 45rpm standard single Zone 1062-B mono
YOU PUT THESE TEARS IN MY EYES / THAT MEXICAN LIMBO
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-29 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self – Vocal & Guitar
Red Baker – Lead Guitar
Jimmy Evans – Rhythm Guitar
Billy Self – Bass
Herb Phyron - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


DECEMBER 1961

The film “Babes In Toyland” premieres during December of 1961. “Babes In Toyland” was created by Walt Disney and was the first live action musical to be produced by the company. The film, starred Ray Bolger, Tommy Sands, Ed Wynn, and Annette Funicello. The Mother Goose themed musical focused on the evil character of Barnaby’s plot to derail the upcoming marriage between characters Tom and Mary in an attempt to further his own romantic agenda. Despite heavy promotion the film was considered a flop for Disney but it did receive two Academy Award nominations for Best Costumes and Best Music.

DECEMBER 3, 1961 SUNDAY

Lew Childre dies at his home in Foley, Alabama. The multi-faceted entertainer used numerous vaudevillian skills in a career that spanned comedy, tent shows, radio, recording and a run on the Grand Ole Opry.

DECEMBER 4, 1961 MONDAY

Billboard reported that ''Money'' by Jerry Lee Lewis ''is a blues styling from Lewis here with punching best and big band sounds in the background. The boy also plays some mean piano. Good wax'', and ''Bonnie B'' side moves right along. Lewis sings about his gal Bonnie in the highest of terms. He also moves some great Boogie Woogie piano. Combo supplies the backin''.

DECEMBER 5, 1961 TUESDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Tears Broke Out On Me'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

June Carter performs on Johnny Cash's live show for the first time at ''The Big D Jamboree'' in Dallas, Texas. Two months later, she becomes a regular member of the Man in Black's road show.

Jimmy Dean recorded ''P.T. 109'' and ''Dear Ivan''.

DECEMBER 6, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''Kickin' Our Hearts Around'' in the evening at the Hollywood studios of Capitol Records.

Gene Autry is arrested on drunk driving charges in Los Angeles after nearly hitting maintenance workers with his station wagon near the corner of Sunshine Terrace and Layrel canyon. Just two weeks prior, he pleaded guilty to a previous DUI.

DECEMBER 7, 1961 THURSDAY

Hawkshaw Hawkins and Jean Shepard have a son, Don Robin Hawkins, named for Don Gibson and Marty Robbins.

DECEMBER 8, 1961 FRIDAY

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans are featured guests during the NBC-TV music series ''The Bell Telephone Hour''.

DECEMBER 11, 1961 MONDAY

Bill Anderson recorded ''Get A Little Dirt On Your Hands''.

DECEMBER 12, 1961 TUESDAY

Roy Acuff begins a one-month tour in Spain and Morocco, sponsored by the    United Service Organizations , to perform for American troops.

DECEMBER 14, 1961 THURSDAY

Henderson, Texas, declares Jim Reeves Day.

Jimmy Dean's ''Big bad John'' becomes the first country-based record awarded a gold single by the Recording Industry Association of America.

Rick Nelson performs ''Everlovin''' on ABC-TV's ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

DECEMBER 15, 1961 FRIDAY

Columbia released Jimmy Dean's Cold War recitation ''Dear Ivan''.

Gospel singer James B. Coats dies. His 1942 title ''The Sweetest Gift'' is destined to become a 1977 country hit for Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris.

DECEMBER 17, 1961 SUNDAY

Patsy Cline recorded ''She's Got You'' during an evening session at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

DECEMBER 18, 1961 MONDAY

Patsy Cline is diagnosed with a nervous breakdown, forcing her to spend the next two weeks in bed at home.

DECEMBER 20, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley finished work on the movie ''Kid Galahad''.

DECEMBER 21, 1961 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley gets his third gold album with the soundtrack to ''Blue Hawaii''. In the United States, the album spent 20 weeks at the number one slot and 39 weeks in the Top 10 on Billboard's Top Pop LPs chart. It was certified Gold on December 21, 1961, Platinum and 2x Platinum on March 27, 1992 and 3x Platinum on July 30, 2002 by the Recording Industry Association of America. On the US Top Pop Albums chart ''Blue Hawaii'' is second only to the soundtrack of West Side Story as the most successful album of the 1960s.

