CONTAINS
For audio recordings click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1956 Sun Schedule <

1956 SESSIONS (12/3)
December 1, 1956 to December 31, 1956

Studio Session for Roy Orbison, December 14, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The College Kids, December 14, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, December 11, 1956 / Sun Records

Live Broadcast Recordings for Elvis Presley, December 15, 1956 

Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, December 20, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, November/December 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Glenn Honeycutt, December 28, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Trio, Late 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Singer, Late 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Harold Jenkins (Conway Twitty), December 31, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for J.R. & J.W. Brown, Late 1956/Early 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Artist (Probably Chuck Stacy) 1956/1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Arnold, 1956/1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Rudy Grayzell, Fall 1956 (1) / Starday Records
Studio Session for Rudy Grayzell, Probably 1957 (2) / Starday Records
Studio Session for Milton Mitt Addington, Unknown Date (1) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Mitton Addington, Unknown Date 1956 (2) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Mitton Addington, Unknown Dates 1956/1957 (3) / Sun Record

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Playlists of the Artists can be found on 706 Union Avenue Sessions of > YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1956

Although mos Sun artists came from the Tri-State area (Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas), the label's allure brought Roy Orbison from west Texas, and, in Orbison's wake came Wade Moore and Dick Penner, the pair who'd written Orbison's first hit, ''Ooby Dooby''. There's no better illustration of the studio at work than the two very different takes of Penner's ''Don't Need Your Lovin' Baby''. Another Penner song, ''Cindy Lou'', sported a guitar lick curiously similar to Tommy Blake's ''Lordy Hoody''. Guitarist Don Dow Gililland (yes, it's spelled that way) earns an occasional mention in vintage guitar mags for his work on Penner's recordings. It was exotic, spooky stuff for 1957. Partially sighted since birth, Gililland co-wrote Sid Kings'''Sag, Drag And Fall'' and became a jazz guitarist in Dallas while holding down a day job at Dallas Area Rapid Transit. Trivia note: he was in ''Rock Baby, Rock It'', the movie that starred Johnny Carroll and Rosco Gordon.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

On this date, Roy Orbison split with the Teen Kings

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY ORBISON & THE ROSES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY DECEMBER 14, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Roy Orbison sought to rectify that problem when he returned to the studio to cut his third Sun single, "Sweet And Easy To Love", backed with "Devil Doll". Taking his cue from Elvis Presley and The Jordanaires, Orbison had brought a vocal group, the Roses, in from Odessa, Texas for the session. The group consisting of Robert Linville, tenor; Ray Rush, baritone; and David Bigham, bass. They performed at high school dances, community events and on local television.

The midpaced ballad "Devil Doll" allowed Orbison's true musical soul to come up for air for the first time. By this point, Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings had parted company and Roy was working with session musicians and Sun's new engineer, Jack Clement.

> SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE <
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips-Roy Orbison
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 423 - Master (2:10)
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Released: - January 24, 1957 - Reissue as SUN 353 on November 25, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 265-A mono
SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE / DEVIL DOLL
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15082-3/23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

With "Only The Lonely" in 1960, sweeping its way through the pop charts, there is no way Sam Phillips wouldn't at least once to recycle some of his Roy Orbison material. The problem, of course, was what to recycle. No matter how you sliced it, Sun held title to Orbi the rocker, while it was Orbi the operatic story teller who was charming the kiddies. Despite their 1956 origins, these titles were chosen because they were less assertive than most of Orbi's catalogue. Moreover, they already boasted a male chorus. Who knows, maybe 1960 teens would take a fancy to barbershop quartets. Turns out, they didn't, and "Sveedle and Easy" sunk into obscurity for the second time in four years.

> DEVIL DOLL <
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips-Roy Orbison
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 424 - Master (2:08)
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Released: - January 24, 1957 - Reissue as SUN 353 on November 25, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 265-B mono
DEVIL DOLL / SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3/24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

During the rehearsals for "Devil Doll" and "Sweet And Easy", Roy Orbison split with the Teen Kings. "It happened right in the studio", recalled Sam Phillips. "They had some difficulty among themselves, and the band broke up then and there. Really it was nothing more than their being extremely young" "We had a commonwealth drawn up", assert James Morrow, "in which the royalties would be split equally five ways. At first the group was to be called 'The Teen Kings', but Sam Phillips and Bob Neal wanted it as 'Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings'. Bob also did not want an equal five-way split of royalties, and evidently Roy didn't want it either. We hand't actually signed anything, and that was where the disagreement arose. Jack, Billy Pat, Peanuts, and I went back to West Texas and formed another group for a few months".

The band ultimately split, but Orbison stayed in Memphis and asked his 16-year-old girlfriend, Claudette Frady, to join him. They stayed in Phillips' home, where they slept in separate rooms; in the studio Orbison concentrated on the mechanics of recording. Sam Phillips remembered being much more impressed with Orbison's mastery of the guitar than his voice. Sun Records producer Jack Clement told Orbison after hearing it that he would never make it as a ballad singer.

> LOVE DUMB BABY <
Composer: - Ray Harris
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take - Not Originally Issued (0:27)
Recorded: - Probably December 14, 1956 - Roy Orbison Vocal and Guitar Only
Released: - 2001
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1/10 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Probably Stan Kesler - Bass
The Roses, Vocal Chorus
Consisting of Robert Linville, Tenor;
Ray Rush, Baritone; and David Bigham, Bass.

