CONTAINS 1965 SESSIONS

Studio Session for Narvel Felts, 1965 / Renay Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, 1965 / Zone Records
Studio Session for Arbee Stidham, May 25, 1965 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Randy & The Radiants, September 16, 1965 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Randy & The Radiants, Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Adams & Dane Stinit, December 5, 1965 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Doctor Ross, Probably 1965/1970 / Fortune Records

Biography of Artists (See: The Sun Biographies)
 

1965

The war in Vietnam continues to worsen as whatever the Americans do including major bombing of North Vietnam they continue to lose more men , at the same time the Anti-War movement grows and on November 13, 1965, 35,000 march on Washington as a protest against the war. There is also civil unrest with rioting, looting and arson in Los Angeles. This was also the first year mandated health warnings appeared on cigarette packets and smoking became a no no. The latest craze in kids toys was the Super Ball and The Skate Board. Fashions also changed as women's skirts got shorter men's hair grew longer as the The miniskirt makes its appearance. Hypertext is introduced for linking on the Internet. The St Louis Arch is completed and The Beatles release 4 new albums including "Help".
 
The voting rights movement in Selma, Alabama Launch a number of marches to bring about changes to the voting rights of African Americans.

1965

Lee Dorsey released ''Ride Your Pony'', which makes it into the Top 10 of Billboard's rhythm and blues chart.

The Gemini Space Program continues into 1965 and lay the groundwork for an eventual manned mission to the moon.


The Gemini Project was created with the goal of making a two-person spacecraft, testing long-term flights and weightlessness on humans, docking spacecraft with orbiting objects, and creating re-entry and landing methods all in preparation for an eventual manned mission to the moon. Half of the missions take place during 1965.

The Gemini I mission launches in April of 1964. -  The Gemini II unmanned spacecraft launched as a part of the Gemini Space Program on January 19, 1965. The Gemini II craft had been scheduled to launch in December of 1964 but technical difficulties had prevented it from doing so. It had also been disassembled twice to avoid Hurricanes Cleo and Dora in August and September of 1964. Its launch was successful in its goals which included testing heat protection and structural integrity upon launch and re-entry, training controllers, and testing guidance steering among other tests.

The Gemini III mission launches in March of 1965 and is the first of the Gemini missions to be manned. It carried astronauts Virgil Grissom and John Young. 

The Gemini IV mission launches in June of 1965 and carried astronauts Edward White and James McDivitt.

The Gemini V spacecraft launched on August 21st of 1965 and carried astronauts Charles Conrad and Gordon Cooper into orbit around the Earth. Their mission was to test long-term weightlessness and to test rendezvous procedures with other objects in space. They also tested maneuvering the spacecraft near other objects, controlled reentry, and several other experiments. The Gemini V mission set the record at the time for the longest crewed orbital flight, with the crew being in space for a total of 8 days. The spacecraft landed back on Earth successfully on August 29th, 1965.

The Gemini missions, twelve in total, continued until November of 1966 and were important as they laid the foundation for the first moon landing and greatly enhanced knowledge about what humans can accomplish in space. Other astronauts that participate in the Gemini missions included James Lovell, Neil Armstrong, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Michael Collins, and Richard Gordon.
 
1965

Sam Phillips puts out Jerry Lee's final single "Carry Me Back To Old Virginia", as a 'spoiler' for  his new Smash release. The Original Sun Sound by Johnny Cash, is the last Sun LP to be  issued. Jack Parnell, programme director at WHBQ in Memphis, refuses to play Randy & The  Radiants because he claims that Sun no longer promote any of their releases.

Alan Freed, the man who gave rock and roll its name, died in 1965 at the early age of 43.  Freed's punishment from the payola scandal was not severe. However, the side effects of  negative publicity were such that no prestigious station would employ him, and he moved to  the West Coast in 1960, where he worked at KDAY-AM in Santa Monica, California.
 
In 1962,  after KDAY refused to allow him to promote "rock and roll" stage shows, Freed moved to  WQAM in Miami, Florida, but that association lasted two months.  He died in a Palm Springs, California hospital on January 20, 1965 from uremia and cirrhosis  brought on by alcoholism. He was 43 years old. Freed was initially interred in the Ferncliff  Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York; his ashes were later moved to their present location in  Cleveland, Ohio at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 21, 2002.

Pre-recorded Music-cassettes were released. Simple to use, the cassette format was to  become very popular. However, during its first year on the market only 9000 units were  sold. Philips did not protect its cassette as a proprietary technology but encouraged other  companies to license its use. The pre-recorded 8 track cartridge appeared on the in-car  entertainment market. It was considered a convenient medium for this purpose because it  could be inserted into the player with one hand and was a continuous loop.
1965

Bob Dylan "plugs in" at the Newport Folk Festival marking the shift from acoustic folkie to  rock and roller.

Folk-rock is ushered in by The Byrds doing a cover of "Mr. Tambourine Man" which help  introduce its author Bob Dylan to a wider audience.

Protest-rock follows focusing on such topics as the escalating war in Vietnam with "Eve Of  Destruction" by Barry McGuire, to the civil rights battles in America exemplified by "People  Get Ready" by the Impressions, to simple anti-authority songs such as the Rolling Stones surly  number 1 hit "Satisfaction".
 
Martha & The Vandellas "Dancing In Streets" is used as a rallying cry when racial riots ignite  in Watts during the summer and Los Angeles DJ The Magnificent Montague's slogan, "Burn  Baby Burn" takes on new meaning as the community goes up in flames.

Blues-rock hits its high point with The Yardbirds, The Who, The Pretty Things and The Paul  Butterfield Blues Band turning out acclaimed records in the aggressive style.

Southern soul scores its first major breakthroughs with Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding,  Solomon Burke and Joe Tex notching huge hits that cut across racial boundaries.

James Brown makes a startling and abrupt shift from pure soul to a rhythm-based new  invention of his own making called "funk" with the hits "Papa's Got A Brand New Bag" and "I  Got You".

The Beatles and Elvis Presley, the two biggest names in rock history, meet for the only time  at Presley's Los Angeles home. While there John Lennon boldly asks his idol why he doesn't  record rock and roll anymore.

The first rock concert movie "The T.A.M.I. Show" is filmed in Santa Monica featuring The  Beach Boys, Rolling Stones, Supremes, Jan & Dean, Miracles, Marvin Gaye, Chuck Berry and a  show stopping performance by James Brown.
1965

In 1965, former Sun recording star Onie Wheeler persuaded his band members the Nelson  Brothers, Doyal and A.J. to join him in Nashville. A.J. had been working at a toy factory in  Sikeston for nine years, and he and Doyal now joined Onie at Sho-Bud. Soon after that,  they joined Roy Acuff as well.

The comings and goings continued; Onie and the Nelsons quit Acuff and tried to make it on  their own for a while. Then the Nelsons opted for a little more security; Doyal became a  preacher and A.J. stayed with Sho-Bud.

''At first'', said A.J., ''you're yung-ho, you'll break  out your instrument and pick at the drop of a hat, you just love to do it. Then after years  and years, you just lose that interest. I'd lost my weekends for too many years''.

For the remainder of his career, Wheeler flitted in and out of the music business. Between  1960 and 1966 he recorded for a variety of labels, had a slot on George Jones's package  show...
 
 
...for two years and worked with Roy Acuff. He did not record again until 1971. "John's  Been Shucking My Corn" was initially released on Old Windmill Records in late 1971, and re-released  a year later on Royal American. Onie's only hit brought in a few show dates, but he  couldn't find a follow-up. During the late 1970s and early 1980s he owned and operated a  guitar repair shop. He was operated on for an aneurysm in January 1984, but started to  work again a few months later. While performing at Jimmie Snow's Grand Ole Gospel radio  show on May 25, 1984, he collapsed on stage and died of a massive heart attack.
 

 
JANUARY 1965
 


JANUARY 1965

Sun 395 ''Peek-a-Boo'' b/w ''Mountain High'' by Randy And The Radiants issued.

JANUARY 1, 1965 FRIDAY

Roy Acuff concludes a 10-day USO (United Service Organization) tour of West Germany, in which he gave 19 performances for American soldiers.

JANUARY 2, 1965 SATURDAY

Martin Luther King, Jr. addressed a mass meeting in Brown Chapel in defiance of an anti-meeting injunction.  

JANUARY 4, 1965 TUESDAY

Leo Fender sells his company, Fender Guitars, for $13 million to CBS.

Bass player Steve Arnold is born. He appears on the Grammy-winning ''Same Old Train'', produced by Marty Stuart for the album ''Tribute To Tradition''.

Mercury Records released Roy Drusky's version of ''(From Now On All My Friends Are Gonna Be) Strangers''.

JANUARY 5, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Billy Walker recorded ''Matamoros'' in a morning session at the Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

Faron Young is arrested for assault after throwing his drink in the face of a policeman cracking down on a violation of Nashville liquor policies at the Music City Club on 16th Avenue. Young is required to pay a $75 fine.

JANUARY 7, 1965 THURSDAY

''The Jimmy Dean Show'' features Roger Miller, Minnie Pearl and Bobby Rydell as guests in the ABC prime-time lineup.

Hank Williams JR. recorded his voice alongside Hank Sr's vocals on ''Crazy Heart'' and ''May You Never Be Alone'' in Nashville in the first session for the Grammy-nominated album ''Father and Son''.

JANUARY 9, 1965 SATURDAY

Norma Jean joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

JANUARY 11, 1965 MONDAY

Columbia Records released Johnny Cash's ''Orange Blossom Special''.

JANUARY 13, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''What's He Doing In My World'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Johnny Cash performs ''Orange Blossom Special'' on ABC's ''Shindig!''. Also in the lineup are The Righteous Brothers, Herman's Hermits and The Statler Brothers.

Rick Nelson songs ''Happy Guy'' during a collegiate-themed episode of ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

JANUARY 14, 1965 THURSDAY

Actress Jeanette MacDonald dies of heart failure in Houston, Texas. Her 1936 movie ''Rose Marie'' introduced the title song and ''Indian Call'', both performed with Nelson Eddy. Slim Whitman revived both numbers as country hits in the 1950s.
 
''The Jimmy Dean Show'' welcomes musical gusts Eddy Arnold and Roy Clark on the ABC prime-time lineup.

JANUARY 15, 1965 FRIDAY

The Steve McQueen movie ''Baby The Rain Must Fall'' opens in theaters, with Glen Campbell making a cameo appearance as a musician.

Bob Dylan recorded ''Subterranean Homesick Blues'' in New York. The song will inspire Eddie Rabbitt, David Malloy and Even Stevens to write the million-selling ''Drivin' My Life Away'' some 15 years later.

JANUARY 16, 1965 SATURDAY

Sandy Mahl is born in Owasso, Oklahoma. She is destined to become Mrs. Garth Brooks and to co-write his hit ''That Summer''.

JANUARY 17, 1965 SUNDAY

The TV movie ''The Man Who Bought Paradise'', starring Angie Dickinson and Buster Keaton, also features a role for ''Georgia On My Mind'' songwriter Hoagy Carmichael.

JANUARY 18, 1965 MONDAY

Singer and fiddler Tammy Rogers is born in Rogersville, Tennessee. She becomes a member of the Grammy-nomination bluegrass band The Steel Drivers and appears as a backing vocalist on Terry Clark's ''A Little Gasoline''.

JANUARY 19, 1965 TUESDAY

Songwriter John D. Loudermilk's ''Tobacco Road'' is performed by The Nashville Teens on the second episode of NBC's ''Hullabaloo''. Also appearing, Paul Anka, Dionne Warwick and Johnny Rivers.

JANUARY 20, 1965 WEDNESDAY

John Michael Montgomery is born in Danville, Kentucky. His hits ''I Love The Way You Love Me'', ''I Swear'' and ''I can Love You Like That'' make him one of the top balladeers of the 1990s.
 
The Byrds recorded Bob Dylan's ''Mr. Tambourine Man'' at the Columbia Studios in Hollywood, with Glen Campbell playing guitar and Leon Russell on piano.

Smokey Robinson and The Miracles recorded ''The Tracks Of My Tears'' at the Hitsville Studio in Detroit, Michigan. More than a decade later, the song is re-jiggered as a country hit for Linda Ronstadt.

JANUARY 20, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Defamed disc jockey Alan Freed, nabbed in a payola scandal dies in a Palm Springs, California hospital from uremia and cirrhosis brought on by alcoholism. He was 43 years old. Freed was initially interred in the Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York. In March 2002, Judith Fisher Freed, carried his ashes to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio. On August 1, 2014, the Hall of Fame asked Alan Freed's son, Lance Freed, to permanently remove the ashes, which he did. The Freed family later announced the ashes would be interred at Cleveland's Lake View Cemetery. Freed co-write credit for The McGuire Sisters' hit ''Sincerely'', later covered by The Forester Sisters.

Glen Campbell covers the Roy Orbison hit ''Crying'' and ''Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)'' an ABC-TV's ''Shindig!''. Others on the episode include Petula Clark, The Kinks and The Rolling Stones.

Sonny James recorded ''I'll Keep Holding On (Just To Your Love)'' and ''Behind The Tear'', the latter penned by fellow artist Ned Miller.

JANUARY 21, 1965 THURSDAY

ABC-TV's ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' features Buck Owens, Norm Crosby and pop group The Mills Brothers.

JANUARY 23, 1965 SATURDAY

''The King Family Show'' debuts on ABC-TV. The variety series stars The King Sisters, who picked up a 1946 country hit with their remake of ''Divorce Me C.O.D.''. They're backed by the Alvino Rey Orchestra.

JANUARY 24, 1965 SUNDAY

Former English prime minister Winston Churchill dies in London. He coined the phrase ''If you're through hell, keep going'', which will be turned into a country song, Rodney Adkins' ''If You're Going Through Hell (Before The Devil Even Knows)''.

JANUARY 25, 1965 MONDAY

Guitarist Al Nevins dies in New York City. He was a member of the instrumental pop group trio The Three Suns, who earned a country hit in 1950 by teaming with Rosalie Allen and Elton Britt on ''Beyond The Sunset''.

JANUARY 27, 1965 WEDNESDAY

With his song ''I Feel Fine'' in the pop charts, Beatles songwriter John Lennon and his wife, Cynthia, begin a 10-day ski vacation in the Alps. Two dozen years later, the song becomes a country hit for Sweethearts Of The Rhodeo.

Glen Campbell delivers three songs on an episode of ABC's ''Shindig!'' that also features Aretha Franklin and The Righteous Brothers. A medley of Crescent City songs also finds The Serendipity Singers covering ''The Battle Of New Orleans''.

Del Reeves joins the American Federation of Musicians in Nashville, Tennessee.

JANUARY 28, 1965 THURSDAY

Bass player Greg Cook is born in Vian, Oklahoma. He joins Ricochet, which wins two trophies from the Academy of Country Music in 1996.

''A Country Coyote Goes Hollywood'' debuts in theaters. Produced by Disney, the picture features Rex Allen as narrator.

Rex Allen, pop singer Jack Jones and western fashion guru Nudie Cohn appear on ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

JANUARY 29, 1965 FRIDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hit ''Too Many Rivers'' at the Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee. It later becomes a country hit for The Forester Sisters.

Dean Martin's album ''Everybody Loves Somebody'', produced by future country executive Jimmy Bowen, goes gold.

The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''It's Another World''.
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
The final single that Roland Janes released by Narvel Felts saw the singer moved back to the Renay label for the Righteous Brothers-inspired ''Girl Come Back'', coupled with ''Sweet, Sweet Loving''. Both songs reflected the changing musical values that came into play in the wake of the Beatles; and both songs were written by Roland's ex-employer, Bill Rice, and his longtime partner, Jerry Foster.

Together, Rice and Foster would later garner over 60 ASCAP awards and become staples of country songwriting; among their memorable compositions were Jerry Lee Lewis's ''Thirtynine And Holdin''.

However, their material to give Narvel Felts's career its much needed boost so, with mutual consent and no recrimination, Narvel moved across town to Hi Records. He was no more successful there, but finally found his niche covering or reviving rhythm and blues songs for the country market. The first hit in that style was a cover of Dobie Gray's ''Drift Away'' in 1973.
 
