CONTAINS

Sun 311-320 Audio Series 

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Jack Clement
"THE BLACK HAIRED MAN" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 334
Recorded: - October 30, 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 20, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 311-A mono
THE BLACK HAIRED MAN / WRONG
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-15 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Clement – Vocal & Drums
Billy Riley – Guitar & Harmonica
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Cliff Acred - Bass
Unknown Vocal Chorus

''In spite of a lot of good natured kidding from his co0workers, jack has delved seriously into a study of traditional folk ballads as a background for his efforts at creating new stories to be told in updated folk style''.

Thus wrote Sun's promotion staffer Barbara Barnes in an attempt to sell Jack Clement as part of the great continuum of folk balladry. He was obviously straddling two stools - country music and the ersatz folk revivalism of the Kinston Trio and their ilk. As a story-song this does not have a great deal of merit and hardly justifies the hours of research that Ms. Barness seemed to think Clement had devoted to it. Quite simply, it sounds as though Clement had concocted the tune for Johnny Cash and then decided to record it himself. He kept the chorus under control and there is an undeniable drive to the song but its prettiness was very markedly different from the country music that Phillips had recorded in the same studio a few years earlier. (HD)(MH)

 
Jack Clement
"WRONG" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 335
Recorded: - October 30, 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 20, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 311-B mono
WRONG / THE BLACK HAIRED MAN
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-16 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Clement – Vocal & Drums
Billy Riley - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Cliff Acred - Bass
Unknown Vocal Chorus

This must have stood a fair chance of success in the pop sweepstake. The prominently mic'd brushwork provides a fine drive to the record in much the same way that the deadened acoustic guitar underpinned many of Johnny Cash's best recordings with a similar sound.

"Wrong" might have been an ideal follow-up to "Guess Things Happen That Way", and, in Cash's hands, it might have been a hit. Clement seemed obsessed with the idea to tall dark strangers moving into town and threatening to take his baby away. The man had obviously seen lots of movies or lived in a really bad neighbourhood. (HD)(MH)
 

 
Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumping Piano
"I'LL SAIL MY SHIP ALONE" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Mann-Burns-Bernard-Thurston
Publisher: - Lois Music
Matrix number: - U 337
Recorded: - November 5, 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 20, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 312-A mono
I'LL SAIL MY SHIP ALONE / IT HURT ME SO
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-17 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Cliff Acred - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willis - Saxophone

Overdub Vocal Chorus Unknown
added at an overdub session in November 1958.

It was at Jerry Lee's insistence that this record (SUN 312) was cut and released on Sun. If nothing else, it should put to rest any doubts about the influence Moon Mullican had on the Killer's style. Resurrechting "I'll Sail My Ship Alone" may have been a fine tribute to Mullican, bit it did little to energize Jerry Lee's career.

In truth, it is not a particularly good record. The appearance of Martin Willis' sax is a first for Jerry Lee, although it is hardly here are Jerry himself, and the guitar player, who sounds more like Billy Riley than Roland Janes. Jerry turns in one of the most distracted sounding vocals of his recorded career. The pitch wavers, the intonation is sloppy; in short, it sounds like Jerry was paying too much attention to his piano work and let the singing go to hell. Unfortunately, the guitar work is strident and unfocussed. During the instrumental break, it sounds as if the guitar player assumed the second eight bars were his, only to find Jerry Lee still ticklin' them ivories. From the brief taste we get of what that solo would have sounded like, its a mercy the guitar stays submerged. (HD)(MH)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumping Piano
"IT HURT ME SO" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music
Matrix number: - U 336 - Overdub Master
Recorded: - November 5, 1958 – Vocal Chorus Overdub for Master
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - November 20, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 312-B mono
IT HURT ME SO / I'LL SAIL MY SHIP ALONE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-18 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Cliff Acred - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willis - Saxophone

Overdub Vocal Chorus Unknown
added at an overdub session in November 1958.