Roy Orbison completed the sessions with the Sun house musicians. When he went out on the road, he used other artists groups to support him. "The first time I met him", recalls Warren Smith's drummer, Jimmy Lott, "was at the Club Zanzibar in Hayti, Missouri. I never realized that Roy had a sight problem until he got ready to go on stage. He took his glasses off, and Warren had to lead him to the microphone like he was blind. He worked hard at being a rock and roller, but even then you could see his heart wasn't in it".

Billy Pat Ellis remembered that Roy and Sam Phillips had gone to Taylor's restaurant next door to the studio when the Teen Kings decided to load up and head back to Texas. Phillips remembered sitting in his little office when Roy came in looking like death.

''They were racking up their drums and walked out'', he said. Jack Kennelly took over the Cadillac and looked out of his window one day to see it being repo'd. Orbison was in the middle of recording his third single, ''Sweet And Easy To Love''/''Devil Doll''. ''Orbison's band walked out on him, so Sam called me and J.M. van Eaton to come work at the session'', remembered Stan Kesler. It was the first time he'd played bass on a session.

Most of the surviving Teen Kings now admit that the only reason anyone has any interest in the group is because of Roy Orbison, but that was less apparent to them in 1956. Only two Teen Kings stayed in the music business; Jack Kennelly became a studio owner in Alberquerque, New Mexico, and Peanuts Wilson became a songwriter. Just five feet tall, he was dubbed ''Peanuts'' to avoid confusion with Jackie Wilson. He moved to Nashville and co-wrote C.W. McCall's big hit, ''Roses For Mama'', and Kenny Rogers ''Love The World Away''. He also worked as a songplugger for Fred Foster's Combine Music until his death in September 1980 at the age of 44. 

For Biography of Roy Orbison see: > The Sun Biographies <
Roy Orbison's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

THE ROSES - Consisting of Robert Linville, tenor; Ray Rush, baritone; David Bigham, bass. They performed at high school dances, community events and on local television. The Roses were also under contract with Dot Records and recorded the vocal version of "Almost Paradise'', written by Norman Petty.

On December 14, 1956, Roy Orbison had brought a vocal group, the Roses, in from Odessa, Texas for his Sun session for his ''Sweet And Easy To Love'' b/w ''Devil Doll'' (Sun 265) release. In 1957 and 1958, "The Roses" were involved in sessions almost every night at the Petty Studio.

In the fall of 1958, The Roses toured with Buddy Holly and the Crickets on Alan Freed's Fall Show of Stars. The Roses were the only vocal group to travel and perform on stage with Buddy Holly.

In 1995, The Roses participated in a Benefit Show in Oklahoma City with Bobby Vee for the Bomb Victims Relief Fund. Since then, The Roses have done several concerts with Bobby Vee and the Vees. In 1997, The Roses appeared at the "Winter Dance Party" in Clear Lake, Iowa with The Crickets. In 2000, The Roses were inducted into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. They also recorded with The Shackshakers, The Fireballs and Jerry Naylor. The Roses co-produce The Norman and Vi Petty Music Festival in June of each year.

DECEMBER 1956

Although mos Sun artists came from the Tri-State area (Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas), the label's allure brought Roy Orbison from west Texas, and, in Orbison's wake came Wade Moore and Dick Penner, the pair who'd written Orbison's first hit, ''Ooby Dooby''. There's no better illustration of the studio at work than the two very different takes of Penner's ''Don't Need Your Lovin' Baby''. Another Penner song, ''Cindy Lou'', sported a guitar lick curiously similar to Tommy Blake's ''Lordy Hoody''. Guitarist Don Dow Gililland (yes, it's spelled that way) earns an occasional mention in vintage guitar mags for his work on Penner's recordings. It was exotic, spooky stuff for 1957. Partially sighted since birth, Gililland co-wrote Sid Kings'''Sag, Drag And Fall'' and became a jazz guitarist in Dallas while holding down a day job at Dallas Area Rapid Transit. Trivia note: he was in ''Rock Baby, Rock It'', the movie that starred Johnny Carroll and Rosco Gordon.

DECEMBER 14, 1956 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley and three members of his entourage were getting ready to leave Memphis and drive their trip to Shreveport, home of the Louisiana Hayride. Along for the ride was director Hal Kanter, which collected the background information for Elvis upcoming movie "Loving You“.

Singer/songwriter Woody Guthrie writes for the last time, composing a letter about a fellow patient at Greystone Park in Morris Plains, New Jersey, who eats cigarette butts off the floor. Guthrie is suffering from a degenerative neurological disease.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The only logged Wade Moore and Dick Penner session at Sun. ''Dad said Sam Phillips wanted them to move to Memphis'', said Lane Cowart (daughter of Wade Moore). Apparently, Dad was thrilled but Dick wanted to continue his studies at North Texas so they did not go''. Wade and Dick had gone their separate ways by the time Penner recorded his solo session on February 16, 1957.