 
Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR NARVEL FELTS
FOR RENAY RECORDS 1965

SONIC RECORDING STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
PROBABLY 3 STUDIO SESSIONS: UNKNOWN DATE 1965
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES
 
01 – ''SWEET, SWEET LOVING'' - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Jerry Foster-Bill Rice
Publisher: - Rolando Music
Matrix number: - R 4002
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1965
Released: - 1966
First appearance: - Renay Records (S) 45rpm standard single Renay 400-A mono
SWEET, SWEET LOVING / GIRL COME BACK
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15515-23 mono
NARVEL FELTS - MEMPHIS DAYS

02 - ''GIRL COME BACK'' - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Jerry Foster-Bill Rice
Publisher: - Rolando Music
Matrix number: - R 4003
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1965
Released: - 1966
First appearance: - Renay Records (S) 45rpm standard single Renay 400-B mono
GIRL COME BACK / SWEET, SWEET LOVING

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Narvel Felts - Vocal & Guitar
Melvin Downing - Bass
Terry Cobbs - Drums
Jamie Holmes - Tambourine
Ken Williams - Harmonica
Bill Rice – Piano

''Narvel was a great talent'', concluded Roland Janes. ''I don't think he ever realized how great he is. Choice of material was a problem for us. He's such a nice guy that he'll record something you want him to record – something which may not suit him''. It took another few years in the commercial wilderness before Felts finally found his niche. His soaring and emotion-charged voice never quite found the right groove at Sonic, but Narvel Felts' eclectic formula; a little country a little rhythm and blues, and a little rock and roll, is well in evidence here.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 

 
FEBRUARY 1965
 

FEBRUARY 1, 1965 MONDAY

Don Gibson is admitted to Baptist Hospital after he's found at the Biltmore Motel, unconscious from a drug overdose. The event is labeled a suicide attempts, triggered by domestic problems, though Gibson later denies trying to take his life.

Keyboard player Dwayne Dupuy is born in Louisiana. He joins Ricochet around 2003, replacing original member Eddie Kilgallon.

FEBRUARY 2, 1965 TUESDAY

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans appear longside Louis Armstrong and Jane Powel on an NBC episode of ''The Bell Telephone Hour'' celebrating ''The American Song''.

Brenda Lee joins ''Hullabaloo'' host Paul Anka for a medley of Elvis Presley's hits, ''Hound Dog'', ''Love Me Tender'' and ''Heartbreak Hotel''. The NBC music show also features The Everly Brothers, Petula Clark and Jay and The Americans.

FEBRUARY 3, 1965 WEDNESDAY

''Shindig!'' regular Leon Russell covers Hank Williams' ''Jambalaya (On The Bayou)'' during the ABC telecast. The episode also features Glen Campbell, Peter and Gordon and future record producer Russ Titelman.

FEBRUARY 4, 1965 THURSDAY

Confederate Railroad keyboard player Chris McDaniel is born in Rock Springs, Georgia. Leaning on southern rock, the band scores 1990s hits with ''Trashy Women'', ''Queen Of Memphis'' and ''Daddy Never Was The Cadillac Kind''.

FEBRUARY 5, 1965 FRIDAY

Charlie Rich recorded ''There Won't Be Anymore'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B. It's nearly nine years before it actually becomes a hit.

FEBRUARY 6, 1965 SATURDAY

Jackie Gleason, who wrote Jimmy Dean's country hit ''To A Sleeping Beauty'', makes the cover of TV Guide.

FEBRUARY 10, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Lefty Frizzell recorded ''She's Gone, Gone, Gone'' at the Columbia Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

FEBRUARY 11, 1965 THURSDAY

Roger Miller recorded ''One Dyin' And A Buyin''' in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Man In Black registers the first gold record of his career, with the album ''Ring Of Fire (The Best Of Johnny Cash)''.

Beatles drummer Ringo Starr marries Maureen Cox at London's Caxton Hall. Some 25 years later, he receives a Grammy nomination in the country field for recording ''Act Naturally'' as a duet with Buck Owens.

Future ''Hee Haw'' cast member Gunilla Hutton makes a stop on CBS-TV's Raymond Burr courtroom drama ''Perry Mason''.

Steel guitarist Leon McAuliffe and Molly Bee are featured on the ABC variety series ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

FEBRUARY 13, 1965 SATURDAY

''The Bill Anderson Show'' debuts on TV, where it will remain in syndication for the next nine years.

FEBRUARY 15, 1965 MONDAY

Pop star Nat ''King'' Cole dies of lung cancer at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica, California. He charted more than 100 singles during his career, including the original version of ''Mona Lisa'', remade in country by Carl Mann, Jilly Wakely, Moon Mullican and Willie Nelson.

Capitol Records released Charlie Louvin's ''See The Big Man Cry''.

Decca Records released the Webb Pierce album ''Memory Number 1''', the Kitty Wells' album ''Burning Memories'' and the album of Loretta Lynn named ''Songs From My Heart''.

FEBRUARY 16, 1965 TUESDAY

Hank Williams Jr. sings along with the voice of his father, while recording the Grammy-nomination album ''Father And Son''. The session's efforts include ''Why Don't You Love Me'', ''Move It On Over'' and ''Lost Highway''.

FEBRUARY 17, 1965 WEDNESDAY

''Tennessee Waltz'' is declared Tennessee's official state song in a resolution signed by governor Frank Clement. 

Jerry Lee Lewis performs ''Great Balls Of Fire'' and his sister, Linda Gail Lewis, serves up Ernest Tubb's ''Thanks A Lot'' during ''Shindig!'' on ABC-TV. Also featured, Glen Cambell, Leon Russell, Perter and Gordon and Sonny and Cher.

Hank Williams Jr. continues work on the Grammy-nominated album ''Father And Son'', pairing him with the late Hank Williams. On the session, ''Mind Your Own Business'', ''Honky Tonk Blues'', ''I Don't Like This Kind Of Livin'''and ''Lonesome Whistle''.

The Ranger 8 moon mission launches from Cape Canaveral on February 17th of 1965. The purpose of the mission was to crash the Ranger 8 spacecraft into the surface of the moon as it took high resolution photos of the surface, in an effort to determine possible landing sites for future manned missions under the Apollo program. It was successful in its mission and Ranger 8 crashed into the surface on February 20th of 1965. There were a total of nine Ranger missions that began in 1959 and lasted until 1965, and the end goal of the collective program was to obtain high resolution photos of the moon’s surface. The Ranger 7 mission achieved this goal but the Ranger 8 mission expanded upon it, with over 7,000 images taken of the surface before impact.

FEBRUARY 18, 1965 THURSDAY

''Take my wife... please!'' Jimmy Dean's self-titled ABC-TV variety show features Johnny Tillotson, pop singer Vikki Carr and comedian Henny Youngman.

C. T. Vivian led a march to the courthouse in Marion, the county seat of Perry County where state troopers rush the protesters and attack them. One of the protestors Jimmie Lee Jackson is shot and killed Alabama State Trooper, corporal James Bonard Fowler while hiding in a nearby café.

FEBRUARY 20, 1965 SATURDAY

Singer, songwriter and label owner Leon Ashley marries fellow artist Margie Singleton.
 
FEBRUARY 21, 1965 SUNDAY

Malcolm X is gunned down while delivering a speech in Harlem, New York.

FEBRUARY 22, 1965 MONDAY

Decca Records released Bill Anderson's ''Certain'' and Jimmy C. Newman's ''Back In Circulation''.

FEBRUARY 23, 1965 TUESDAY

Bobby Goldsboro is a musical guest on NBC-TV's ''Hullabaloo'', alongside Sammy Davis Jr. and The Drifters.

FEBRUARY 24, 1965 WEDNESDAY

The Frank Sinatra-directed ''None But The Brave'' opens in theaters, with Jimmy Griffin, a future member of Bread and The Remingtons, playing a World War II soldier.

Glen Campbell performs ''It's Only Make Believe'' during the ABC telecast of ''Shindig!''. The house band featuring Cambell and keyboard player Leon Russell, also covers The Beatles' ''I Don't Want To Spoil The Party''.

Charlie Louvin recorded ''You Finally Said Something Good (When You Said Goodbye)''.

The Beach Boys recorded ''Help Me, Rhonda'' at Los Angeles' Western Recorders with Glen Campbell in a supporting role on guitar.

FEBRUARY 27, 1965 SATURDAY

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans team up with The Sons Of The Pioneers on ''Happy Trails'' and ''Jingle! Jangle! Jingle!'' in a medley of western songs during ABC's prime-time series ''The Hollywood Palace''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF
FOR ZONE RECORDS 1965

SONIC SOUND STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
ZONE SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1965
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

01 – ''WHAT MAKES A HEART KEEP ON LOVING'' – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Tyra Publishers
Matrix number: 501 A
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1965
Released: - 1965
First appearance: - Zone Records (S) 45rpm standard single Zone 1085-A mono
WHAT MAKES A HEART KEEP ON LOVING / FOUR WALLS OF MEMORIES

02 – ''FOUR WALLS OF MEMORIES'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Tyra Publishers
Matrix number: 501 B – Fast Version
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1965
Released: - 1965
First appearance: - Zone Records (S) 45rpm standard single Zone 1085-B mono
FOUR WALLS OF MEMORIES / WHAT MAKES A HEART KEEP ON LOVING

03 – ''FOUR WALLS OF MEMORIES'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Slow Version - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1965

04 – ''WHAT'LL I DO'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1965

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self – Vocal & Guitar
Herb Smith – Lead Guitar
Aubrey Rice – Steel Guitar
Billy Self – Bass
Oreo Jaco - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 

 
MARCH 1965
 

MARCH 1, 1965 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Buck Owens' album ''I've Got A Tiger By The Tail'', which includes his version of ''Cryin' Time''.

Roger Miller joins Tony Bennett and Count Basie as guests on the NBC telecast of ''The Andy Williams Show''.

Minnie Pearl drops off 72,500 Easter Seals letters at the Nashville post office, and delivers a comedic performance for postal workers.

MARCH 2, 1965 TUESDAY

Marty Robbins recorded Gordon Lightfood's ''Ribbon Of Darkness'' during an evening session at Nashville's Columbia Studio.

MARCH 3, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Future ''Hee Haw'' honey Gunilla Hutton has a guest role on ABC's crime drama ''Burke's Law'', with Paul Lynde and Bert Parks.

Roy Clark appears on ''Shindig!''. The ABC music series also features Johnny Tillotson, Joe Tex and Jay and The Americans, who perform the future Johnny Duncan and Janie Fricke hit ''Come A Little Bit Closer''.

MARCH 4, 1965 THURSDAY

Little Jimmy Dickens recorded ''May Bird Of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose'' during the evening at the Columbia Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Loretta Lynn recorded ''The Home You're Tearin' Down'' at the Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

Sonny James has a guest slot on the ABC variety series ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

The first march takes place in Selma, Alabama as the marchers head east out of Selma on U.S. Highway 80 and cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge they find a wall of state troopers waiting for them on the other side, 600 civil rights marchers were attacked by state and local police with nightsticks and tear gas. Seventeen marchers were hospitalized, leading to the naming of the march as "Bloody Sunday".

MARCH 8, 1965 MONDAY

The first United States combat troops arrive in Vietnam.

Glen Campbell recorded ''Guess I'm Dumb'', a pop single, at the Western Recording Studio in Hollywood, California. The session is produced by Brian Wilson, who Campbell is filling in for on Beach Boy performance dates.

Capitol Records released Sonny James' ''I'll Keep Holding On (Just To Your Love)''.

March 8th Brutal televised images of the attack, which presented people with horrifying images of marchers left bloodied and severely injured, roused support for the U.S. civil rights movement. Newspapers and News Magazines around the world also showed similar photos which shocked the world bringing more support to the civil rights movement.

MARCH 9, 1965 TUESDAY

Three months after the first attempted it, Ray Price recorded the single version of ''The Other Woman'' in an evening session at the Columbia Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

Bobby Bare recorded ''It's Alright'' during the afternoon at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Federal District Court Judge Frank Minis Johnson issued a restraining order, preventing the Selma to Montgomery march from taking place until he could hold additional hearings later in the week. Martin Luther King, Jr. led about 2,500 marchers out to the Edmund Pettus Bridge and held a short prayer session before turning the marchers back around, thereby obeying the court order preventing them from marching all the way to Montgomery. Later that evening three white ministers who had come for the march were attacked and beaten with clubs, The worst injured was James Reeb, a white Unitarian Universalist who died in hospital on Thursday, March 11th.

MARCH 10, 1965 WEDNESDAY

The Everly Brothers sing ''Wake Up Little Susie'', ''That'll Be The Day'' and ''Bird Dog'' during ABC's ''Shindig1''. Other guests include Aretha Franklin, The Drifters, Tony Bennett, Dobie Gray and The Righteous Brothers.

MARCH 11, 1965 THURSDAY

Jimmy Dean recorded ''The First Thing Ev'ry Morning (And The Last Thing Ev'ry Night''.

Johnny Cash recorded his first version of Ramblin' Jack Elliott's ''Mister Garfield'' at Nashville's Columbia Recording Studio.

''The Jimmy Dean Show'' features Homer and Jethro, Judy Lynn and pop singer Jerry Vale as the week's musical guests on ABC-TV.

MARCH 13, 1965 SATURDAY

The Statler Brothers recorded ''Flowers On The Wall'' at a session originally slated for Johnny Cash, who failed to appear, at the Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

MARCH 15, 1965 MONDAY

The singles, Sun 396 ''Carry Me Back To Old Virginia'' b/w ''I Know What It Means'' by Jerry Lee Lewis and Sun 397 ''Carleen'' b/w ''Too Late To Right My Wrongs'' by Gorgeous Bill issued.

Elvis Presley begins filming ''Harum Scarum'' with co-star Mary Ann Mobley.

Following the televised images and critism of U.S. civil rights President Lyndon Baines Johnson presented a bill to a joint session of Congress. The bill itself would later pass and become the Voting Rights Act. Johnson's speech in front of Congress was considered to be a watershed moment for the civil rights movement; Johnson even used the movement's most famous slogan "We shall overcome".

MARCH 16, 1965 TUESDAY

Warner Mack recorded ''The Bridge Washed Out'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

Country hitmakers Burl Ives and Patti Page guest in an episode of ''The Bell Telephone Hour'' titled ''Wayfarer On The Mississippi'' on NBC-TV.

Waylon Jennings makes his first recordings in a new deal with RCA Records, working with Chet Atkins at a Nashville session.

Hank Williams JR. concludes recording for the Grammy-nominated album ''Father and Son'', pairing him with the vocals of his late father. The day's work includes ''I Won't Be Home No More'', ''Wedding Bells'' and ''Lovesick Blues''.

Jody Miller recorded ''Queen Of The House'', a response to Roger Miller's ''King Of The Road'', at Los Angeles' Capitol Recording Studios.

Judge Johnson ruled in favor of the protestors, saying their First Amendment right to march in protest could not be abridged by the state of Alabama.  

MARCH 17, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Connie Smith recorded ''I Can't Remember'' in an overnight session at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Claude King recorded ''Tiger Woman'' during an evening session at Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

MARCH 18, 1965 THURSDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford recorded ''Hicktown''.

The Rolling Stones urinate on a service station wall in England, the incident adding to their bad-boy reputations. Four years later, the group cuts ''Honky Tonk Women'', ranked in the Country Music Foundation book among country's greatest singles.

First space walk by the Russian cosmonaut Alexey Leonov from the Voskhod 2. 
 
MARCH 19, 1965 FRIDAY

Waylon Jennings recorded his first charted single, ''That's The Chance I'll Have To Take'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville during an evening session.

MARCH 21, 1965 SUNDAY

In March of 1965, Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. organized a peaceful demonstration for African-American civil rights and voting rights by marching from Selma to Montgomery in Alabama. The first two attempts at crossing the Pettus bridge were halted by state troopers, but on the third march the protesters were backed by the U.S. Army and National Guardsmen and allowed to pass through. King led about three-thousand people on the journey to the capitol and when they arrived in Montgomery they were met by about 30,000 more people who wished to join the demonstration. By August of 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 into law, guaranteeing African-Americans the right to vote.  Led by Martin Luther King, participants include Leonard Bernstein and Peter, Paul and Mary, whose Peter Yarrow earns a country hit later as the writer and producer of Mary MacGregor's ''Torn Between Two Lovers''.

MARCH 22, 1965 MONDAY

Columbia Records released Marty Robbins' ''Ribbon Of Darkness''.

MARCH 23, 1965 TUESDAY

Drummer Kevin Griffin is born. He becomes a founding member of Yankee Grey, who gain a nomination from the Academy of Country Music for Best New Duo or Group following the release of their debut album in 1999.

MARCH 24, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Bobby Goldsboro guests on the ABC music series ''Shindig!''. Jackie Wilson sings ''Danny Boy'', and Bobby Sherman turns in ''Hello Mary Lou''.

MARCH 25, 1965 THURSDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''Before You Go'' in an afternoon session at the Capitol Recording Studios in Los Angeles, California.

