CONTAINS 1967 SESSIONS

Studio Session for The Smoke Ring, Unknown Date 1967 / Gold Dust Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, 1967 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Larry Brinkley, October 30, 1967 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Rockin' Rebellions, November 1967 / Gold Dust Records
Studio Session for Load Of Mischief, Late 1967 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Feathers, Unknown Dates 1967/1969 / Select-O-Hits

Biography of Artists (See: The Sun Biographies)


1967

The continued presence of American troops increased further and a total of 475,000 were serving in Vietnam and the peace rallies were multiplying as the number of protesters against the war increased. The Boxer Muhammad Ali was stripped of his boxing world championship for refusing to be inducted into the US Army. In the middle east Israel also went to war with Syria, Egypt and Jordan in the six day war and when it was over Israel controlled and occupied a lot more territory than before the war. Once again in the summer cities throughout America exploded in rioting and looting the worst being in Detroit on July 23, 1967 where 7000 national Guard were bought in to restore law and order on the streets. In England a new type of model became a fashion sensation by the name of Twiggy and mini skirts continued to get shorter and even more popular with a short lived fashion being paper clothing. Also during this year new Discotheques and singles bars appeared across cities around the world and the Beatles continued to reign supreme with the release of "Sgt. Peppers Lonely Heart Club Band" album, and this year was also coined the summer of love when young teenagers got friendly and smoked pot and grooved to the music of "The Grateful Dead. Jefferson Airplane and The Byrds". The movie industry moved with the times and produced movies that would appeal to this younger audience including "The Graduate" Bonnie and Clyde" and "Cool Hand Luke" . TV shows included "The Fugitive" and "The Monkees" and color television sets become popular as the price comes down and more programmes are made in color.

1967

Aaron Neville's ''Tell It Like It Is'' goes to number 1 on the Billboard rhythm and blues chart.

Birth of Tim McGraw in Delhi, Louisiana.

The late sixties was a period of immense social, cultural, and political upheaval. A new generation, born around the time of World War II, had come into its own and, suddenly, it seemed as if the world was turning upside down. People were living in communes and hippie pads. They were gathering together for huge outdoor events called ''be-ins'' and ''love-ins''. They were marching in the streets to protest the war in Vietnam or to call for more civil rights. They had long hair and were wearing bell-bottoms, fringed vests, and granny glasses - when they were wearing anything at all. They were talking about ''flower power'' and ''free love'', and reading the work of such free-thinking writers as Allen Ginsberg, Ken Kesey, and Timothy Leary. And they were experimenting with LSD and marijuana. Rock and roll reflected these changes and helped influence them. Thanks to artists like Bob Dylan and the Beatles, rock and roll was being taken seriously, and scores of new groups were forming in San Francisco, London, Los Angeles, and New York. The Doors, Cream, Jimi Hendrix, Big Brother and the Holding Company (featuring Janis Joplin), the Grateful Dead, Pink Floyd, and the Velvet Underground all released their debut albums in 1967, the year the media dubbed the ''Summer of Love''. And there were other developments, like free-form radio and the underground press, that helped shape rock and roll into the music and social force that we now know.


1967

By 1967 an entirely new kind of music had come to dominate the nation; among its many  strains was a new brande of Memphis music, descended from the black gospel music that  Sam Phillips had always meant to record. Many of the musicians who congregated daily at  Stax, Hi, American, Sonic, or Sounds of Memphis had passed through Sun on their way; some  of the new studio bosses, such as Stan Kesler, Roland Janes, Quinton Claunch, and Ray  Harris, had started their careers at Sun. Even a few of the hit records of the day, like Sam  The Sham's ''Woolly Bully'', were cut at the Sun studio; but the Sun label itself was firmly  consigned to the past.

The Sun catalog sat in abeyance for a year. Since the mid-1960s Phillips had received offers  for the label, most persistently from CNS/Columbia, which was anxious to get the Cash  masters out of circulation. Phillips had considered a deal with Mercury Records in 1962, in  which Sun would act as a production company for Mercury. The founder and president of  Mercury, Irving Green, came to see Phillips, and new releases were suspended for a few  months, but the negotiations fell through. Jerry Wexler at Atlantic Records pursued a similar  deal to the one that brought Stax into the Atlantic fold, but again, nothing was finalized.

After Sun ceased releasing new product, Sam Phillips started considering offers for the  catalog. Jud Phillips, acting in his role as Jerry Lee Lewis;s business manager, approached  his brother with the idea of purchasing all of the Lewis masters after Lewis revived his  career in the country market, but Sam refused to commit just one portion of the catalog.

The period from 1967 to 1971 was the heyday of the rock festival - giant, outdoor concerts where the communal vibe and ambiance was as important as the music. It was the Age of Aquarius, and more than three million people attended some 300 festivals, events at which scores of bands played while the audience camped out overnight. Rock and roll had virtually become a religion, and festivals were its high mass.

The first Rolling Stone Magazine is published.

JANUARY 1, 1967 SUNDAY

Moon Mullican dies from a heart attack at his home in Beaumont, Texas. The Grand Ole Opry member and King of the Hillbilly Piano Players mixed boogie numbers and ballads for hits from 1947-1951, including ''Mona Lisa'' and ''Cherokee Boogie''.

The Four Guys move from West Virginia to Nashville. Three months later, they join the Grand Ole Opry.

Buck Owens rides the Monterey Park float in the Parade of Roses in Pasadena, California, replacing Sonny and Cher, who were bounced after appearing in a public demonstration. The pop duo still appears, on a Farmers insurance Group float.

Elvis Presley's new contract with manager Colonel Tom Parker takes effect. Parker receives a 50% commission on any income above guarantees.

Charlie Monroe's wife, Betty, dies of cancer.

Yodeller Kenny Roberts has a daughter, his eighth child.

JANUARY 3, 1967 TUESDAY

Connie Smith recorded ''I'll Come Runnin''' at day's and at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

JANUARY 7, 1967 SATURDAY

Charley Pride becomes the first African-American solo singer to perform on the Grand Ole Opry, following an introduction from Ernest Tubb. Pride sings ''The Snakes Crawl At Night'' and ''I Can't Help It (If I'm Still In Love With You)''.

Neil Diamond makes a return appearance on ABC's Dick Clark-hosted ''American bandstand'', performing ''Solitary Man'', a future country hit for T.G. Sheppard.

JANUARY 9, 1966 MONDAY

Rock artist Dave Matthews is born in Johannesburg, South Africa. The namesake of The Dave Matthews Band, he joins Willie Nelson as a Farm Aid board member. He also duets with Kenny Chesney on the 2009 country hit ''I'm Alive''.

Decca Records released Bill Anderson's ''Get While The Gettin's Good''.

Capitol released Jean Shepard's ''Heart, We Did All That We Could''.

JANUARY 10, 1967 TUESDAY

Singer Kelly Lang is born in Oklahoma City. The daughter of Conway Twitty's road manager, she marries T.G. Shappard seven months after her 40th birthday.

JANUARY 11, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Waylon Jennings' second wife, Lynne, files for divorce, charging him with ''excesses, outrages and cruelty''.

Johnny Cash and June Carter recorded the classic ''Jackson'' at the Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''Roarin' Again''.

JANUARY 15, 1967 SUNDAY

The very first NFL versus AFL championship football game, also known as the Super Bowl, takes place on January 15, 1967. The game is played between the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs. The Green Bay Packers win the game with a score of 35 to 10. Bart Starr, who was the Packers’ quarterback, is chosen as the Most Valuable Player (MVP) of the game. An estimated 60 million people watched the game on TV.

Mick Jagger's hand is cut when a woman tries to get a lock of his hair with a pair of scissors, as The Rolling Stones enter a New York studio for ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The Stones 1969 release ''Honky Tonk Women'' ranks among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.

The Roy Orbison movie ''The Fastest Guitar Alive'' premieres in New York City.  A musical western, the story is set near the end of the American Civil war with Orbison portraying a Southern spy with a bullet-shooting guitar given the task of robbing gold bullion from the United States Mint in San Francisco in order to help finance the Confederacy's war effort. The film features Orbison performing seven original songs which appeared on his 1967 MGM record album of the same name. His song "There Won't Be Many Coming Home" is featured in the 2015 western film''The Hateful Eight''. ''The Fastest Guitar Alive'' is the soundtrack title for the 3313 record album from MGM Records released in June 1967. Its single "There Won't be Many Coming Home" reached number 18 in the UK and entered the Australian chart at its highest position of number 32 before slipping down the chart. The track, "Rollin' On", was covered on the 33rpm record album ''Famous Western Film Melodies'' by the Prague Radio Dance Orchestra.

JANUARY 16, 1967 MONDAY

Decca Records released The Wilburn Brothers' album ''Two For The Show''.

JANUARY 17, 1967 TUESDAY

Glen Campbell recorded ''Just To Satisfy You'' at the Capitol Recording Studio at Hollywood and Vine in Los Angeles. It becomes a hit for Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson 15 years later.

JANUARY 18, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Loretta Lynn recorded ''If You're Not Gone Too Long'' at Bradley's Barn in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee.

JANUARY 19, 1967 THURSDAY

Bass player Dennis Crouch, of The Nashville Bluegrass Band, is born in Strawberry, Arkansas. He plays on the soundtracks of ''Cold Mountain'' and ''Crazy Heart'', plus the Alison Krauss and Robert Plant album ''Raising Sand''.

JANUARY 20, 1967 FRIDAY

Gene Autry's Golden West Broadcasters purchases the KTLA-TV studio on Hollywood's Sunset Strip for $5 million from Paramount, which had been leasing the property to Golden West.

JANUARY 21, 1966 SATURDAY

''Green Acres'' star Eddie Albert is a guest on the Grand Ole Opry, performing Eddy Arnold's ''Make The World Go Away'' on the stage of Nashville's Ryman Auditorium.

JANUARY 23, 1967 MONDAY

Decca Records released Warner Mack's ''Drifting Apart''.

Columbia Records released Stonewall Jackson's ''Stamp Out Loneliness''.

Capitol released Wynn Stewart's ''It's Such A Pretty World Today''.

JANUARY 25, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Charley Pride recorded ''I Know One''.

JANUARY 26, 1967 THURSDAY

Ferlin Husky recorded ''You Pushed Me Too Far''.

JANUARY 27, 1967 FRIDAY

Sixty nations, including the U.S. and U.S.S.R., sign a treaty banning nuclear weapons in space.

Waylon Jennings makes his first appearance on the Grand Ole Opry.

JANUARY 28, 1967 SATURDAY

The Monkees are featured on the cover of TV Guide. Their recording of ''Last Train To Clarksdale'' will be ranked among country's 500 all-time greatest singles in the 2003 Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.

JANUARY 30, 1967 MONDAY

Two months after his older brother was drafted, Jan Howard's second son, Corky Howard, voluntarily joins the military to serve in Vietnam.

Capitol Records released Sonny James' ''Need You''.


1967

The first Smoke Ring sessions were cut at Phillips Recording Studio at Madison Avenue, in Memphis, and  engineered by Knox Phillips, son of Sam Phillips. These sessions also brought together Smoke Ring guitarist  Jim Casey, and Sam's youngest son, Jerry Phillips. Jerry, a guitarist and songwriter, was a member of the  legendary band, The Jesters, whose hit, Cadillac Man, was the last release on Sun Records, and is still a cult  favorite in the Unites States and Europe. Jerry is a double treat on both guitar and piano.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE SMOKING RING
FOR GOLD DUST RECORDS 1967

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
GOLD DUST SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1967
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - LEO REYNOLDS, BOBBY WOOD
AND/OF KNOX PHILLIPS

01 - ''NO NOT MUCH'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 3:03
Composer: - R. Allen-A. Stilmann
Publisher: - Beaver Music
Matrix number: - 126
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967
Released: - 1968
First appearance: - Gold Dust (S) 45rpm Gold Dust 317-A mono
NO NOT MUCH / WHEN MARTY THROWS A PARTY
Reissued: - 1969 Buddah Records (S) 45rpm BDA 77-A mono
NO NOT MUCH / WHEN MART THROWS A PARTY

02 - ''WHEN MARTY THROWS A PARTY'' - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - M. Addington-M. Reynolds
Publisher: - Gotta Music
Matrix number: - 127
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967
Released: - 1968
First appearance: - Gold Dust (S) 45rpm Gold Dust 317-B mono
WHEN MARTY THROWS A PARTY / NO NOT MUCH
Reissued: - 1969 Buddah Records (S) 45rpm BDA 77-B mono
WHEN MART THROWS A PARTY / NO NOT MUCH

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Little Joe Hupp - Vocals, Keyboards
Chuck Asmus - Vocals, Drums
Nick Hupp - Bass
Roger Volk - Drums
Bob Hupp - Guitar
Jim Casey - Saxophone, Guitar, Trombone
Dave Dohren - Trumpet
John Schrad - Saxophone
Probably - Jerry Phillips

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


From left: Joe Hupp, Chuck Asmus, Nick Hupp, Roger Volk, Bob Hupp, Jim Casey, Dave Dohren, John  Schrad. >

THE SMOKING RING - was a rock band from Norfolk, Nebraska active in the 1960s. It was formed from  two previous regionally popular rock and roll groups, Little Joe & the Ramrods and The Strollers. They had  strong regional success but charted only one national hit, 1969's "No, Not Much".  First as, Little Joe and The Ramrods consisting of "Little Joe" Hupp, guitar and piano, founded this group in  the early 1960s, and had some success playing throughout the midwestern United States. 

They recorded a  single in Oklahoma, "B.B. Limbo" b/w "Yogi Twist", released on Soma Records; a second recording session,  in Minneapolis, yielded "Somebody Touched Me", "Hurtin' Inside", "Oop Poo Pa Doo", and "We Belong  Together". The Ramrods split up over a disagreement, at which time discussions with members of The  Strollers picked up.

The Strollers had originally formed in 1959 and played mostly local events into the early 1960s. Among its  members were Little Joe's brother, Bob Hupp. In 1965 the group lost its drummer and decided to merge with  Little Joe & the Ramrods into one group, which they would rename The Smoke Ring in 1965.

Their first national release was the single "That Girl Was My Girl" on Mala Records in 1966. Starting in  1967, they expanded their lineup to include more brass instruments, and regularly toured the Midwest,  opening for Dickie Lee, Rufus Thomas, The Shangri-Las, Bobby Vee, and The Everly Brothers. Soon after  meeting Thomas and Lee, they booked time at Sun Studios at Madison Avenue and recorded the single "No,  Not Much", a cover of a 1950's hit by The Four Lads. The local disc, released on Goldust Records, was  picked up for national distribution by Buddah Records, and the tune saw nationwide success, becoming a hit  in several major metropolitan areas in the U.S. and climbing to number 85 on the Billboard Hot 100 early in  1969. A second single on Buddah, "Portrait Of My Love", missed the charts, and a full-length that had been  recorded was shelved; it has yet to see release. The group appeared on American Bandstand in 1969  following the single's success.

Later in 1969, Certron Records released their single "High On A Rainbow" b/w "First Reaction", which also  did not chart but was a regional success. During this time, the group's wardrobe consisted of tuxedos fitted  with bell bottom trousers. They disbanded in 1972; that same year, Little Joe Hupp released a locally,  produced full-length, Heavy Metal Whale, under the name The Smoke Ring, which did not feature any of the  band's previous members. Some of the members (including lead vocalist Tommy Shaw) continued under the  name MSFunk in 1973, basing themselves out of Chicago.