STUDIO SESSION FOR WADE MOORE & DICK PENNER (THE COLLEGE KIDS)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY DECEMBER 14, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

If Wade Moore and Dick Penner are remembered by Sun fans, it will not be for this recording. The Collage Kids primarily remembered for writing the immortal "Ooby Dooby", brought to fame on Roy Orbison's first Sun record. As vocalists, the duo offer an appealing blend, although Dick Penner's high voice predominates and works against the sterotyped virile Sun style. In fact, both sides of this recording have a minor key sound not typically associated with Sun artists.

North Texas State University in Denton was their seat of learning and part of their daily routine was to lie in the sun on the frat house roof and write songs for sun.. This session was taped during the Yuletide vacation of 1956.

> BOP BOP BABY <
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:08)
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1024 mono
HOT SOUTHERN BOPPERS
Reissued: - 2008 Big 3 Internet iTunes MP3-38
MUSIC THAT INSPIRED WALK THE LINE

"Bop Bop Baby" lives up to its name with a solid stop-rhythm and excellent instrumental work. The side is unusual in that it flirts with being in a minor key thoughout. Minor key rockers were uncommon on Sun's or anyone release schedule. The guitar work on the first solo is sparkling and nicely complemented by the electric bass. The second solo forsake minor key magic and borrows liberally from the melody line of "Roll Over Beethoven".

> BOP BOP BABY < 
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 250 Take 2 - Master (2:08)
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 269-A mono
BOP BOP BABY / DON'T NEED YOUR LOVIN' BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-4/7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

"Don't Need Your Lovin' Baby" is really a solo vehicle for Dick Penner. The guitar work has a distinctive oriental flavor to it, yet it rocks in a solid bluesy groove. Again, there are enough flatted thirds to keep the song;s key signature ambiguous. What is quite clear here is the marvellous interplay between the lead guitar and an unidentified drummer. Not since Jerry Lee and Jimmy Van Eaton, has such rapport been heard on a Sun record. Billboard was also impressed and touted this "wailing minor blues" in its May 27, 1957 review. Although Dick Penner was back in the Sun studio two months later as a solo act, this is Wade and Dick's only appearance on this session.

> DON'T NEED YOUR LOVIN' BABY <
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 251 - Master (2:43)
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 269-B mono
DON'T NEED YOUR LOVIN' BABY / BOP BOP BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-4/8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

> DON'T NEED YOUR LOVIN' BABY <
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (3:00)
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Vocal Dick Penner Only
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1024-3 mono
HOT SOUTHERN BOPPERS
Reissued: - 1998 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8317-19 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 5

> WILD WOMAN <
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:46)
Recorded: - December 14, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1023-1 mono
ROCK AND ROLL PILS
Reissued: - 1999 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 9353-16 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL - VOLUME 3

SOMEONE I'LL LOVE
Composer: - Wade Lee Moore-Allen Richard Dick Penner
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 14, 1956

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wade Moore - Vocal
Dick Penner - Vocal and Guitar*
Don Gilliland - Bass
Bob Izer - Guitar
Probably Roger Berkely – Drums

Extensive biography of Dick Penner and Wade Moore see: The Sun Biographies

For Biography of The College Kids see: > The Sun Biographies <
The College Kids' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION : TUESDAY DECEMBER 11, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

The second Phillips International release was all the reassurance Sun collectors needed that this new label would not specialize in tepid white pop music. This two-sided gen by Hayden Thompson put joy in the hearts of rockabilly lovers and Sun fans everywhere and told an apprehensive world that the wildman, unrepentant rockabilly antics at 706 Union had found a second home. There were now two Memphis labels to watch and collect.

On this session, Jack Clement brought in a young pianist who had just joined the Sun label and who had been helping out on sessions with Carl Perkins and others. Just a day before he had played with Billy Riley's band and Clement thought that Jerry Lee Lewis could usefully add a little rhythmic power to the already formidable pace of "Love My Baby". It was one of these December 11 takes that was chosen for release by Sun Records' boss Sam Phillips and marked as such on a tape box nine days later.

The sweet smell of Elvis Presley's success was sufficient to lure the teenager to 706 Union and his thundering "Love My Baby" was captured for posterity during one of Sun's busiest ever periods. For added measure, a precocious Jerry Lee Lewis railroads the studio Spinet.

> LOVE MY BABY <
Composer: - Herman Parker-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 305 - Master (2:09)
Recorded: - December 11,1956
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single PI 3517-A mono
LOVE MY BABY / ONE BROKEN HEART
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

LOVE MY BABY
Composer: - Herman Parker-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporation
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued (2:32)
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) BFX 15263-1 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - FAIRLANE ROCK
Reissued: - 1997 Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm 270131-2/29 mono
LOVE MY BABY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Jerry Lee Lewis - Piano
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

Note: other versions of "Love My Baby" have been issued on Bear Family, Charly and other labels.

For Biography of Hayden Thompson see: > The Sun Biographies <
Hayden Thompson's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1956

Hayden Thompson recorded for Sun at the dawn of a long career... in fact, an ongoing career as of this writing. The idea to record ''Love My Baby'' apparently came from Billy Riley, who, says Thompson, had already recorded it, although the tape hasn't survived.

Certainly, Phillips was in favor of some recording ''Love My Baby'' because he'd asquired the publishing when he issued Junior Parker's original version in 1953. Rockabilly purists insist that the piano has no place on a rockabilly record, but Jerry Lee Lewis's subtle underscoring is entirely appropriate. There weren't many great singles on Phillips International, but ''Love My Baby'' was one of them, and nothing Thompson ever recorded over his career eclipsed it.