Eddy Arnold guests on ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' with pop singer Kay Starr and folk group The Village Stompers.

Johnny Cash crashes a 1964 Cadillac into a telephone pole on South Street during a rainy day in Nashville. He pays a visit to Vanderbilt Medical Center to assess a number of minor injuries.

25,000 people marched from St. Jude to the steps of the State Capitol Building in Montgomery, Alabama where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his speech "How Long, Not Long''.

MARCH 27, 1965 SATURDAY

Roger Miller's ''King Of The Road'' occupies the number 1 position on the Billboard country singles chart.

MARCH 29, 1965 MONDAY

RCA celebrates the grand opening of RCA Studio A, later known as Music City Music Hall and Javelina. Among the records made their, Lee Ann Womack's ''I Hope You Dance'', George Strait's ''Unwound'' and Kacey Musgraves' ''Merry Go Round''.
 
Columbia Records released Lefty Frizzell's ''She Gone Gone Gone''.

MARCH 30, 1965 TUESDAY

''Bonanza'' actor Michael Landon hosts NBC's ''Hullabaloo'', performing the former country hit ''Don't Fence Me In''. Also featured are Peter and Gordon, Dionne Warwick and Ian and Sylvia.

''The Beverly Hillbillies'' welcomes Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs for the third time in an acting role. The bluegrass duo also performs the theme song to the CBS show.
 

 
APRIL 1965
 

APRIL 1, 1965 THURSDAY

Lee Gillette retires from Capitol Records in Los Angeles. During his tenure with the label, he worked with such artists as Merle Travis, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Hank Thompson and Leon Payne.

APRIL 3, 1965 SATURDAY

Songwriter Hy Heath dies in Los Angeles. His credits include Tennessee Ernie Ford's ''Mule Train'', Ray Price's ''Run Boy'', Louis Jordan's ''Deacon Jones'' and Hank Williams' ''Take These Chains From My Heart''.

APRIL 5, 1965 MONDAY

Decca Records released Loretta Lynn's ''Blue Kentucky Girl''.

Capitol Records released The Beach Boys' pop hit ''Help Me, Rhonda'' with Glen Campbell playing acoustic guitar.

Guitarist Mike McCready is born in Pensacola, Florida. He's a founding member of the alternative-rock band Pearl Jam, noted in the lyrics of Lonestar's 1996 hit ''No News''.

APRIL 6, 1965 TUESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''Crying In The Chapel'', as an Easter Special single (447-0643) more than four years after he recorded it, hitting number three on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and topping the Easy Listening chart for seven weeks, the greatest chart success for Presley over a six-year span. The single reached number one on the British charts in 1965 where it stayed for two weeks. It was later included as a bonus track on Presley's 1967 gospel album, ''How Great Thou Art''. The single was eventually certified "Platinum" by the RIAA for sales in excess of one million units in the United States.

APRIL 7, 1965 WEDNESDAY

MGM released Elvis Presley's movie ''Girl Happy'', and  is a 1965 American musical romantic comedy  and beach party film  starring Elvis Presley  in his 18th feature. The movie won a fourth place prize Laurel Award  in the category Top Musical of 1965. It featured the song "Puppet On A String", which reached number 14 on the Billboard  Hot 100, number 3 on the Adult Contemporary chart and in Canada, and was certified Gold by the RIAA.

Willie Nelson recorded ''Night Life'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

APRIL 8, 1965 THURSDAY

Chet Atkins and Floyd Cramer are featured as musical guests on ABC-TV's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

APRIL 9, 1965 FRIDAY

Houston opens the Astrodome, the later site of a live Sonny James album, and the home of the Houston Livestock and Rodeo.

Bruce Johnston joins The Beach Boys, ending Glen Campbell's four-month tenure as the fill-in for Brian Wilson on the road.

APRIL 10, 1965 SATURDAY

Walter Brennan, whose recitation of ''Old Rivers'' made him a country hitmaker, is featured on the cover of TV Guide.

Eddie Montgomery's future wife, Tracy, is born.

APRIL 13, 1965 TUESDAY

Roger Miller wins five trophies in the seventh annual Grammy Awards; Best New Country and Western Artist; Country and Western Album, for ''Dang Me'', ''Chug-A-Lug'', and Country and Western Single, Song and Male Vocal, for ''Dang Me''.

The Everly Brothers performs the Ray Charles hit ''I Got A Woman'' on the NBC music show ''Hullabaloo''.

The Midwest region of the United States experienced a large tornado outbreak on Palm Sunday in 1965. In April of 1965 tornadoes hit six states, including Iowa, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Ohio. There were a total of forty-seven tornadoes that were reported and confirmed and the storms caused hundreds of millions of dollars worth of damage to the region. Over one thousand people were injured and there were 271 reported fatalities from the tornado outbreak.

APRIL 14, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis performs ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On'' on ''Shindig!''. Glen Campbell also appears on the ABC show with a version of ''Wabash Cannonball''.

APRIL 15, 1965 THURSDAY

Roger Miller recorded ''Engine Engine Number 9'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

George Jones, Gene Pitney and Molly Bee appear on the ABC prime-time series ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

APRIL 18, 1965 SUNDAY

Tug McGraw makes his major league debut, pitching for the New York Metz. Two years later, McGraw has a son, country music's Tim McGraw.

APRIL 19, 1965 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Buck Owens' ''Before You Go''.

Elvis Presley finished shooting for the movie ''Harum Scarum''.

Ernest Tubb recorded ''Waltz Across Texas'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Decca Records released Warner Mack's ''The Bridge Washed Out''.

APRIL 20, 1965 TUESDAY

Wynn Stewart recorded ''The Tourist'', the song that gives his backing bands name, The Tourists.

APRIL 22, 1965 THURSDAY

Porter Wagoner is among the week's guests on ABC-TV's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

APRIL 23, 1965 FRIDAY

Chet Atkins recorded ''Yakety Axe'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Stoneman Family guests on the NBC-TV special ''The Danny Thomas Show'', performing ''Mountain Dew'' with the host.

APRIL 24, 1965 SATURDAY

The Beach Boys appear in concert at the Washington Coliseum in the District of Columbia. With Bruce Johnson now performing in the band, it marks the last show in which Glen Campbell covers for Brian Wilson.

APRIL 25, 1965 SUNDAY

Rory Lee Feek is born in Atchison, Kansas. He forms the duo Joe and Rory with his wife, Joey Martin, and authors Blake Shelton's ''Some Beach'', Clay Walker's ''The Chain Of Love'' and Easton Corbin's ''A Little More Country Than That''.

APRIL 27, 1965 TUESDAY

Merle Haggard recorded ''I'm Gonna Break Every Heart I Can'' his first single for Capitol Records.

Brenda Lee performs ''Too Many Rivers'' and ''The Race Is On'' as a guest on NBC's ''Hullabaloo''. The show also features George Hamilton, The Ronettes and Wayne Fontana and The Mindbenders.

APRIL 28, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Don Gibson recorded ''Watch Where You're Going'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Leroy Van Dyke performs ''Auctioneer'' during ABC's prime-time telecast of ''Shindig!''.

The Anthony Perkins picture ''The Fool Killer'' debuts in theaters. Former Sun artist David Houston sings the title song.

APRIL 29, 1965 THURSDAY

Decca celebrates Ernest Tubb's 25th anniversary with the label during a luncheon at New York's Friar's Club, where he receives a gold record for selling 1 million copies of ''Walkin' The Floor Over You''.

Guitarist Richard Raines is born. He joins the Carthage, Texas, band Perfect Stranger, which develops a 1995 hit with ''You Have The Right To Remain Silent''.

APRIL 30, 1965 FRIDAY

Actor Adrian Pasdar is born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Known for his work in the TV series ''Heroes'' and ''Judging Amy'', he marries Dixie Natalie Maines.
 

 
MAY 1965
 

 
MAY 1965

During May of 1965 the largest anti-Vietnam teach-in took place at the University of California Berkeley. Tens of thousands of people attended the event which lasted for a day and a half and was held at a playing field at the university. The teach-in was organized by the Vietnam Day Committee and featured several notable speakers and attendees, including Norman Mailer, Norman Thomas, Dr. Benjamin Spock, and I.F. Stone. The organizers had also invited a representative of the U.S. State Department to speak in defense of President Johnson and the Vietnam war, but they declined the invitation.

MAY 1, 1965 SATURDAY
 
Merle Kilgore opens for Hank Williams Jr. for the first time. It begins a tradition that lasts for more than 20 years.

Singer and songwriter Helen Darling is born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She charts one single with Decca in the 1990s and scores as a songwriter by co-writing Jo Dee Messina's hit ''Bring On The Rain''.

Ernest Tubb makes a return appearance in the Apple Blossom Festival parade in Winchester, Virginia.

MAY 2, 1965 SUNDAY

Future country hitmaker Tom Jones makes his American TV debut, performing on CBS' ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Also appearing that evening, Dusty Springfield, The Rolling Stones and comedian Totie Fields.

MAY 4, 1965 TUESDAY

RCA Records released Waylon Jennings' inaugural single for the label, ''That's The Chance I'll Have To Take''.

Buck Owens recorded ''Only You (Can Break My Heart)'' after lunch at Los Angeles Capitol Recording Studios.

MAY 5, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Buck Owens recorded an instrumental called ''Paris'' at the Capitol Recording Studios in Hollywood. He later retitled it ''Buckaroo''. The single was Buck Owens' fourth number 1 on the country chart in less than a year. "Buckaroo" spent 16 weeks on the chart. The B-side, entitled "If You Want A Love", peaked at number 24 on the country chart weeks later. To date, it is the last instrumental to top the Hot Country Songs chart. "Buckaroo" was also performed live by The Byrds, and a version can be heard on their album ''Live at the Fillmore - February 1969''. In 2006, the piece was featured in the movie ''Idocracy'' and later covered by Leo Kottke.

''Shindig!'' devotes its entire ABC telecast to the music of Elvis Presley. Glen Campbell performs ''A Big Hunk O'Love'', Linda Gail Lewis does ''Don't Be Cruel'' and ''Crying In The Chapel'', and Sonny and Cher sing ''All Shook Up''.

Using the name Warlocks, The Grateful Dead makes its first concert appearance at Magoo's Pizza in Menlo Park, California. The group is referenced in passing in Lonestar's 1996 hit ''No News''.

MAY 6, 1965 THURSDAY

Elton Britt, Boots Randolph and Pearl Bailey are showcased in the ABC series ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

MAY 7, 1965 FRIDAY

Country and pop are paired unusually in a concert at Legion Field in Birmingham. Marty Robbins, Sonny James, Skeeter Davis, Del Reeves and Archie Campbell share the stage with The Beach Boys, The Rolling Stones and The Righteous Brothers.

MAY 8, 1965 SATURDAY

The Rolling Stones play the Jacksonville Coliseum in Florida with opening acts The Sir Douglas Quintet and Bobbie Martin. In attendance, Ronnie Van Zant, who goes on to co-write Lynyrd Skynyrd's ''Sweet Home Alabama''.

MAY 9, 1965 SUNDAY

''It Ain't Me, Babe'' songwriter Bob Dylan performs at the prestigious Royal Albert Hall in London. Among those in attendance, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.

MAY 10, 1965 MONDAY

Ray Price recorded ''Don't You Ever Get Tired Of Hurting Me'' around midnight at Nashville's Columbia Recording Studios.

MAY 11, 1965 TUESDAY

Bill Anderson and Jan Howard recorded their first duet, ''I Know You're Married''.

Desert Rose Band founder Chris Hillman makes his national TV debut as a member of The Byrds when the band performs ''Mr. Tambourine Man'' on NBC's ''Hullabaloo''. The episode also features The Supremes and Peter and Gordon, who sing ''True Love Ways''.

Johnny Cash is arrested for trespassing in Starkville, Mississippi, when he walks on private property to pick some flowers. During his night in jail, he violently kicks the walls of his cell, breaking his big toe.

MAY 12, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Keyboard player Eddie Kilgallon is born in East Greenbush, New York. He co-writes George Strait's ''One Night At A Time'' and performs with Ricochet, the Academy of Country Music's 1998 Vocal Group of the Year.

Wilson Pickett recorded "In the Midnight Hour" at Stax Studios, Memphis, 12 May 1965. The song's co-writer Steve Cropper recalls: "Atlantic Records president, Jerry Wexler said he was going to bring down this great singer Wilson Pickett" to record at Stax Studio where Cropper was a session guitarist "and I didn’t know what groups he'd been in or whatever. But I used to work in [a] record shop, and I found some gospel songs that Wilson Pickett had sung on. On a couple at the end, he goes: 'I'll see my Jesus in the midnight hour! Oh, in the midnight hour. I'll see my Jesus in the midnight hour.'" and Cropper got the idea of using the phrase "in the midnight hour" as the basis for an rhythm and blues song. Besides Cropper the band on "In the Midnight Hour" featured Stax session regulars Al Jackson (drums) and Donald ''Duck'' Dunn (bass). According to Cropper, Wexler was responsible for the track's innovative delayed backbeat, as Cropper revamped his planned groove for "In the Midnight Hour" based on a dance step which Wexler demonstrated in the studio - "this was the way the kids were dancing; they were putting the accent on two. Basically, we'd been one-beat-accenters with an afterbeat; it was like 'boom dah,' but here was a thing that went 'um-chaw,' just the reverse as far as the accent goes''.

"In the Midnight Hour" reached number 1 on the Rhythm and Blues chart  in Billboard magazine dated 7 August 1965 and crossed over to the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 reaching number 21: however according to Stax owner Jim Stewart the domestic sales total of the single in its original release was a moderate 300,000 units. However "In the Midnight Hour" by Wilson Pickett has become an iconic rhythm and blues track, placing at number 134 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All-Time, Wilson Pickett's first of two entries on the list (the other being "Mustang Sally" at #434). It is also one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll, Pickett's only such entry. The song is currently ranked as the 152nd greatest song of all time, as well as the tenth best song of 1965, by Acclaimed Music. However, Razzy Bailey has a minor hit in 1984 with a country remake.

Johnny Cash recorded the single version of Ramblin' Jack Elliott's ''Mister Garfield''.

MAY 13, 1965 THURSDAY

Beaumont declares George Jones Day.

Lari White is born in Dunedin, Florida. The soulful vocalist earns three hits in the 1990s and acts in the Tom Hanks movie ''Cast Away''. She also becomes the first woman to produce an album by a major male star, Toby Keith's ''White Trash With Money''.

Elvis Presley begins three days of recording session for the movie ''Frankie And Johnny'' at the United Artists Studios in Hollywood. The title track is eventually certified for gold.

Rex Allen, Roy Clark and Judy Lynn take performance slots on ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' on ABC-TV.

MAY 16, 1965 SUNDAY
 
The Jimmie Davis Tabernacle, a non-denominational place of worship after the ''You Are My Sunshine'' singer, is dedicated near Jonesboro, Louisiana.

Pop songwriter Burt Bacharach marries actress Angie Dickinson in Las Vegas, Nevada. During the 15 years they're legally linked, he earns a country hit when Sonny James covers his song ''Only Love Can Break A Heart'', originally a pop hit for Gene Pitney.

MAY 17, 1965 MONDAY

Rock musician Trent Reznor is born in Mercer, Pennsylvania. The focal point of Nine Inch Nails, he becomes a force in the 1990s alternative movement. Johnny Cash recorded his song ''Hurt'', which earns six MTV video nominations in 2003.

Columbia Records released Claude King's ''Tiger Woman''.

MAY 19, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Roger Miller receives a gold single for ''King Of The Road''. The lyrics tell of the day-to-day life of a vagabond hobo who despite being poor (a "man of means by no means") revels in his freedom, describing himself humorously as the "king of the road". It was Miller's fifth single for Smash Records. The popular crossover record hit number 1 on the United States Country chart, and number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100, and number 1 on the Easy Listening surveys. It was also number 1 in the United Kingdom Singles Chart, and in Norway. Miller recalled that the song started when he was driving and saw a sign on the side of a barn that said "trailers for sale or rent".

The song has been covered by many other artists, including George Jones, Dean Martin, Jack Jones, James Booker, The Fabulous Echoes, Boney M, R.E.M. (a shambolic, drunken offhand cover about which guitarist Peter Buck later commented, "If there was any justice in the world, Roger Miller should be able to sue for what we did to this song"), Johnny Paycheck, Alvin and the Chipmunks, Boxcar Willie, Randy Travis, Rangers, James Kilbane, John Stevens, the Statler Brothers, Rufus Wainwright and Teddy Thompson, Giant Sand, Peligro, The Proclaimers, Ray Conniff Singers and The Reverend Horton Heat, Jerry Lee Lewis and Joe Strummer during live performances. James ''The King'' Brown (an Elvis impersonator) performed the song for a 2001 Audi commercial on Germany.