The group was inducted into the Nebraska Music Hall of Fame in 1995, and has occasionally reunited for  regional concerts since then. The Group still plays in concerts, several times at the Divots Concert series as  opening acts to Chicago and others (2008) Played at Nebraska Rocks (2009) (2010) - still based in Norfolk  Nebraska with many of the same members. The Band, who Joe Hupp had released "Heavy Metal Whale",  featured Garth Fundis (original member) as the recording engineer on the 45, who also played rhythm guitar  and tambourine on the recording. This song "Heavy Metal Whale" was recorded in Nashville. All of the  following union members: featured Ralph "Ralphie" Goldheim on vocals, organ, piano. Scotty Hastings on  vocals, drums and flute. Mike Mckern on vocals, drums and steel drum. Joe Lalich "Jody Ray" on vocals and  bass. Mike Smith on vocals and guitar.

Smoke Ring guitarist Keith Goins put together the last version of The Smoke Ring in September 1971. At  that time, all he had left was drummer Danny Keller, so he nearly had to start from scratch. Lindy Gallaher  (bass player from "Isaac" in Kansas) was the first to arrive, along with Colin Keefe (trumpet and lead vocals)  and Mike Ragatz (trombone) from another regionally-based horn band, "The Chancellors". Lindy suggested  two other members from "Isaac" Robert Orr (keyboards and trombone) and Larry Stewart (trumpet, sax, and  flute). The new players moved into Kings Ballroom (owned by band manager Joe Hupp) and put an entire  show together in three days. Six months later, the band moved to Memphis, soon hired Tommy Shaw, and  not long after that changed their name to MSFunk. MSFunk members later became members of Toto, The  Ides of March, Styx, Damn Yankees, Le Roux, and Shaw Blades.


1967

Jerry's elder brother, Knox, is now virtually in charge of everything that Sun is involved in.


1967

Ray Smith decided to move his family to Burlington, Ontario to play the club circuit in  southeastern Canada. He was disillusioned with recording and found Ontario a better base  for touring in the northern part of the USA. He said that it gave him better media exposure  too: ''I had TV shows all over Canada, on Channel 9, Toronto, Channel 11 Hamilton, and  Ottawa Channel 12''.

His music was now moving back towards country. He recorded into the 1970s on another  string of labels, from Caravan to Corona, and on to Zirkon and Celebrity Circle.

In 1972 he  had a small hit on Nashville's hot label, Cinnamon, but it was then that his long association  with Charlie Terrell ended. According to Terrell: ''Ray was making good money, playing good  clubs and venues, and he was driving Cadillacs - but his biggest fault was that he didn't want  to get out and do any promotional work''.

''I continued to manage him even after he moved home to Canada but I was unable to get  him to follow up on the good opportunities we had. I was busy with other things and couldn't  chase him all round the country, and we just had to drop out of that arrangement. Ray was  always a drinker - but it got more and more as time went on''. Ray's step brother, Don  Hindman, said: ''Ray had talent, but he just wouldn't leave the booze alone''.

Ray Smith ended his recording career several years later on small Canadian labels like Wix  and Boot. By then, he was recording for the rock and roll revival market and combining his  own songs with interpretations of songs by Presley, Lewis, and the other big leaguers.  Originally a rhythm guitarist on stage, Ray had always played piano too, though not on  records, and he now started to make the piano more of a feature in his act. Reviewing an  album on Wix, writer Bill Millar found: ''Smith pounds the piano with a ferociousness fit to  upset the Richter Scale, and his under-developed sense of accuracy – on a par with Esquerita  – simply adds to the fun''.

In 1978 and 1979, Smith toured the revival scene in England and other counties in Europe. It  was to mixed reviews. In London, too much beer consumed before a show found Bill Millar  among an audience suffering ''fluffed words, unexpected screams and general ineptness...  he tried to kick the piano stool and missed... a unique theatrical experience''. Yet other  shows from the period were a resounding success and, on his more sober days, it was still  easy in the late 1970s to see through the years and back to the real Ray Smith – the man  who had so impressed Charlie Terrell and Sam and Jud Phillips. The man with one of the best  and most adept voices in popular music, the man with the ability to sell a song both on  record and on stage, the showman who was at home with the piano or the guitar, and with  the music of the million dollar quartet or the ratpack. The man with the a line in witty or  sarcastic quips, and with a desire to succeed.


Success in Ray Smith's personal life came and went the same way it did in his career. On  November 29, 1979, he went to visit his estranged wife, Lillie, apparently to talk about him  coming back home. The conversation didn't go well. According to Charlie Terrell: ''After he  was in Canada, Ray was poping pills as well as drinking. He committed suicide after he came  back from a tour. He'd been on prozac from a doctor, and he had these personal problems.  He'd been messing around with a secretary near Hamilton, Ontario and he came off tour to  see his wife to get her back. She took him back many times before, but this time she  wouldn't do it. He was depressed – he couldn't stand and any kind of rejection. He took a gun  from the drawer and shot himself. Their son was right there in the house''. Terrel was one of  the pallbearers at Ray Smith's funeral on December 2, 1979. The Phillips brothers, Sam and  Judd, survived Ray Smith by over one and two decades respectively. Jud Phillips died on  July 20, 1992 in Memphis, from throat cancer. He had continued in some aspects of artist  promotion for many years after giving up Judd Records as well as running a number of other  business including a bottling plant in his home town of Florence, Alabama. Sam Phillips died  in July 2003 in Memphis. Bill Lowery died in Atlanta in 2004.

The last link to Ray Smith and the Rock And Roll boys manager Charlie Terrell, and the last  active member was Stanley Walker, whose band still advertised in the Paducah Sun in 2006,  playing local fairs and old peoples tea dances. Not a fate that Ray Smith would have aspired  to, and not one the highly talented, highly strung, and intermittently focused singer was  ever likely to have achieved.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF
FOR SUN RECORDS 1967

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1967
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – PROBABLY KNOX PHILLIPS

''Breaking New Ground'', If you don't listen closely you're going to miss a really clever song. It's about a hard working man and an unappreciative wife. He's had it. The lyric celebrates ''Breaking New Ground'', not out there on the lower 40, but in s new world of wine, women and song. Very little sentiment here – just a determined man who's had it with the status quo.

''Yesterday's Gone'', this one's about a bunch of losers who hand around talking about the good old days when everything seemed so right. Forget it, says the singer. You can't bring back yesterday.

The title poses an interesting dilemma. This song bears the same title as Chad and Jeremy's hit from 1964, although the similarity ends there. Had Mack opened for a title change, he might have borrowed a phrase from his first line, but that would have gotten him to ''Down At The Boondocks'', close enough to ''Down In The Boondocks'', a 1965 hit by Billy Joe Royal. Again, no similarity other than the title, but you can see how impressionable Mack could become when he put on his songwriter's hat.

01 – ''BREAKING NEW GROUND'' – B.M.I. - 1:46
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-28 mono
MACK SELF – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''FOLSOM PRISON BLUES'' – B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Johnny R. Cash-Gordon Jenkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-25 mono
MACK SELF – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 – ''YESTERDAY'S GONE'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self – Vocal & Guitar
More Details Unknown
Unknown Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


FEBRUARY 1967

The singles, Sun 404 ''No You For Me'' b/w ''Breakin' Up Again'' by The Climates and Sun 406 ''I'm Gonna Move In The Room With The Lord'' b/w ''I'm Tired, My Soul Needs Resting'' by Brother James Anderson issued.

''Country Girl'' b/w ''Muddy Ole River (Near Memphis Tennessee)'' by Dane Stinit are released as Sun 405, the last country music to appear on the Sun label.

FEBRUARY 1, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Claude Gray recorded ''How Fast Them Trucks Can Do''.

Burl Ives guests on ''The Danny Kaye Show'' on CBS-TV.

FEBRUARY 2, 1967 THURSDAY

Decca Records released the album ''Wilma Burgess Sings Misty Blue''.

FEBRUARY 6, 1967 MONDAY

Singer and songwriter/guitarist Anita Cochran is born in Pontiac, Michigan. She attains a hit in 1997 when Steve Wariner joins her for ''What If I Sad''.

Columbia Records released Johnny Cash and June Carter's ''Jackson''. The song is written in 1963 by Billy Edd Wheeler and Jerry Leiber and first recorded by Wheeler. It is best known from two 1967 releases: a pop hit single by Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood, which reached number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and a country hit single by Johnny Cash and June Carter, which reached number two on the Billboard Country Singles chart and has become more appreciated by non-country audiences in recent years as a result of Cash's continued popularity and its use in the 2011 film ''The Help''. The song is about a married couple who find (according to the lyrics) that the "fire" has gone out of their relationship. The song relates the desire of both partners to travel to Jackson where they each expect to be welcomed as someone far better suited to the city's lively night life than the other is.

FEBRUARY 7, 1967 TUESDAY

Nashville saxophone player Boots Randolph picks up a gold album for ''Yakety Sax''. Randolph's take on the piece was inspired by a sax solo in the Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller song ''Yakety Yak', recorded in 1958 by The Coasters. The tunes are similar, and both feature the "yakety sax" sound. Randolph first recorded "Yakety Sax" that year for RCA Victor, but it did not become a hit till he re-recorded it for Monument Records in 1963; this version reached number 35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

FEBRUARY 8, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley puts down $5,000 toward the purchase of a $437,000 a 163-acre ranch in Walls, Mississippi, minutes across the Tennessee state line from Graceland. He and his entourage and their wives had become interested in horseback riding after Elvis purchased a horse for Priscilla as a gift. The hobby had outgrown the pasture at Graceland. Over the months to come, Elvis and the gang will enjoy spending a lot of time at the Circle G. It becomes a happy diversion for Elvis as his frustration and unhappiness over the state of his career reaches its height.

FEBRUARY 9, 1967 THURSDAY

''Hurry Sundown'' directed by Otto Preminger, debuts in movie houses. The film stars Michael Caine and Jane Fonda, with a brief appearance by 14-year-old Steve Sanders, destined for membership in The Oak Ridge Boys.

FEBRUARY 11, 1967 SATURDAY

The Four Guys make their Grand Ole Opry debut.

The Monkees announce they intend to play on their own records, cutting Glen Campbell list of clients as a studio musician.

Warner Mack recorded ''How Long Will It Take''

Loretta Lynn makes her first appearance at number 1 in Billboard with ''Don't Come Home A'Drinkin' (With Lovin' On Your Mind)''.

FEBRUARY 12, 1967 SUNDAY

English authorities raid Keith Richard's Sussex home. He and his Rolling Stone compadre, Mick Jagger, receive drug charges at a later date. The duo is credited for co-writing 1969's country song ''Honky Tonk Women''.

FEBRUARY 13, 1967 MONDAY

Decca Records released Loretta Lynn's album ''Don't Come Home A'Drinkin'''. 

The Grand Ole Opry visits Reno. Roy Acuff heads a group of Opry members who make a stand at Harrah's through March.

Capitol Records released Tex Ritter's ''Just Beyond The Moon'', the Country Music Hall of Famer's last Top 15 hit.

FEBRUARY 14, 1967 TUESDAY

Eddy Arnold attends a White House dinner in Washington, D.C., at the request of the president's daughter, Lynda Bird Johnson. Arnold barely makes it in time after getting stuck in an elevator.

Waylon Jennings recorded the Mel Tillis-written ''Mental Revenge'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B during an evening session.

FEBRUARY 15, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Jack Greene recorded the Mel Tillis-penned ''All The Time''.

Eddy Arnold has a return engagement as a guest on the CBS series ''The Danny Kaye Show''.

FEBRUARY 16, 1967 THURSDAY

Roger Miller recorded ''Walkin' In The Sunshine'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

FEBRUARY 17, 1967 FRIDAY

Western actor Smiley Burnette dies of leukemia in Encino, California. He served as Gene Autry's sidekick in a wave of movies in the 1930s and 1940s.

Loew's announces it's purchased the lease on the Mark Hopkins Hotel in San Francisco from Gene Autry.

FEBRUARY 18, 1967 SATURDAY

Teen-aged Steve Sanders makes a guest appearance on CBS-TV's ''Gunsmoke''. As an adult, he spends eight years as a member of The Oak Ridge Boys.

Billboard reports Roy Acuff has sold Dunbar Cave, a music resort in Montgomery County, Tennessee, for more than $200,000.

FEBRUARY 19, 1967 SUNDAY

Dallas Frazier writes the George Jones hit ''If My Heart Had Windows'', later remade by Patty Loveless.

Burl Ives guests on ''The Andy Williams Show'' on NBC-TV.

FEBRUARY 20, 1967 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Merle Haggard's ''I Threw Away The Rose''.

FEBRUARY 24, 1967 FRIDAY

The Bee Gees sign their first management deal with Robert Stigwood in London. Within a year, they introduce their song ''Words'', destined to become a country hit for Susie Allanson in 1979.

FEBRUARY 25, 1967 SATURDAY

Connie Smith guests on the ABC-TV series ''The Lawrence Welk Show''.

FEBRUARY 26, 1967 SUNDAY

Dr. George Nichopolous treats Elvis Presley for the first time, for saddle sores, at his ranch near Walls, Mississippi. ''Dr. Nick'' becomes a central figure in the posthumous revelations about Presley's drug abuse.

FEBRUARY 27, 1967 MONDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford plays a country singer who's moving to California in an episode of CBS-TV's ''The Lucy Show''.

Columbia Records released Ray Price's ''Danny Boy''.

Decca released Bill Anderson's album ''Get While The Gettin's Good''.

FEBRUARY 28, 1967 TUESDAY

Stonewall Jackson recorded ''Promises And Hearts (Were Made To Break)''.


MARCH 1, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Johnny Cash and girlfriend June Carter recorded ''Long-Legged Guitar Pickin' Man'' at Columbia Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

MARCH 2, 1967 THURSDAY

''Almost Persuaded'' score three trophies during the ninth annual Grammy Awards. David Houston wins Best Country and Western Recording and Best Country and Western Performance, Male, while songwriters Billy Sherrill and Glenn Sutton take Best Country and Western Song,.

Jimmy Dean plays a murder suspect on NBC-TV's ''Daniel Boone''. He soon becomes a regular member of the cast which also includes Fess Parker and Ed Ames.

MARCH 3, 1967 FRIDAY

''I Honestly Love You'' songwriter Peter Allen marries Liza Minnelli.

MARCH 4, 1967 SATURDAY

Billboard reports Red Sovine has undergone cataract surgery at Vanderbilt Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee.

Merle Haggard goes to number 1 on the Billboard chart for the first time with ''The Fugitive''.

Capitol Records released Merle Haggard's album ''I'm A Lonesome Fugitive''.

MARCH 6, 1967 MONDAY

Elvis Presley begins work on the movie ''Clambake''.

Actor Nelson Eddy dies of a stroke in Miami Beach, Florida. He and co-star Jeanette MacDonald first recorded ''Indian Love Call'' and the title song for the 1936 movie ''Rose Marie''. Both songs became country hits for Slim Whitman in the 1950s.