DECEMBER 15, 1956 SATURDAY

A yellow Caddy limousine pulled in from Memphis at five a.m. and a weary Elvis Presley checked into the Captain Shreve Hotel in downtown Shreveport, Louisiana. It is hard to imagine that this is the place were barely two years earlier Elvis with Scotty, Bill and Sam Phillips sat together, dreaming of leaving truck driving for a career in music.

When Elvis slept a few hours in the early morning hours in his hotel room, according to a statement launched by the "The Shreveport Journal," groups of female teens an unrestricted "find Elvis" campaign. Oscar Davis, one of Colonel Parker's assistant told the newspaper he did not know where Elvis lodges, but it would not surprise him if his fans would find him. The teenager, said Davis, had a pretty successful, coordinated system for it.

And now, Elvis was back here, has a longing for just a little peace and quiet. He opened the window of his room and shouted down a plea for quiet to the crowd already forming below, so he could get some much needed sleep after the tiring journey. The secrecy of Elvis' room number and its position was, despite of all efforts by the police, failed.

Captain Shreve Hotel a young fan took the big prize. The 9-year-old Philippa "Flip" Unger from Denton, Texas and her mother stopped on the way home by the hotel. When she heard that Elvis was in the city, they decided to stay in order to watch his show at the Fairgrounds. But "Flip" received more than she had expected; it has allowed her the access to Elvis' room to meet him and she got "a big hug" and an autograph.

Those fans who were not looking for Elvis and were spectators for the show in the evening at 8 p.m., already gathered outside the Youth Center. Teenager Billie Jean Prescott captured the first place in the row, when she arrived at 7a.m. early in the Youth Center.

Meanwhile, the police turned their attention to the upcoming concert. A plot was hatched to set up a fake Elvis to decoy the avid fans away from the real one. Patrolman Robert Catts had the same build and sleepy eyes as Elvis. So he was awarded (or punished, depending on how you look at it) with the task of impersonating the King. Officer Catts was outfitted in Elvis attire and a pink Cadillac was even brought in from a local car dealer to complete the ruse. At an appointed hour the Caddy took off with a police escort for the five mile journey to the state fairgrounds. When the motorcade pulled up to the entrance of the Youth Building, Catts and his entourage were mobbed while the real Elvis slipped quietly in the backdoor almost unnoticed.

It had been just over two years since Elvis had first appeared on the stage of the Louisiana Hayride. The Youth Building had a seating capacity of about 10,000 and every ticket had been sold. The plan was to setting up a fence in front of the stage and limiting the number of chairs on the floor, but as soon as the doors were opened, that plan went out the window. A solid mass of teenagers grabbed the chairs and drug them as close to the stage as possible.

Elvis arrived at the Youth Center in the early evening to keep his usual press conference before the show. All in all it was a busy night for Elvis. The two primary local newspapers, “The Shreveport Times” and “The Shreveport Journal” dispatched their top photographers to cover the mayhem. Langston McEachern shot for the Times and Jack Barham for the Journal. The two were given unlimited access to the facility and moved about freely on stage and off.

Probably the most meaningful autograph, which gave Elvis that day, received Mrs. Betty Fields, a polio patient, who was since 1957 in the Confederate Memorial Hospital. She was brought with a so-called "iron lung" including equipment in the Youth Center to meet their idol. The meeting she had won in a radio contest.

But this evening was also a great challenge for Shreveport’s police. The teenager gave the impression that they wanted, with all their enthusiasm, tear Elvis into pieces and the police erected more or less effective barricades around the building, which barely was enough to protect Elvis from the hordes of fans. It needed a remarkable agility of Elvis as he fled before his admirers from one room to another - always two steps ahead of his fans.

Elvis spoke briefly with the two Presidents of Elvis fan clubs, Janelle Alexander of Shreveport and Kay Wheeler of Dallas. Janelle later told reporters that when she met Elvis, she experienced at the same time the "feeling" of love, hate, anger, hero worship, excitement and even a lot more, that she wouldn’t say. Kay agreed with the words: "Every time I meet him, I freak out. He is the most fascinating person I ever knew. Elvis is the living image of all that teenagers should see and hear“.

Bob Masters, reporter of "The Shreveport Times" reported that Elvis prolonged the press conference for a Christmas greeting to local teens: "Cool Yule and a fantastic first".

In addition to his duties for the "Shreveport Journal," Jack Barham was on assignment for “Life Magazine”. Life was preparing a story about Elvis and needed a photo to illustrate a conversation between Elvis Presley and his Japanese counterpart. And yes, there were Elvis-impersonators even back then!

Backstage was “organized chaos” at best and Jack found Elvis and Colonel Parker in a small room amid a sea of media, fans, promoters and Hayride performers. Jack explained to the Colonel the need to “stage” a shot of ‘Elvis on the phone to illustrate the conversation that had already had taken place between the two nationals. The Colonel seized upon the excuse to clear the room and give his star some quiet tie before the performance. The dressing room had one standard rotary phone with a six-foot cord on a shelf in the corner. The cramped quarters quickly proved unyielding as Jack searched a vain for a good angle and the Colonel grew impatient. A search of the other rooms backstage determined this was the only phone and show time was fast approaching. The situation seemed hopeless. Colonel Parker – however – was not to be defeated. He quickly provided his own solution by yanking the phone from the wall and bellowing at Jack and Elvis to follow him into the hall. A folding chair was plopped down and Elvis was ordered to talk on the phone whose shredded wires dangled out of frame. Jack sat Elvis in the chair backwards for a casual feeling and the photo shot was over in short order.