The song is featured in Wim Wender's 1976 film ''Im Lauf der Zeit'' (In the Course of Time; English title ''Kings Of The Road''. It is also played at the beginning of ''Talladrea Nights'': ''The Ballad Of Ricky Bobby'', ''Brokeback Mountain'', ''Into the Wild'', ''Traveller'' and in ''Swingers''. Miller performs it in the concert film ''The Big T.N.T. Show''. The recording by The Proclaimers is included in the film ''The Crossing'' (1990). Near the end of their official music video, the pair are shown reading a newspaper whose headline is "Roger Miller, King of Plugs".

After the major success achieved by "King of the Road", Dean Martin recorded the 1965 tune "Houston", which is similar in both lyrics and feel. A send-up version by English entertainer Billy Howard was a British chart hit in 1976. A German version by the band Wise Guys exists. In both the English and German versions of Animals United, Billy the Meerkat sings the short rendition of this song walking past the other animals while carrying the gourd.

MAY 22, 1965 SATURDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford perform ''King Of The Road'' and ''Sixteen Tons'' while hosting the ABC variety series ''The Hollywood Palace''.

MAY 24, 1965 MONDAY

Filming begins in Los Angeles for Elvis Presley's ''Frankie And Johnny''. Starring Elvis Presley as a riverboat gambler. The role of "Frankie" was played by Donna Douglas from The Beverly Hillbillies TV series. The film reached number 40 on the Variety weekly national box office list for 1966. The budget of the film was estimated at $4.5 million. The director was Frederick De Cordova, who was the director and producer of ''The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson'' beginning in 1970.

There was discussion that Ann Margret might play the female lead - she owed Edward Small a film under a contract with her. Filming started in May 1965 and took place in Hollywood and New Orleans. Under his contract with United Artists, Presley was paid $700,000 plus 50% of the profits. The New York Times reported that the film opened with a "dull thud" and "sheds feathers almost from the start" stating that Presley's formula never before "seemed so feeble and so obvious''. Kevin Thomas, of the Los Angeles Times, felt it was a good vehicle for Presley.



© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ARBEE STIDHAM
FOR SUN RECORDS 1965

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MAY 25, 1965
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR KNOX PHILLIPS

By 1965, when Arbee Stidham recorded for Sun, Stidham had become a well-known and much-recorded artist. His early recordings included a 1947 version of ''My Heart Belongs To You'', a song which he revives here to a new soul beat and bars line. The vocal stylings remain in the blues idiom, however.

01 – ''PLEASE LET IT BE ME'' - B.M.I. 2:40
Composer: - Arbee Stidham
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 25, 1965
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30106-A-6 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 6 - SUNSET SOUL
Reissued: - April 1989 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-7-12 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FRANK, THIS IT

02 – ''MY HEART BELONGS TO YOU'' - B.M.I. 2:06
Composer: - Arbee Stidham
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 25, 1965
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30106-A-7 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 6 - SUNSET SOUL
Reissued: - April 1989 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-7-13 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FRANK, THIS IT

03 – ''YOU CAN'T LIVE IN THIS WORLD BY YOURSELF'' - B.M.I. 2:54
Composer: - Arbee Stidham
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 25, 1965
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30106-A-8 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 6 - SUNSET SOUL
Reissued: - April 1989 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-7-14 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FRANK, THIS IT

04 - ''TAKE THE PAIN FROM MY HEART'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Arbee Stidham
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 25, 1965
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-7-11 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FRANK, THIS IT

05 - ''PLEASE SEND ME SOMEONE TO LOVE''
Composer: - Arbee Stidham
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 25, 1965

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Arbee Stidham – Vocal & Guitar
Unknown – Guitar, Organ,
Bass, Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 

MAY 25, 1965 TUESDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''Meanwhile, Down At Joe's'' and ''A Woman Half My Age''.

MAY 26, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Don Gibson recorded ''A Born Loser'' in a morning session at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Jimmie Rodgers sings ''Honey Comb'' during the ABC telecast of ''Shindig!''. The episode also features The Rolling Stones, Jackie DeShannon and Sonny and Cher, who cover Jerry Lee Lewis' ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On''.

MAY 30, 1965 SUNDAY

The Animals play the Jimmy Reed song ''Bright Lights, Big City'' on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The song will become a country hit for Sonny James in 1971. Sullivan's entertainment for the evening also includes Wayne Newton and Connie Francis.

MAY 31, 1965 MONDAY

Roger Miller recorded ''Kansas City'' in Nashville, Tennessee.
 

 
JUNE 1965
 

JUNE 1, 1965 TUESDAY

Buck Owens recorded the Christmas classic ''Santa Looked A Lot Like Daddy'' at the Capitol Studio in Los Angeles, California.

Columbia Records released Johnny Cash's ''Mister Garfield''.

JUNE 3, 1965 THURSDAY

Former Sun rockabilly artist Conway Twitty recorded ''Guess My Eyes Were Bigger Than My Heart'' in an afternoon session at the Columbia Studios in Nashville, Tennessee. It becomes his first song to be appear on the country chart.

Webb Pierce recorded ''Who Do I Think I Am'' at Nashville's Columbia Recording Studios.

JUNE 5, 1965 SATURDAY

Gram Parsons' mother, Avis Persons, dies in Winter Haven, Florida, of alcohol-related cirrhosis of the liver. Her death coincodes with Gram Parsons' high-school graduation.

JUNE 7, 1965 MONDAY

Porter Wagoner recorded ''Green, Green Grass Of Home''. On the same session, Norma Jean recorded ''I Wouldn't Buy A Used Car From Him''.

JUNE 9, 1965 WEDNESDAY

The Everly Brothers are guests on the ABC music series ''Shindig!''. Also featured are The Righteous Brothers, Billy Preston, Clydie King and regular Glen Campbell, who performs ''Tom Dooley''.

Johnny Dollar recorded ''Stop The Start (Of Tears In My Heart)'' at the Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

JUNE 10, 1965 THURSDAY

Johnny Cash begins two days of recording ''The Sons Of Katie Elder'' at Nashville's Columbia Recording Studios.

After years of recording primarily in Los Angeles, newly-minted Country Music Hall of Famer Tex Ritter holds his first Nashville recording session.
 
JUNE 12, 1965 SATURDAY

The Beatles are awarded MBEs (Member of the Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II.

Tex Ritter joins Grand Ole Opry. His first performance during the evening is ''Deck Of Cards''.

JUNE 13, 1965 SUNDAY

The Seekers perform ''A World Of Our Own'' on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The song becomes a country hit for Sonny James three years later. Sullivan's lineup for the evening also included Tom Jones and comedian Sid Caesar.

JUNE 14, 1965 MONDAY

Decca Records released Loretta Lynn's ''Blue Kentucky Girl'' album.

Roy Acuff kicks off a one-week tour of the Dominican Republic in Santo Domingo, performing for American troops through the USO (United Service Organizations).

Capitol Records released the ''Beatles VI'' album. It includes ''I Don't Want To Spoil'', covered by Rosanne Cash as a country hit two dozen years later.

The Beatles hold the first of two sessions in which they recorded ''Yesterday'' at London's Abbey Road. The song is referenced 17 years later in the Merle Haggard hit ''Are The Good Times Really Over (I Wish A Buck Was Still Silver)''.

Decca Records released the Bill Anderson album ''From This Pen'', and an album of Kitty Wells called ''Lonesome, Sad And Blue''.

JUNE 15, 1965 TUESDAY

Future country star Billy Joe Royal perform on the ABC special ''Big Night Out'' alongside The Beatles, Leslie Gore and Paul Revere and The Raiders.
 
Operation Rolling Thunder Launched In Vietnam.

JUNE 16, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Bob Dylan recorded ''Like A Rolling Stone'' in New York with Al Kooper playing organ. The song, and Kooper's part, will be referenced 30 years later in the Tracy Lawrence country hit ''Time Marches On''.

The Everly Brothers trade licks with the British invasion group Gerry and The Pacemakers on an edition of ''Shindig!'' on ABC-TV.

JUNE 17, 1965 THURSDAY

The Beatles recorded the Buck Owens country hit ''Act Naturally'', with Ringo Starr singing lead, at the Abbey Road Studios in London. It's the same session in which they finish recording ''Yesterday''.

Johnny Cash performs at the New York Folk Festival at Carnegie Hall.

JUNE 18, 1965 FRIDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''I'm Letting You Go'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

JUNE 20, 1965 SUNDAY

Ira Louvin and his wife, Anne, die in an automobile accident headed east on Interstate 70 in Callaway County, Missouri. His car is hit by another car headed west. Several open alcohol bottles are discovered in the westbound auto.

JUNE 21, 1965 MONDAY

Johnnie Wright recorded the Tom T. Hall song ''Hello Vietnam''.

Roy Acuff concludes a one-week USO (United Service Organizations) tour, where he played for American soldiers in the Dominican Republic.

JUNE 22, 1965 TUESDAY

Bill Phillips recorded ''Put It Off Until Tomorrow'' with Dolly Parton providing harmonies.

JUNE 23, 1965 WEDNESDAY

A month after filming started, Elvis Presley finished his acting work for ''Frankie And Johnny'' in Los Angeles, California.

Tamla Records released Smokey Robinson and The Miracles' pop hit ''The Tracks Of My Tears''. The song is destined to re-emerge as a country and pop hit for Linda Ronstadt.

Jody Miller performs ''Queen Of The House'' on ABC-TV's ''Shindig!''. Also on the episode, The Byrds, Billy Preston, The Everly Brothers, The Stoneman Family and The Righteous Brothers.

JUNE 24, 1965 THURSDAY

Kenny Rogers opens Act Three on Main Street in Houston, Texas. The club is sold by the end of the year.

Beatle John Lennon has his second book, ''A Spaniard In The Works'', published in England. In the previous six months, the Lennon-penned songs ''I Feel Fine'' and ''I Don't Want To Spoil The Party'' destined for country remakes became pop hits.

Bill Anderson recorded ''Brights Lights And Country Music''.

JUNE 25, 1965 FRIDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Make The World Go Away'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee. Cameras capture the session for the ABC-TV series ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

Sonny James recorded ''Need You''.

JUNE 27, 1965 SUNDAY

Johnny Cash sets off a fire at Los Padres National Forest in California, blamed on a faulty exhaust on the singer's camper. The blaze consumes nearly 585 acres of condor habitat and requires 450 firefighters to extinguish.

JUNE 28, 1965 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Merle Haggard's first single for the label, ''I'm Gonna Break Every Heart I Can''.

Merle Haggard marries Bonnie Owens in Mexico.

JUNE 29, 1965 TUESDAY

Bobby Bare recorded ''A Little Bit Later On Down The Line'' during the evening at Nashville's RCA Studio B. The song waits another three years to become a hit.

JUNE 30, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Roy Orbison's contract with Monument Records expires. He signs a new deal with Metro Goldwyn Mayer record division for $1 million.

Jerry Lee Lewis performs ''High School Confidential'' during the ABC telecast of ''Shindig!''. Also appearing, Glen Campbell, Jackie Wilson and The Righteous Brothers.
 

 
JULY 1965
 

JULY 1, 1965 THURSDAY

The western ''The Sons Of Katie Elder'', starring John Wayne and Dean Martin, opens in movie theaters. The theme song provides Johnny Cash with a hit.

Big-band leader Claude Thornhill dies of a heart attack at his home in Caldwell, New Jersey. His orchestra recorded the first hit version of ''Sunday Kind Of Love'', a country hit for Reba McEntire in 1988.

JULY 2, 1965 FRIDAY

Los Angeles observes Peter, Paul and Mary Day. Peter Yarrow is destined to earn a country hit as the producer and songwriter of the Mary MacGregor single ''Torn Between Two Loves''.

JULY 3, 1965 SATURDAY

Roy Rogers' 33-year-old horse, Trigger, dies, in California. The silver screen cowboy has the horse mounted and placed on display in his museum.

The cover of TV Guide belongs to Jimmy Dean.

JULY 4, 1965 SUNDAY

B.J. Thomas signs his first recording contract with Pacemaker Records.

JULY 5, 1965 MONDAY

Capitol Records released a double-sided Buck Owens single, ''Only You (Can Break My Heart)'' backed with ''Gonna Have Love''.

Decca Records released Webb Pierce's ''Who Do I Think I Am''.
JULY 7, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Allied Artists Pictures released ''Tickle Me'' is a 1965 American musical comedy film starring Elvis Presley as a champion rodeo bull-rider and bronco-buster. Presley won a 1966 Golden Laurel Award as best male actor in a musical film for this role. It is the only Elvis film released by Allied Artists Pictures and saved the studio from financial collapse, ''Tickle Me'' helping to avert bankruptcy thanks to a song from its recycled soundtrack, "(Such An) Easy Question", which was a Top 40 hit in the United States, peaking at number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 and reaching number 1 on the Billboard Easy Listening chart in July, 1965.The film made $5 million at the box office.

The soundtrack had no "new" material, as album cuts were selected, then overdubbed. In two cases, different takes were used ("Long, Lonely Highway", and "I Feel That I've Known You Forever", the latter featuring what appears to be a vocal done on the sound stage).

Julie Adams and Jocelyn Lane co-star. The screenplay was written by Elwood Ullman and Edward Bernds, who had written The Three Stooges film shorts and theatrical films as well as scripts for The Bowery Boys.

The film was first released in the VHS format in the early 1980s in a limited version from Allied Artists Home Video. It was issued again by CBS/Fox video in 1985, 1987 and 1992, and by Warner Home Video in 1997. In 2007, ''Tickle Me'' was released for the first time on DVD, in the wide-screen letterbox format.

Sonny James recorded ''True Love's A Blessing''.

JULY 10, 1965 SATURDAY

Ken Mellons is born in Kingsport, Tennessee. The deep-voiced singer earns a 1994 hit with ''Jukebox Junkie''.

Wreck on the highway, Roy Acuff, guitarist June Stearns and steel player Shot Jackson are injured in a near-fatal car crash in east Tennessee. Acuff has a pair of pelvic fractures and a broken collarbone. Stearns never returns to the band.

JULY 11, 1965 SUNDAY

One day after Roy Acuff was injured in a near-fatal car accident, fellow Grand Ole Opry member Mother Maybelle Carter is likewise in a car wreck in Ohio.

JULY 12, 1965 MONDAY

Decca Records released Kitty Well's ''Meanwhile, Down At Joe's'',  Columbia released Johnny Cash's ''The Sons Of Katie Elder'', and Capitol released Sonny James' ''Behind The Tear''.

JULY 13, 1965 TUESDAY

Songwriter Neil Thrasher is born in Birmingham. After a short career in the duo Thrasher Shiver, he writes Randy Houser's ''How Country Feels'', Rascal Flatts' ''Fast Cars And Freedom'' and Jason Aldean's ''Fly Over States'', among others.

JULY 15, 1965 THURSDAY

Loretta Lynn becomes a grandmother at age 33 when her daughter gives birth to Loretta Lynn Shreeve at Nashville's Madison Hospital.

Carl Smith performs ''She Called Me Baby'' during a guest appearance on ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' on ABC-TV.

JULY 16, 1965 FRIDAY

Retired songwriter Ted Snyder dies in Woodland Hills, California, following abdominal surgery. His compositions include ''Who's Sorry Now'', a hit for western swing band Milton Brown and His Brownies as well as Connie Francis.

Cyndi Hoelze is born in San Leandro, California. Instrumental in the creation of the first Americana music chart, she marries singer and songwriter Radney Foster.

JULY 17, 1965 SATURDAY

Craig Morgan is born in Nashville's General Hospital. A member of the Army reserves, he makes an impact beginning in 2003 with slice-of-life vignettes such as ''That's What I Love About Sunday'', ''Bonfire'' and ''Redneck Yacht Club''.

JULY 19, 1965 MONDAY

Decca Records released The Wilburn Brothers' It's Another World'', and Johnny Wrights' ''Hello Vietnam''.

JULY 21, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Dobro, banjo and guitar player Sidney Cox is born in Homer, Louisiana. He becomes a member of The Cox Family, a bluegrass act that earns critical acclaim and appears on the successful soundtrack to ''O Brother, Where Art Thou''.

Jody Miller contributes, ''Silver Threads And Golden Needles'' to ''Shindig!'' on ABC-TV. Elsewhere in the lineup are Sonny and Cher, Gene Pitney, Billy Preston, The Righteous Brothers and The Sir Douglas Quintet.