On this side, the label credited "Jerry Lee Lewis and his Pumping Piano". the label lied. The not-very pumping piano was played by Charlie Rich, who also co-composed this song with Bill Justis. The material is very heavy into self pity, and engages the more maudlin side of Jerry's vocal stylings. This would not be the last time Jerry Lee's flair for the melodramatic surfaced in his recorded work. (HD)

 
Billy Riley
"DOWN BY THE RIVERSIDE" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Jack Clement-Billy Riley-Edwin Howard
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 340
Recorded: - January 19, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 1, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 313-A mono
DOWN BY THE RIVERSIDE / NO NAME GIRL
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-19 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal & Guitar
Pat O'Neil - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Charlie Rich or Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Martin Willis - Saxophone
Unknown Vocal Chorus

The original idea for a rocked-up version of "Down By The Riverside" came from Memphis Press Scimitar reporter Edwin Howard who had recorded one single for Sam Phillips in order to document the process of recording. In the first flush of enthusiasm after its release, Howard re-wrote the lyrics to "Down By The Riverside" and was given 50% of the song after Riley subsequently copped the idea. Bill Justis overdubbed a chorus and a second sax part over the bed track which went some distance towards disguising Riley's somewhat lackluster vocal.

Billy Riley reworked the traditional anti-war song into a suitably rocking style for the 1959 marketplace. (HD)(MH)

 
Billy Riley
"NO NAME GIRL" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Jack Clement-Billy Riley
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 341
Recorded: - January 19, 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 1, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 313-B mono
NO NAME GIRL / DOWN BY THE RIVERSIDE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-20 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal & Guitar
Pat O'Neil - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Charlie Rich or Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Martin Willis - Saxophone
Unknown Vocal Chorus

Even though "No Name Girl" portrays a spirited and carefree atmosphere, the record required considerable thought and energy to get right. True, it was a simple formula, alternating eight bar verses with sax breaks, while modulating keys up and down. However, the released version came from the third session devoted to getting it right. Things finally clicked on January 19, 1959. A session held twelve days earlier on the same two titles had produced nothing releasable. Neither had a December 16 date the previous year, "No Name Girl" was attempted for the first time. The final work, a "driving countryish effort with blues and hoedown overtones", to quote Billboard, was the brainchild of Riley and Jack Clement . (HD)

 
Warren Smith
"SWEET, SWEET GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Don Gibson
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 342
Recorded: - January 7, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 314-A mono
SWEET, SWEET GIRL / GOODBYE MR. LOVE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-21 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Cliff Acred - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
 
Overdubbed Session
Lee Holt - Vocals
Bill Abott - Vocals
Charlie Rich - Vocals
Gerald Nelson Singers - Vocals

"Sweet Sweet Girl", shows how powerful a force Don Gibson was at this point in his career. This title was a throwaway track on a Gibson album, yet it was deemed strong enough material for a Warren Smith release on Sun Records. The lyrics contain a rare sentiment in country music: I ain't gonna talk about you when you're gone. You were good to me and that's good enough for me. I was the jerk, not you. How many times have you heard that message expressed in country music? Billboard failed to pick up on this one. They gave the side a mediocre two-star review, missing the Don Gibson connection altogether. Instead they called it "a wild rocker". Given Smith's past flirtation with "Miss Froggie" and trip to "Ubangi" country, this hardly quality as "wild". What it was, sadly, was Warren Smith's last release on Sun Records before starting a successful career on Libert as a mainstream country vocalist. (HD)

 
Warren Smith
"GOODBY MR. LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Warren Smith-Billy Byrd
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 343
Recorded: - January 7, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 314-B mono
GOODBY MR. LOVE / SWEET, SWEET GIRL
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16803 DI-3-22 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Cliff Acred - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
 
Overdubbed Session
Lee Holt - Vocals
Bill Abott - Vocals
Charlie Rich - Vocals
Gerald Nelson Singers - Vocals

''Goodbye Mr. Love'' proves the truth in Jack Clement's assertion that Smith was the ''closest approximation of a mainstream 'Nashville' singer ever to enter 706 Union''. It also disproves Smith's assertion that he could not record country music at Sun. The overall sound on this recording is very close to the product coming out of Nashville in 1959, particularly in view of the chorus. All of this makes Smith's lack of success on Sun after 1957 double incomprehensible. In retrospect, this was far from Smith's best work but, coupled with ''Sweet Sweet Girl'', it was an exceptionally strong double sided contender. Billboard called this single ''ultra commercial'', speculating that ''Smith'll have the top money making coupling of his career''. On the day that Billboard published that review, Sun prepared a royalty statement showing that Smith was unrecouped to the tune of $634.00, which probably represented un-repaid loans. At roughly the same time, Smith's three year term with Sun was up. A change was gonna come.  (HD)(MH)