DECEMBER 22, 1961 FRIDAY

Warner Bros. released The Everly Bothers' pop hit ''Crying In The Rain''. Tammy Wynette gains a minor country hit with the song in 1981.

DECEMBER 25, 1961 MONDAY

Harlan and Jan Howard give their boys a collie for Christmas. They name the puppy Bucko, for Buck Owens.

DECEMBER 27, 1961 WEDNESDAY

''The Steve Allen Show'' airs for the last time on NBC, more than five years after it began. The variety series' comedic host wrote the 1950 crossover hit ''Let's Go To Church (Next Sunday Morning)'', recorded by Margaret Whiting and Jimmy Wakely.

DECEMBER 29, 1961 FRIDAY

Columbia released Jimmy Dean's ''To A Sleeping Beauty'', written by Jackie Gleason.

DECEMBER 30, 1961 SATURDAY

Jack Greene is asked to be Ernest Tubb's drummer when Tubb's plays Atlanta's East Point. Six months later, he's in the band.

DECEMBER 31, 1961 SUNDAY

Janis Joplin performs her first concert at the Halfway House in Beaumont, Texas. Joplin's ''Me And Bobby McGee'' is ranked among the 500 greatest country singles of all-time in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.

Johnny Cash plays in Camden, New Jersey, with June carter, Flatt and Scruggs and Marty Robbins. While Robbins performs, bass player Marshall Grant tosses an M-80 into a urinal backstage, the resulting blast covering a dressing rook in sewage.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

- THE SISKIN TAPES -

This recordings contains 11 songs from the Prisonaires, a disc pressed for the personal use of a prison sponsor named Garrison Siskin, a successful businessman and renowned philanthropist from Chattanooga. It seems that a very limited number of copies of the disc were made and less than a handful survived. Thanks to the Siskin disc, and we are now able to hear this phase in the recorded life of the Prisonaires.

The precise date of the live recordings is unknown but there are some clues. One of the songs was not written until mid-1957 and Lynn Bomar who is heard introducing the disc died in 1964, so that gives a six and a half year period of possibility. It is most likely that the tapes from which the LP was pressed were made either during 1958 or during the years 1961 or 1962. Johnny Bragg sings lead on the recordings but he was out of prison on parole throughout 1959 and when he returned in 1960 he apparently did not start to sing.

It is almost certain that these recordings were made inside the Tennessee State Penitentiary because there are spoken references to being ''here at the Tennessee State Prison'' although it is possible that they were recorded as part of live radio broadcasts or a radio tape to be broadcast later, there is reference at one point to ''someone listening to this tape somewhere''. The first eight recordings are effectively a concert by the Prisonaires, though not a live one in front of an audience as there is no extraneous sound seeping though, but the last three songs are different; they were addressed personally to Garrison Siskin and added to the end of the tape along with a personal message from Warden Bomar to Siskin overlaid when the LP was made.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE PRISONAIRES

TENNESSEE STATE PENITENTIARY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
EXCELLO SESSION: VARIOUS DATES PROBABLY 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

The Prisonaires 'concert' starts with second tenor singer, Alfred Brooks, making an introduction to the first song, ''When The Saints Go Marching In''. His script makes clear the prisoners' support for the rehabilitation program and leaves the listener and any potential benefactor in no doubt about the role of the warden: ''We the Prisonaires is very grateful to be able to be a part of the rehabilitation program... which was set up by our warden Mr. Lynn Bomar and the Governor of the state of Tennessee, and we hope as you play this tape you will say a special prayer for us in the group and the other 1600 men here... we want you to know that we feel very happy to be able to put these songs on for you''.

So why is Alfred Brooks the spokesman? He only joined the group in 1955 and had a far less prominent profile than Johnny Bragg. It could be that he had better diction or that he was a more reliable reader of the opening script, but it is more likely that the recording dates from around 1961 when Bragg had just returned to prison after a year on parole and was no longer the sole guiding force of the group. Brooks was effectively its leader at that point.