JULY 22, 1965 THURSDAY

Following a near-fatal car wreck 12 days earlier, Roy Acuff cancels all his remaining dates for the year, except a USO (United Services Organizations) tour of South Vietnam.

Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Bill Wyman are fined five pounds for urinating on a gas station wall in London. In 2003, their recording of ''Honky Tonk Women'' is ranked in a Country Music Foundation book among the 500 greatest country singles, ''Heartaches By The Number''.

JULY 25, 1965 SUNDAY

Folk singer and songwriter Bob Dylan angers the crowd when he plays his first electric concert at the Newport Folk Festival. For the last part of the shoe, he borrows a guitar from Johnny Cash. Also watching backstage, Bill Monroe.

JULY 26, 1965 MONDAY

''Seven Spanish Angels'' singer Ray Charles enters a rehab center in Los Angeles to battle a heroin addiction.

Capitol Records the Buck Owens albums ''Before You Go, No One But You'' and ''The Instrumental Hits Of Buck Owens And His Buckaroos''.

JULY 28, 1965 WEDNESDAY

President Johnson announces U.S. combat troop strength in Vietnam will increase to 125,000, and the draft   will double.

Starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer, ''The Sound Of Music'' is released.

Johnny Cash recorded ''Happy To Be With You'' at the Columbia Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

Roy Clark performs with British Invasion band The Dave Clark Five during ABC-TV's ''Shindig!''. Jay and The Americans reprise Woody Guthrie's ''This Land Is Your Land'', and Billy Preston does the Chuck Berry-penned ''Too Much Monkey Business''.

JULY 29, 1965 THURSDAY

ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' welcomes Boots Randolph and Molly Bee.

JULY 30, 1965 FRIDAY

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Social Security Act of 1965, which establishes Medicare. The program will be referenced in George Jones' 1992 single ''I Don't Need Your Rockin' Chair''.

JULY 31, 1965 SATURDAY

Three weeks after a near-fatal car crash, Roy Acuff begins using crutches.
 

 
AUGUST 1965
 

AUGUST 1965

Elvis Presley's unissued Sun recording ''Tomorrow Night'' is issued. Since LaVern Baker's recording hadn't   yet been released, it was Lonnie Johnson's version that Elvis influenced his styling. This overdubbed version   of "Tomorrow Night" (LPM 3450) was released nine years after Elvis recorded it. For several years it was   feared the original master of "Tomorrow Night" was either lost or destroyed. That fear provide to be   unfounded, as RCA released the original version in 1985 on the "Reconsider Baby" (AFL1-5418) album, Sun   master.

The arrest of a black motorist spurs six days of rioting in Los Angeles, resulting in more than 4,000 arrests.

AUGUST 2, 1965 MONDAY

Claude King recorded the Dorsey Burnette-penned ''Catch A Little Raindrop'' in the afternoon at Nashville's Columbia Studios.

Decca Records released Bill Anderson's ''Bright Lights And Country Music''.

AUGUST 4, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Pop idol Bobby Sherman sings Roy Acuff's ''Wabash Cannonball'' on the ABC series ''Shindig!''. The Righteous Brothers also do Jimmie Davis' ''You Are My Sunshine'' and the standard ''Unchained Melody''.

AUGUST 5, 1965 THURSDAY

Connie Smith recorded ''If I Talk To Him'' in a late-night session at Nashville's RCA Studio B. Among the musicians is guitarist Jerry Reed.

AUGUST 6, 1965 FRIDAY

Voting Rights Act is signed into law which prohibited most of the unfair practices used to prevent blacks from registering to vote, and provided for federal registrars to go to Alabama and other states with a history of voting-related discrimination to ensure that the law was implemented.

AUGUST 7, 1965 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley begins location work in Hawaii on ''Paradise Hawaiian Style''.

Raul Malo is born in Miami, Florida. He sings lead for The Mavericks, an edgy foursome that wins multiple Vocal Group of the Year honors in the 1990s. He later builds a stylistically diverse solo career before The Mavericks regroup.

AUGUST 9, 1965 MONDAY

Roy Acuff is released from the hospital, 30 days after a head-on car wreck outsite of Sparta, Tennessee, nearly claimed his life.

Decca Records released Loretta Lynn's solo single, ''The Home You're Tearin' Down'', plus ''Ernest Tubb And Loretta Lynn;;, the first of three albums that feature both singers.

AUGUST 10, 1965 TUESDAY

Roger Miller recorded ''England Swings'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

AUGUST 11, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Bobby Goldsboro is a special guest on ''Shindig!''. The ABC show's lineup also features Glen Campbell, The Righteous Brothers, Sonny and Cher, The Ronettes and Billy Preston, who performs ''Hound Dog''.
 
Race riots break out in Watts, California leaving large parts of the city burnt and looted and 34 dead. 7.00 PM California highway patrolman, Lee Minikus, arrests Marquette Frye after Frye failed his sobriety tests. 7.00 PM to 7.23 PM Crowd of a few hundred gathered around the scene. 7.00 PM to 7.23 PM Additional Police are bought in for crowd control. 7.23 PM Patrolman, Lee Minikus arrests three Frye family members Marquette, his brother Ronald, and their mother. 7:40 PM Police leave the scene with those they have arrested leaving behind an angered, tense crowd. 8.00 PM to Midnight angry mob goes on rampage including stoning cars and threatened police in the area.

AUGUST 12, 1965 THURSDAY

Warner Mack recorded ''Sittin' On A Rock (Crying In A Creek)'' at the Columbia Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Black leaders including preachers, teachers, and businessmen try to restore order in the  Watts, California  community.
 
AUGUST 13, 1965 FRIDAY
 
Rioting continues with an increase of looting and arson with 100 fire brigades trying to put out fires started by rioters. 14,000 national guardsmen are called in and join the police trying to maintain order on the streets of Watts, California.

AUGUST 14, 1965 SATURDAY

Bobby bare joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Lieutenant Governor Anderson appeared on television announcing the curfew which made it a crime for any unauthorized persons to be on the streets in Watts, California, the curfew area after 8:00 p.m.
AUGUST 15, 1965 SUNDAY

Billboard's report of Warren Smith's automobile accident, said that he was living in Longview, Texas. Soon   after, there was a jail term for stealing narcotics. The early 1970s found Smith working as a safety man with   the Heat Control Company in Longview.

He never gave up on the recording business and made several   anonymous sounding singles for Jubal in Nashville before returning to his rockabilly roots during the late   1970s revival.

His recordings for Sun Records make it clear just how good Smith was. He could shift gears from slam-bam   rock and roll to a back country ballad, and sell you on either. Always in tune, he never lapsed into vocal tics   and contrivances. In every sense, he was a pure singer. On January 30, 1980, Warren Smith died of a heart   attack, aged just forty-seven.

The Beatles play New York City's Shea Stadium, breaking all rock concert attendance and box-office records.
AUGUST 15, 1965 SUNDAY

The Beatles play for 55,000 at Shea Stadium, grossing $304,000, a world record at the time. In the audience is Henry Paul, of Black Hawk, attending his very first concert. also on hand, Rolling Stone Mick Jagger and Keith Richard.

Riots and vandalism end in Watts, California.

AUGUST 16, 1965 MONDAY

Charley Pride has his first recording session in Nashville, Tennessee.

AUGUST 17, 1965 TUESDAY

Governor Brown lifts the curfew. The riots ended in Watts, California, with 34 dead and 1,032 reported injuries, including 90 Los Angeles police officers, 136 firemen, 10 national guardsmen, 23 persons from other governmental agencies, and 773 civilians. More than 600 buildings were damaged by burning and looting and another 200 buildings were destroyed.

AUGUST 18, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Mississippi hairdresser Tammy Wynette makes her first trip to Nashville.

AUGUST 19, 1965 THURSDAY

The Harden Trio recorded ''Tippy Toeing''.

The Beatles perform at the Sam Houston Coliseum in Texas for an audience that includes future singer and songwriter Rodney Crowell.

AUGUST 20, 1965 FRIDAY

George Hamilton IV has a daughter, Mary Dabney Hamilton.

AUGUST 21, 1965 SATURDAY

Connie Smith joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee. She sings two songs during the night, ''Then And Only Then'' and ''If I Talk To Him''.

AUGUST 23, 1965 MONDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''Sam's Place'' during the afternoon at the Capitol Recording Studios in Los Angeles, California.

AUGUST 24, 1965 TUESDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''Waitin' In Your Welfare Line'' in an afternoon session at the Capitol Studios in Hollywood, California.

AUGUST 25, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Patsy Stoneman, of The Stoneman Family, marries John J. Murphy Jr.

AUGUST 27, 1965 FRIDAY

Meet the Beatles, a nervous Elvis Presley hosts the Fab Four at his home in the tony Bel Air section of Los Angeles, California.
 
Elvis looked so phenomenal that night. He used to wear these bolero shirts and had them in every colour, expect brown. He hated brown! He wearing a blue shirt that night. We all went to the den and all of a sudden we heard screaming, like thunder, as if a bomb went off. The front door opened and outside there were thousands of fans everywhere. The word had got out. What we heard was the front door open as The Beatles walked in! The Beatles came in with Brian Epstein, their manager. They walked up to Elvis and were introduced, and Elvis sits down on the chair. The Beatles all sit down on the floor right in front of Elvis, in a semi-circle, and they look up and they are just gaping & staring at him.

There's this dead silence in the room until Elvis says, 'Well, what-the-hell, if you guys aren’t going to talk to me I’m going to my bedroom'. And then everyone started to laugh and that broke the ice.

Gene and Margie Vincent's divorce is finalized in Albequerque, New Mexico.

AUGUST 28, 1965 SATURDAY

Eileen Edwards is born in Windsor, Ontario. As Shania Twain, she becomes the first woman to sell more than 10 million copies each of consecutive albums, ''The Woman In Me'' and ''Come On Over'', and wins the CMA's Entertainer of the Year in 1999.

Seven weeks after a near-fatal car crash, Roy Acuff returns to the Grand Ole Opry, singing ''Great Speckled Bird''.

AUGUST 30, 1965 MONDAY

Decca Records released Jimmy C. Newman's ''Artificial Rose''.

AUGUST 31, 1965 TUESDAY

The Beatles play at the Cow Palace in San Francisco, where they meet Johnny Cash.
 

 
SEPTEMBER 1965
 


SEPTEMBER 1965

The Ikeya-Seki comet was discovered during September of 1965 by Japanese astronomers Ikeya Kaoru and Seki Tsutomu. The extremely bright comet was visible to the naked eye in the daylight during the next month as it made its closest approach to the Sun. The Ikeya-Seki comet was important in that it provided a unique opportunity for scientists to observe that type of comet for the first time using modern scientific instruments. The last time that a comet of this type had been spotted prior to the Ikeya-Seki comet was in 1882.
Randy & The Radiants (clockwise: Johnny Dark, Ed Marshall, Mike Gardner, Howard Calhoun, Bill Slais,  Randy Haspel, and ''Twistin''' Tony Rossini, 1964 >

SEPTEMBER 1, 1965 WEDNESDAY

''The Return Of Roger Miller'' becomes the first gold album for the singer.

Glen Campbell turns in versions of ''Hard Headed Woman'' and ''Hallelujah, I Love You So'' on ABC's ''Shindig!''. He shares the stage with James Brown, Billy Preston, The Kinks and Booker T and The MGs.

After a dozen years with Capitol, Tommy Collins' new contract with Columbia Records takes effect. Within six months, he has first hit in more than a decade, with ''If You Can't Bite, Don't Growl''.

Sonny James recorded ''I'll Never Find Another You'' and ''It's The Little Things''.

SEPTEMBER 3, 1965 FRIDAY

The first weekend bluegrass festival, organized by Carlton Haney, opens in Fincastle, Virginia. The three-day event features Bill Monroe, The Stanley Brothers, Clyde Moody, Jimmy Martin, Don Reno, Mac Wiseman, The Country Gentlemen and others.

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs recorded a new version of ''Foggy Mountain Breakdown'', which they originally tackled 16 years prior.

SEPTEMBER 6, 1965 MONDAY

Decca Records released Brenda Lee's pop hit ''Too Many Rivers'', later a country success for The Forester Sisters''.
 
The ABC sitcom ''No Time For Sergeants'' airs for the last time. The cast included Bobby Bare in several episodes.

Capitol Records released Merle Haggard's debut album, ''Strangers''.

SEPTEMBER 7, 1965 TUESDAY

Columbia released the Little Jimmy Dickens novelty ''May The Bird Of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose''.

Comedic performer Red Ingle dies of a hemorrhage in Santa Barbara, California. Along with his group The Naturel Seven, which included Jo Stafford, Ingle scored a 1947 country hit with ''Temtation (Tim-Tayshun)''.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1965 WEDNESDAY

The movie ''Forty-Acre Feud'' opens in Nashville. The cast includes, Bill Anderson, Loretta Lynn, Skeeter Davis, Roy Drusky, Ferlin Husky, George Jones, Minnie Pearl, Ray Price, Del Reeves, Hugh X. Lewis and guitarist Eddie Hill.

SEPTEMBER 9, 1965 THURSDAY

Bill Anderson recorded ''Golden Guitar''.

''The Jimmy Dean Show'' tapes its season-opening episode at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium. Appearing on the ABC music series, Eddy Arnold, Connie Smith, Buck Owens and Gene Pitney.

Actor Charles Esten is born in Pittsburch, Pennsylvania. He portrays country musician Deacon Claybourne in the ABC-TV drama ''Nashville'' and performs on multiple volumes of the TV soundtrack ''The Music Of Nashville''.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1965 FRIDAY

The Byrds recorded the Pete Seeger-written pop hit ''Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There Is A Season)'' in Los Angeles. The group includes future country hitmakers Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman.

SEPTEMBER 13, 1965 MONDAY

Capitol Records released The Beatles' ''Yesterday''. The record's B-side is a cover of Buck Owens' ''Act Naturally''.

The Beatles' Ringo Starr and his wife, Maureen, have a son Zak Starkey, in London. He grows up to become a drummer, just like his dad, who earns a country Grammy nomination in 1990 for his work with Buck Owens.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1965 TUESDAY

After three seasons stationed in the Pacific Ocean, ''McHale's Navy'' is transferred to a World War II setting in southern Italy for its final two years in prime time. Kitty Well's son, Bobby Wright, portrays crew member Willie Moss.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RANDY & THE RADIANTS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1965

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 16, 1965
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – KNOX PHILLIPS

01 – ''MY WAY OF THINKING'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Donna Weiss
Publisher: - Scion Music
Matrix number: - U 360  - Master
Recorded: - September 16, 1965
Released: - November 25, 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 398-A mono
MY WAY OF THINKING / TRUTH FROM MY EYES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-2-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Once again, Randy and the boys prove they were listening to their radios in the summer of 1965. ''My Way  Of Thinking'' was written by Donna Weiss, who went on to write ''Bette Davis Eyes'', although Ray Davies  of the Kinks might be forgiven for thinking he was hearing an out-take of ''You Really Got Me''. Likewise,  the Supremes seem to have been in heavy rotation when ''Truth From My Eyes'' was assembled.
Randy and The Radiants: Above: Randy Haspel (vocals and guitar); Ed Marshall (lead guitar); Mike Gardner (drums). Below: Bob Simon (songwriter and vocals);  Howard T. Calhoun, Jr. (bass and piano);  Bill Slais, Jr. (sax and vocals) >

Radiants member Bob Simon wrote ''Truth From My Eyes'', but Sam Phillips was much keener on ''My  Way Of Thinking''. ''We thought 'My Way Of Thinking' was embarrassing'', Randy Haspel told Robert  Gordon. ''Soon 'Truth' was number one on WMPS, and we were in the papers every night, but WHBQ  wouldn't play it.

(The program director said), 'We won't play a Sun record'. I said, 'What're you talking  about?' I told Knox who fired off an angry letter to WHBQ, and as the song was winding up on WMPS it  got a whole new lease on life at WHBQ''. Sadly, Sun no longer had the wherewithal to translate this local  attention into national action.
 
Jud Phillips was back in the fold, and he planned a tour of the South that  never quite happened. ''It's tough to think you peaked when you were seventeen years old'', said Haspel...
 
 
...''It  seemed everything was possible, anything could happen, and it was all gonna come true''.

Recently (1998) , Bob Simon has returned to Phillips as a songwriter. For several years, he was in San  Francisco, then Nashville where he wrote Reba McEntire number 1 hit ''What Am I Gonna Do About You'',  Randy went to New York, auditioned for John Hammond at Columbia, tried the Nashville experience, and  then he too returned to Memphis. The Radiants still play in town and recorded an unreleased album for the  Sun Studio label in 1991.