 
Onie Wheeler
"JUMP RIGHT OUT OF THIS JUKEBOX" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 344
Recorded: - November 22 or December 6, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 315-A mono
JUMP RIGHT OUT OF THIS JUKEBOX / TELL 'EM OFF
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-23 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Onie Wheeler – Vocal & Harmonica (Overdub)
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler – Bass & Harmonica
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

The master of ''Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox'' was held back for almost one and a half years before it finally saw the light of day. perhaps it had been considered to be too countrified for 1957. Despite his misgivings about the unprofessional atmosphere at Sun, this recording really showcases Onie's idiosyncratic style. The March 2, 1959 issue of Billboard rated the song with two stars and said that it had ''fair prospects''. Their review may have been commercially astute but failed to notice the distinctive and charmingly hybrid sound produced by Onie and Sun. (HD)(MH)

 
Onie Wheeler
"TELL 'EM OFF" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 345
Recorded: - November 11, or December 6, 1957
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 315-B mono
TELL 'EM OFF / JUMP RIGHT OUT OF THIS JUKEBOX
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-24 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Onie Wheeler – Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

His one Sun outing, "Tell 'Em Off" was held back to over a year, by which time the veteran singer was working at a shoe factory in his home state of Missouri. Fortunately the respite turned out to be temporary, proving that you couldn't keep a man down who had a voice like s spilled barrell of tar. His distinctive vocal is enhanced by the slapback echo which also fattens up the echoey low string guitar figure. (HD)(MH)

 
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"THANKS A LOT" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 350
Recorded: - July 10, 1958 - Overdubbed with chorus (The Confederates)
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 316-A mono
THANKS A LOT / LUTHER PLAYED THE BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-25 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
 
Overdubbed session probably July 9, 1958
Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
 
Overdub The Confederates
George Evans -Tenor
Dave LaBonte - Lead
Bill "Bus" Busby – Baritone
Wally Singleton - Bass

Charlie Rich responded to the call with "Thanks A Lot", a well constructed self-piying weeper. Cash turned in a solid reading of Rich's material and even the choral overdub was respectable. About the only laughable thing associated with this side is Charlie Rich's original demo of the song. Obviously, some serious attention was directed to Rich's original lyrics, which were worked over before the session. Otherwise, Cash might have following Rich's lead and sung, "You went to see the lawyer / told him I was oh so mean / You told him I was the most no good thing / you had ever seen / He's suing me for everything I've got / Thanks a lot, thanks a lot". (HD)

 
Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two
"LUTHER PLAYED THE BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 350 - Take 3
Recorded: - July 30, 1955
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 316-B mono
LUTHER PLAYED THE BOOGIE / THANKS A LOT
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-3-26 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

On this side, Phillips dug deep into Cash's Sun catalogue and came up with a little autobiographical gem on  this session. "Luther Played The Boogie" had been deemed unworthy of release for over three years. Now it  was just what the doctor ordered: an original Sun copyright that would be unlikely to interfere with  disc jockey attention to the "hit side" of SUN 316. Surprisingly, this little bit of vintage whimsy drew more  than its share of attention at the time and has been enjoyed by collectors ever since for both its sound and  content. (HD)

 
Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumping Piano
''LOVIN' UP A STORM" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Allyson Khent-Luther Dixon
Publisher: - Figure Music
Matrix number: - U 346
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 317-A mono
LOVIN' UP A STRORM / BIG BLON' BABY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-4-1 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

Jimmy M. Van Eaton recalls, ''A lot of stuff, some of which you've probably discovered going through the tapes, was never intended to be released. With Jerry Lee, that was how we did 80%, maybe more of the sessions. You'd just start jamming and Sam has the tape running. That's why with Jerry Lee there were often no arrangements, no beginnings, no endings.