Elvis retreated back inside the dressing room and invited Jack Barham to keep him company while he warmed up for the show. Not one to waste the moment, Colonel Parker grabbed Langston McEachern and talked him into take pictures of his wheeler-dealer self, that shows him working the phones like “doing business”. Dishonest? Yes, but that was Colonel Tom Parker.

McEachern and Barham swirled around Elvis, trying to capture some of his tremendous energy on film. Both snapped pictures furiously and did their best with the existing lightening conditions. Neither really sensed the lasting impact Elvis would have on the music scene. Langston: “None of us did. He was just our friend Elvis and this was for us just one more night on the job.” With that in mind, Langston McEachern broke free and rushed off to make the headline for “The Shreveport Times”. Jack Barham stayed behind to finish up.

The most impressive stick of audio of this evening in the archives of the Hayride is Elvis' addition of "Hound Dog", which was pure dynamite. His change in the short span of two years is nowhere more evident than in this interpretation of his popular hit. Record- and movie producers watched the concert, and were, though forewarned, speechless.

Comparisons to a young Frank Sinatra would no longer paint the picture of the power Elvis had and the frenzy his presence could evoke. This was something new, something entirely different. The world was, at last, ready for Elvis.

Finally it was show time - the last time this year 1956. Elvis entered the stage this evening at 21.30. During his appearance he was backing by "The Jordanaires", a popular gospel group that toured and recorded many years with Elvis. Horace Logan Elvis turned to the audience, who took the stage - dressed in white shoes with blue sole, a green jacket, blue pants, white shirt, tie and scarf. His 35-minute performance included ten songs: ''Heartbreak Hotel'', ''Long Tall Sally'', ''I Was The One'', ''Love Me Tender'', ''Don’t Be Cruel'', ''Love Me'', ''I Got A Woman'', ''When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again'', ''Paralyzed'' and ''Hound Dog.''

Pericles Alexander, entertainment editor of "The Shreveport Times" wrote: Elvis mere appearance on the Hayride stage caused nuclear flashbulbs of photographers and screams of teenagers, which swelled into a pandemonium. Regardless of the circular motion of the troubadour, he was rarely, if ever, heard from the audience, who shouted as the Zulus at every little muscle twitch. The Pelvis put more "body"-English in a song as many throwers in baseball and he moved often and better than a well-oiled Swiss watch''.

Bob Masters of “The Shreveport Times” wrote in an article: ''Elvis Presley came to town yesterday, and last night 9,000 rock and rollers “flipped”. His appearance on the stage of the Louisiana Hayride at the fairgrounds Youth Center set off was undoubtedly one of the finest displays of mass hysteria in Shreveport history. Presumably he sang: you couldn’t hear him over the screams of the frenzied 9,000. But at least his hips were moving and his pelvis certainly was. He wasn’t halfway through “Heartbreak Hotel” before it became apparent nobody ever had a more appropriate nickname. It was a hectic evening for Elvis all around. A scheduled press conference more nearly resembled a mob scene with representative of the press and radio lost among the throngs of fans, autograph seekers and the curious who infiltrated the meeting. A brief talk with the Pelvis – who finally managed to escape the mob with about two minutes remaining in his 60 minutes “press conference” – disclosed that he was glad to be back in Shreveport, has four Cadillac and a Lincoln Continental and apparently enjoyed all the fuss made over him''.

Frank Page: “I was present at all performances of Elvis' here, which he made at the Louisiana Hayride, and knew how the audience would react to this young man. I was prepared for greater things, but I was not prepared for this night. When Elvis finally came on stage, thousands of Brownie Reflex cameras starts going at the same time. On some photos that were shot that night, show me on one side of the stage and I look out scared and anxious. I was! I had never seen 10,000 teens that shouted themselves the top of their lungs. It was absolutely frightening. The screams began when Elvis took the stage and they did not stop throughout his performance. Many people told later that the audience could not tell whether he was singing or not or whether the band was playing, but it cared nobody. "The King" was back at home''.

The now legendary phrase “Elvis has left the building” was first uttered by Horace Logan that night quite by accident. The show had been a regular performance of the Louisiana Hayride and Elvis was the third act of about twenty. Once his performance was over and the encore complete, the crow of teenagers made for the exits. In a futile plea for the acts that would follow, Horace Logan made the announcement to assure the audience that Elvis would not be back out but that there was still much left of the regular show. The crowd’s exodus continued unabated. The show somehow went on.