02 – ''TRUTH FROM MY EYES'' - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 361  - Master
Recorded: - September 16, 1965
Released: - November 25, 1965
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 398-B mono
TRUTH FROM MY EYES / MY WAY OF THINKING
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-2-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

03 – ''SHE BELONGS TO ME'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Bob Dylan
Publisher: - Special Raider Music
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - September 16, 1965

04 – ''YOU CAN'T JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Willie Dixon
Publisher: - Jewell Music Publishers - Bug Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 16, 1965
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-18 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Randy Jay Haspel – Vocal & Guitar
Bob Simon - Singer/Songwriter
Ed Marshall – Lead Guitar
Howard Calhoun – Bass and Keyboard
Mike Gardner – Drums
Bill Slais – Tenor Saxophone and Vocals

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 

 
  
 
 

  
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR RANDY & THE RADIANTS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1964/1965

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1964/1965
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – KNOX PHILLIPS

01 - ''A LOVE OF THE PAST'' - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-23 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

02 - ''BE GOOD WHILE I'M GONE'' - B.M.I. - 1:37
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-3 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

03 - ''BLUE SUEDE SHOES'' - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None 
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-16 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

04 - ''BROWN EYED HANDSOME MAN'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Chuck Berry
Publisher: -  Jewell Music Publishing Company
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

05 - ''DEDICATED TO THE ONE I LOVE'' - B.M.I. - 3:25
Composer: - Ralph Bass-Lowman Pauling
Publisher: - MCA Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-19 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

06 - ''DON'T LET THE SUN CATCH YOU CRYING'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Gerard Marsden-Fred Marsden-Led Chadwick-Les Maguire
Publisher: - Dick James Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

07 - ''EMPTY SPACE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

08 - ''FOLLOW HIM''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

09 - ''GREEN ONIONS'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Al Jackson-Lewis Steinberg-Booker T. Jones-Steve Cropper
Publisher: - Progressive Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

10 - ''GROW UP LITTLE GIRL'' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - John Monasco
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-9 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

11 - ''I HOPE WE MEET NEXT SUMMER'' - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Donna Weiss
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-14 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

12(1) - ''I WON'T ASK WHY'' - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 16, 1965
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-11 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

12(2) - ''I WON'T ASK WHY'' - 2 - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 16, 1965
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-22 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

13 - ''LOVE ME TOO''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

14 - ''LUCILLE'' - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Albert Collins-Richard Wayne Penniman
Publisher: - MCA Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-10 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

15 - ''(IN THE) MIDNIGHT HOUR'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Steve Cropper
Publisher: - Irving Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

16 - ''MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT'' - B.M.I. - 3:24
Composer: - Janie Bradford-Berry Gordy Jr
Publisher: - Jobete Music - EMI Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-15 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

17(1) - NOBODY WALKS OUT ON ME'' - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-21 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966
 
 17(2) - NOBODY WALKS OUT ON ME'' - 2 - B.M.I - 2:18
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-2 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

18 - ''ONE SUMMER NIGHT - B.M.I.
Composer: - Danny Webb
Publisher: - Addone Music
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

 19 - ''RAINDROPS''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

20 - ''TO SEEK AND THAN FIND'' - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 16, 1965
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-8 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

21 - ''SLOW DOWN'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jack Earls
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965

22 - ''SOME THINGS LAST FOREVER''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965
 
23 - ''THOUSAND MILES AWAY'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Sheppard-Miller
Publisher: - Keel Music
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1965
 
24 - ''TRUE AND SWEET'' - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-12 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966
 
25 - ''TURN ON YOUR LOVE LIGHT'' - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Deadric Malone-Joseph Scott
Publisher: - Universal/MCA Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-24 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966
 
26 - ''WALK SOFTLY'' - B.M.I. - 1:37
Composer: - Bob Simon
Publisher: - Rockin' Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-20 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

According to Randy Haspel, ''If Phillips had issued at the end of 1964 ''Mountain's High'' to gauge the band's popularity, what happened next took him by surprise. A Bob Simon song called ''Walk Softly'', written at age 14, was heard by former Sun artist and producer Bill Justis, whose instrumental ''Raunchy'' had earned Sam a gold record in 1957. Justis recorded Bob's song in Nashville with a singer named Joanne Tauchstone, and the release, on Monument Records' subsidiary Sound Stage Seven, became an instant regional hit. Sam Phillips had to wonder how a song by an artist that he had just signed could have got away. After that, Bob's songs were given priority in our recording sessions''.
 
27 - ''YOU ARE THE ONE'' - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Mary Unobsky-Donna Weiss
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-5 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

28 - ''GLADD ALL OVER'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Dave Clark-Mike Smith
Publisher: - Music United- Ivy Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-13 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966

29 - ''BOPPIN' THE BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Carl Perkins-Howard Griffin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1964/1966
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Big Beat Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDWIKD 26-7 mono
RANDY & THE RADIANTS - MEMPHIS BEAT - THE SUN RECORDINGS 1964-1966
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Randy Jay Haspel – Vocal & Guitar
Bob Simon - Singer/Songwriter
Ed Marshall – Lead Guitar
Howard Calhoun – Bass and Keyboard
Mike Gardner – Drums
Bill Slais – Tenor Saxophone and Vocals

Gregg Grinspan, Tony Rossini,
Jimmy Beckemeyer, Otis Glasscock - Backing Vocals

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 

SEPTEMBER 16, 1965 THURSDAY

The ABC sitcom ''O.K. Crackerby'' debuts, with ''Funny Way Of Laughin''' singer Burl Ives portraying the richest man in the world.

The Everly Brothers, The Byrds and The Rolling Stones are all on hand as ''Shindig!'' kicks off its second season on ABC-TV.

SEPTEMBER 17, 1965 FRIDAY

Sonny and Cher pick up a gold single for their pop hit ''I Got You Babe'', featuring Glen Campbell in the backing band. The song gets mentioned in Kenny Chesney's 2009 hit ''Out Last Night''.

''The Jimmy Dean Show'' moves from its traditional Thursday night time slot to Friday nights on ABC. First guests on the new night, Buck Owens, Gene Pitney, Eddy Arnold and Connie Smith.

SEPTEMBER 18, 1965 SATURDAY

Connie Smith and Bob Luman joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1965 MONDAY

The Stanley Brothers hold their final recording session as a duo in Cincinnati. Their last song, ''Soldier's Grave''.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1965 TUESDAY

Colonel Tom Parker renegotiates Elvis Presley's deal with RCA Records. Presley commits to the label for one extra year, through 1972, in exchange for a hike in his annual guaranteed payment from $200,000 to $300,000.

''Gunfighter Ballads And Trail Songs'' brings Marty Robbins his first gold album.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1965 THURSDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis contributes ''Breathless'' to the ABC series ''Shindig!''.

Songwriter Rodney Clawson is born in Dallas, Texas. He scores hits by writing Kenny Chessney's ''American Kids'', Jason Aldean's ''Burnin' It Down'', Luke Bryan's ''Drunk On You'', Lady Antebellum's ''Bartender'' and Florida Georgia Lines' ''Dirt''.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1965 FRIDAY

Wilma Burgess recorded her first hit, ''Baby''.

Ernest Tubb and Jody Miller are musical guests on ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''. Tubb's prime-time performances include ''Filipino Baby'' and ''I'll Step Aside''.

SEPTEMBER 25, 1965 SATURDAY

''To A Sleeping Beauty'' songwriter Jackie Gleason takes the cover of TV Guide.

SEPTEMBER 27, 1965 MONDAY

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans are featured guests on the week's installment of ''The Andy Williams Show'' on NBC-TV.

Brenda Lee makes a return appearance on ''Hullabaloo'' joined on the NBC show by Peter and Gordon, The Animals and Beau Brummels.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1965 TUESDAY

Dottie West recorded ''Would You Hold It Against Me''.

Charley Pride receives a call from manager Jack D. Johnson, informing him he's been signed by RCA Records.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1965 THURSDAY

Roy Acuff Jr. makes his first recordings, covering his father's ''Wabash Cannonball'' during a session at Nashville's Columbia Recording Studio.

Daron Norwood is born in Lubbock, Texas. He has a brief recording career with Giant Records during the mid-1990s, contributing to a Keith Whitley tribute album.

Jimmy Rodgers makes a return appearance on the ABC music show ''Shindig!''.

 



OCTOBER 1965
 

 
 
OCTOBER 1965
 
The Gateway Arch, located in St. Louis, Missouri, was completed on October 1965 when the final top section of the monument was put in place. The Gateway Arch was created as a landmark to memorialize the symbolic gateway between the Eastern United States and the West. It was designed by Eero Saarinen who won a design competition for the arch in 1947 and it took four years of construction to complete. The monument is 630 foot tall, 630 foot wide and made with stainless steel.

OCTOBER 1, 1965 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley finished work on the Paramount movie ''Paradise Hawaiian Style''.

The ABC-TV musical variety program ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' features whisperin' Bill Anderson as a guest.

OCTOBER 2, 1965 SATURDAY

Future country star Billy Joe Royal sings ''Down In The Boondocks'' on the ABC series ''Shindig!''.

OCTOBER 4, 1965 MONDAY

Johnny Cash is arrested in the El Paso airport and charged with possession of more than 1,000 pills, including dexedrine and tranquilizers.

CBS-TV's ''The Steve Lawrence Show'' presents a salute to country music, with Eddy Arnold, Grandpa Jones, The Jordanaires, The Stoney Mountain Cloggers and fiddlers Shorty Lavender, Benny Martin and Tommy Vaden.

Decca Records released Warner Mack's ''Sittin' On A Rock (Crying In A Creek)''. 

OCTOBER 6, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Rick Nelson sings ''Love And Kisses'' on the ABC-TV sitcom ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

OCTOBER 7, 1965 THURSDAY

Dean Martin performs the Ted Daffan classic ''Born To Lose'' on ''The Dean Martin Show''. The NBC telecast also features Vic Damone singing the Cindy Walker song ''You Don't Know Me''.

Charlie Rich sings ''Mohair Sam'' and ''Lonely Weekends'' on ABC-TV's ''Shindig!''.

OCTOBER 8, 1965 FRIDAY

Don Gibson, Bobby Vinton and Jody Miller are featured guests on ABC-TV's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

Bass player Bill Black is checked into Memphis' Baptist Hospital with a brain tumor. Noted for his work on ''Heartbreak Hotel'' and ''Hound Dog'', he slips into a coma and dies within two weeks.

OCTOBER 9, 1965 SATURDAY

John Denver performs at New York's Carnegie Hall as a member of the fold act The Chad Mitchell Trio.

OCTOBER 11, 1965 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Buck Owens' ''Buckaroo''.

Police in Grand Prairie, Texas, arrest three members of Jerry Lee Lewis' band and a teenager girl when more than 200 illegal pills are found in their Cadillac.

Roger Miller sings ''You Don't Want My Love'' with the host on NBC-TV's ''The Andy Williams Show''. Also appearing on the episode are Bob Hope and Mary Tyler Moore.

Columbia Records released Johnny Cash's ''Happy To Be With You''.

OCTOBER 14, 1965 THURSDAY

Connie Smith recorded ''Nobody But A Fool (Would Love You)'' in an afternoon at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

''National Barn Dance'' alumnus George Gobel guests on the NBC variety series ''The Dean Martin Show'', where the host covers the Hank Williams classic ''Take These Chains From My Heart''.

Future country songwriter Jim Weatherly guests on the ABC music show ''Shindig!''. Also featured are The Animals and Billy Preston.

OCTOBER 15, 1965 FRIDAY

Roger Miller has a son, Dean Miller, in Los Angeles, California. The younger singer recorded for Capitol in the 1990s and writes the Terry Clark hit ''A Little Gasoline''.

''The Jimmy Dean Show'' features musical guest Johnny Tillotson and regular cast member Molly Bee.

OCTOBER 16, 1965 SATURDAY

Glen Campbell performs Roger Miller's ''Kansas City Star'' on ''Shindig!''. The ABC TV show also welcomes The Lovin' Spoonful and Peter and Gordon.

OCTOBER 18, 1965 MONDAY

The Beatles recorded the basic track to ''In My Life''. The song is referenced in Ty Herndon's 1995 hit ''What Mattered Most''.

Columbia Records released Ray Price's ''Don't You Ever Get Tired Of Hurting Me''.
OCTOBER 21, 1965 THURSDAY

For three successive years, the Bill Black Combo was named ''Most Played'' group in America by Billboard  magazine and ''Number 1 Combo'' by Cash Box, a magazine published predominately for jukebox operators.  By 1962 the group had four gold records, ''Smokie (Parts 1 & 2)'', ''White Silver Sands'', and ''Josephine'', and  a string of successful albums, including ''Sexy Jazz, Solid & Raunch'', and ''Movin'''. It was reported in the  Press-Scimitar that anything the combo released was given an automatic first pressing of 250,000. Bill  reveled in the success, but the day-to-day business of looking after the group's interests, which increasingly  involved television appearances and a worldwide touring schedule, became a chore. In 1962 Bill gave up  leadership of the group to Bob Tucker, who already had replaced Reggie Young.

For years, Bill had complained of headaches. His wife, Evelyn, thought it was from all the loud music and  crowd noise, and the lack of sleep from being out on the road. In April 1965 he complained of pain across his  temple and around his upper cheeks. Because he had not been out on the road recently, Evelyn talked him  into going to the doctor.

''I thought it was his sinuses, and he did, too'', says Evelyn. ''I took him to a doctor we had been going to. He  took X-rays of his head and said would get back in tough with us. About four or five hours later, he called  and said he couldn't get a good picture. It was like fog. He wanted him to go downtown to the neurological  floor at Baptist Hospital.

Evelyn took Bill to the hospital, but the admitting nurse mistakenly assigned him to the psychiatric floor.  ''He's not crazy'', Evelyn told the nurse when she discovered the error. ''I told her the doctor did not say  psychiatric ward, he said neurological ward'', says Evelyn. ''She threw a fit and charged me $100 for the time we stayed there. I got the doctor's secretary to call her. I said I wasn't going to pay the $100''.

Finally, Evelyn got Bill admitted on the right floor. After running some tests, the doctor took Evelyn aside  and told her the news was not good. They had found a tumor on the left side of his brain. ''We're going to  have to open his head to see'', the doctor said.

After the surgery, the doctor came out into the waiting room to talk to Evelyn. The prognosis was not good.  He told her the tumor was about the size of a pecan. ''I asked him if he got it all'', says Evelyn. ''He said they  tried, but they had to take quite a bit of his brain to get what they got''.

The doctor told her they would have to operate again. For what reason, they weren't going to sew him up.  They were going to leave what he called a ''floating incision''. Before sending Bill home from the hospital,  they would wrap his head in bandages. After he told Evelyn the bad news, the doctor broke down and wept. ' 'What a waste for someone so talented, he said.

When Bill had recovered from the effects of the anesthesia, and was able to leave the hospital, Evelyn took him home to recuperate. The doctor told her not to discuss the surgery with him. If she needed to talk to others, he said, be sure to do it in another room where Bill wouldn't hear.

Evelyn was devastated by the news. Bill was only thirty-nine years old. They had three children, Nancy and Louis, both teenagers, and Leigh Ann, who was a little over a year old. Bill had been her lover, best friend, and soulmate since she was sixteen. She could not imagine life without him.

Over the next few weeks, Bill seemed to improve. Evelyn nursed him and took care of his bandages. She noticed that when the pressure built up inside his head, the bandages pumped up and down with each beat of his heart. But before long, his behavior became erratic, if only for short periods of time. One night he awakened and got out of bed while Evelyn was asleep. He leaped down the eight steps from their bedroom to the ground floor, at that time they lived in a tri-level house, and ran out the back door into the driveway. Evelyn awakened when she heard him calling for his father. She ran outside and found Bill standing in his underwear. ''He was trying to find his daddy'', she says. ''But he had been dead for ten or twelve years''. The doctors had told her not to argue with Bill, no matter what he said. With that in mind, she gently nudged him back toward the house. ''Bill, let's go back to bed'', she said. ''It's dark and your daddy's asleep. Let's not wake him up''. ''Well, okay'', Bill said, and went back into the house.

When Elvis Presley heard that Bill was ill, he went by to visit with them. He took Evelyn aside, ''He said he was sorry about Bill and that if anything happened he would not go to the funeral so it would not turn into a circus'', says Evelyn. ''He said he'd come back after everything was over with''.