''When The Saints Go Marching In'' is taken at an energetic pace following a piano introduction and all members of the group play their part impressively. The lead singer is probably Alfred Brooks but there is also a strong and unusual bass part from James Doyle, including the memorable line about ''when the moon drips away in blood''. At the end of the song Brooks introduces the group members. They are Bragg and himself, lead and second tenor respectively, along with baritone singer Howard Anderson, bass singer James Doyle, Henry Jones on piano, and guitarist L.B. McCollough. These Prisoniares contain only Bragg from the original membership and only Bragg, Jones and probably McCollough from the last Sun recording sessions. Brooks joined in 1955 but two of the new singers from the Marigolds era, Harold Hebb and Willy Wilson are no longer present, having been replaced by Doyle and Anderson.

There is nothing known of Anderson although on March 11, 1959 the Kinsport Times newspaper in Tennessee reported on 25 indictments by a circuit court jury and Howard Anderson was one of three people sentenced for breaking and entering. There was a Howard Anderson living near downtown Nashville according to the city directories for the late 1940s, and one of the Anderson Gospel Singers who recorded on Nashville's World label in 1948 may have been named Howard. Any of these people could have been the singer heard on these tapes.

01 – ''WHEN THE SAINTS GO MARCHING IN'' - B.M.I. - 3:31
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-1 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

The second song the Prisonaires presented in their concert tape was ''In The Garden'', a gospel vehicle for Johnny Bragg's clear tenor and for impressive ensemble singing from the group. Written in 1912 by Charles Austin Miles, a pharmacist turned hymn writer and publisher from New Jersey, the song was about the meeting between the resurrected Jesus and Mary Magdalene in the garden of Joseph. It has been one of the most popular hymn since the time when it was featured by evangelist and singer Homer Rodeheaver who recorded it for a number of companies from 1910 into the 1930s. ''In The Garden'' was recorded by Jim Reeves on a popular 1959 RCA album ''God Be With You'' and this may have been the specific catalyst for the Prisonaires to include it in their concert although the song had been issued before and around this time by a number of black gospel singers, including Sister Rosetta Tharpe, the Five Blind Boys of Mississippi, Nashville's own Fireside Gospel Singers, and in 1959 by both Clara Ward and the Spirit of Memphis Quartet. On May 27, 1966, Elvis Presley recorded ''In The Garden'' for his Grammy Award winning album ''How Great Thou Art''.

02 – ''IN THE GARDEN'' - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Charles Austin Miles
Publisher: - Robbins Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-2 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

A very different but equally good vehicle for the group was ''Bony Moronie'', a throwaway rock and roll song written and recorded by Larry Williams on Specialty Records in 1957. It reached the popular sales charts in November and peaked at number 18 early in 1958. It is not introduced by Alfred Brooks as a new hit song and while it defines the earliest possible date for these tapes it does not really narrow the date down. It appears to be Alfred Brooks singing lead on ''Bony Moronie'' with Johnny Bragg contributing to the group's repetitive ''bony, bony, bony'' and ''who, hohs'' behind Brooks's lead. Interestingly, the group sings about their girl being a ''real good lover'', a line Larry Williams didn't write.

03 – ''BONY MORONIE'' - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Larry Williams
Publisher: - Venice Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-3 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

In considerable contract her ''Suppertime'', a song that paints a vivid picture about 'going home' at last, both in the real world and the next. It was written by gospel songwriter, singer and evangelist, Ira Stanphill, who had been written and performing his songs since he was a teenager in the 1930s in Missouri. His best known song was ''Mansion Over The Hilltop'', but ''Summertime'' came close in popularity down the years. It was moved into the popular domain in 1959 through LP cuts by Johnny Cash and Jim Reeves. Here, Johnny Bragg tells the story emotively while the group's harmonies become more and more intense. Bragg's narrative section is moving but it is difficult to forget the contrast between the song's idealized picture of the happy family called home to eat at the end of the day on the rural homestead and the harsh reality of Bragg's early life in a broken home in urban Nashville. Bragg told Jay Warner he had been a rambunctious child: ''My people would try to whup me when I did something wrong. The neighbours would whup you too if you got in trouble. That's when you got a whuppin, and when you went home you'd get another whuppin''.