Capitol Records released Ray Pennington's original version of ''I'm A Ramblin' Man''. The song finds its place as a hit for Waylon Jennings seven years later.

Merle Haggard, Billy Mize and Bob Morris each win twice in the second Academy of Country and Western Music awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. Haggard takes Top Male Vocalist and shares Top Vocal Group with Bonnie Owens.

Actress Connie Britton is born in Boston, Massachusetts. She portrays aging country singer Rayna James in the ABC-TV drama ''Nashville'' and performs on the Top 10 album ''The Music Of Nashville: Original Soundtrack Season 1 Volume 1''.

MARCH 7, 1967 TUESDAY

Nine years after notching his lone country hit, ''Splish Splash'', Bobby Darin and actress Sandra Dee are divorced.

MARCH 10, 1967 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley suffers a minor concussion when he slips in the bathroom. The accident causes delays in the filming of ''Clambake''.

MARCH 11, 1967 SATURDAY

Aretha Franklin's "I Never Loved a Man" (Atlantic #2386) reaches number one, remaining  there for seven weeks. In a kind of soul-waltz time, the record built up from a quiet but  dramatic opening organ figure into a hammering, screaming, but always firmly controlled  yell of delight, as a brilliantly organized band fed more and more to support the singer's  emotion. It was the first of Franklin's eighteen number one songs on the r & b charts, more  than any other artist between 1960 and 1985. Noteworthy commercial success combined  with impeccable artistry earned her the sobriquet, "Queen of Soul''.

Dyke and the Blazers' "Funky Broadway" (Original Sound #64) enters the r & b charts,   remaining there 27 weeks, peaking at number 11. The word "funk" didn't become part of the   legitimate radio jargon until the song had "bubbled under" for so long that disc jockeys were   forced to play it and say the word. Though nobody knows who coined the term, "funk" simply   was not a word used in polite society. "Funky Broadway," however, changed all that.

The CBS variety series ''The Jackie Gleason Show'' delivers a country episode with appearances by Roy Acuff and His Smokey Mountain Boys, The Collins Kids, Roy Clark, Homer and Jethro, Boots Randolph, Buck Owens and Sue Thompson.

Jimmy Dean appears alongside guest host Kate Smith on the ABC variety show ''The Hollywood Palace''.

MARCH 13, 1967 MONDAY

Decca Records released Patsy Cline's ''Greatest Hits''.

Capitol released Buck Owens' ''Sam's Place''.

MARCH 14, 1967 TUESDAY

The Statler Brothers recorded ''Ruthless''.

MARCH 15, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Roy Acuff begins a two-week tour of South Vietnam, performing for American troops. It's his second time to go on behalf of the USO (United Service Organizations).

MARCH 16, 1967 THURSDAY

Mandolin player Ronnie McCoury is born. He joins his father's group, The Del McCoury band, one of the leading acts in bluegrass music. They win numerous IBMA Entertainer of the Year honors and joins the Grand Ole Opry in 2003.

Actress Melissa Brennan is born in Eatontown, New Jersey. During her work on the soap opera ''Days Of Our Lives'', she meets fellow actor Scott Reeves and marries him. He eventually becomes a member of country duo Blue County.

Carl Smith recorded ''Deep water''.

MARCH 18, 1967 SATURDAY

TV guide gives the cover to comedian Jackie Gleason, five years after he earned a country hit as the songwriter of Jimmy Dean's ''To A Sleeping Beauty''.

MARCH 22, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Paramount released Elvis Presley's ''Easy Come, Easy Go''. The movie is a 1967 American musical film comedy starring Elvis Presley. Hal Wallis produced the film for Paramount Pictures, and it was his final movie for Elvis Presley. The film co-starred Dodie Marshall, Pat Harrington, Jr., Pat Priest, Elsa Lanchester and Frank McHugh. (It was McHugh's last feature film.) The movie reached number 50 on the Variety magazine national box office list in 1967. ''Easy Come, Easy Go'', Presley's twenty-third film, was released on March 22, a mere thirteen days before his twenty-fourth, ''Double Trouble''.

Paramount originally intended to make a movie called ''Easy Come Easy Go''starring Jan and Dean with director Barry Shear but it was cancelled when the stars and several crew were injured in a train crash.

Recording sessions took place on September 28 and 29, 1966, at Paramount Studio in Hollywood, California. After the relative freedom of the Nashville sessions in May that yielded ''How Great Thou Art''and other songs more to his taste, Presley was reportedly unhappy with the quality of the songs selected for the film, allegedly referring to the selections as "shit" during the recording session. It is often reported that Presley recorded "Leave My Woman Alone" for the film, but only an instrumental backing was ever recorded; Presley never recorded a vocal for the song. Seven selections were recorded for the film; the song "She's A Machine" was not used in the movie, but would be released on ''Elvis Sings Flaming Star'' the following year.

The remaining six appeared on an extended play single released to coincide with the March 1967 premiere of the film. It failed to chart on the Billboard Hot 100, and sold fewer than 30,000 units total. Given that the EP format was no longer a viable marketing medium, and the poor performance of ''Easy Come, Easy Go'', it was the final release of new material by Presley in the EP format.

MARCH 26, 1967 SUNDAY

Ralph Emery marries Joy Kott.

MARCH 29, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs appear on-screen on CBS-TV's ''The Beverly Hillbillies'', for the sixth time in their career. The duo also performs the sitcom's theme song, ''The Ballad Of Jed Clampett''.

MARCH 30, 1967 THURSDAY

Barbara Mandrell gets engaged to Navy pilot Ken Dudney.

Folk artist Paul Clayton commits suicide by pulling a heater into the bathtub apartment in New York City. Clayton was a co-writer of Billy Grammer's 1959 country hit ''Gotta Travel On''.

MARCH 31, 1967 FRIDAY

The original Country Music Hall of Fame holds an invitation-only ceremony a day before its public opening. Among the attendees, Eddy Arnold, Webb Pierce and Boudleaux and Felice Bryant.


APRIL 1, 1967 SATURDAY

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum opens in a barn-like structure on Music Row in Nashville. It remains at that location for 34 years, before moving downtown.

APRIL 3, 1967 MONDAY

Bobbie Gentry recorded ''Ode To Billie Joe'' at Los Angeles' Capitol Recording Studio.

Decca Records released The Wilburn Brothers' ''Roarin' Again''.

APRIL 4, 1967 TUESDAY

Martin Luther King, Jr. during a speech at the New York City Riverside Church spoke strongly against the U.S.'s role in the war, insisting that the U.S. was in Vietnam "to occupy it as an American colony". After his speech against the Vietnam War many supporters of Martin Luther King, Jr. including President Johnson, union leaders and powerful media publishers began to line up against him.

APRIL 5, 1967 WEDNESDAY

MGM released Elvis Presley's ''Double Trouble''. The movie is a 1967 American musical film and the comedic plot concerns an American singer who crosses paths with criminals in Europe. The movie was number 58 on the year end list of the top-grossing films of 1967. Elvis was paid $750,000 plus 40% of the profits.

Troy Gentry is born in Lexington, Kentucky. He joins Eddie Montgomery to form Montgomery Gentry, a rollicking, Southern rock-influenced act that wins the Country Music Association Vocal Duo of the Year honor in 2000.

Singer and songwriter Bill Nettles dies of a heart attack in Monroe, Louisiana. Allegedly the original composer of Jimmie Davis' ''Nobody's Darling But Mine'', he netted a hit with the 1949 single ''Hadacol Boogie''.

APRIL 6, 1967 THURSDAY

Nineteen artists bands together to recorded to recorded a tribute to Chet Atkins, titled ''Chet's Tune'', including Eddy Arnold, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Porter Wagoner, Norma Jean, Hank Snow, Hank Locklin, Dottie West and Skeeter Davis.

APRIL 7, 1967 FRIDAY

Tammy Wynette marries songwriter Don Chapel in Ringgold, Georgia.

APRIL 9, 1967 SUNDAY

Glen Campbell has a minor guest role on ABC's crime drama ''The F.B.I.''.

APRIL 10, 1967 MONDAY

Merle Haggard recorded ''Branded Man'' at the Capitol Recording Studio in Hollywood, with Glen Campbell among his sidemen.

Decca Records released Jack Greene's ''All The Time''.

APRIL 12, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Rolling Stones Keith Richards and Mick Jagger are punched by a customs official at the Le Bourget Airport in Paris. The two will co-write ''Honky Tonk Women'', deemed among country's 500 greatest singles in a Country Music Foundation publication.

''The Cool Ones'' opens in movie theaters. Starring Roddy McDowall, it includes a role for Glen Campbell as a pop singer.

Marty Robbins recorded ''Tonight Carmen''.

APRIL 13, 1967 THURSDAY

Charlie Daniels moves to Nashville, Tennessee.

APRIL 15, 1967 SATURDAY

Over 100,000 people march on the United Nations headquarters in New York City in protest of the Vietnam War.

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans appear on ABC's ''The Hollywood Palace'' with host Milton Berle and baseball stars Willie Mays and Maury Wills.

APRIL 17, 1967 MONDAY

Rock drummer Matt Chamberlain is born in San Pedro, California. Known for his work with The Wallflowers, Edie Brickkell and Melisa Etheridge, he also plays on country hits by Martina McBride, Sara Evans, Thomas Rhett and Keith Urban.

''Last Train To Clarksville'' is featured in ''The Monkees At The Movies'' an episode of NBC's ''The Monkees''. The song is ranked among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation's ''Heartaches By The Number''.

APRIL 20, 1967 THURSDAY

Loretta Lynn recorded ''What Kind Of Girl (Do You Think I Am?'' at Bradley's Barn in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee.

APRIL 21, 1967 FRIDAY

Tom T. Hall recorded his first charted single, ''I Washed My Face In The Morning Dew'', at Columbia's Nashville studio.

APRIL 22, 1967 SATURDAY

Heath Wright is born in Vian, Oklahoma. He becomes the lead singer for Ricochet, playing a major role in the 1990s hits ''Daddy's Money'', ''What Do I Know'' and ''He Left A Lot To Be Desired''.

The Four Guys join Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

APRIL 24, 1967 MONDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Turn The World Around'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

APRIL 26, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Monte Warden is born in Houston, Texas. The Austin-based singer makes his first album in the 1980s, eventually scoring a hit as a songwriter when George Strait recorded ''Desperately''.

APRIL 27, 1967 THURSDAY

Waylon Jennings recorded ''The Chokin' Kind'' during an afternoon session at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Principal filming ends for the Elvis Presley movie ''Clambake'' in Los Angeles, California.

APRIL 28, 1967 FRIDAY

Bill Anderson recorded ''No One's Gonna Hurt You Anymore'' and ''Wild Week-End''.

APRIL 29, 1967 SATURDAY

Singer Ronnie Van Zant is arrested in Jacksonville for disorderly conduct and released on $50 bond. His band, Lynyrd Skynyrd, earns one of the greatest country singles in history, according to a Country Music Foundation book, ''Sweet Home Alabama''.

Stonewall Jackson guests on the syndicated TV program ''The Porter Wagoner Show''.

Charley Pride makes his national TV debut on ABC's ''The Lawrence Welk Show''.

APRIL 30, 1967 SUNDAY

Freddy Weller makes his debut as a member of Paul Revere and The Raiders on CBS' ''The Ed Sullivan Show''.


MAY 1, 1967 MONDAY

Elvis Presley marries Priscilla Beaulieu at the Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada.  The wedding, arranged by Colonel Tom Parker to maximize publicity, featured very few guests and was over in only eight minutes. It was followed by a quick press conference and a $10,000 breakfast reception, attended by friends, family, and business associates from MGM, RCA, and the William Morris Agency.  The wedding caused rifts between Elvis and several of his closest friends who were not invited to the actual wedding ceremony. Red West, especially, was furious about the situation. He and his wife had been personally invited by Elvis to Las Vegas for the wedding, had dressed for the occasion, and at the last minute were told that they would not be present. For Red, who had been with Elvis since the beginning of his rise to fame and had given Elvis the role of best man at his own wedding, this was enough of an insult that he decided to quit his job working for Elvis. Many other friends of Elvis were also disappointed and held resentment towards him for many years to follow, although they mainly blamed Parker for their exclusion rather than Elvis himself.

Tim McGraw is born in Delhi, Louisiana. Married to Faith Hill in 1996, his ear for outstanding songs gains him multi-platinum albums and more than 20 years of hits, including ''Please Remember Me'', ''Back When'' and ''Live Like You Were Dying''.

Skeeter Davis recorded ''What Does It Take (To Keep A Man Like You Satisfied)''.

Decca Records released Loretta Lynn's ''If You're Not Gone Too Long''.

Columbia released Marty Robbins'''Tonight Carmen'', and Buck Owens' album ''Buck Owens And His Buckaroos in Japan!''.

MAY 6, 1967 SATURDAY

The Stoneman Family performs at the VFH Hall in Hillsville, Virginia. It amounts to a homecoming concert, just miles from Galax, where the family endured the Depression.

MAY 8, 1967 MONDAY

LaVerne Andrews dies of cancer in Los Angeles. With younger siblings Maxene and Patty, she was a part of The Andrews Sister, a World War II-era pop trio that dented the country charts during the 1940s in pairings with Bing Crosby and Ernest Tubb.

Two years after he first tackled the song, Wynn Stewart recorded the hit version of ''Cause I Have You''.

MAY 10, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Songwriter Barry Dean is born in Okmulgee, Oklahoma. He pens Little Big Town's ''Pontoon'', Martina McBride's ''God's Will'', Tim McGraw's ''Diamond Rings And Old Barstools'' and Jason Aldean's ''1994''.

MAY 13, 1967 SATURDAY

Merle Haggard makes his Grand Ole Opry debut at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

David Houston appears on ''The Porter Wagoner Show''.

MAY 14, 1967 SUNDAY

The Turtles sings ''Happy Together'' on CBS-TV's ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Nearly a dozen years later, the song becomes a country hit for T.G. Sheppard.

MAY 15, 1967 MONDAY

Mark Chesnutt's future wife, Tracie Motley, is born.

Two years after writing the future country hit ''I Feel Fine'', Paul McCartney meets Linda Eastman, destined to become Mrs. McCartney, at the London club Bag O' Nails, where both are attending a George Fame concert.

MAY 17, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Glen Campbell recorded ''Gently On My Mind'', written by John Hartford and arranged by Leon Russell, at the Capitol Recording Studio in Hollywood, California.

The Bob Dylan documentary ''Don't Look Back'' debuts at San Francisco's Presidio Theatre. Its off-stage moments include Dylan and Joan Baez harmonizing on two Hank Williams hits, ''Lost Highway'' and ''I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry''.

MAY 19, 1967 FRIDAY

Johnny Cash and his brother, Tommy Cash, get into a fistfight in front of their parents in the Nashville airport over Johnny's use of pills. Johnny draws blood when he lands a punch on Tommy's cheek.

Ralph Stanley holds his first recording session as a solo artist in Cincinnati, Ohio.

MAY 20, 1967 SATURDAY

While headed from Houston to southern Louisiana on tour, Ernest Tubb tells Jack Greene it's time he leaves the Troubadours to work on his solo career.