As soon as Scotty Moore heard about Bill's surgery, he called D.J. Fontana. They decided to meet in Memphis, with D.J. driving up from Shreveport and Scotty driving over from Nashville. ''We met with Bill and had dinner with him'', says Scotty. ''He was his old jovial self and he looked great''. They left thinking Bill had everything under control. However, according to Evelyn it was all an act for Scotty and D.J. Bill didn't want his friends to feel sorry for him. Even though neither she nor the doctors talked to Bill about the seriousness of his condition, she knew he was aware of everything.

By fall, Bill's condition worsened. The doctors had operated on him twice. They told Evelyn that if they operated a third time, it would leave Bill a vegetable. The last week of his life, Bill lapsed into a semicoma. He didn't say much toward the end. He smiled at his wife Evelyn and squeezed her hand. On October 22, 1965, Evelyn and other family members were sitting in the hospital room with Bill when the nurse looked in on them. They had been there about eight hours that day. The nurse suggested they to get something to eat. After eating, they returned to the room, but Bill Black was dead.

The funeral, they returned to the room, but Bill was dead. The funeral was held at Bellevue Baptist Church, with burial in Forest Hill Cemetery. Scotty Moore and his wife, Bobbie went to the funeral with D.J. Fontana and his wife, Barbara. Scotty and D.J. were pallbearers. Afterward, they went out to Graceland to commiserate with Elvis. Everyone was stunned by Bill's unexpected death. No one knew quite what to say.

OCTOBER 21, 1965 THURSDAY

After two operations and lengthy hospital stays, Black died of a brain tumor at the age of thirty-nine. His death occurred during his third operation that doctors had hoped would eradicate the tumor once and for all. Black was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee. Elvis Presley was criticised for not attending the funeral, but he believed that his presence would turn it into a media frenzy. He decided instead to visit the family privately after the service to express his condolences. According to Louis Black, Presley said, "If there's anything that y'all need, you just let me know and it's yours''.

Black's widow sold Bob Tucker and Larry Rogers both the right to use the name Bill Black's Combo. The band changed to country when it joined Columbia Records, and won Billboard's Country Instrumental Group of the Year award in 1976.

Dean Martin performs the Roger Miller hit ''King Of The Road'' on his weekly NBC variety series, ''The Dean Martin Show''.

OCTOBER 22, 1965 FRIDAY

Ernest Tubb is named to the Country Music Hall Of Fame during a ceremony at Nashville's Municipal Auditorium.

Fire breaks out in Tex Ritter's room at the Andrew Jackson Hotel in downtown Nashville. Ritter loses his guitar, several hunting rifles and new cowboy outfits made in England and Hong Kong.

OCTOBER 23, 1965 SATURDAY

Roy Acuff Jr. makes his Grand Ole Opry debut, introduced by his legendary father. On an encore, Junior reprises his daddy's classic ''Wabash Cannonball''.

Elvis Presley receives a speeding ticket in Memphis, Tennessee.

ABC's ''Shindig!'' welcomes The Byrds, including Chris Hillman, who will go on to found The Desert Rose  Band. The music show's lineup also features Dobie Gray, Delaney Bramlett and Glen Campbell.

OCTOBER 24, 1965 SUNDAY

Patti Page joins piano-comedian Victor Borge and clarinetist Benny Goodman on ''The Bell Telephone Hour''.

OCTOBER 25, 1965 MONDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''I Want To Go With You'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

OCTOBER 26, 1965 TUESDAY

The Beatles receive Membership of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire during a ceremony at London's Buckingham Palace. The group's recently released ''I Feel Fine'' becomes a country hit when it's remade by Sweethearts Of The Rodeo.

OCTOBER 27, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''The Last Word In Lonesome Is Me'' written by Roger Miller at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Native American songwriter Peter LaFarge commits suicide   by slashing his wrists in a Greenwich Village bathtub. At the time, Johnny Cash has a country hit with the LaFarge-penned ''The Ballad Of Ira Hayes''.

OCTOBER 28, 1965 THURSDAY

Future country songwriter Larry Henley appears on ABC's ''Shindig!'' as the lead singer for ''Bread And Butter'' band The Newbeats. Per usual, Glen Campbell plays guitar as a member of the house band.

Charlie Louvin goes back to the recording studio for the first time since the death of his brother and former duet partner, Ira Louvin. The session includes Johnny Russell's ''Making Plans'', destined to become a hit for Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton.

OCTOBER 29, 1965 FRIDAY

The Who release ''My Generation''.

OCTOBER 30, 1965 SATURDAY

Ronnie Milsap marries Joyce Reeves.

OCTOBER 31, 1965 SUNDAY

Sandy Rogers, the adopted son of Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, dies from choking on his own vomit after an alcohol binge in Frankfurt, West Germany, where he was stationed with the Army.
 

 
NOVEMBER 11965
 

NOVEMBER 1965

The popular daytime soap opera “Days of Our Lives” debuted on NBC during the month of November in 1965. Known for its complicated and shocking plot lines, the drama chronicled the fictional trials and tribulations of modern American families. During the 1970s, the show was recognized for tackling controversial and important subjects of the time like interracial relationships and fertility issues. Airing nearly every weekday, “Days Of Our Lives” has currently shown over 12,000 episodes and continues to remain popular.

NOVEMBER 1, 1965 MONDAY

Kris Kristofferson arrives in Nashville, where he takes a job as a janitor at the Columbia Recording Studios. The gig is an intermediate step before he becomes one of the town's most influential songwriters.

Decca Records released Wilma Burgess' first hit, ''Baby''.

The Lovin' Spoonful cover the Little Jimmy Dickens novelty ''May The Bird Of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose'', on NBC's ''Hullabaloo''.

NOVEMBER 2, 1965 TUESDAY

Tommy Collins recorded ''If You Can't Bite, Don't Growl''.

NOVEMBER 4, 1965 THURSDAY

Porter Wagoner recorded ''Skid Row Joe''.

NOVEMBER 5, 1965 FRIDAY

George Jones performs at a nightclub in La Porte. Texas. The next morning, fan club secretary Jacqueline Young is found strangled to death in a pasture outside of town.

Bobby Bare and Arthur Godfrey appear on ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' on ABC-TV.

Decca released the album ''Bright Light And Country Music'' by Bill Anderson and The Po Boys.

NOVEMBER 6, 1965 SATURDAY

Naomi Judd's brother, Brian, dies of tumors at age 17.

Jazz and vaudevillian songwriter Clarence Williams dies in Queens, New York. Associated with Louis Armstrong and Fats Waller, his output included ''My Bucket's Got A Hole In It'', a country hit for Hank Williams, T. Texas Tayler and Rick Nelson.

Future country star Billy Joe Royal performs ''Down In The Boondocks'' on the ABC music show ''Shindig!''. The lineup is filled out by Jackie Wilson, Fontella Bass and The Rolling Stones.

NOVEMBER 7, 1965 SUNDAY

A sign of the times, Chet Atkins comes out in favor of stereo in The Tennessean, ''Everything sounds better in stereo... It makes everything sound more life-like''.

NOVEMBER 8, 1965 MONDAY

Capitol records released Buck Owens' ''Santa Looked A Lot Like Daddy''.

Don and Venetia Everly have a daughter, Erin Invicata Everly, in Los Angeles, California.

Little Jimmy Dickens performs ''May The Bird Of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose'' on ''Hullabaloo''. Also appearing on the NBC show, Marvin Gaye, Dusty Springfield and The Serendipity Singers.

American soldier Niles Harris survives an attack on the 173rd Airborne Division in Vietnam. The battle provides the storyline for Big and Rich's ''*th Of November''.

NOVEMBER 11, 1965 THURSDAY

Loretta Lynn recorded ''You Ain't Woman Enough'' and ''Dear Uncle Sam'' during an evening session at Nashville's Columbia Recording Studio.

The Beatles recorded ''You Won't See Me''. Nearly 10 years later, Anne Murray has a pop hit with the song as the flip side of her country hit ''He Thinks I Still Care''.

Songwriter Dallas Frazier recorded his original version of ''Elvira'', a future country hit for The Oak Ridge Boys.

NOVEMBER 12, 1965 FRIDAY

Del Reeves and Molly Bee are in the lineup on ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

NOVEMBER 13, 1965 SATURDAY

Rick Nelson guests on ABC's ''Shindig!'' with Ray Head, Davy Jones, The Turtles and The Righteous Brothers.

NOVEMBER 15, 1965 MONDAY

Brenda Lee is featured on NBC's ''Hullabaloo'' with Barry McGuire, The Kingsmen and The Rolling Stones.

Capitol Records released Sonny James' ''True Love's A Blessing''.

Decca Records released Loretta Lynn's gospel album ''Hymns''.

NOVEMBER 16, 1965 TUESDAY

Ferlin Huskey recorded ''Once''.

NOVEMBER 19, 1965 FRIDAY

Roger Miller sings ''England Swings'', ''Engine Engine Number 9'' and ''King Of The Road'' while taping ''The Big T.N.T. Show'', a TV special that airs in January next year. Also featured, The Byrds, Phil Spector, Petula Clark, The Ronettes and The Lovin' Spoonful.

Jody Miller joins Forrest Tucker as a guest on ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

NOVEMBER 21, 1965 SUNDAY

Fiddler Cecil Brower dies during a party at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City of a perforated ulcer. One of the pioneers of western swing, he established the fiddle's role in the genre during his tenure with Milton Brown's Musical Brownies.

Jimmy Dean performs at the prestigious Carnegie Hall in New York. The show represents the final appearance of fiddler, who dies at a post-show party at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York.

NOVEMBER 22, 1965 MONDAY

''It Ain't Me, Babe'' songwriter Bob Dylan marries Sara Lowndes on Long Island, New York.

NOVEMBER 23, 1965 TUESDAY

The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''Someone Before Me''.

NOVEMBER 24, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Metro Goldwyn Mayer released Elvis Presley's ''Harum Scarum'', and is a 1965 American musical comedy film, which was shot on the original Cecil B. DeMille set from the film ''The King Of Kings'' with additional footage shot on location at the Iverson Movie Ranch in Chatsworth, California. Some of the film was based on Rudolh Valentino's ''The Sheik'' released in 1921. The film reached number 11 on the Variety national weekly box office chart, earned $2 million at the box office, and finished number 40 on the year end list of the top-grossing films of 1965. The film is listed in Golden Raspberry Award founder John Wilson's book ''The Official Razzie Movie Guide'' as one of The 100 Most Enjoyably Bad Movies Ever Made. The film was released in Europe as ''Harem Holiday''.

Mandolin player Adam Steffey is born in Tennessee. He joins Alison Krauss' bluegrass band, Union Station, performing on ''When You Say Nothing At All'', before leaving the group in 1998. In 2009, he helps form the bluegrass band The Boxcars.

Tennessee Ernie Ford guests on the CBS variety series ''The Danny Jaye Show''.

Sonny James recorded ''Take Good Care Of Her''.
 
NOVEMBER 25, 1965 THURSDAY

Sun 398 ''My Way Of Thinking'' b/w ''Truth From My Eyes'' by Randy and The Radiants issued.

Glen Campbell performs ''May The Bird Of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose'' on an episode of ''Shindig!'' that emanates from paradise, Hawaii. Guitarist James Burton also contributes ''Yakety Axe''.

NOVEMBER 26, 1965 FRIDAY

Little Jimmy Dickens, George Jones and Gale Garnett appear on ABC-TV's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

NOVEMBER 27, 1965 SATURDAY

The Rolling Stones perform at the Cincinnati Gardens. The date is the first concert ever attended by future country radio personality and songwriter Gerry House.

NOVEMBER 28, 1965 SUNDAY

Petula Clark performs ''My Love'' from New York on CBS' ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Five years later, the song emerges in country music in the hands of Sonny James.

NOVEMBER 29, 1965 MONDAY

Johnny Cash recorded the political satire ''The One On The Right Is On The Left'' in Nashville at the Columbia Recording Studios.

Future country star Chris Hillman appears on ''Hullabaloo'' as a member of The Byrds, performing Bob Dylan's ''The Times They Are A-Changin'''. The NBC show also features Michael London, Jackie DeShannon and Paul Revere and The Raiders.

Capitol Records released the Charlie Louvin single ''You Finally Said Something Good (When You Said Goodbye)''.
 

 
DECEMBER 1965
 

DECEMBER 1965
 
The epic film “Doctor Zhivago” premieres in New York during December of 1965. The film starred Omar Sharif as the title character and Julie Christie as “Lara.” The story, based on a 1957 novel by Boris Pasternak, followed two lovers who were torn apart during the Russian Revolution. The film has been consistently ranked as one of the best movies ever created by critics but was banned in the USSR. It was nominated for ten Academy Awards and won five of them including Best Music, Best Cinematography, and Best Screenplay.

DECEMBER 1, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Merle Haggard and The Strangers recorded ''Swinging Doors'' at the Capitol Recording Studios in Hollywood, California.

DECEMBER 2, 1965 THURSDAY

Dean Martin sings Don Gibson's ''Blue Blue day'' on his weekly NBC-TV series ''The Dean Martin Show''.

Leroy Van Dyke perform ''Auctioneer'' and ''Walk On By'' on ABC-TV's ''Shindig!''.

Songwriter Casey Beathard is born in Torrance, California. He authors such hits as Kenny Chesney's ''Don't Blink'', Darius Rucker's ''Come Back Song'', Eric Church's ''Homeboy'' and George Strait's ''The Breath You Take''.

DECEMBER 3, 1965 FRIDAY

The Rolling Stones' Keith Richard is electrocuted on stage in Sacramento when his guitar touches the microphone. It takes seven minutes to revive him. The Stones' ''Honky Tonk Women'' will be listed among country's 500 greatest singles in a Country Music Foundation book, ''Heartaches By The Number''.

ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' airs live from New York's Carnegie Hall with guests Chet Atkins, Boots Randolph and Don Gibson.

DECEMBER 4, 1965 SATURDAY

Bill and Bette Anderson have their second daughter, Jennifer Lane.

Eddy Arnold earns a number 1 country single in Billboard with ''Make The World Go Away''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY ADAMS & DANE STINIT
FOR SUN RECORDS 1965

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN DEMO SESSION: SUNDAY DECEMBER 5, 1965
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS

On December 5, 1965 Billy Adams had been paid as session leader on demo recordings by a new singer in  town, Dane Stinit. Adams made one unissued vocal at the time on a song titled ''Empire''. Then a full Dane  Stinit session was held for January 29, 1966 when Billy Adams and Bill Yates both featured as musicians on  the resultant single, ''Don't Knock What You Don't Understand''. Dane Stinnett (correct spelling) later told  Colin Escott he was from Kentucky but living in Indiana when, ''we went to Memphis for a party and Bettye  Berger heard me sing and decided to take me to the Phillips studio to cut an album. Sam Phillips came in and  took over the controls from Stan Kesler right there on the spot and later signed me to a contract. I was  surprised because we were just a little raggedy group''. Phillips must have agreed about Dane's band. He  promptly added Billy Adams to the demo session and then Bill Yates as well to the formal session. Stinit's  disc came out in may 1966 but by the time he recorded again, six months later, Billy Adams was off the label  and Sun backed Stinit with a band drawn from the American Studio group by ace guitarist Reggie Young.

01 - ''SHOT OUT OF THE SADDLE**'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Vickery
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 5, 1965
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-4-15 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 1960S - ONE MORE MEMORY

02 - ''GHOST OF MARY LOU**'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Dave Stinit
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 5, 1965

03 - ''EMPIRE*'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 5, 1965

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Adams - Vocal* and Drums
Dane Stinit - Vocal** and Guitar
Donald Duck Dunn - Bass
Bill Yates - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 

DECEMBER 6, 1965 MONDAY

Several of Elvis Presley's friends commission art instructor John McIntire to sculpt a statue of Jesus (The Graceland Christ) for the Meditation Garden at Graceland Mansion, their Christmas present to The King.

Columbia Records released The Harden Trio's ''Tippy Toeing''.

DECEMBER 7, 1965 TUESDAY

Marty Robbins recorded the Jeanne Pruett-penned ''Count Me Out'' at Nashville's Columbia Studio.

DECEMBER 8, 1965 WEDNESDAY

Roy Acuff begins a one-week tour of South Vietnam, where he entertains American troops. Following those days, Acuff will continue to perform in the Far East and spends Christmas in Tokyo.

Rick Nelson sings a pair of song, ''Truck Drivin' Man'' and ''I Catch Myself Crying'', during an episode of the ABC sitcom ''The Advetures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

Sonny James recorded ''Room In Your Heart''.