Instead, Sam Phillips went outside his stable of composers and copyrights in search of potent material for his erstwhile moneymaker. The problem is, most top songwriters were reluctant to submit their best work to an artist who was being blacklisted by disc jockey's all over North America

On "Lovin' Up A Storm", the writers have taken meteorological rock to its pinnacle and Jerry's vocal and piano are duly frenzied. The rhythmic hook gives the song some powerful appeal, but the result are a bit too studied to be among Jerry's best work. Even so, the record deserved more of a response than it got. 
 
It's interesting that while many Sun sessions were calming down considerably by January 1959 and sweetening the result with strings and voices. Jerry Lee, Roland Janes and Jimmy van Eaton were still pounding away as if the calendar on the wall said 1957. ''Lovin' Up A Storm'' is a particular showcase for Jimmy M. Van Eaton. The powerful stop-rhythm drum into and those two-bar single-stroke rolls into the chorus mark this record as special.
 
Everything else become secondary, from Jerry Lee's dramatic vocal to the lyrics. Speaking of which, can anybody figure out what they are? For a while we thought we had the opening lines figured out: ''When kisses fly like oak leaves / Caught in a gust of wind''. But then we listened to some of the outtakes on Bear Family's ultimate Jerry Lee Box (BCD 17254) alongside the single and we came away knowing less than we did going in. The good news is, it doesn't matter. Jerry might as well be spewing gibberish or talking trash. Who cares? Just listen to those drums! (HD)(MH)(SP)
 

 
Jerry Lee Lewis & His Pumping Piano
"BIG BLON' BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:38
Composer:- Roberts-Jacobson
Publisher: - Alamo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 347
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single SUN 317-B mono
BIG BLON' BABY / LOVIN' UP A STORM
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-4-2 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
J Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

"Big Blon' Baby" had been recorded previously by Ronnie Self, whose version stiffed as badly as Jerry Lee's. The exclamation "Jumpin' Jehosaphat, Big blon' baby!" was obviously intended to rekindle memories of "Goodness gracious, great balls of fire". It didn't. Musically, the record has its pros and cons. Roland (if indeed its him) takes one of his least memorable recorded solos, although Jimmy Van Eaton's final single stoke drum roll is a moment to be reckoned with. In 1979 Jerry Lee Lewis re-cut (the only real rocker on (the ''Would You Take Another Chance On Me'' album) is hotter, faster and wilder, but also somehow lacks the charm of the earlier cut. (HD)(MH)

 
Jimmy Isle
"WITHOUT A LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Jimmy Isle-Ronnie Isle
Publisher: - Kenny Marlow Music - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 353
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 23, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 318-A mono
WITHOUT A LOVE / TIME WILL TELL
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-4-3 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Isle - Vocal
Bill Riley - Guitar
Pat O'Neill - Bass
Tommy Ross - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Sax
Unknown Vocal Chorus

After being signed to Sun Records, Jimmy Isle was brought to Memphis to record one session (from which two singles were drawn) with Jack Clement at the helm. The rather empty Jimmy Isle session file contains five names: Billy Riley, bassist Pat O'Neill, drummer Tommy Ross, as well as Charlie Rich and Martin Willis, so that's probably who we're hearing on this session. (HD)

 
Jimmy Isle
"TIME WILL TELL" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Jimmy Isle-Ronnie Isle
Publisher: - Kenny Marlow Music - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 352
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 23, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 318-B mono
TIME WILL TELL / WITHOUT A LOVE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-4-4 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Isle - Vocal
Bill Riley - Guitar
Pat O'Neill - Bass
Tommy Ross - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Sax
Unknown Vocal Chorus

Once again, Isle's music is geared to the white teenager marketplace. Its biggest selling point remains the rhythmic hook Isle and company have borrowed from Bo Diddley.   Again Billboard was cautiously impressed, assigning both sides (SUN 318) a three star rating. They credited Isle with singing "with spirit and style" and said the sides "should be watched". it is likely that more people watched them than listened to them. (HD)