MAY 22, 1967 MONDAY

Columbia Records released Johnny Cash and June Carter's ''Long-Legged Guitar Pickin' Man'', and Sonny James' ''I'll Never Find Another You''.

Marty Robbins recorded ''Gardenias In Her Hair''.

Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser closes the Straits of Tiran to Israeli shipping. Israel declares any closure of the Straits of Tiran to Israeli shipping considered an act of war.

MAY 27, 1967 SATURDAY

Guests on TV's ''The Porter Wagoner Show'' are Waylon Jennings and Mel Tillis.

MAY 28, 1967 SUNDAY

Barbara Mandrell marries drummer Ken Dudney at the First Presbyterian Church in Oceanside, California.

MAY 29, 1967 MONDAY

Elvis Presley and Priscilla re-enact their wedding at Graceland Mansion in Memphis after some of Elvis' friends and relatives complain they weren't invited to the Las Vegas ceremony four weeks earlier.


JUNE 1, 1967 THURSDAY

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band is released in Britain.

''The Graduate'' starring Dustin Hoffman with music by Simon and Garfunkel, is released.

Stu Phillips joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Kingston Trio calls it quit. Group members Nick Reynolds, Bob Shane and John Stewart insist they remain friends but express frustration with their lot in life, ''The public won't let us sing anything but ''Tom Dooley'' and other standard folk tunes''.

JUNE 2, 1967 FRIDAY

Clarence ''Tom'' Ashley dies in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He played banjo and guitar as a solo singer and as a member of The Carolina Tar Heels, with his recording of ''The Coo-Coo Bird'' ranked among country's 500 greatest singles in a Country Music Foundation book, ''Heartaches By The Number''.

JUNE 3, 1967 SATURDAY

Kitty Wells and Johnny Wright are featured on the syndicated TV series ''The Porter Wagoner Show''.

JUNE 4, 1967 SUNDAY

Don Gibson marries Bobbi Patterson, whom he credits for steering him away from eight years of dependency on alcohol and pills, in Charlotte, North Carolina.

JUNE 5, 1967 MONDAY

John ''Lonzo'' Sullivan, of Lonzo and Oscar, dies of a heart attack while driving a tractor on his Tennessee farm. Sullivan was the second person to portray Lonzo in the Grand Ole Opry comedy duo, best known for its twisted routine ''I'm My Own Grandpa''.

Mandolin player Suzanne Cox is born in Springhill, Louisiana. The daughter of Willard Cox, she sings lead frequently for The Cox Family, a bluegrass-gospel quartet that appears on the multi-platinum soundtrack to ''O Brother, Where Art Thou''.

Decca Records released Warner Mack's ''How Long Will It Take''.

The Six-Day War begins when Israel launches simultaneous attacks against Egypt and Syria, Jordan also joined the fray, but the Arab coalition was no match for Israel's proficient armed forces. In six days of fighting, Israel occupied the Gaza Strip and the Sinai Peninsula of Egypt, the Golan Heights of Syria, and the West Bank and Arab sector of East Jerusalem, By the time the United Nations cease-fire took effect on June 11, 1967, Israel had more than doubled its size.

JUNE 6, 1967 TUESDAY

David Houston recorded ''My Elusive Dreams'' with Tammy Wynette.

Jerry Lee Lewis performs at the Palomino in North Hollywood, California. He threads his set with a cover of ''Together Again'' in honor of Buck Owens, who is watching from the front row.

JUNE 8, 1967 THURSDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''It Takes People Like You (To Make People Like Me)'' in an afternoon session at the Capitol Recording Studios in Hollywood, California.

Los Angeles councilman Tom Bradley declares Ray Charles Day in the city.

JUNE 9, 1967 FRIDAY

John Denver marries Annie Martell, the namesake of his 1974 hit ''Annie's Song''.

JUNE 10, 1967 SATURDAY

Six Day War Ends: Israel and Syria agree to observe the UN mediated cease-fire ending six days of Israeli fighting against Egypt, Jordan and Syrian forces.  Following Six Day War Egypt enforces an Egyptian blockade of the Suez Canal which lasted till June 5th 1975 making the Suez Canal closed to all shipping and trapping fourteen cargo ships known as "The Yellow Fleet" which remained trapped in the canal for over eight years.

Preparing to film ''Speedway'', Elvis Presley leaves Memphis for California on a bus with his entourage, their families and his new bride, Priscilla. The trip includes a stop in the Grand Canyon.

JUNE 12, 1967 MONDAY

Decca Records released Bill Anderson's ''No One's Gonna Hurt You Anymore''.

ABC released songwriter Curly Putman's version of ''My Elusive Dreams''. His version doesn't become a hit, David Houston and Tammy Wynette's version does.

Capitol released Merle Haggard's ''Branded Man''.

Decca released the Jack Greene album ''All The Time'', and Ernest Tubb and Loretta Lynn's duet album ''Singin' Again''.

Songwriter Sylvia Dee dies in New York City. Among her credits are Willie Nelson's ''Bring Me Sunshine'', Billy Walker's ''I Taughter Her Everything She Knows'' and Skeeter Davis' ''The End Of The World''.

JUNE 14, 1968 WEDNESDAY

The Monkees begin recording their pop hit, ''Daydream Believer'', at the RCA Studios in Hollywood, California. The song is destined to become a country hit for Anne Murray.

The summer replacement series ''The Steve Allen Comedy Hour'' debuts on CBS. Allen's resume includes success as a country songwriter, ''Let's Go To Church (Next Sunday Morning)'' was a 1950 hit for Margaret Whiting and Jimmy Wakely.

JUNE 16, 1967 FRIDAY

The movie ''Hell On Wheels'' opens in theaters with roles for Connie Smith and Marty Robbins, who plays a NASCAR driver. Also appearing, The Stonemans.

Rumors emerge that Porter Wagoner has been killed and his female singing partner, Norma Jean, is critically injured after a South Carolina man with a name similar to Wagoner is shot. Wagoner's road show is in Little Rock at the time.

Johnny Rivers, author of the future country hit ''Poor Side Of Town'', performs on the opening night of the historic Monterey Pop Festival in California. He shares the bill with Simon and Garfunkel, Lou Rawls and The Association.

JUNE 16-18, 1967 FRIDAY-SUNDAY

The Monterey International Pop Festival was held in Monterey, California. Organized by record executive Lou Adler and John Phillips, of the Mamas and Papas, Monterey was the first big festival of the era, attracting 50,000 fans and setting the stage for the flurry of festivals that would follow. It featured a stellar lineup of post-British Invasion rock royalty: Simon and Garfunkel, the Who, Big Brother and the Holding Company (featuring Janis Joplin), the Grateful Dead, the Jefferson Airplane, the Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, Otis Redding, Paul Butterfield, Country Joe and the Fish, and Moby Grape. It also marked the American debut of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Prior to the climax of ''Wild Thing'', Hendrix announced, ''I'm gonna sacrifice something that I really love, man'', then doused his guitar with lighter fluid and set it on fire.

JUNE 17, 1967 SATURDAY

Country-rock innovators The Byrds appear at the historic Monterey Pop Festival in California. The bill for the second day also includes Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, Al Kooper and Booker T and The MGs, among others.

Michael Martin Murphy marries Diana Vero in Dallas, Texas.

JUNE 18, 1967 SUNDAY

Country-rock pioneers Buffalo Springfield perform during the final day of the Monterey Pop Festival in California, alongside sitar player Ravi Shankar, The Who, The Mamas and The Papas and guitar player Jimi Hendrix.

Tim Hunt, the lead vocalist for Yankee Grey, is born. The group scores one Top 10 single, ''All Things Considered'', in 1999, mixing southern rock and tight harmonies.

JUNE 19, 1967 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Ferlin Husky's ''You Pushed Me Too Far'', Wynn Stewart's ''Cause I Have You'', and Glen Campbell's single ''Gently On My Mind''.

JUNE 20, 1967 TUESDAY

Singer and guitarist Dan Tyminski is born in Rutland, Vermont. He joins Alison Krauss' Union Station, performing on ''When You Say Nothing At All'', and singing lead on The Soggy Bottom Boys \\I Am A Man Of Constant Sorrow''.

Nicole Kidman is born in Honolulu, Hawaii. Raised in Australia, she marries country star Keith Urban in 2006.

Columbia Records released Ray Price's ''I'm Still Not Over You''.

JUNE 21, 1967 WEDNESDAY

The state of Oklahoma observes Patti Page Day as Page begins a three-night stand at the Semi-Centennial Exposition in Oklahoma City.

JUNE 22, 1967 THURSDAY

The Statler Brothers recorded ''You Can't Have Your Kate And Edith, Too''.

JUNE 23, 1967 FRIDAY

Charley Pride recorded ''Does My Ring Hurt Your Finger''.

JUNE 26, 1967 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Buck Owens' ''Your Tender Loving Care''.

Filming begins in Los Angeles for Elvis Presley's movie ''Speedway''.

JUNE 27, 1967 TUESDAY

Tammy Wynette recorded ''I Don't Wanna Play House''.

The Rolling Stones' Mick Jagger is found guilty in London on a January narcotics charge and sent to jail. He goes on to sing lead on ''Honky Tonk Women'', ranked among country's greatest singles in a Country Music Foundation publication, ''Heatrtaches By The Number''.

JUNE 29, 1967 THURSDAY

Keith Richard, member of The Rolling Stones is found guilty in London of narcotics charges, incurred at a party he hosted in January.

JUNE 30, 1967 FRIDAY

Rollong Stones Mick Jagger and Keith Richard are freed from a London jail, days after they were sentenced on drug charges.


JULY 1, 1967 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley is in the audience for Ann-Margret's Las Vegas show.

Blonde bombshell Pamela Anderson is born in Ladysmith, British Columbia. In 2006, she marries Kid Rock, whose song ''Picture'' earns him several country nominations at major awards shows.

JULY 2, 1967 SUNDAY

Don Ellis Gatlin is born in Norfolk, Virginia. With his older brother, he forms Darryl and Don Ellis, nabbing a nomination from the Country Music Association in 1993 for Vocal Duo of the Year.

JULY 4, 1967 TUESDAY

Capitol Records released Sonny James' ''It's The Little Things''.

JULY 5, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Here Comes Heaven'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

JULY 6, 1967 THURSDAY

Jackie Wilson recorded his rhythm and blues hit ''(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher And Higher''. Dolly Parton gets a Grammy nomination with her version of the song in the late-1970s.

JULY 7, 1967 FRIDAY

Buck Owens performs for the first time at Los Angeles' prestigious Hollywood Bowl. The lineup also features Merle Haggard, Glen Campbell, Bonnie Owens, Ferlin Husky, Tex Ritter, Red Simpson, The Geezinslaws and Wynn Stewart.

JULY 10, 1967 MONDAY

Acuff-Rose opens a new, multy-million-dollar building on Franklin Road in Nashville.

Kenny Rogers leaves The New Christy Minstrels.

Capitol Records released Bobbie Gentry's ''Ode To Billie Joe''.

Fiddler Hoyle Nix, who wrote the western-swing classic ''Big Ball's In Cowtown'', marries Joy Franklin in Durant, Oklahoma. 

Wynn Stewart recorded ''Love's Gonna Happen To Me''.

JULY 11, 1967 TUESDAY

The day after leaving The New Christy Minstrels, Kenny Roger forms The First Edition with Thelma Camacho, Mike Settle and Terry Williams.

Bob and Sara Dylan have a daughter, Anna Lea Dylan, months before he recorded the original version of ''I'll Be Your Baby Tonight'', a future country hit for Judy Rodman.

Columbia Records released Carl Smith's ''Deep Water''.

JULY 12, 1967 WEDNESDAY

''That Tennessee Beat'' debuts in movie theaters with Merle Travis, The Statler Brothers, Minnie Pearl, Floyd ''Lightnin''' Chance, Pete Drake, Buddy Mize, Boots Randolph and The Stoney Mountain Cloggers.

JULY 14, 1967 FRIDAY

Johnny Cash receives his second gold album, for ''I Walk The Line''.

Decca Records released Webb Pierce's ''Fool, Fool, Fool''.

Burglars steal $5,000 worth of goods from Hank Snow's office while he plays the Grand Ole Opry. Taken are watches, cufflinks, diamond earrings, belt buckles and insurance papers, but no money.

JULY 17, 1969 MONDAY

Susan Ashton is born in Irving, Texas. The contemporary Christian singer adds background vocals to several Garth Brooks recordings, including ''She's Every Woman'', ''She's Gonna Make It'' and ''You Move Me''.

Saxophone player John Coltrane dies of liver cancer at Huntington Hospital, New York. The jazz icon is mentioned alongside Frank Sinatra and The Righteous Brothers in the bridge of Brad Paisley's 2011 single ''Old Alabama''.

JULY 19, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Alternative-country icon Gram Parsons applies for membership in the Los Angeles chapter of the Musicians Union.

JULY 20, 1967 THURSDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis begins a tour of England, his first since his marriage to his cousin became public knowledge in a 1958 visit that undermined his career.

JULY 21, 1967 FRIDAY

ABC-TV debuts ''Malibu U'', a summertime music show with a collegiate theme, hosted by Rick Nelson.

JULY 22, 1967 SATURDAY

The Kinney Corporation buys Elektra Records for $7 million, making it a sister to Kinney's Warner Bros. subsidiary. The Elektra roster eventually includes Hank Williams Jr., Eddie Rabbitt, Conway Twitty and Crystal Gayle.

JULY 24, 1967 MONDAY

Tommy Duncan dies in San Diego from a heart attack. The former vocalist for Bob Wills' Texas Playboys delivered such milestone recordings as ''Right Or Wrong'', ''New San Antonio Rose'' and ''Poly Poly''.

JULY 25, 1967 TUESDAY

The London Times carries an ad that lobbies for the legalization of marijuana. It's signed by all four members of The Beatles, each of whom is destined to achieve some country success as a songwriter or recording artist.

JULY 27, 1967 THURSDAY

With her first hit, ''Ode To Billie Joe'', in release, Bobbie Gentry begins recording her debut album at the Capitol Recording Studio in Los Angeles, California. It's rather inventively titles, ''Ode To Billie Joe''.

JULY 31, 1967 MONDAY

Charley Pride recorded ''The Day The World Stood Still''.


AUGUST 1, 1967 TUESDAY

Lee and Roberta Greenwood have a daughter, Kelly Greenwood, in Las Vegas, Nevada.

AUGUST 2, 1967 WEDNESDAY

The Sidney Poitier movie ''In The Heat Of The Night'' premieres in New York, with Ray Charles and Glen Campbell each contributing to the soundtrack.

AUGUST 4, 1967 FRIDAY

Warren Beatty's ''Bonnie And Clyde'' premieres at the Montreal Film Festival. Flatt and Scruggs' ''Foggy Mountain Breakdown'' appears in the soundtrack, which also benefits from musicians Doug Dillard, Tommy Tedesco and Glen Campbell.

AUGUST 7, 1967 MONDAY

Jack Greene recorded ''Until My Dreams Come True''.

Capitol Records released Buck Owens' album ''Your Tender Loving''.

AUGUST 8, 1967 TUESDAY

Jack Greene recorded ''What Locks The Door''.