DECEMBER 9, 1965 THURSDAY

Keyboard player Jerry Hughes is born. He joins Cincinnati's Yankee Grey, whose blend of country and southern rock garners a nomination from the Academy of Country Music for Top New Duet or Group in 2000.

The Andrews Sisters appear on NBC-TV's ''The Dean Martin Show'', singing the former country hit ''Don't Fence Me In'' with the host. The episode also features Rich Little and Louis Armstrong.

DECEMBER 10, 1965 FRIDAY

Leroy Van Dyke is featured on ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' as the ABC series broadcasts live from Hollywood with Jerry Vale and Joanie Sommers.

DECEMBER 11, 1965 SATURDAY

Decca Records presents Brenda Lee a red Mustang convertible during a 21st birthday party at Nashville's Hermitage Hotel. In attendance, future Country Music Hall of Famers Red Foley, Owen Bradley and Felice and Boudleaux Bryant.

DECEMBER 12, 1965 SUNDAY

The Byrds perform ''Mr. Tambourine Man'' and ''Turn! Turn! Turn!'' during CBS' telecast of ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The group includes Chris Hillman, a future member of country music's Desert Rose Band.

DECEMBER 14, 1965 TUESDAY

Roy Acuff concludes a one-week USO (United Service Organizations) tour of South Vietnam, where he gave two performances daily for American troops. The tour moves on to other Pacific ports until after New Years.

Jean Shepard recorded ''If Teardrops Were Silver''.

DECEMBER 16, 1965 THURSDAY

Ella Fitzgerald and Gordon MacRae sing a medley of ''You Are My Sunshine'', ''Red River Valley'' and ''Bury Me Not On The Lonesome Prairie'' with the host on ''The Dean Martin Show''. Also appearing, comedian George Gobel.

DECEMBER 17, 1965 FRIDAY

Vernon Oxford has his first recording session in Nashville, cutting ''Watermelon Time In Georgia'', cited in the Country Music Foundation's ''Heartaches By The Number'' among the 500 greatest singles in country music history.

ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' features Bobby Rydell and Kay Starr.

DECEMBER 18, 1965 SATURDAY

Sergeant Barry Sadler recorded ''The Ballad Of The Green Berets'' in New York. "The Ballad Of The Green Berets" is a patriotic song in the ballad style about the Green Berets, an elite special force in the U.S. Army. It is one of the very few songs of the 1960s to cast the military in a positive light and in 1966 it became a major hit, reaching number 1 for five weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 and four weeks on Cash Box. Ultimately, the song was named Billboard's number 1 single for the year 1966. It was also a crossover smash, reaching number 1 on Billboard's Easy Listening chart and number 2 on Billboard's Country survey.

The song was written by Robin Moore and Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler, while the latter was recuperating from a leg wound suffered as a medic in the Vietnam War. Moore also wrote a book, The Green Berets, about the force. The tune itself is borrowed from the traditional American folk song "The Butcher Boy''.

The lyrics were written in honor of Green Beret James Gabriel, Jr., the first native Hawaiian who died in Vietnam, who was executed by the Viet Cong while on a training mission on April 8, 1962. One verse was written in honor of Gabriel, but it never made it into the final version. Sadler debuted the song on television on January 30, 1966 on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Green Berets" is currently used as one of the four primary marching tunes of the Fighttin' Texas Aggie Band.

DECEMBER 22, 1965 WEDNESDAY

The movie ''Doctor Zhivago'' debuts in America theaters. The picture's traveling theme inspires John Hartford to write ''Gently On My Mind''. John Hartford won four 1968 Grammy Awards with the song. Hartford himself won the award for Best Folk Performance and Best Country and Western Song (Songwriter). The other two awards Best Country and Western Solo Vocal Performance, Male and Best Country and Western Recording, went to American country music singer Glen Campbell for his version of Hartford's song. It was released in June 1967 as the only single from the album of the same name. It was re-released in July 1968 to more success. Glen Campbell's version has received over 5 million plays on the radio. Campbell used "Gentle on My Mind" as the theme to his television variety show, The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour between 1969 and 1972. Dean Martin's version, recorded in 1968, was a major hit in the United Kingdom; three versions of the song, Campbell's, Martin's and Patti Page's, all reached the top ten of the U.S. Easy Listening chart in 1968. The song was ranked number 16 on BMI's Top 100 Songs of the Century. Elvis Presley recorded the song at American Sound Studios in Memphis in January 1969, and the song featured on the award winning album''From Elvis In Memphis''.

DECEMBER 23, 1965 THURSDAY

Porter Wagoner's son, Richard, reports for service in the Army, which eventually leads him to Vietnam.

DECEMBER 24, 1965 FRIDAY

Porter Wagoner moves out of his Nashville home, permanently separating from his wife, Ruth, although they don't officially divorce for 20 years.

Guitarist Joe Maphis and Jody Miller are guests on the week's edition of ABC's ''The Jimmy Dean Show''.

DECEMBER 25, 1965 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley's friends give him a statue of Jesus (The Graceland Christ) for his newly completed Meditation Garden at Graceland Mansion in Memphis. Girlfriend Priscilla Beaulieu gives him a slot-car track.

Songwriter Alex Zanetis, best known for co-writing ''Snap Your Fingers'', is injured in a car crash on Highway 50 in Flora, Illinois. He's hospitalized at Clay County Hospital with a fractured jaw, broken arms and other minor infuries.

Jimmy Dean visits a hog farm owned by in-law Troy Pritchard in Plainview, Texas. Shortly after, he buys half of the farm, starting down a road in business that will find him the owner of his own sausage company.

Buck Owens' instrumental ''Buckaroo'' begins a two-week reign atop the Billboard country singles chart.

DECEMBER 27, 1965 MONDAY

Porter Wagoner is separated from his wife, Ruth. They don't get officially divorced for another 21 years.

Decca Records released Bill Anderson's two-sided hit, ''I Love You Drops'' backed with ''Golden Guitar''.
 
Brenda Lee appears on NBC's ''Hullabaloo'', joined by The Young Rascals and comedian Alan King.

Capitol released songwriter Dallas Frazier's original version of ''Elvira'', a song eventually associated with The Oak Ridge Boys.

DECEMBER 28, 1965 TUESDAY

RCA Records ships Charley Pride's first single, ''The Snakes Crawl At Night''.

Johnny Cash pleads guilty to drug possession in El Paso, Texas, where he was busted in October with over 1,000 pills. A related newspaper photo leads the Ku Klux Klan to boycott Cash concerts under the misguided premise that Cash's wife is black.

DECEMBER 30, 1965 THURSDAY

Homer and Jethro and Louis Prima guest on the NBC series ''The Dean Martin Show''.


Doctor Ross's final single for Devora Brown was back of the Fortune label and numbered somewhat out of sequence. Fortune had issue number 538 in 1960 for ''Crazy Bop'' by the Earthquakes. Now, for some reason, the number was re-employed in the service of Isaiah Ross. It is unclear quite when Ross made the disc but it was probably part of a longer session or sessions during the 1960s that were collected onto a Fortune LP in November 1970, credited to Doctor Ross - The Harmonica Boss with the Disciples (Messengers of Soul). The sound of the LP is a typically muddy Fortune jumble, perhaps overdubbed in an apparent attempt to bring Ross's sound into the world of soul and revivalist blues.

The single may have been issued as early as 1965 if the issue number was in fact a mistake linked to the matrix numbering, but newspaper reports from 1971 refer to the single being due for issue at that time. When it did appear it was credited to Doctor Ross, The Harmonica Boss, with Tony Valla & The Alamos. Ross probably just sings and plays harmonica here while the Alamos provide guitar, bass, drums, and an organist on the Sonny Boy Williamson song, ''Sugar Mama'', who doubles as pianist on ''I'd Rather Be A Woman's Baby (Then An Old Girl's Slave)''. However, the mid and late-1960s saw the start of a period of renewed acclamation for Isaiah Ross - and this approval was gained from a whole new audience.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR DOCTOR ROSS
FORTUNE RECORDS 1959

FORTUNE RECORDING STUDIO
3942 THIRD AVENUE, DETROIT, MICHIGAN
FORTUNE SESSION: PROBABLY 1965-1970
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK BROWN

01 – "I'D RATHER BE A YOUNG WOMAN'S BABY''
(THAN AN OLD GIRL'S SLAVE)'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Isaiah Ross
Publisher: - Trianon Publications
Matrix number: F 358
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1965/1970
Released: - 1970
First appearance: - Fortune Records (S) 45rpm Fortune 538 mono
I'D RATHER BE A YOUNG WOMAN'S BABY / SUGAR MAMA
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16939-31 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

01 – "SUGAR MAMA'' - B.M.I. - 3:09
Composer: - John Sonny Boy Williamson
Publisher: - Trianon Publications
Matrix number: F 357
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1965/1970
Released: - 1970
First appearance: - Fortune Records (S) 45rpm Fortune 538 mono
SUGAR MAMA / I'D RATHER BE A YOUNG WOMAN'S BABY
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16939-32 mono
DOCTOR ROSS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charles Isaiah Ross - Vocal, Guitar, Harmonica
Unknown Organ, Piano, Guitar, Bass, Drums
Doctor Ross was suddenly rediscovered, or rather, discovered, or even reinvented, in the mid-1960s as a one-man band working to white audiences in the fold blues boom years. He made a number of highly praised albums and this was certainly when the Doctor's solo boogies gained in reputation both at home and in Europe. The catalyst for this was a visit by researchers Pete Welding and Don Kent who traced Ross to Flint in 1964, arranged for him to play at a folk song festival at the University of Chicago, and recorded him as a one-man-band for Welding's Testament label. As Welding wrote, his style of music, ''is poorly represented on record. Like black string band music, it was much more commonly practised and widely distributed through black America than its meager documentation would suggest''. 

This led to a tour in Europe in 1965 with a package known as the annual American Folk Blues Festival. Ross went down so well it led to a number of additional albums and further tours in 1972 and 1974. During his first European tour he became known as The Flying Eagle because he acknowledged applause by spreading his arms out and doing a little bird-like dance. Ross worked the Ann Arbor Blues Festival in 1970 and made a few appearances at venues nearer home in his vacation time, all the while singing on at GM. He became a regular in Europe, appearing for instance at a festival in Berlin in 1980. Fred Reif managed Ross for many years and said, ''He really seemed to love that job at GM, and they would occasionally let him off work to do tours''. In 1981 Ross gained some national acclaim for his contribution of a song, ''Good Morning Little School Girl'', to the Takoma album Rare Blues produced by Norman Dayton, which won a Grammy award for Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording of the year. As late as 1990 Ross appeared at the Toledo Rhythm and Blues Festival in Ohio, and he toured England in the spring of 1991.
Interviewers and promoters reported mixed experiences when working with the Doctor. While he was  appreciative of the efforts people made to promote and help him, he apparently became convinced that  everyone from Sam Phillips on down had made money of him, he said in those later interviews that Phillips  had ''made millions on my music and he put to all on Elvis'', and that he should have seen more money that  he did for covers of his songs by Cream and others (though often they really weren't his originals). One  promoter said, ''he was a nice guy but a strange guy, a bit of a space cadet, but a great musician.

He just  seemed somewhat disconnected from reality, a bit living in his own world. I found it hard to get him to take  care of business. Once he backed out at the last minute, with the lame excuse that some no-account relative  had stolen his passport''.
 
This is a contrast with the Ross of 1965 who, when he first came to London, was  found by Blues Unlimited's interviewer Mike Leadbitter, to be ''a charming and pretty modest fellow who  doesn't boast or exaggerate'', and who says of Sam Phillips, ''we got our money, just the same'' whether he  was making sessions for Chess or Sun.

Promoter David J. Boyd met Ross in 1968 when he persuaded him to play at a free political concert in a  park. He then booked Ross into local clubs and found gigs for him on and off for 25 years. He said, ''We  would often go through Doc's mail - Ross was mostly illiterate - and I'd help explain contract offers and the  like''. Boyd describes the day when Eric Clapton, ''sent Doc a telegram offering to send a limo to take him to  a Clapton concert at the Pine Knob Music Theater. I advised he should go and said I would go with him, but,  Doc;s answer was 'No, he never gave me a dime from ''Cat Squirel'' and, besides, the Detroit Tigers are on  TV and Jack Morris is pitching'. And that was that''. In other versions of this story, people have related how  Ross described Clapton Turning up at Ross's house, being told to ''fuck off'', and chased away with a pistol.  Fred Reif had a similar baseball story. ''Ross was an avid Detroit Tigers fan. I had booked him for a few gigs  in Italy one time and I get a call from the promoter there, on the day he was supposed to arrive. No Dr. Ross.  So I gave him a call and he answers the phone. I was very upset because he missed his flight. He said he  couldn't find his passport. I told him I would make the 30 mile trip down to Flint (from Saginaw) and help  him in finding it. I get down there and he is watching a Tiger ballgame on the television. I asked him where I  should start looking. He said to go into his spare room, where it was filled with all kinds of stuff and  basically all shoved to the middle of the room. There it was - his passport, just laying there in the middle of  the floor. I told him he had to get on the next flight tomorrow, which he did, although he didn't really want to  go. He would have wanted to stay home and watch more of the Tigers on television''.

Boyd says he was always being put off when he had a booking planned for Ross, who refused to give up his  day job. ''He did plan to retire in August 1993 after 37 years in the Chevrolet shop at GM. So we were just  waiting for the word, for him to say, 'Yeah, OK music is what I want to do. I'm out of the shop'. But he  always found excuses. I think it was a good part of his life. It was a social life. One year before it was I don't  know. President Bush may get re-elected and then I don't know what to do. The year before that, it was 'The  war in the middle east. I can't quit yet', as though the boys ain't gonna make it and the planes won't fly if he's  not at work'? Dan Rose got to know Ross in his later years when Ross was living on Welch Boulevard in  Flint. Rose made plans for Ross to act and perform in a feature-length fictional movie, Wayne County  Rambling, and found Ross to be, ''exceedingly nice, and looking forward to our shooting. We had trouble  raising funds, and decided to put on a fundraiser in NYC and he was going to perform at it. He was very  excited to be coming to NY''. Sadly, Ross never made it to New York. He died of a heart attack a couple of  weeks before the fundraiser. According to Rose, Isaiah Ross ''died at work at General Motors Truck & Bus in  Flint, Michigan. We were all real said. We ended up making the fund raising night a very splendid tribute  night to him''.

Isaiah Ross died in Flint on May 28, 1993. He was survived by seven children from his three marriages (and  three divorces) and 20 grandchildren. Ross's funeral was attended by 200 people, and family friend Robert  Williams told the Flint Journal: ''He was a loner who rarely visited or called anyone. I used to take his dinner  to him daily to make sure he was eating. He'd stay at home, he'd go to work and work all day. Then he'd  come home and watch his black and white television set... watch the Tigers. He would practice music by  himself - wouldn't let anyone in the house. He wasn't selfish, he'd help you with his heart. He was close to  his family. He didn't care about money and never spent any on himself. He wouldn't buy a color television  and drove a 1979 Buick''. A few years after Ross's death one of his sons sold a pile of Ross's memorabilia at a  flea market in Detroit, including Ross's contract with Sun Records that now resides in the Rock And Roll  Hall of Fame in Cleveland.

One of the finest tributes to Ross's life in music is the Scholarship Fund at Mott College in Flint. David J.  Boyd helped organise the Fund in 1994. He still promoters a DVD of Ross's last concert at Flint Public  Library, produced and directed by Steve Hester on January 10, 1993, and the proceeds go toward funding the  Scholarship. Boyd said, ''Doc was world famous, however he was virtually unknown in his own home town.  I thought a music scholarship in his name would keep his name alive and help other people learn about music  that he loved so much''. Steve Hester said, ''Doc was a great musician and loved to show the kids in the  audience all his harmonicas and how he played so many instruments at once. My sons will never forget Doc  for this and his efforts certainly brought an interest in the blues to their young ears''.

Reflecting on his own career, in the festival years after his rediscovery, Isaiah Ross once told Barry Lee  Pearson, ''I sing just the way I feel, and a lot of things I'm singing done happened to different ones of my  friends, and some of it have happened to me. It makes me feel like a millionaire to play, to present my style.  So I'm proud and happy by it. I feel good''. Ross told a local newspaper in 1971: ''I'm just looking for the  good things. I knew I was great all the time, but I had nobody to back me... I love the college audiences... All  you need is that good old soul beat, and no electric. (Modern electric guitarists) it's like two preachers: one  may have lots more education than the other, but maybe the other one has the call''. The Doctor had the call,  and many were the people who called the Doctor down the years.
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©