Ray Smith
"ROCKIN' BANDIT" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Ira Jay Lichterman
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 354
Recorded: - February 21, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 23, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 319-A mono
ROCKIN' BANDIT / SAIL AWAY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-4-5 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Ray Smith - Vocal
Stanley Walker - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Gary Diamonds - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

Ray Smith confirmed what a powerful vocalist he was on both of his March 1959 release (SUN 319). Given the novelty value of "Rockin' Bandit", it is really surprising that the disc met with little success. The very same gunshot effects had appeared on the pop charts the previous year in the Olympics' record of Western Movies. Maybe teenagers were tired of being shot at. "Rockin' Bandit" was composed by a local teenager named Ira Lichterman, who emerged as a Sun artist in his own right in November, 1960.

This side was supplied by a thirteen year old younster named Ivor Jay Lichterman* who worked in a leather factory in Memphis and had sent in a demo of the song on which he accompanied himself by slapping his thights. It was not a song that Ray was keen to do, but Bill Justis insisted and so they did it. (HD)

 
Ray Smith
"SAIL AWAY" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 355 - Take 2
Recorded: - February 21, 1959
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - March 23, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 319-B mono
SAIL AWAY / ROCKIN' BANDIT
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-4-6 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Ray Smith - Vocal
Stanley Walker - Guitar and Duet Vocals
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Gary Diamonds - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

"Sail Away" is a less gimmicky and highly effective outing for Smith. Here, the vocalist duets with his regular guitarist, Stanley Walker, in a Charlie Rich tune. Rich's influence can be heard in some powerful lyrical images ("I may find joy in some green valley / be a bum, live in an alley") as well as his omnipresent piano. No matter how you slice it, this is an anti love song. The feeling may be fairly universal, but the marketplace has rarely opened its arms to a lament saying "whatever it takes to get away from you, I'm all for it".

When visited an abandoned 706 Union Avenue in June, 1960, there were few signs of life at the old Sun studio. The floor was littered with returned 45s in piles nearly 3 feet deep.  On the day everyone moved to the new quarters on Madison Avenue, nobody had bothered to erase the chalkboard in the studio. It still contained the latest sales figures for the last batch of Sun releases. The very last entry on the list was SUN 319. Only five thousands units had been shipped as of moving today. Presumably, sales of this release eventually broke into five figures, before Sam Phillips realized that all the gunshot overdubs had been in vain. (HD)

 
Ernie Chaffin
"DON'T EVER LEAVE ME" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Singing River Music
Matrix number: - U 356 - Master
Recorded: - June 9, 1958 - Probably Recorded August 1958
Gulfport, Mississippi
Released: - April 27, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 320-A mono
PLEASE DON'T EVER LEAVE ME / MIRACLE OF YOU
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-4-7 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal and Guitar
Pee Wee Maddux - Guitar
More Details Unknown

What a joyous surprise to have Ernie depart from Sun in a style every bit as memorable as his arrival - perhaps even more countrified? After the pop experiments and excesses, ''Please Don't Ever Leave Me'' was a blessed return to fundamentals. Ernie's vocal is unadorned country and Ernie Harvey's work is mainstream country steel guitar. Interestingly, this final offering, by virtue of being so uncompromisingly country, lacks some of the brooding intensity of Chaffin's earlier work but makes up for it in pure country charm. (HD)(MH)

 
Ernie Chaffin
"MIRACLE OF YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Singing River Music
Matrix number: - U 357
Recorded: - June 9, 1958
Memphis Recording Service
706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Released: - April 27, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single SUN 320-B mono
MIRACLE OF YOU / PLEASE DON'T EVER LEAVE ME
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803 DI-4-8 mono digital
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal and Guitar
Other Details Unknown

This side is a credible entry into the country crossover sweepstakes. Chaffin's vocal is powerful, and the song itself is well crafted, although the dirge-like tempo doesn't help matters. The piano triplets make it clear that the pop market was in everybody's sights. Most notably, the chorus does not overwhelm the proceedings. Their sweetening is tasteful and minimal. Perhaps had either side of this outing showed some sign of commercial success, Sun would have extended its commitment to Ernie Chaffin. Sadly, he returned to Mississippi, where he continues to record Christian music in Gulfport, backed by his wife and children. (HD)

 
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