AUGUST 13, 1967 SUNDAY

Warren Beatty's ''Bonnie And Clyde'' makes its debut in American theaters. The soundtrack features Flatt and Scrugg's ''Foggy Mountain Breakdown'', plus work by Los Angeles musicians Doug Dillard, Tommy Tedesco and Glen Campbell.
 
Producer Michael Knox is born in Macon, Georgia. He oversees Jason Aldean's hits, plus such titles as Tracy Adkins' ''This Ain't No Love Song'', Montgomery Gentry's ''Where I Come From'' and Thomas Rhett's ''It Goes Like This''.

AUGUST 14, 1967 MONDAY

Wynn and Delores Stewart have their second daughter, Tatia Wynett Stewart, in La Puente, California.

AUGUST 15, 1967 TUESDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''Gardenias In Her Hair''.

AUGUST 16, 1967 WEDNESDAY

The CBS summer replacement series ''The Steve Allen Comedy Hour'' ends after two months. Allen had a 1950 hit as a songwriter with ''Let's Go To Church (Next Sunday Morning)'', recorded by Margaret Whiting and Jimmy Wakely.

AUGUST 17, 1967 THURSDAY

Guitarist Doni Harris is born in Edmond, Oklahoma. A cousin of Little Texas singer Tim Rushlow, he joins his relative in 2002 when the band Rushlow is formed, scoring a hit off its debut album with ''I Can't Be Your Friend''.

Gary Puckett and Union Gap recorded ''Woman, Woman'', written by country singer Jim Glaser. The group includes future country songwriter Kerry Chater.

AUGUST 18, 1967 FRIDAY

Filming reaches its conclusion for Elvis Presley's ''Speedway'' in Los Angeles, California.

A year after Petula Clark scored a pop hit with his song ''My Love'', British songwriter Tony hatch marries singer and songwriter Jackie Trent in London's Kensington Registry Office. Sonny James revives ''My Love'' as a country his three years later.

AUGUST 19, 1967 SATURDAY

Charlie Walker joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Beatles drummer Ringo Starr and his wife, Maureen, have a son, Jason Starkey. Starr is destined to receive a Grammy nomination more than 20 years later for a duet with Buck Owens on ''Act Naturally''.

AUGUST 20, 1967 SUNDAY

A sound decision, Ray Dolby introduces the Dolby noise-reduction system, which cuts tape hiss in recordings.

AUGUST 21, 1967 MONDAY

Decca Records released Claude Gray's ''How Fast Them Trucks Can Go''.

Capitol released Bobbie Gentry's debut album, ''Ode To Billie Joe''.

AUGUST 22, 1967 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley cancels a recording session, because Richard Davis, one of Elvis' employees, had accidently killed a pedestrian, a Japanese gardener, while driving one of Elvis' cars. Determined to keep Elvis away from bad publicity or legal trouble, Colonel Tom Parker put Elvis on a plane to Las Vegas immediately, putting him safely out of state - and thus cancelling this session.

Jimmy C. Newman recorded ''Blue Lonely Winter''.

AUGUST 25, 1967 FRIDAY

Bob Dylan's ''Blond On Blonde'' is awarded a gold album. The collection was one of three Dylan albums recorded at Nashville's Columbia Recording Studios.

Singer and songwriter Jeff Tweedy is born in Belleville, Illinois. He becomes the frontman for the alternative country band Uncle Tupelo and the alternative-rock band Wilco. He also gets recognized in the lyrics of Eric Church's 2015 single ''Mr. Misunderstood''.

AUGUST 26, 1967 SATURDAY

Jacksonville, Florida, declares Jack Greene Day.

AUGUST 28, 1967 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Glen Campbell's ''Gently On My Mind'' album, Merle Haggard's ''Branded Man'' album.

Buck Owens recorded ''How Long Will My Baby Be Gone'' in the evening at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood, California.

AUGUST 29, 1967 TUESDAY

Glen Campbell recorded ''By The Time I Get To Phoenix'' and ''Hey Little One'' at the Capitol Recording Studio in Hollywood.

Buck Owens recorded ''Let The World Keep On A Turnin''' in an evening session at the Capitol Studios in Hollywood, California. He re-recorded it the following year as a duet with his son, Buddy Alan.

AUGUST 30, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Waylon Jennings recorded ''Walk On Out Of My Mind'' during an evening session at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

More than a year after Vivian Cash filed for divorce, Johnny cash withdraws legal opposition. She retains custody of all their children, including Rosanne Cash.


SEPTEMBER 1, 1967 FRIDAY

ABC-TV airs the final episode of ''Malibu U'', a summertime music program featuring host Rick Nelson. The show ran just seven weeks.

The Khartoum Resolution issued which effectively ends the oil embargo when Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Libya begin exporting oil to the west. Like many wars the rights and wrongs depend on those recording the details and The Six Day War is no different with two distinct views "Preemptive strike by Israel" or an "unprovoked attack" . But the one thing history can not dispute is the military success of the operation for the Third Arab-Israeli War.

SEPTEMBER 4, 1967 MONDAY

Charles ''Smokey'' walker, general manager of Nashville's WKDA-FM, dies in a motorcycle accident, while 10-year-old daughter Michelle sustain minor injuries. He was married to Jo Walker, executive director of the Country Music Association.

SEPTEMBER 5, 1967 TUESDAY

Connie Smith recorded ''Burning A Hole In My Mind;; and ''Baby's Back Again'' during a late-night session at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Dolly Parton makes her first appearance on TV's ''The Porter Wagoner Show''.

The Association performs ''Never My Love'', destined to be a country hit for Vern Gosdin, during a Bing Crosby-hosted installment of ABC's ''The Hollywood Palace''.

Sweden c hanges over to driving on the right. The changes to driving on the right hand side which came into law this weekend caused less problems and accidents than in a normal weekend due to the additional careful driving of Swedish Drivers becoming acquainted to the change.

SEPTEMBER 7, 1967 THURSDAY

George Jones' dad, George, dies.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1967 FRIDAY

''Music City, USA'', a syndicated TV show, debuts on WSIX in Nashville. Regulars on the series include Bob Luman and Ray Stevens, plus host Jerry Naylor and band leader Bill Pursell.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1967 SUNDAY

Jerry Reed sits in on electric guitar as Elvis Presley recorded ''Guitar Man'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee. "Guitar Man" is a 1967 song written by Jerry Reed, who took his version of it to number 53 on the country music charts in 1967. Soon after Reed's single appeared, Elvis recorded the song with Reed playing the guitar part, and it became a minor country and pop hit. According to Peter Guralnick in his two volume biography of Presley, the singer had been trying unsuccessfully to record the tune, but wasn't happy with the groove. He said something to the effect of: "Get me that redneck picker who's on the original tune", and his staff brought Reed into the studio - who nailed it on the first take (though this romantic account is contradicted by a studio tape of the session that documents the first, second and fifth takes which are available on video-sharing website youtube.com. The single spent one week at number one on the country chart. Thirteen years later, "Guitar Man" was re-recorded in a new electric arrangement, with Presley's original vocal left intact, and it was the last of his eleven number one country hits. The record also peaked at number twenty-eight on the Billboard Hot 100.

SEPTEMBER 10, 1967 SUNDAY

The territory of Gibraltar holds a referendum on whether or not to stay with Great Britain or join Spain on September 10th, 1967. An overwhelming majority of the citizens of Gibraltar voted in favor of keeping British sovereignty with 99% in favor and a 95% voter turnout. The territory had been under British control since 1713 and was an important naval point for Britain since it borders where the Atlantic Ocean joins the Mediterranean Sea. By 1981, Gibraltar residents were granted British citizenship and the territory was soon able to self-govern.

SEPTEMBER 11, 1967 MONDAY

Bobbie Gentry collects a gold single for ''Ode To Billie Joe''.

SEPTEMBER 13, 1967 WEDNESDAY

''The Kraft Music Hall'' debuts on NBC-TV, where it remains for four years. The show rotates numerous hosts, with Eddy Arnold, Don Rickles and Alan King handling the role most often.

Warner Mack recorded ''I'd Give The World (To Be Back Loving You)''.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1967 THURSDAY

The NBC crime drama ''Ironside'', starring Raymond Burr, debuts. The show will be referenced in Tom T. Hall's ''(Old Dogs-Children And) Watermelon Wine''.

Dean Martin delivers the Jim Reeves hit ''Welcome To My World'' on the NBC variety series ''The Dean Martin Show''.

Dolly Parton makes her first in-concert appearance in Porter Wagoner's show in Lebanon, Virginia. She's greeted with boos and chants for Norma Jean, the female singer she replaced.

SEPTEMBER 15, 1967 FRIDAY

''Bonnie And Clyde'', featuring Lest Flatt and Earl Scruggs' ''Foggy Mountain Breakdown'' as its theme song, opens in London and Paris. The soundtrack also includes Glen Campbell, Tommy Tedesco and Doug Dillard.

SEPTEMBER 16, 1967 SATURDAY

Jeannie Seely joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

''The Lawrence Welk Show'' has its season premiere on ABC-TV. The cast includes, for this one season, Lynn Anderson, who turns in a rendition of ''Buttons And Bows''.

David Houston and Tammy Wynette share the number 1 slot on the Billboard country chart with ''My Elusive Dreams''.

SEPTEMBER 17, 1967 SUNDAY

The Doors perform on the Ed Sullivan show ''Light My Fire'', including the lyric ''Girl, we couldn't get much higher''.

Designer Mary Quant introduces the miniskirt in the mid-sixties, it was nothing short of revolutionary. The daring hemline was not only modern, but affordable, and became the style of choice for movie stars to working-class women. The fashion also symbolized the growing influence of younger styles and trends.

Jimmy Buffett is in attendance at the New Orleans Saints' inaugural NFL game at Tulane Stadium. The Los Angeles Rams win, 27-13.

SEPTEMBER 18, 1967 MONDAY

Merle Haggard and The Strangers recorded ''Sing Me Back Home'' at the Capitol Recording Studios in Hollywood, California.

Kitty Wells' mother, Myrtle Deason, dies.

Decca Records released Jack Greene's ''What Locks The Door''.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Rick Nelson and wife Kristin have twins, Matthew and Gunnar, in Santa Monica, California. The boys' 1990 debut album earns three pop hits, though they never approach the success of their father.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1967 THURSDAY

Faith Hill is born in Jackson, Mississippi. Following her 1993 debut ''Wild One'', she becomes one of country's most successful female singers, gaining major crossover hits with ''This Kiss'' and ''Breathe''. She marries Tim McGraw in 1996.

Everybody loves Minnie Pearl sometime. The comedienne guests on NBC-TV's ''The Dean Martin Show''.

Tennessee Ernie Ford begins a four-day run at the New Mexico State Fair in Albuquerque. He is forced to leave the state before the stint is concluded when his wife, Betty Ford, attempts to overdose at home in California.

SEPTEMBER 22, 1967 FRIDAY

With ''Bonnie And Clyde'' in theaters, Mercury released Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs' theme music to the movie ''Foggy Mountain Breakdown''.

While shooting ''The Bill Anderson Show'' at the WSIX-TV studios in Nashville, Jan Howard's briefcase falls off the trunk of her car. A man in an Oldsmobile picks it up and drives off, taking her tax records, personal documents and tranquilizers.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1967 SATURDAY

Penn State defensive tackle Mike Reid is injured on the sixth play of the season's opening game against Navy, requiring his second knee operation. Navy wins, 23-22, in Annapolis, Maryland. Reid goes on to become a country singer and songwriter.

The Monkees appear on the cover of TV Guide a year after their hit ''Last Train To Clarksville'', ranked among country's 500 greatest single in the Country Music Foundation's ''Heartaches By The Number''.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1967 SUNDAY

Norma Jean marries furniture dealer Harold ''Jody'' Taylor at the Oklahoma City home of Wanda Jackson. The marriage spurred Norma Jean to surrender her role on ''The Porter Wagoner Show''.

SEPTEMBER 25, 1967 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Buck Owens' ''It Takes People Like You (To Make People Like Me)''.

The Box Tops earn a gold single for ''The Letters''. Guitarist Gary Talley goes on to provide backing vocals on Willie Nelson's ''Always On My Mind''.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1967 THURSDAY

Karen Fairchild is born in Gary, Indiana. She becomes a founding member of Little Big Town, a group that makes four-voice harmony an integral part of the hits ''Boondocks'', ''Little White Church'', ''Tornado'' and ''Pontoon''. The band wins the Country Music Association's Vocal Group of the Year in 2012, 2013 and 2014.

NBC-TV's ''The Dean Martin Show'' welcomes musical guests Roy Rogers, Dale Evans and Petula Clark.

There stands the glass, Nashville voters bring the city out of the dark ages, approving the sale of alcohol by the ounce in hotels, restaurants and private clubs. Booze is, of course, one of the hallowed topics of country music.

SEPTEMBER 29, 1967 FRIDAY

Governor Buford Ellington declares Elvis Presley Day in Tennessee. Presley celebrates by shooting off fireworks at Graceland Mansion.


OCTOBER 1, 1967 SUNDAY

Warner-7 Arts buys Atlantic Records for $17.5 million from Mo Ostin, Nesuhi Ertegun and Jerry Wexler. The new Warner-Elektra-Atlantic entity eventually yields such country acts as Tracy Lawrence, Faith Hill, Emmylou Harris and Hank Williams Jr.

Porter Wagoner, Red Foley and Jimmie Davis perform for Louisiana governor John McKeithen at the statehouse in Baton Rouge.

OCTOBER 2, 1967 MONDAY

Singer and songwriter Gillian Welch is born in New York City. The earthy performer becomes an acclaimed member of the alternative country movement, appearing on the ''Hope Floats'' and ''O Brother, Where Art Thou?'' soundtracks.

Decca Records released Jimmy C. Newman's ''Blue Lonely Winter''.

Johnny Cash recorded ''Rosanna's Going Wild'' at the Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

OCTOBER 3, 1967 TUESDAY

Woody Guthrie dies in Queens after a 15-year struggle with Huntington's disease. The folk singer and songwriter influenced the social content of several 20th-century genres, including country, and is eventually added to the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Chuck Wagon Gang guitarist Howard Gordon, the husband of the group's Anna Carter, dies of a heart attack after taping ''The Wilburn Brothers Show'' in Nashville. A former member of the Light Crust Dough Boys, he'd played with the Chuck Wagon Gang since 1951.

The Bee Gees recorded ''Words''. The song will become a country hit when Susie Allanson covers it in 1979.

OCTOBER 4, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Former country hitmaker Bobby Darin portrays George M. Cohan in a retelling of the Broadway figure's story on NBC's ''The Kraft Music Hall''.

OCTOBER 5, 1967 THURSDAY

Eddy Arnold is a return guest on NBC's ''The Dean Martin Show''.

OCTOBER 6, 1967 FRIDAY

Ferlin Husky recorded ''Just For You''.

OCTOBER 7, 1967 SATURDAY

Sevier County holds the first Dolly Parton Day as 7,000 people gather at the courthouse for a show that also features Porter Wagoner and Mel Tillis.

''Solitary Man'' songwriter Neil Diamond portrays a nightclub singer on the CBS' crime series ''Mannix''.