04 – ''SUPPER TIME'' - B.M.I. - 3:58
Composer: - Ira Stanphil
Publisher: - Brentwood Benson Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-4 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

Next up the group takes a back seat while Henry ''Dishrag'' Jones takes on the old rhythm and blues favourite, ''Caldonia'', written in 1944 by rhythm and blues bandleader Louis Jordan and copyrighted in the name of his wife, Fleecie Moore. It was number 1 Rhythm & Blues hit for Jordan in July 1945 and no kind of a current hit when Jones launched into it but it had been listed by Bragg as among his favourite songs. Jones takes the vocal and plays piano on this song supported by handclaps and 'yeahs' and other encouragement from the group. There is also a drummer on this recording, although one was introduced at the start of the concert underlining that this concert was put together from tapes recorded at different times.

Henry Jones is an intriguing character who has not been properly identified. We don't even know where his nickname came from, perhaps a job in a kitchen, or the nature of his hair. It is not clear whether he could have been the same ''Dishrag'' mentioned by blues singers as a formative player on the Memphis blues scene in the 1930s and 1940s. Record producer and musician Jim Dickingson once recalled how as a white child in Memphis, around 1950, ''the family yard man, Alec, brought me a piano player to teach me. He brought me this guy who was legendary. I don’t know what his real name was. They called him ''Dishrag''. You hear people talking about Dishrag... Never took his overcoat of his hat off, sat down at my mother's piano, and started to play like nothing I'd ever heard''. From the few known photographs of ''Dishrag'' Jones, he appears to be roughly the right age for someone who might have been playing piano in Memphis in the 1930s.

05 – ''CALDONIA''*/** - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Fleecie Moore
Publisher: - Chero Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-5 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

The next track enter the realm of small politics as the Prisonaires pay homage to the ''Gentle Hands'' of their warden. Alfred Brooks does his best to sound sincere when saying the group would like to sing ''for out dear beloved warden... a man who we've become to love… and who think, love us... we've tried to live up the the expectations that he wish of us''. Johnny Bragg leads into the song with ''I am guided through the day by gentle hands... and my spirit now is freed by gentle hands'' while the group builds the tension behind him. The song was written by country singer Leon Payne and recorded on Capital Records in 1951. It was recorded by the Blackwood Brothers in 1958 and was firmly a country gospel item until adopted here by the Prisonaires.

06 – ''GENTLE HANDS'' - B.M.I. - 3:17
Composer: - Leon Payne
Publisher: - Christian Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-6 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

Next it is time for the group's headline song, ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'', and for Brooks to ''now introduce our lead singer, Johnny Bragg, the feller that at one time had the number one song of the nation''. Bragg responds to the applause with ''Hello... I don't think I deserve that'' and he goes on to give a spiel he must have used a thousand times before at rehabilitation program events: ''I thank God... and our dear beloved warden and the governor of the state... to help to get the song out in the free world''. He specifically does not name the Governor, lending power to the argument that this recording was made during the period Governor Frank Clement was out of office between the start of 1959 and the start of 1963. The new Governor was Bufort Ellington, a friend and former member of Clement's administration and a supporter of the Prisonaires, but he and Bragg were not as close as Bragg and Clement. When Bragg starts to sing the bashful man who took the applause of his fellow singers is gone, he is full of confidence and delivers the song emotionally as if it were hist first version rather than his thousandth. His voice soars and falls wonderfully while the group play their part and join in on the trademark high ending. Their part differs slightly from the Sun recording and the ''ooh wee oohs'' sound just that but more modern here.

Talking here about the song Bragg shared the limelight with others, as he always continued to do. He told Bill Millar: ''I'm the co-writer on the song along with Robert Riley...', and he told Millar about the part a young Elvis Presley had played in helping him with his phrasing of the song when it was first recorded: ''We had a lot of trouble with the word change and the people, the Prisonaires and Sam, seemed to think it was a waste of time, ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'', that the song was too weak... but I could see something there... and we worked many hours. Elvis Presley, he was just another guy at the time. Elvis came in the studio and Sam ran him out of the studio... and I asked Sam to let the guy come in and talk with me during the lunch break''.