Horace Logan: “All right, uh. Elvis has left the building. I have told you absolutely straight up this point – you know, that he has left the building. He left the stage and went out in the back with the policemen and he is now gone from the building. I remind you again that the Hayride will continue right on till 11.30 p.m., presenting, again, most of the country artists that you have seen tonight. We’ll be very pleased to have you remain with us. I invite you also to tune in tonight, all of you who are listening to KWKH, to our Red River Round up which, beginning at 11.30 p.m., will be heard straight through until one o’clock tonight. You’ll have the opportunity of hearing on that show a gre3at many of the country music disc jockeys who are visiting with us here tonight in the Youth Building of the Louisiana State Fairgrounds. I’d like to remind you that this performance tonight was a benefit performance for the YMCA of the city of Shreveport. Elvis receives no money whatsoever for his performance here tonight. All of the proceeds other than the actual expenses of presenting the show will go to the Shreveport YMCA. I must say this for you young ladies and gentlemen. You have been exactly that: Young ladies and gentlemen, and we are very proud of you for your performance here tonight. It’s been so nice having you with us. If you’d like to sit down now, we’re going to go on with the show here in just about five minutes. You’re listening to the Louisiana Hayride, coming to you from the Youth Building at the Louisiana State Fairgrounds, home of the Centenary College basketball games for 1957''.

Elvis spent the night in Shreveport before he went home the next morning. "The Shreveport Journal" described the scene at the hotel as follow: “The Rock And Roll Czar had a reasonably quiet departure on Sunday morning. About 50 of his fans gathered in the "Captain Shreve" lobby to see leave their idol. A lot of police officers and security of the hotel protect Elvis, so that teenagers do not tear him to pieces in their infatuation''. Elvis gave still some autographs.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

LIVE BROADCAST RECORDINGS FOR ELVIS PRESLEY
FOR KWKH'S LOUISIANA HAYRIDE, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA, 1956

HIRSCH YOUTH CENTER
LOUISIANA FAIRGROUNDS, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
DECEMBER 15, 1956 - VIEWING TIME TV-STATION KWKH
SESSION HOURS: 8:00 PM
PRODUCER - HORACE LOGAN

Elvis Presley made his final performance on ''The Louisiana Hayride''. The now legendary fraise ''Elvis has left the building'' was first made by Horace Logan on this night.

Some of the shows from the ''Louisiana Hayride'' were very poorly recorded. The most up to date technology has been used to restore the original tapes. Every efforts had been made to achieve optimum quality however, priority is given to its historical content.

HEARTBREAK HOTEL
Composer: - Mae Boren Axton-Tommy Durden-Elvis Presley
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Elvis Presley Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - HRA1-8689 (2:42)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-16 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-C/5 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

Only the second half of ''Heartbreak Hotel'' was recorded. For completeness, the first half of the song is taken from Elvis' performance in Tupelo Mississippi on the September 26, 1956 show.

LONG TALL SALLY
Composer: - Enotris Johnson-Richard Penneman-Robert Blackwell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Southern Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - HRA1-8690 (2:37)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-17 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-C/6 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

I WAS THE ONE
Composer: - Aaron Schroeder-Claude DeMetruis-Hal Blair-Pepe Pepers
Publisher: - A.S.C.A.P. - MCA Music
Matrix number: - HRA1-8691 (3:14)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-18 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-C/7 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

LOVE ME TENDER
Composer: - Vera Matson-Elvis Presley
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Elvis Presley Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - HRA1-8692 (3:38)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-19 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-C/8 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

DON'T BE CRUEL
Composer:- Otis Blackwell-Elvis Presley
Publisher:- B.M.I. - Elvis Presley Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - HRA1-8693 (3:06)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-20 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-D/1 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

LOVE ME
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: B.M.I. - Jerry Leiber Music-Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - HRA1-8694 (3:08)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-21 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-D/2 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

I GOT A WOMAN
Composer: - Ray Charles
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Progressive Music
Matrix number: - HRA1-8695 (3:36)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-22 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-D/3 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

WHEN MY BLUE MOON TURNS TO GOLD AGAIN
Composer: - Willie Walker-Gene Sullivan
Publisher: - B.M.I. - APRS
Matrix number: - HRA1-8696(2:49)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-23 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-D/4 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

PARALAZED
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-Elvis Presley
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Elvis Presley Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - HRA1-8697 (2:44)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-24 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-D/5 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

HOUND DOG
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: B.M.I. - Jerry Leiber Music-Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - HRA1-8698 (4:56)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-25 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-D/6 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

ELVIS HAS LEFT THE BUILDING
Matrix number: - None (2:02)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-26 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956
Reissued: - April 16, 2016 Memphis Recording Service (LP) 33rpm MRV 4000 1256-D/7 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

HAYRIDE END JINGLE
Matrix number: - None (0:44)
Recorded: - December 15, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Memphis Recording Service (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 30001256-27 mono
THE COMPLETE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE ARCHIVES 1954-1956

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elvis Presley - Vocal and Acoustic Rhythm Guitar (Martin Dreadnought 18)
Scotty Moore - Electric Lead Guitar (Gibson ES 295)
Bill Black - Acoustic Upright Bass (Kay Maestro M-1)
Dominic Joseph Fontana - Drums Gretsch

Vocal Accompaniment by The Jordanaires consisting of
Gorden Stoker - Tenor Lead Vocal
Neal Matthews - Tenor Vocal
Hugh Jarrett - Bass Vocal
Hoyt Hawkins - Baritone Vocal