OCTOBER 8, 1967 SUNDAY

Jimmy Dean presents CBS viewers with a medley of country classics on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. He sings ''Born To Lose'', ''Oh Lonesome Me'', ''I Can't Stop Loving You'' and ''Jambalaya (On The Bayou)''.

OCTOBER 9, 1967 MONDAY

Dolly Parton and her uncle, Bill Owens, establish Owepar, a publishing company that owns the copyrights to their songs.

Elvis Presley begins filming the western ''Stay Away, Joe'' in Sedona, Arizona.

Bobbie Gentry's ''Ode To Billie Joe'' becomes her first gold album.

Trumpet player Doc Severinsen replaces Skitch Henderson as the band leader of the NBC Tonight Show Orchestra. Severinsen goes on to co-write Mac Davis hit, ''Stop And Smell The Roses''.

''Daydream Believer'' is featured in ''Art For Monkees' Sake'', an episode of NBC's ''The Monkees''. The song is destined to become a country hit for Anne Murray.

Banjo player Charles ''Chick'' Hurt dies. He played from 1932-1960 with The Prairie Ramblers, a WLS Radio act that supported Patsy Montana on the 1935 hit ''I Wanna Be A Cowboy's Sweetheart''.

Penn State defensive lineman Mike Reid undergoes knee surgery in Danville, Pennsylvania. Two decades later, his name is found in the songwriter credits on a Ronnie Milsap hit, ''Where Do The Nights Go''.

OCTOBER 10, 1967 TUESDAY

Dolly Parton recorded with Porter Wagoner for the first time. 

Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies signed by the United States and the Soviet Union comes into force.

OCTOBER 11, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton recorded ''The Last Thing On My Mind''.

OCTOBER 12, 1967 THURSDAY

Former ''National Barn Dance'' comedian George Gobel guests on ''The Dean Martin Show'' on NBC-TV. The show's host performs Don Gibson's ''Blue Blue Day''.

Ray Price recorded ''Take Me As I Am (Or Let Me Go)''.

OCTOBER 14, 1967 SATURDAY

Tammy Wynette realizes her first number 1 single in Billboard as a solo artist with ''I Don't Wanna Play House''.

OCTOBER 16, 1967 MONDAY

Dolly Parton replaces Norma Jean on ''The Porter Wagoner Show''.

Conway Twitty recorded ''The Image Of Me'', his first country hit, in the afternoon at the Columbia Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

Decca Records released the Bill Anderson and Jan Howard duet ''For Loving You''.

Bobbie Gentry guests on ''The Carol Burnett Show'' on CBS-TV.

Capitol Records released Wynn Stewart's ''Love's Gonna Happen To Me''.

Decca released the album ''Bill Anderson's Greatest Hits'', Kitty Wells' album ''Queen Of Honky Tonk Street'', and Loretta Lynn's album ''Singin' With Feelin'''.

OCTOBER 17, 1967 TUESDAY

Bob Dylan begins recording the ''John Wesley Harding'' album, the second of three recordings, at the Columbia Recording Studios, with local musicians Kenny Buttrey, Charlie McCoy and Pete Drake.

OCTOBER 18, 1967 WEDNESDAY

The World War II comedy ''How I Won The War'' opens at London's Premiere Theatre. It marks the acting debut of ''I Feel Fine'' co-writer John Lennon in a non-Beatles film.

The Disney picture ''Charlie, The Lonesome Cougar'' debuts in movie theaters, with old hand Rex Allen providing narration.

OCTOBER 19, 1967 THURSDAY

Songwriter Joe Beal dies, 10 years after Bobby Helms recorded his best-known song, ''Jingle Bell Rock''.

OCTOBER 20, 1967 FRIDAY

Red Foley, Jim Reeves, artist manager J.L. Frank and record producer Steve Sholes join the Country Music Hall of Fame during the first Country Music Association awards ceremony in Nashville, Tennessee.

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs recorded their third studio version of ''Foggy Mountain Breakdown'', this time with record producer Bob Johnston.

Jack Greene is a triple-winner in the inaugural Country Music Association awards in Nashville, taking Male Vocalist and Album of the Year, for ''There Goes My Everything''. The title track claims Single of the Year and wins Song of the Year for songwriter Dallas Frazier.

OCTOBER 21, 1967 SATURDAY

The Browns make their final appearance on the Grand Ole Opry as a trio, as Maxine and Bonnie Brown retire, leaving Jim Ed Brown to a solo career.

The Music City News presents its first annual awards at Ernest Tubb's Record Shop in Nashville. Merle Haggard wins Favorite Male Artist, and Loretta Lynn is named Favorite Female Artist.

Lib Robertson marries Frank Hatcher in Charlotte, North Carolina. They divorce in 1980, by which time she's already become the manager for Randy Travis.

OCTOBER 22, 1967 SUNDAY

Waylon Jennings gets married for the third time, to Barbara Rood.

Rex Allen narrates NBC's ''Walt Disney's Wonderful World Of Color'', providing the voiceover for an episode titled, ''Run, Appaloosa, Run''.

OCTOBER 23, 1967 MONDAY

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs provide background music for an episode of NBC-TV's ''The Monkees'' titled ''Hillbilly Honeymoon''.

Tommy Sosebee dies in Greenville, South Carolina. A member of Pee Wee King's Golden West Cowboys, he earned a solo hit with 1953's ''Till I Waltz Again With You''.

The concert movie ''Festival'' debuts in New York City. The film features music from the Newport Folk Festival by Johnny cash, Bob Dylan, Judy Collins, Joan Baez, Cousin Emmy, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Pete Seeger and Peter, Paul and Mary.

OCTOBER 25, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Colgems released ''The Monkees' pop hit ''Daydream Believer''. A dozen years later, the song becomes a country hit for Anne Murray.

OCTOBER 26, 1967 THURSDAY

Singer and guitarist Keith Urban is born in New Zealand. Introduced through a three-piece band, The Ranch, he becomes one of the first country icons of the 21st century, winning the Country Music Association's Entertainer of the Year in 2005.

OCTOBER 28, 1967 SATURDAY

Actress Julia Roberts is born in Smyrna, Georgia. She marries Lyle Lovett for two years in the mid-1990s, and stars in ''Runaway Bridge'', which launches hits for The Dixie Chicks and Martina McBride.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LARRY BRINKLEY
FOR SUN RECORDS 1967

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: OCTOBER 30, 1967
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – KNOX PHILLIPS


From Jackson, Tennessee Larry Brinkley recorded locally for Jaxon (unissued cuts) and Charlie Roach's   Westwood and for the Magic label in Memphis, and unissued cuts for Sun around October 1967. When the   rockabilly days were over, Larry teamed with Lee McAlpin (who played piano with Carl Perkins' band) and   they wrote songs together, notably "The Man In The House", recorded by Loretta Lynn. Larry Brinkley and   Lee McAlpin are still doing good. In 1968, they wrote together "You're Getting Ready To Hurt Me", edited  by Knox Music, and recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis. Sam Phillips said "It's a good one" but for some unknown   reason that recording never find its way on wax.

Larry Brinkley ^

In late 1962 and early 1963, Larry Brinkley started to play the Delta Club while The Stewart Brothers played   at the Pine Ridge Club like Kenny Parchman did. Both club were in a half mile of each other and owned by  Arthur and Robert Jarret, two brothers. Larry remembers seeing there Billy Adams, who had himself records   on Sun, and who was a good friend to Elvis. He had a 1962 Lincoln he got from Elvis, still had gold EP   letters on the sides of the top. That little trivia came from Larry himself.

01 – ''BIG M
Composer: - Billy Adams
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: October 30, 1967

02 – ''MISSISSIPPI HOLLOW''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: October 30, 1967

03 – ''SORRY 'BOUT THAT''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: October 30, 1967

04 – ''CRY! CRY! CRY!''
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: October 30, 1967

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Larry Brinkley – Vocal
Lee McAlpin – Guitar
David Crum – Guitar
R.W. Stevenson – Bass
Tony Moore – Drums
Billy Riley – Harmonica
Bobby Wood - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


OCTOBER 30, 1967 MONDAY

''Daydream Believer'' is featured in ''Monkees Marooned'', an episode of NBC-s ''The Monkees''. The song is destined to become a country hit for Anne Murray.

Decca Records released Warner Mack's ''I'd Give The World (To Be Back Loving You)''.

Capitol released Merle Haggard's ''Sing Me Back Home''.

OCTOBER 31, 1967 TUESDAY

Roger Miller performs ''You Can't Roller Skate In A Buffalo Herd'' on an episode of ABC's ''The Hollywood Palace'', hosted by Bing Crosby.

Sonny James recorded ''A World Of Our Own''.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE ROCKIN' REBELLIONS
FOR GOLD DUST RECORDS 1967

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
GOLD DUST SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE NOVEMBER 1967
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – EUGENE LUCHESSI, DICKEY LEE
AND/OF STAN KESLER

01 – ''WOULD YOU LIKE TO GO
(SOMEWHERE ME SOMETIME) '' – B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Paul Craft
Publisher: - Beaver Music-Gatto Music
Matrix number: - G-120-4926
Recorded: - Unknown Date November 1967
Released: - 1968
First appearance: - Gold Dust (S) 45rpm Gold Dust 300 mono
WOULD YOU LIKE TO GO / DRUMS AND OTHER THINGS

02 – ''DRUMS AND OTHER THINGS'' – B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - The Rockin' Rebellions
Publisher: - Beaver Music-Gatto Music
Matrix number: - G-121-4927
Recorded: - Unknown Date November 1967
Released: - 1968
First appearance: - Gold Dust (S) 45rpm Gold Dust 300 mono
DRUMS AND OTHER THINGS / WOULD YOU LIKE TO GO

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Henry Lovoy - Vocal
Donald Barbee - Guitar & Keyboards
Ronald Barbee - Bass
Rick Fortenberry - Lead Guitar
Ross Gagliano - Drums

C. Chalmers - String Arranged

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©



THE ROCKIN' REBELLIONS - first got together as a band in 1966 with members Donald Barbee (guitar  and keyboards), Ronald Barbee (bass), Rick Fortenberry (lead guitar), and Ross Gagliano (drums). They  played rock and roll dance numbers at local sock hops in and around the Birmingham, Alabama area. In  September of that year, they brought in lead singer Henry Lovoy. The group practiced at the Woodlawn  Shoes Repair shop that Ross owned. This is where dedication and hard work paid off and the band really  came together as one of the premier garage bands of the Southeast.


In November of 1966, the group recorded their very own ''By My Side'' at the Boutwell Recording Studio.  The song was written by Donald Barbee and Henry Lovoy. The flip side was a Beatles cover of ''Run For  Your Life''.

The first radio airplay was on WSGN’s ''Dave Roddy's Top 40 Countdown''. It entered the charts  at number 37 making it up to number 28.  On May 6, 1967, the Rebellions recorded a Jimmy Johnson-engineered Frank Zappa-penned tune - ''Any  Way The Wind Blows;; at Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals. The flip side was a cover of Bo Diddley song,  ''Don’t Let Go''. The Rockin’ Rebellions entered the big VOX (sound equipment) sponsored ''WVOK Battle  of the Bands'' contest held at the Boutwell Auditorium in downtown Birmingham on May 20, 1967. The  Rockin’ Rebellions won top honors, beating out 67 other bands from throughout Alabama. Their big prize  was three VOX Super Beatle amplifiers, the kind the Beatles used!

On June 17, 1967 at the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium, the Rebellions won again, this time they were  awarded first place in the ''Southeastern Battle of the Bands'' over bands from Georgia, North and South  Carolina, and Florida.

That year the Rockin’ Rebellions appeared on all four (the Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter) ''Shower of  Stars'' shows sponsored by WVOK radio in Birmingham and WBAM in Montgomery. They played with such  artists as The Who, the Young Rascals, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Herman’s Hermits, Gary Puckett and  the Union Gap, Billy Joe Royal, Lou Christie, and many other top stars that were in their heyday.

In November of 1967, renowned local disc jockey Duke Rumore introduced the band to Eugene Luchessi  from Memphis, producer of Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs, who set up a recording session at the new Sun  Recording Studio at Madison Avenue in Memphis that Sam Phillips had built with the money he received  from the sale of Elvis Presley’s contract to RCA Victor. The Rebellions were well-received by Dickie Lee  and Stan Kesler who produced ''Would You Like To Go (Somewhere With Me Sometime)''.

Henry, Ross, Donald, Ronald, and Rick were on their way to even more concerts across the South, playing  in Florida with the Swingin' Medallions and the Classics IV, in concerts set up be WAPE (who was affiliated  with WVOK and WBAM, with Dan and Clyde Brennan). They also played for WCLS in Georgia,  performing with Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels and the Royal Guardsman. Touring constantly, they  also played many gigs in Tennessee and Kentucky.

From playing local armory sock hops - to being voted the best band in the Southeast, to playing with all of  the stars of the 1960’s rock and roll era, to still playing today in different groups (but occasionally still  getting together), Henry, Ross, Donald, Ronald, and Rick have always represented Birmingham, Alabama  with class and dignity as our very own Rockin' Rebellions.


NOVEMBER 1, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Australian pop artist Tina Arena is born in Melbourne. Her songs are covered for the American country charts by Wynonna, who earns a hit with ''Heaven Help My Heart'', and Jo Dee Messina, who scores with ''Burn''.

Sonny James recorded ''Heaven Says Hello''.

NOVEMBER 2, 1967 THURSDAY

Johnny Cash is arrested and jailed overnight in Lafayette, Georgia, for illegal possession of pep pills. The next morning, the sheriff asks Cash why he is wasting his life and hurting his family to get high.

David Allan Coe finished a four-year sentence at the Ohio State Penitentiary. He was found guilty of possessing burglary tools.

Margaret Umensetter dies at age 64. She was a member of the popular Grand Ole Opry comedy duo Sarie and Sally.

Homer and Jethro perform ''Yellow Rose Of Texas'' and ''Let Me Go, Lover!'' on ''The Dean Martin Show''. The NBC series host also turns in versions of the Ray Price hits ''Pride'' and ''Release Me''.

NOVEMBER 3, 1967 FRIDAY

Rick Nelson shows up in a guest role on the short-lived ABC western ''Hondo''.

NOVEMBER 4, 1967 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley auctions off vehicles and farm equipment at his Circle G ranch near Walls, Mississippi, bringing in $108,000.

NOVEMBER 5, 1967 SUNDAY

Days after his latest narcotics arrest, Johnny Cash is persuaded by his girlfriend, June Carter, to attend the First Baptist Church in Hendersonville, Tennessee. He hears a sermon about the woman at the well and rededicates his life.

NOVEMBER 6, 1967 MONDAY

Hank Williams Jr. marries high school sweetheart Sharon Martin and departs on a California honeymoon.

Columbia Records released Johnny Cash's ''Rosanna's Going Wild''.

NOVEMBER 8, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Harry Nilson begins two days of recording in Hollywood that produce the pop hit ''Everybody's Talkin'''. It's hailed in the Country Music Foundation's ''Heartaches By The Number'' among the 500 greatest country singles of all-time.

Otto Gray dies in Springfield, Arkansas. His group, the Oklahoma Cowboys, cemented the singing cowboy image just before the advent of movie sound in the 1920s. The group also provided a training ground for Zeke Clements and Whitey Ford, the Duke of Paducah.