07 – ''JUST WALKIN' IN THE RAIN'' - B.M.I. - 3:36
Composer: - Johnny Bragg-Robert Riley
Publisher: - Hal Leonard Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-7 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

The next track is a fascinating example of how the Governor and warden used the Prisonaires to write songs to flatter particular huests, allies, enemies and sponsors. Note the word ''The Boastin' Texas'' is introduced as ''a song that Governor Frank Clement of Tennessee asked us to write for the Governor of Texas, which was Governor Shivers, and this is what we came up with''. ''was'' because Allan Shivers had left the governor's office in 1957. This is a song that flatters its subject through friendely criticism; it's almost a polite society version of the 'dirty dozens' with the group making fun of the Texan accent and letting Texans know in no uncertain terms they've got nothing Tennessee can't match. Even when singing to the unseen audience for this tape, Bragg becomes very animated in performing the lyric in praise of his home state, despite his own bad experiences in that society.

08 – ''THE BOASTIN' TEXAN'' - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-8 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

In the introduction to ''A Prisoner's Prayer'', Alfred Brooks continues the theme of ''money please'' saying. ''Mr. Siskin, for you and your wonderful family we cannot find words to say... how much we thank you... for the generosity you have bestowed upon us''. He continues, saying the group is writing songs for Mr. Siskin that they have promised him and will send them ''in a few days... hoping that before long we will be able to sing for you again in prison''. Johnny Bragg delivers ''A Prisoner's Prayer'' in as heartfelt a manner as he did when the song became the Prisonaires second disc on Sun. It was written by James Procter, a white criminal identification police officer, who was inspired by the Prisonaires' tale to write a song about ''a prisoner who may never be free'' and who asks for forgiveness when the lights go out in cell block 23.

09 – ''A PRISONER'S PRAYER'' - B.M.I. - 3:22
Composer: - James Procter-Johnny Bragg
Publisher: - Memphis Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-10 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

''Only Believe'', is probably the first of the promised songs with Siskin's name on it. At basis, it is an old gospel song written by an evangelist from Colorado, Paul Rader, in 1921 when he was about to become a pioneer in Chicago gospel radio, ''all things are possible, if you'll only believe'', but here it doubles as the backdrop to a narrative about how Mr. Siskin is ''the kind of man God had in mind when he created the human race... (who has) known want but retains humbleness after he's attained material... given freely of his worldly goods, you are out kind of man''.

10 – ''ONLY BELIEVE'' - B.M.I. - 3:22
Composer: - Paul Rader
Publisher: - The Rodeheaver Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-11 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

In considerable contrast, the next homage to Siskin places him in the Caribbean. To a catchy calypso beat this man of Jewish origin from Chattanooga is transformed into a Spanish' senior and is told ''he's the man we like to greet/ he's very sweet/ he's a man that can't be beat''. It is likely that Howard Anderson takes the lead vocal here and the lyrics to ''Senor Siskin (He's A Man That Can't Be Beat)'' are as memorable as the Latin rhythm where a drummer is again present. What benefactor could resist forking out his cash after such a musical tribute? We are told that the group ''met Senor Siskin at a great big church'' and that was very likely so if Siskin had been successful in boosting the group's appearances and profile. Siskin was a considerably wealthy philanthropist whom was particularly concerned with causes that aided the handicapped. His father had arrived in Chattanooga in 1900 from Lithuania to escape the persecution of Jewish families there Garrison and his brother Mose sold newspapers on the streets of Chattanooga while their father built up a scrap metal business. In 1926 the brothers took over the business and developed the Chattanooga Steel Supply Co., taking over another business in Atlanta and opening plants in other cities including Nashville. In 1942 Garrison Siskin suffered a life-threatening injury when a heavy object fell on his leg at a railroad station and on his recovery he vowed to devote his life to helping others. In 1950 the brothers set up the Siskin Foundation dedicated to the highest religious, social welfare, educational and humanitarian ideals. Garrison was on the board of directors of Big Brothers of America and was Chairman of the Board of the Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia Railway. Siskin later said: ''I took my case up with God. In the early hours of the morning, I would spend my life helping people who could not help themselves. Out parents had in any case taught us that a good name is rather to be chosen than riches. They asked us to make our investments in people, and we invested in people of all races, faiths and cultures. Need was the only prerequisite''. Garrison Siskin died in 1979 but the Siskin Memorial Foundation continues today through the Siskin Hospital for Physical Rehabilitation in Chattanooga.