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 16, 1956 SUNDAY

The Shreveport Times wrote in an article from 16.12.1956: To Aid YMCA Elvis has reportedly made a million dollars or more in the last couple of years – he commands top pay for his performances – but last night he did his gymnastics for nothing. But the singer and the members of the KWKH Hayride contribute receipts to the Shreveport YMCA’s expansion program. Elvis seemed to be glad to perform for nothing – and certainly he didn’t spate the gyrations, For 35 minutes or thereabouts he gave what can certainly be described as an “unforgettable” performance. It was a big night for the Shreveport police force, too. With teenagers giving every indication of tearing the Pelvis limb from limb out of sheer admiration and animal spirits, the police threw up more or less effective barricades throughout the building. They were effective enough to keep Presley from being mobbed, but just barely. It required considerable agility to keep up with him as he fled from one room to another – always a step or two ahead of his admirers. All in all, it was a big event in several respects and a good time was had by all, maybe Elvis more than anybody else. Whether Shreveport will ever be the same again remains to be seen''.

DECEMBER 16, 1956 SUNDAY

Tab Hunter recorded a pop version of the just-released Sonny James hit ''Young Love'', using The Jordanaires on backing vocals.

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans guest on NBC-TV's ''The Dinah Shore Chevy Show''.

DECEMBER 17, 1956 MONDAY

Bass player Roy Huskey Jr. is born in Nashville. He appears on recordings by Alan Jackson, Ricky Van Shelton, Travis Tritt, Ricky Shaggs and The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, among others.

Columbia released Marty Robbins' double-sided hit, ''Knee Deep In The Blues'' and ''The Same Two Lips''.

DECEMBER 17, 1956

In an article in dated December 17, 1956 compared "The Shreveport Journal" Elvis with three former teen idols: “One thing is clear: the youth is a phenomenon," the Journal observed. “Cosby, Valle, Sinatra and all the others together in one person, did not get the same wild homage as the 21-year-old Mississippian receives. The strange thing is that Cosby, Valle and Sinatra have a definable talent. Presley, according to the standard none, but it is perhaps the prototype of a new form of entertainment. Anything you can do is to hope.

Elvis came back to Shreveport a couple of times after that memorable 1956 performance and regularly sent those responsible for the Hayride telegrams updating on his hectic career. With the medium of television now a permanent fixture and the change in popular music firmly in place, the Louisiana Hayride would fade from sight in the sixties, but for Elvis the journey was just beginning. Many groups rush to take credit for Elvis Presley’s career but the Louisiana Hayride is not among them. He alone was responsible for creating and maintaining a style that remains unique to this day. Elvis gave a rise to Rockabilly which, in turn, became the heart and soul of modern pop music.

Frank Page: “Elvis called me on one occasion to urge us to keep the Hayride going and thank us for what we’d done for him. His last appearance in Shreveport was July 1, 1976''.

Elvis Presley fans and fan clubs are still coming to Shreveport and stop at the Municipal Auditorium, which still looks exactly like in the 1950's. They want to stand where Elvis stood, want to see his wardrobe and where he lived. In recent times, the dressing room was decorated with pictures and stories of his Hayride performances and renamed the street in "Elvis Presley Avenue - a final tribute to this great showman.

Frank Page: ''For Hank Williams and the other stars or superstars who entered our stage, the Louisiana Hayride was a place where we all met, they were together, a place where we rehearsed for the big moment. But we also met a family and Elvis - the favorite son. These 18 months, which he spent with us, are frozen in time - gone but not forgotten, his music and the energy of his performances. Who could ever forgotten his appearance, his clothes, the fever and the promise of "good rockin' tonight".

Slim Whitman: “Once when I came off stage after my act, Elvis said “Let me wear your coat”. I told him it was way too big for him but I let him wear it. As usual, his act tore the place apart and when he came off I kidded him “Man, the only reason you went over so big is because they all thought it was me out in that coat''.

Betty Amos: “I was very fond of Elvis but sometimes I didn’t like him very much. He could be sweet, gentle, kind and thoughtful, but perplexing and aggravating too. He was sexy, handsome, childish and, at times, downright cruel. He’d hit me and I’d hit him. Looking back, I suppose in all probability I was the closest he ever came to having a sister''.

Jeanette Hicks: “Elvis was one good locking man. Those eyes! He liked to play pee-a-boo. He used to sneak up behind me backstage, cover my eyes and say “Guess who?” in a funny voice. Well, there was no mistake who it was''.

Vera “Dido” Rowley: “I remember one Saturday night at the Hayride. Jim Reeves had gone to California for a screen test and I was sitting backstage with Elvis. He asked me “You ever think I’ll get a screen test?” I told him “Sure. You’ll be the biggest star ever”. He was flabbergasted. “You really think so?” I said “It’s written all over you”.

On the 50th Anniversary of Elvis' first appearance with the fee of $ 18 per night, a larger than life statue was erected in front of the steps of the Municipal Auditorium.

Horace Logan died in 2002 in Victoria, Texas. Frank Page died four years later in Shreveport, the city in which some of the biggest and hottest talent of the rockabilly music made their way across through the country and their artistic successes can be most likely never copied.

Over 60 years have passed since the Louisiana Hayride with his music the bayous and swampy arms of the river its home countries, the westerly small towns and farms in Texas, north and east of the low-yielding farms of Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama and neighboring states flooded with his music. To the live broadcasted Saturday night's show from the Municipal Auditorium danced the population on their porches, in living rooms, in the Honkytonks and even in churches throughout all the land.