Bobbie Gentry appears on Bob Hope's ''Shoot-In At NBC'', a one-hour special that pits comics against cowboys in a spoof of ''High Noon''. Others in the lineup include Steve Allen, Jack Palance, Cameron Mitchell and Don Rickles.

NOVEMBER 9, 1967 THURSDAY

Rolling Stone magazine debuts with a cover story of John Lennon. The rock publication also puts the occasional country star out front, including Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Tanya Tucker, Garth Brooks and Willie Nelson.

Roger McGuinn boots Davis Crosby from The Byrds, just months before the band recorded one of country-rock's seminal albums, ''Sweetheart Of The Rodeo"".

Ray Price recorded ''I've Been There Before''.

NOVEMBER 11, 1967 SATURDAY

Johnny Cash performs live without the aid of drugs for the first time in more than a decade at a high school in Hendersonville, Tennessee.

Bob Dylan's manager, Albert Grossman, signs Janis Joplin to a management contract. During their association, she recorded ''Me And Bobby McGee'', ranked in a Country Music Foundation publication among country's 500 greatest singles.

NOVEMBER 12, 1967 SUNDAY

Dorothy Goad (aka Dollie Good) from The Girls Of The Golden West, dies. The duo, which included her sister Millie, had a successful career in the 1930s and 1940s, highlighted by ''There's A Silver Moon On The Golden Gate''.

The Turtles appear on CBS-TVs ''The Ed Sullivan Show'', performing the future T.G. Sheppard hit ''Happy Together''.

NOVEMBER 13, 1967 MONDAY

Tammy Wynette recorded ''Take Me To Your World''.

Decca Records released Jack Greene's album ''What Locks The Door''.

NOVEMBER 16, 1967 THURSDAY

The Osborne Brothers recorded ''Rocky Top'' at Bradley's Barn in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee.

NOVEMBER 18, 1967 SATURDAY

Cajun accordion player Jimmy Breaux is born in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana. As a member of BeauDoleil, he supports Mary Chapin Carpenter on her 1991 hit ''Down At The Twist And Shout''.

NOVEMBER 20, 1967 MONDAY

''Daydream Believer'' is featured in ''A Coffin Too Frequent'', an episode of NBC's ''The Monkees''. The song is destined to become a country hit for Anne Murray.

NOVEMBER 21, 1967 TUESDAY

Bob Dylan recorded ''I'll Be Your Baby Tonight'' at the Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, during sessions for his ''John Wesley Harding'' album. Judy Rodman turns the song into a country hit nearly 20 years later.

NOVEMBER 22, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Otis Redding recorded ''(Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay'' at the Stax Recording Studio in Memphis, Tennessee. It ranks among the 500 greatest country singles of all-time in the Country Music Foundation's 2003 book ''Heartaches By The Number''.

United Artists released Elvis Presley's movie ''Clambake''. The movie was a musical film directed by Arthur H. Nadel and starring Elvis Presley, Shelley Fabares and Bill Bixby. Written for the screen by Arthur Browne Jr., the film is about the heir to an oil fortune who trades places with a water-ski instructor at a Florida hotel to see if girls will like him for himself, rather than his father's money. Clambake was the last of Presley's four films for United Artists. The movie reached number 15 on the national weekly box office charts. The soundtrack album reached number 40 on the Billboard album chart.

Elvis Presley concludes location shooting in Sedona, Arizona, for his western comedy ''Stay Away, Joe''.

Eddy Arnold performs ''Here Comes Heaven'' on a country-themed edition of NBC's ''The Kraft Music Hall''. Also featured are The Everly Brothers, songwriter Johnny Mercer and Ray Charles, who joins host Dinah Shore to sing ''You Are My Sunshine''.

NOVEMBER 23, 1967 THURSDAY

Jack Greene becomes the first country star to appear in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York.

NOVEMBER 24, 1967 FRIDAY

Columbia Records released Ray Price's ''Take Me As I Am (Or Let Me Go)''.

Hank Williams Jr. recorded ''It's All Over But The Crying'' in Nashville during the second day of sessions for the ''A Time To Sing'' soundtrack. Co-star Shelley Fabares also cuts one song for the movie.

NOVEMBER 26, 1967 SUNDAY

Bass player John Stirratt is born in New Orleans, Louisiana. He performs with the alternative country band Uncle Tupelo and Wilco.

NOVEMBER 27, 1967 MONDAY

Capitol Records released Glen Campbell's ''By The Time I Get To Phoenix'' album, and Ferlin Huske's single ''Just For You''.

The pop group The Association wins a gold single for ''Never My Love''. The song is eventually reprised by Vern Gosdin as a country hit.

''Daydream Believer'' is featured in ''Hitting The High Seas'', an episode of NBC's ''The Monkees'. The song is destined to become a country hit for Anne Murray.

Ralph and Joy Emery have a son, Michael Emery.

NOVEMBER 28, 1967 TUESDAY

Jimmy Buffett's apartment in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, is destroyed by fire. Buffett, who is performing in New Orleans at the time, is unhurt. His roommate dies in the blaze.

Filming ends in Los Angeles for the Elvis Presley picture ''Stay Away, Joe''.


END 1967

The Sun record, issued with little fanfare in January 1968, was by a group dubbed Load of  Mischief. One side featured riffs copped from the Stax catalog and the other from Motown. It  was a lamentable finale.

Sam Phillips has admitted that Sun Records perished because of his diminishing commitment  to the record business. ''The basic reason that Sun did not become a major label'', Sam  Phillips said, ''was that I preferred to invest my time in other things. I didn't want to hook up  with a major corporation because I knew I couldn't do the job the way I wanted to do it as  part of a big company, even though I had several offers''. ''In the 1960s, things were changing  rapidly and drastically as far as distribution was concerned. Most top-selling artists were  lured away from the small companies during the latter part of the 1950s, and a number of  the indie labels themselves were bought out. I could see what was coming and I wanted no  part of it. It is not my way to work for somebody''.

Sam Phillips also saw that the days when you could get some cuts on tape, mastered,  pressed, and promoted for a few hundred dollars were long gone. Modern sessions called for  more musicians, most of whom demanded union scale. In fact, every facet of the industry,  from the technical to the promotional, was becoming more expensive.

In the changing climate, albums were a necessity, and singles were increasingly seen as  trailers or loss leaders for LPs. Phillips never truly believed in the album market; in fact,  Shelby Singleton issued more albums of Sun product in the first year after he bought the  catalog than Phillips had issued in fifteen years. Some have seen Phillips' lack of interest in  the album market as evidence of his parsimony, but for him it was a much more complex  issue: ''Albums weren't selling that much, but beyond that, I was always very cautious about  not putting out a lot of product on my artists simply to ensure a certain level of income. I  think that opportunity has always been abused by the major record companies. You only  have to look at some of the crap they put out on Elvis Presley, with no regard for the man's  great abilities''.

If the record business is a lottery, Sam Phillips accomplished one of the most difficult feats a  gambler can: he had the good fortune to win the big money, and the good sense to reinvest  his winnings broadly, instead of risking them all on the chance of an bigger payback. As Sun  Records wound down, he bought radio stations, Holiday Inn stock (he was one of the first  investors in the chain), properties with mineral rights, and so on. Though it's easy to lament  his eventual departure from the recording industry, it's clear that financially he made the  right choice. Knox Phillips explains his father's thinking: ''Sam wasn't going to gamble his  money promoting records any more. He had seen some of his friends go broke, such as the  people who ran Vee-Jay, and he became very conservative. We still had some records that  sold well on a regional level, but there wasn't a commitment of spirit''.


1967

After recorded for Sun in 1957, Roy Hall concentrated on management rather than performing. As a sideline, he and Webb Pierce formed their own record label, Pierce Records, but this was short-lived and by 1967 Hall formed a promotion agency Roy Hall Attractions in Dallas, Texas. ''We were promoting Texas singers down there'', he said, ''unsuccessfully at first, but we kept at it and then eventually moved our base to Nashville in 1972''. In the 1970s, Hall also published the Nashville Enquirer newspaper, dealing mainly in the country music scene. Hall the ads were for companies he seemed to be involved with the legend has it that the other half were put in at random and accounts sent to the incredulous ''advertisers'' after the event. None of these enterprises took off in a big way and Hall spent quite some time in the 1960s and 1970s with the bottle. ''I used to have a little drinking problem'', he told Martin Hawkins. It was at the end of his drinking phases that he realised, and recorded, ''I'll Never Get Rich Part 1 and 2'' on the Quarter Cash label in Dallas. In 1974he had told Hawkins the same thing. ''I have been off the drink here in Nashville for the past 16 months, and I do a lot of work now with Alcoholics Anonymous. I'm enjoying life. I ain't going back to the old ways, no sir''. What Roy did do was to revel in a little late-found fame in the 1970s, and then in 1980 when Nick Tosches featured him in ''Creem'' magazine. He was inspired to play gigs again and to record an album for Barrelhouse Records of Chicago. ''There's no such thing as an overnight success'', he told Hawkins on a day when ex-rock and roller Charlie Rich was topting the country and pop charts with schmaltzy ballads.  Roy Hall died on March 2, 1984 in Nashville.


© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

A milestone of sorts. The last Sun record. The label that began by recording backporch music, primitive rhythm and blues, heartrending hillbilly, and then gave birth to rockabilly and a string of cultural icons, finally ended in January 1968 with Load Of Mischief. The 230 or so releases in the Sun catalog neatly encapsulate one of the great cultural upheavals in the 20th century. Sun started with black music and told the story of its assimilation over a 15 year period. That makes it fitting in a way that the last Sun record should be by a white band working in a style that owned much to then-current black music.

STUDIO SESSION FOR LOAD OF MISCHIEF
FOR SUN RECORDS 1967

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1967
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR KNOX PHILLIPS

01 - "I'M A LOVER" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Mike Houseal
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 377  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1967
Released: - January 1968
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 407-A mono
I'M A LOVER / BACK IN MY ARMS AGAIN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-2-25 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5


Load Of Mischief. From left: Larry Wall, Jimmy Tarbutton, David Mayo, Ray Sanders, Ken Woodley . >

Lead singer Davis Mayo was born in Memphis, and in 1965 he was leading a band called the Coachmen in Little Rock, Arkansas. He made his first recordings at Roland Janes' Sonic Studios on Madison Avenue. ''I met all the other guys in different bands'', says Mayo. ''Ken Woodley played keyboards, Ray Sanders was in a band called the Jokers, Mike Houseal played guitar, but the star was Larry Wall who played bass 'cause he'd come over from the Gentrys.


I knew the Coachmen were going to stay in Little Rock so I talked to all these guys and we rehearsed at Ken Woodley's house, and it clicked. I knew Knox and he signed us to Sun''.

The record hadn't been out long when Sam Phillips folded Sun to become president of Holiday Inn Records. He transferred the Load Of Mischief master to Holiday Inn, remixing it for its re-release, adding Charlie Chalmers' horn section. ''We weren't happy about that'', notes Mayo. ''I remember arguing with Sam about it. I told him that Columbia Records wasn't in the hotel business, so what was Holiday Inn doing in the record business? I took the unissued Sun masters over to Estelle Axton at Stax, and she signed us to their Hip label. We recorded as ''Paris Pilot'' for Hip. Don Nix was our producer''.

Mayo went on to work with Steve Cropper at his TMI Records, and then recorded with a band called Zuider Zee for Columbia (who were not in the motel business). By then he was under the aegis of British producer Gordon Mills (Tom Jones, Gilbert O'Sullivan, etc.) Ken Woodley and Mike Gardner hung around Don Nix's camp during the booze and pill-fueled 1970s and, until recently (1998), Ray Sanders was the house bass player at the restored Sun Studio on 706 Union Avenue.

02 – "BACK IN MY ARMS AGAIN'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Brian Holland-Lamont Dozier-Edward Holland
Publisher: - Jobete Music Publishing
Matrix number: - U 376  - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1967
Released: - January 1968
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 407-B mono
BACK IN MY ARMS AGAIN / I'M A LOVER
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-2-26 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

03 – "BABY, YOU'VE GOT IT'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1967
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm PLP-343-A-7 mono
EARLY MEMPHIS SOUNDS - DEEP SOUL CLASSICS VOLUME 6

04 – "NOWHERE TO RUN''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1967

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Load Of Mischief consisting of
David Mayo – Vocal
Mike Houseal – Guitar
Ken Woodley – Organ
Ray Sanders – Bass
Larry Wall - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


DECEMBER 1, 1967 FRIDAY

Country and pop singer Jimmie Rodgers is pulled over by a Los Angeles policeman for traffic violations. He is found two hours later in his car with a broken wrist and fractured skull, requiring three brain operations and the insertion of a steel plate.

Nancy Ross gives birth to Polly Parsons, the only daughter of country-rock icon Gram Parsons, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Ringo Starr, a future Grammy nominee in the country field, flies to Rome to begin filming the movie ''Candy''.

DECEMBER 3, 1967 SUNDAY

Singer and songwriter Wayne Kemp, the author of ''The Image Of Me'' and ''Love Bug'', is involved in an accident while touring in Moline, Illinois. Two of his band members are killed, and Kemp suffers serious burns.

DECEMBER 5, 1967 TUESDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''Sweet Rosie Jones'' in an afternoon session at the Capitol Recording Studios in Hollywood, California.

Gary Herzberg is born in Montebello, California. Under the stage name Gary Allan, the scratchy-voiced singer debuts in 1996, launching a string of hits that includes 'Smokey Rings In The Dark'', ''Nothing On But The Radio'', ''Watching Airplanes'' and ''Every Storm (Runs Out Of Rain)''.

Charlie Louvin recorded ''Hey Daddy''.

DECEMBER 6, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Forty songwriters attend the inaugural meeting of the Nashville Songwriters Association International. They include Kris Kristofferson, Marijohn Wilkin, Eddie Miller, Boudleaux and Felice Bryant and Liz and Casey Anderson.

DECEMBER 10, 1967 SUNDAY

Soul singer Otis Redding dies in a plane crash near Madison, Wisconsin. Just a month later, ''(Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay'' becomes his biggest recording. The song is later remade as a country hit by Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson. The band was traveling to performances in Redding's Beechcraft H18. On December 9, 1967, they appeared on the ''Upbeat'' television show produced in Cleveland. They played three concerts in two nights at a club called Leo's Casino. After a phone call with Zelma and their children, Redding's next stop was Madison, Wisconsin; the next day they were to play at the Factory nightclub, near the University of Wisconsin.

Although the weather was poor, with heavy rain and fog, and despite warnings, the plane took off. Four miles (6.4 km) from their destination at Truax Field in Madison, the pilot radioed for permission to land. Shortly thereafter, the plane crashed into Lake Monona. Bar-Kays member Ben Cauley, the accident's sole survivor, was sleeping shortly before the accident. He woke just before impact to see bandmate Phalon Jones look out a window and exclaim, "Oh, no!" Cauley said the last thing he remembered before the crash was unbuckling his seat belt. He then found himself in frigid water, grasping a seat cushion to keep afloat. A non-swimmer, he was unable to rescue the others. The cause of the crash was never determined. James Brown claimed in his autobiography ''The Godfather of Soul'' that he had warned Redding not to fly in the plane.