11 – ''SENOR SISKIN'''** - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-12 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Bragg - Lead Tenor Vocal
Alfred Brooks - Tenor Vocal/Announcer
Howard Anderson - Baritone
James Doyle - Bass
L.B. McCollough - Guitar
Henry Jones - Piano & Vocal*
Possibly Hubbard Brown – Drums**

12 – MESSAGE FROM PRISON WARDEN LYNN BOMAR'' – 1:08
Matrix number – None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-19 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - ONLY BELIEVE

An spoken message from prison warden Lynn Bomar to Garrison Siskin that was added to the start of the  tape for the LP pressings. It gives a wonderful glimpse of the rehabilitation program at work. Bomar delivers a most ingratiating message: ''for our good friend, the honourable Garrison Siskin of Chattanooga, Tennessee'', recording that he enjoyed their meeting recently and was delighted to learn of Siskin's interest in the Prisonaires. He extends a cordial invitation to visit the penitentiary and thanks Mr. Siskin ''for helping your follow man less fortunate than yourself''. The final three songs above are addressed directly to Siskin and are all about his helping the Prisonaires, presumably by obtaining bookings to perform outside the prison, by donating money to the prison, or perhaps by helping to pursue parole issues on their behalf.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


DON'T SAY TOMORROW – The Prisonaires had their moment in the national spotlight in the  mid-1950s, but they continued to appear at events in and around Nashville north before and  after Johnny Bragg was released on parole in January 1959 and re-entered prison in 1960  for parole violations.

After the original members of the Prisonaires were one by one released from the  penitentiary between 1955 and 1957, the focus fell more and more on their most high  profile member, Johnny Bragg. The perceived success or not of the rehabilitation programme  became tied to an extent to the success of Bragg's life.

The Prisonaires in the air. ^

In his last year under increasing  criticism for endangering the well-being of the public by allowing prisoners to leave the  penitentiary. At the same time, Bragg's biographer has catalogued a number of events  involving jealous prisoners that endangered Bragg himself in the prison. For whatever  mixture of reasons Frank Clement resolved to pardon Bragg and on January 16, 1959  Clement signed his release documents just before leaving office. Shortly after, a UPI press  report recorded: ''Johnny Bragg, who wrote, 'Walkin' In The Rain' in prison, walked into the  sunshine of freedom Wednesday. The Negro convict spent 16 years in the Tennessee  Penitentiary here. Wednesday he was paroled. Former Gov. Frank Clement who had  befriended and helped Bragg, commuted his sentence to life just before he left office earlier  this month. The Pardons and Paroles Board said Bragg appeared to have been rehabilitated,  and that he has a job in his uncle's barber shop in Nashville. He must report regularly to a  parole officer for the rest of his life''.

Johnny Bragg moved into the home of his grandmother Parthenia in north Nashville and  considered how to take his life forward. He certainly did not plan to be a barber. He may  have thought about reforming the original Prisonaires but the others either had jobs or were  unreliable and so Bragg joined with a female singing group, the Solettes, who he met at  Ebeneezer Missionary Baptist church. They played local churches and other shows and  travelled to Memphis, Chattanooga, and Atlanta to sing. Bragg also played on package tours  in the north and played as an opening act in Las Vegas lounges. Frank Clement and Warden  Bomar had put in a word for him with Jack Stapp at Tree Music were Robert Riley was then  working and Stapp paid Bragg to put his song ideas on tape for others to transcribe. Then in  March 1959 Stapp introduced Bragg to record producer Owen Bradley who signed him to the  major label, Decca Records.

When he was arrested for violating parole and returned to the penitentiary after only a year  of freedom, Johnny Bragg initially withdrew from music and throughout 1960 he resumed to  sing with the Prisonaires. He rejoined in 1961 after being inspired by visits to the prison  from The Jordanaires and Elvis Presley. The Prisonaires of the 1960s continued to be  allowed to travel to play at Tennessee's churches, county fairs and other events as well as to  entertain the dignatories gathered at the mansion by the new governor, Buford Ellington.
When Frank Clement came back for a second term as governor in January 1963, Johnny  Bragg's singing life was little different that it had been a decade earlier.

He told Bill Millar: ''Back inside, I had a third Prisonaires who didn't record but they were  real great''. Thanks to the Siskin tapes we now know that these later Prisonaires were in fact  recorded. It seems that when Bragg first rejoined what he referred to as the ''third  Prisonaires'', the group comprised Alfred Brooks, James Doyle, and a number of other  singers backed by Henry Jones on piano and L.B. McCollough on guitar. This may be exactly  the group we hear on the ''Siskin tapes''.