The other victims of the crash were four members of the Bar-Kays—guitarist Jimmy King, tenor saxophonist Phalon Jones, organist Ronnie Caldwell and drummer Carl Cunningham; their valet, Matthew Kelly; and the pilot, Richard Fraser.

Redding's body was recovered the next day when the lake bed was searched. The family postponed the funeral from December 15 to December 18 so that more could attend. The service took place at the City Auditorium in Macon. More than 4,500 people came to the funeral, overflowing the 3,000-seat hall, although many did not know who he was. Johnny Jenkins and Isaac Hayes did not attend, fearing their reaction would be worse than Zelma Redding's. Redding was entombed at his ranch in Round Oak, about 20 miles (32 km) north of Macon. Jerry Wexler delivered the eulogy. Redding died just three days after recording "The Dock of the Bay". He was survived by Zelma and three children, Otis III, Dexter and Karla. Otis, Dexter and cousin Mark Lockett later founded the Reddings, a band managed by Zelma. She also maintained or worked at the janitorial service Maids Over Macon, several nightclubs and booking agencies. On November 8, 1997, a memorial plaque was placed on the lakeside deck of the Madison convention center, Monona Terrace.

DECEMBER 11, 1967 MONDAY

Dolly Parton recorded as a solo artist for RCA for the first time.

NBC airs ''Movin' With Nancy'', featuring Nancy Sinatra, Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Lee Hazlewood, who duets with Nancy on ''Jackson''. 

DECEMBER 17, 1967 SUNDAY

Bass player Duane Propes is born in Longview, Texas. He joins the six-man band Little Texas, whose thick harmonies lead to a successful 1990s run highlighted by ''God Blessed Texas'', ''What Might Have Been'' and ''You And Forever And Me''.

DECEMBER 19, 1967 TUESDAY

Roy Acuff sets off on a two-week USO (United Service Organizations) tour of American bases in Cuba, the Bahamas, the Canal Zone and Puerto Rico.

DECEMBER 20, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Jack Greene recorded ''Back In The Arms Of Love''.

DECEMBER 23, 1967 SATURDAY

Jack Greene joins the Grand Ole Opry at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

DECEMBER 24, 1967 SUNDAY

Bobbie Gentry performs ''Ode To Billie Joe'' on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Broadcast from New York, the CNS show also features The Muppets, The Cowsills, Arthur Godfrey and George Carlin.

DECEMBER 25, 1967 MONDAY

Decca Records released The Osborne Brothers' ''Rocky Top''.

Vince Gill receives a Gibson electric guitar for Christmas. He continues to use the instrument even after becoming a star more than 20 years later.

Brent Rowan receives his first electric guitar for Christmas. He becomes one of Nashville's most in-demand players 13 years later, appearing on hits by Brooks and Dunn, Conway Twitty, George Strait, Mark Chesnutt and Shania Twain, among others.

DECEMBER 26, 1967 TUESDAY

Carl Smith makes his first appearance as a guitar player with Ernest Tubb's road band, the Texas Troubadours.

Audrey Wiggins is born in Asheville, North Carolina. She forms a duo with brother John Wiggins, racking up three Vocal Duo of the Year nominations from the Country Music Association during the 1990s.

Capitol Records released Sonny James' ''A World Of Or Own''.

DECEMBER 27, 1967 WEDNESDAY

Columbia Records released Bob Dylan's ''John Wesley Harding'', the second in a trio of albums he recorded in Nashville during the 1960s. One of its songs, ''I'll Be Your Baby Tonight'', becomes a country hit for Judy Rodman in 1987.

Songwriter Jim Beavers is born in Midland, Texas. He authors Tim McGraw's ''Felt Good On My Lips'', Toby Keith's ''Red Solo Cup'', Luke Bryan's ''Drink A Beer'' and Josh Turner's ''Why Don't We Just Dance''.

DECEMBER 28, 1967 THURSDAY

Dean Martin and Polly Bergen team up on The Sons Of The Pioneers' western classic ''Tumbling Tumbleweeds'' during the week's installment of the NBC variety series ''The Dean Martin Show''.

DECEMBER 29, 1967 FRIDAY

Bandleader Paul Whiteman dies. Over a decade later, two of his earlier hits are revived for country fans, ''Among My Souvenirs'' by Marty Robbins, and ''Without A Song'' by Willie Nelson.

DECEMBER 31, 1967 SUNDAY

Songwriter Bert Berns dies of a heart attack at the Oliver Cromwell Hotel in New York City. His pop classic ''Piece Of My Heart'' is recorded by Janis Joplin before becoming a country hit for Faith Hill.


Charlie Feathers continued recording demos of original compositions on his home recorder, allowing him to  further evolve and diversify his songwriting abilities and continued playing live gigs, signing with the Gene  Williams Booking Agency in 1965. However, by this stage of his career he was performing to ever dwindling  crowds, as Billy Millar illustrated, "...his performing schedule thinned out considerably and his priorities  shifted elsewhere, like car racing and softball. In fact, Charlie gained such a rep around town as a top fast  pitch hurler that many of his teammates were unaware of his musical exploits".


Charlie Feathers at front of Select-O-Hits record store, 605 Chelsea Avenue, Memphis, 1968. ^

Providentially, the thought of  succumbing to the murky depths of namelessness rarely entered his mind, despite being inactive for a  number of years, in terms of recording and performing, Charlie was never far from his guitar and tape  recorder. This persistence held him in good stead when he was re-discovered by English rockabilly fanatic  'Breathless' Dan O'Coffey in 1967.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE FEATHERS
FOR PHILWOOD RECORDS 1967/1969

SELECT-O-HITS STUDIO
1566 LOOKOUT DRIVE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1967/1969
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – TOM PHILLIPS & DAN O'COFFEY
REMIXED BY SKIP PHILLIPS, JOHNNY PHILLIPS AND GEORGE PAULUS


Convincing Charlie that he should reactivate his career, Dan O'Coffey organized a session at the Memphis  Select-O-Hit studio on Lookout Drive where Feathers revived his heyday at Meteor and King when he cut an  impeccable version of Hank Thompson's "Wild Side Of Life". Johnny Bond's "I Wonder Where You Are  Tonight" was transformed into "Where's She At Tonight" (a song Charlie would later re-record as "Rain")  with a Feathers original, "Don't You Know", a slow but driving country ballad, rounding out the session. This  session was rapidly followed by further dates at Select-O-Hit into 1968, where Charlie churned out one tune  after another like the old hand that he was.

Producers Tom Phillips and Dan O'Coffey   at front of Select-O-Hits record store 605 Chelsea Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee, June/July 1966. >

The five or six years away from a studio seemed like a matter of  days, as he brought his "fillin'" to bare on country weepers and uptempo rockabilly numbers alike, and  witnessing at least one release on Tom Phillips' (Sam's brother) Philwood label.

Coupling a rendition of the Johnny Burnette Trio's "Tear It Up" with a "Tongue-Tied Jill" spin-off, "Stutterin'  Cindy", Charlie's Philwood single was fervently snatched up by his English fans, who considered his records  to be the equivalent of gold.

01 - ''TEAR IT UP'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:38
Composer: - Paul Burlison-Dorsey Burnette-Johnny Burnette
Publisher: - Vernon Music
Matrix number: - 036
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - October 1968
First appearance: - Philwood Records (S) 45rpm Philwood P-223 mono
TEAR IT UP / STUTTERIN' CINDY
Reissued: - 1979 Star Records (LP) 33rpm Star 312 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS

02 - ''STUTTERIN' CINDY'' – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Blackgold Publishing
Matrix number: - 037
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - October 1968
First appearance: - Philwood Records (S) 45rpm Philwood P-223 mono
TEAR IT UP / STUTTERIN' CINDY
Reissued: - 1979 Star Records (LP) 33rpm Star 312 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS

03 - ''GONE GONE GONE'' – B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Publisher
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-1 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

04 - ''TONGUE-TIED JILL'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Jody Chastain-Jerry Huffman
Publisher: - Redneck Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-2 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

05 - ''WILD SIDE OF LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: -Arlie Carter-William Warner
Publisher: - EMI United
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-3 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

06 - ''DO YOU KNOW'' - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Coby Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-4 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

07 - ''(SHE KNOWS HOW TO) ROCK ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Tom Perryman
Publisher: - Unichappell Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-5 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

08 - ''WIDE RIVER'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Coby Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-6 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

09 - ''CRAZY HEART'' – B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Coby Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-7 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

10 - ''UH HUH HONEY'' – B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: Johnny Bond
Publisher: - Babb Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-8 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

11 - ''COLD DARK NIGHT'' – B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Coby Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-9 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

12 – ''RAIN'' – B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Coby Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-10 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

13 - ''MAMA OH MAMA'' – B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Coby Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-11 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

14 - ''CHERRY WINE'' B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Coby Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-12 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

15 - ''THERE WILL BE THREE'' – B.M.I. - 3:27
Composer: - Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Coby Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-13 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

16 - ''I'M MOVIN' ON'' – B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Hank Snow
Publisher: Carlin Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1967/1969
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Barrelhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Barrelhouse LP BH-014 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!
Reissued: 1992 Edsel Records (CD) 500/200rpm EDCD 348-14 mono
CHARLIE FEATHERS - THAT ROCK-A-BILLY CAT!

Probably more songs recorded.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Feathers - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
Troy Jones - Guitar
Ramon Maupin - Guitar
Marcus Van Story - Upright Bass
Tiny Fuller - Guitar
Bubba Fuller - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©


RAMON MAUPIN TOLD HIS STORY TO STEVE KELEMEN - Back in the 1950's we called rockabilly. A  country boy trying to do rock and roll. It sounded too country to be rock and roll, but it had a good  wholesome upbeat sound like Charlie Feathers and Carl Perkins. It sounded real good. In those days rock and  roll was an up tempo blues song like Elvis did. As far as I'm concerned he started rock and roll. I don't know  who named it rock and roll, but he's the one who started it. He had a song as you may remember called  "That's Alright'' and on the other side "Blue Moon Of Kentucky". I've been listening to those old blues  forever and I really enjoyed it.


Something really touched my heart. I was from Memphis, the home of the  blues and daddy played blues on the fiddle. You don't hear many people playing blues on the fiddle. That  really sunk into me and I have to say that the blues played a big part in rock and roll.

When Elvis sang that first song he sounded like a black man and some of us didn't know the difference to  begin with. I remember I was over on the South Parkway when I first heard Elvis singing "That's Alright''.  The time just stood still. It knocked my socks off. I went home and told mom and dad about hearing this man  singing on the radio. It was music for the young people in those days because they didn't have music until  rock and roll came along. It gave us a chance to change music for the whole world and accept something  different from what had been done for so many years. I understood it right off. Now rockabilly is the country  style upbeat because it didn't have the real blues background. As far as Elvis, I really didn't want to bother  anybody. I was around Bill Black and Scotty Moore and did not ask any of those guys to introduce me to  Elvis. I would have liked to have met him. i didn't actually meet him but one day I could have. I was working  uptown at Howersteins. Elvis was going with Barbara Hearn who worked there. One day he was waiting for  her and when I got off work he was standing in the ally and I was going to walk up to him and tell him that I  recorded with Sun Records also. But when I walked up to him I just stopped and said (to myself) no, I'm not  going to say nothin' to that man. Everybody's wearing him to death. I'm just going to leave him alone. And I  just walked away. I saw him a time or two after that and on some of his early outdoor shows in Memphis.

Charlie Feathers used to tell me things about him mainly more comical than the fact. He talked about what  him and Elvis did and I'd get a big laugh out of it. He thought a lot of Elvis. I used Scotty and Bill to play for  me on a couple of the first records that I had. I had 3 records altogether some 45 years ago. The first record  was "No Chance" b/w "Love Gone". I wrote "No Chance". "Love Gone" was written by my cousins the  Stratmans. Alan Stratman was a great fiddle player and played for a living all his life. I think he was a world  champion fiddler. Anyway, it was his daughters who wrote "Love Gone" which was originally a poem. They  just gave me the poem and I made it into a song. I put the melody to it, that's all I did. I always thought it was  good. It didn't come out exactly how I wanted it to because I didn't know how to get it that way.

We went to the studio in those days and just pretty much went ahead without knowing much about sound. If  Scotty and I had taken time to work it out or I had listened a little better, I'm sure we could have made it a  little different. I remember we did "Love Gone" in a waltz 3-4 time and it should have really been done in a  4-4 time. I will say that Bob Deckermen who played steel on it did a really fine job. I remember it played on  a jukebox down in Memphis for over a year and sold a few thousand copies. I remember someone saying,  ''That song of yours ain't country''. It ain't rock and roll. It ain't nothing'". It kind of hurt my feelings a little  bit. Then I got to thinking about it and said well that makes it different, don't it. So I didn't feel bad about it  later on. In those days a lot of people were coming out with records. You had to have a distributor to put out  a record to have anyone hear it. They would buy a few and put them in jukeboxes and on the radio. When we  went to St. Louis no one wanted to hear it because they had too many records they were trying to push. Slim  Wallace said we'll just listen to it. They listened, took it and distributed it. I was surprised because it sold a  few hundred copies a day until everyone who heard it brought up all the copies.

Now about the second record "Rockin' Rugus" b/w "What's The Use". My cousin Alen wrote "What's The  Use" and I wrote "Rockin' Rufus". They were done with Ace Cannon (his real name is Johnny). He made an  impression on me because he was such a good player. I said well, I'm going to write a song about this sax  player and I got him to play on it. Stan Kessler played the bass on it. Scotty Moore played the guitar and I  don't remember who played drums. It was kind of a Honky tonk song with the sax on it. It was half country  and half rockabilly.

As far as shows, I played on, I was just young and didn't know how to make a career out of it. If someone  wanted me to play guitar, that's what I did. I remember playing guitar at Ellis Auditorium in Memphis with  Charlie Feathers, Ferlin Husky and Jerry Lee Lewis. I never had been in front of those many people before. I  was scared to death and can't remember playing but Charlie said I played just fine. Jerry Lee came out ready  to give all and tore his shirt off. A policeman had to come on and drag him off. Charlie laughed about that.


Marcus Van Story and Charlie Feathers recorded ''Stutterin' Cindy'' at Select-O-Hits Recording Studio, Memphis, Tennessee, 1968. >

I met Charlie Feathers when I was about 19. I played guitar for him for about 15 years. He strictly had his   own ideas about music. People told me to go on my own without Charlie but he was teaching me some stuff   especially about sound. He had some real good ideas, I thought. Later he made more of a name for himself. I   really miss Charlie and will keep on missing him. There was only one Charlie Feathers.


He was quite a   character. He was one of the best actual comedians I've ever heard in my life. He said the whole reason for   the Civil War was that the South cut off the Yankee's supply of grits. I wrote "Jungle Fever" that did.

He  wanted something that was just right for him or he wouldn't do your songs. He wrote bridge part for "Jungle   Fever." The record did pretty good for him.  At one time I had the Martin guitar that he Elvis use on "Mystery Train. Me and Charlie use to play behind   Tommy Tucker in a club in West Memphis for a while. Charlie played the bass, I played the guitar and   Tommy played rhythm guitar and sang. I've been recording for years and years at the house. My wife's a   good singer and I have two sons who want to do some recording with me.




© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©