Sometime around 1964, after these recordings were made, there was a new guitarist  replacing L.B. McCollough and new singers in Acie Horton and Sullivan Hayes. The guitarist  was Clarence McKeel, a white country music songwriter, of whom Bragg told Bill Miller,  ''These was a white man added to the Prisonaires – a feller by the name of Clarence McKeel,  we called him Two Flats... a lot of people thought it wouldn't work but Clarence turned out  to be one of the greatest guys, guitarists, we had, great songwriter, good musician''. In May  1965 they were rejoined by an original member of the Prisonaires, Marcel Sanders, who was  back inside for a two year stretch. At this point, James Doyle took the role of main guitarist.

There is a surviving audio tape from a Christmas TV Special that aired over a public  broadcast station in Nashville, WDCN-TV in 1966. The Prisonaires that Christmas comprised  Johnny Bragg, A.C. ''Fat Man'' Horton, James Doyle, and Pat Dunn. The eight songs they sang  included ''Joy To The World'', ''White Christmas'', and a Bragg original, ''I Wish Every Day Was  Like Christmas''. In the TV programme it is mentioned that the new Commissioner of the  Department of Corrections, Harry Avery, who took office in 1963 when Frank Clement was  -reelected as Governor, sent staff to make sure that the Prisonaires got back together and  that he has made sure they had ''personal supervision for the last four years''. There is no  evidence that the group had ever not been together, but here was yet another prison leader  finding that it was a good move to take some credit for the existence of the Prisoniares.

A report dated December 1968 in the prison records descibes an inventory for the  Prisonaires' and lists items bought for the group: a black amp for $250, a brown amp for  $75, a set of drums for $150, a Univox guitar at $100, a Gibson at $109, a $400 sound  system, microphones, totalling $110, and an organ and pedal piano at $350. More  interestingly, the note goes on to describe perhaps the last group of Prisonaires. They were  James Doyle, descrided as ''received on May 22, 1954 for crime of murder, sentenced to 99  years. Guitarist (sic) and songwriter, age 48, top entertainer with unusual solo voice'', Acie  Horton, ''received in 1960, aged 31 serving 75 years for rape, a tenor, songwriter, good
performer'', Sullivan Hayes, aged 36 and in for assault and burglary, Melvin Mosley serving  ten years for rape from 1966; Clarence McKeel aged 48, ''received in the prison November  1964, first degree murder, a guitarist, songwriter, with songs recorded'', and John Henry  Bragg who is described as ''currently on parole''. The unknown author of this prison fact  sheet wrote of Bragg: ''This man is one of the best showmen that I have ever known. He has  an unusual singing ability with exceptional voice control... You have never met an extrovert  until you have met Johnny Bragg'.


The Prisonaires >

WORLD OF MAKE BELIEVE - As well as being the best-known member of the Prisonaires and  the Marigolds, Johnny Bragg also had a solo recording career that had several false starts and  took many turns. In 1959 his extrovert nature led him to drive around Nashville in a  distinctive salmon-coloured car and wearing a suit and bowler hat.  This courted attention  from police and public alike and between 1960 and 1967 he was back in prison, returning  again periodically on parole violations until 1977.


After Excello and Decca he recorded for a  label he part-owned, Elbejay Records, and for several other labels, the releases becoming  more obscure from year to year.

In December 1971 Johnny Bragg married Gail Green and their daughter, Misti, was born two  days later. They were living at 88 Fain Street in Nashville according to correspondence  between the prison, Bragg and researcher Colin Excott in January 1972.

Armed with this information researcher Bill Millar recalled: ''I looked for Johnny Bragg in  October 1972. We drove all around the very black Nashville ghetto, all red dirt roads and no  trees. We were driven around by singer Bobby King, a taxi driver, and we left messages at  the garage where singer Gene Allison worked and at Bragg's sister's house. Two days later  Johnny appeared at out hotel accompanied by his white wife, Gall, and 9 month old  daughter, Misti. He wore pink and white striped slacks and a jacket of pillar-box red. He also  sported an extravagant afro. It wasn't what you'd look like if you didn't want to be noticed!  Like many a sex offender Johnny minimised the seriousness of his offences, blaming his  repeated incarceration on the lack of constitutional rights for the black man''.

Johnny Bragg not only continued writing and recording songs for many years but he  continued performing too, mainly at church-sponsored events locally and further afield, but  sometimes at commercial venues. He undertook charitable worked, spending his songwriting  royalties on others as much as himself. His later years were lived with a much lower public  profile than previously.

Unlike many other black vocal teams, the original Prisonaires never regrouped for a  latterday career. William Stewart died in Florida in 1964, Marcell Sanders died in the late  1960s, Ed Thurman died in an accident in 1973 and John Drue died of cancer in 1977. Then,  over a quarter century later, the New York Times reported in 2004: ''Johnny Bragg, the  leader of the Prisonaires, a singing group of Tennessee State Penitentiary inmates whose  rhythm and blues music helped start Sam Phillips's Sun Records and influenced Elvis Presley,  died here on Wednesday (September 1). He was 79''. The newspaper noted that the  Prisoners had been pioneers in that they were among the first rhythm and blues vocal group  to record and have hit records released in the south.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE FEATHERS
FOR HOLIDAY INN RECORDS 1962/1963

PROBABLY SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: LATE 1961/EARLY 1962
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY STAN KESLER

With Charlie Feathers' career at a stand still, he worked local gigs only and supported his family with   numerous day jobs including driving an ambulance. In end 1962/early 1963 Charlie Feathers recorded ''Deep   Elm Blues'' b/w ''Nobody's Darlin''' for Holiday Inn. Holiday Inn was owned by Sun's owner Sam Phillips,   who bought shares in the hotel chain when it first began and most likely launched the label as a promotional   device. Again, it's a very sought-after record, but only because it has Feathers' name is on it.

01 - ''DEEP ELM BLUES'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:33
Composer: - Traditional-Arranged by Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - State Street Music
Matrix number: - HI-41063B
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961/1962
Released: - April 10, 1963
First appearance: - Holiday Inn Records (S) 45rpm Holiday Inn 114 mono
DEEP ELM BLUES / NOBODY'S DALING
Reissued: - July 1998 Revenant Records (CD) 500/200rpm Revenant 209-21 mono
GET WITH IT - ESSENTIAL RECORDINGS 1954-1969


The ''Deep Elm Blues'' is an American traditional song. The title of the tune refers to the "Colored Red Light   District" in downtown Dallas, Texas, known as "Deep Ellum''. Sometimes the song's title is also spelled   "Deep Elem" or "Deep Ellum''. The first known recording was made by the Cofer Brothers under the name   of The Georgia Black Bottom on OKeh Records. The Shelton Brothers recorded various versions of this   song, the first being cut in 1933 with Leon Chappelear under the pseudonym of Lone Star Rangers for   Bluebird Records. 

Honest Joe's Pawn Shop, Down Elm Street, Deep Ellum, Dallas, Texas, 1959. >

They recorded it again in 1935 for Decca Records followed by ''Deep Elm No.2'' and   ''Deep Elm No.3''. Les Paul (as Rhubarb Red) recorded ''Deep Elem Blues'' and ''Deep Elem Blues No.2'' on   Decca in 1936.

The Sheltons also recorded it in the 1940s as ''Deep Elm Boogie'' for King Records. Other   versions of the song were made between 1957 and 1958 by Jerry Lee Lewis for Sun Records, by Mary   McCoy & the Cyclones for Jin Records and, later, by Jerry Garcia, the Grateful Dead, Levon Helm, the   Infamous Stringdusters, Rory Gallagher and most recently by Redhorse Black.

02 - ''NOBODY'S DARLIN' BUT MINE'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 1:57
Composer: - Jimmy Davis
Publisher: - Leeds Music-Peter Maurice Music
Matrix number: - HI-41063A
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961/1962
Released: - April 10, 1963
First appearance: - Holiday Inn Records (S) 45rpm Holiday Inn 114 mono
NOBODY'S DALING / DEEP ELM BLUES
Reissued: - July 1998 Revenant Records (CD) 500/200rpm Revenant 209-20 mono
GET WITH IT - ESSENTIAL RECORDINGS 1954-1969

Probably more songs recorded.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Feathers - Vocal and Guitar
More details unknown


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©