In the 1960s, television was the center of family activity and stars such as Bob Hope, etc. switched from radio to television. The Louisiana Hayride was not as important as formerly for rising stars. The TV was now the instrument by which they were known nationally – like Elvis' appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show was. In the 1970s, the Hayride ceased to exist and the shows were set, his fame from a bygone era.

In 1975, Dave Kent contacted KWKH to buy the name of the Hayride. The name "Hayride" was never copyrighted and since the radio station had no intention of ever using the name again, Kent was more than welcome. The management of KWKH never had the foresight to leave to protect the name. But even more incredible was the sloppy method of employees to preserve the history of this important show. Around the time when Kent bought the Louisiana Hayride, KWKH moved of the longtime location in the Texas Road in Shreveport to a location on Interstate 20. Moving companies broke some things and threw others away. The management of the radio station asked Kent if he wanted an old box of recordings of the show, which was still in their possession. He sent out his son Joey Kent to pick up the old stuff, and while he was still there, they asked him if he can help to remove an old desk. When the desk was moved away, a reel dropped that was wedged between the desk and the wall, to the ground and wrapped itself off. Joey held the coil on his foot and discovered the name "Elvis" on the tape. When he and his father sounded, it turns out that it was the recording of Elvis Hayride debut.

It was a great success for the Louisiana Hayride and Elvis Presley. The radio broadcasts of the show made Elvis outside Tennessee’s a larger audience. Elvis ushered in a new musical era; his first single is considered the first “Rockabilly” single in music history.

DECEMBER 18, 1956 TUESDAY

Comedian Ron White is born in Fritch, Texas. He becomes a member of the Blue Collar Comedy Tour, scoring a Top 10 country album.

DECEMBER 19, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Gene Vincent's ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'' is one of 14 musical performances in the Jayne Mansfield movie ''The Girl Can't Help It'', which debuts in theaters. Also performing, Eddie Cochran, Fats Domino, Little Richard, Bobby Troup and The Platters.

DECEMBER 20, 1956 THURSDAY

Fiddler Rob Hajacos is born in Richmond, Virginia. He becomes one of Nashville's most in-demand players working sessions by Taylor Swift, Garth Brooks, Shania Twain, Alan Jackson, Brooks and Dunn and Reba McEntire, among others.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY DECEMBER 20, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

The song marked for release, "One Broken Heart", was also worked to over more than one session, starting in October as a tentative country ballad and ending on December 20 as a much more produced item with an interesting rhythm and changes in tempo and mood. Hayden is his own vocally, and handles the ballad and its changes in tempo brilliantly.

On this side, Thompson provided Knox Music with some original material of his own. Starting with a deceptive Latin rhythm. Thompson soon breaks free into 4/4 rhythm, much as his hero Elvis had done in this same studio just two years earlier on "Milkcow Blues Boogie".

> ONE BROKEN HEART <
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporation
Matrix number: - P 306 - Master (2:26)
Recorded: - December 20, 1956
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single PI 3517-B mono
ONE BROKEN HEART / LOVE MY BABY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson - Vocal & Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
J.M. Van Eaton - Drums

Note: other versions of "One Broken Heart" have been issued on Bear Family, Charly and other labels.

For Biography of Hayden Thompson see: > The Sun Biographies <
Hayden Thompson's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

END 1956

While Hayden Thompson was waiting for his own break on Sun Records, Hayden started to tour a little with some of the people he had met the Sun studio. It seems that his own ambition was greater than that of his own band members, the Jazzliners, perhaps compounded by his having recorded with other musicians.

Thompson also played his rock and roll act, featuring himself and his Presley imitation, with a much older band, Slim Rhodes and his Mountaineers, who were veterans of the mid-South country circuit and of Sun Records.

Hayden said, "When I think of Slim Rhodes and his band, I think of some of the greatest people I've ever worked with. They were a fine band, really professional.

They had been very big all over the South for years before met them. They'd been on WMC radio for years and when I knew Slim he also had a TV show there in Memphis. Slim was from the era well before rock and roll and he was country, but he also knew how to keep current with the trends. He always had a featured singer in his shows, along with his own band and singers.

So that's how I got hooked up with him. He wanted to feature some rock and roll in his show. So I joined him for three or four months as a featured act in the spring and summer of 1957. We travelled all over Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and the Memphis area''.

Jerry Lee Lewis and Sam Phillips in the Sun Studio >

END 1956

Despite his touring commitments, Jerry Lee Lewis was extraordinarily prolific in the studio during 1957 and early 1958. With Roland Janes and J.M. Van Eaton trying to follow him as best they could, Lewis would plunder his subconscious for songs, hoping to find something that would catch Phillips' ear.

The variety was enormous: sentimental hillbilly weepers in waltz time, such as ''I'm Throwing Rice'', contemporary country hits like ''Singing The Blues'', rhythm and blues songs like ''Sixty Minute Man'' and ''Honey Hush'', old pop favorites such as ''Love Letters In The Sand'', folksongs like ''Crawdad Hole'', a little gospel in the form of ''Old Time Religion'', and even one giantly egotistical original ''Lewis Boogie''.

Surprisingly, it is the music left in the outtake boxes that provides the definitive proof of Lewis's genius. In his hands, an impossibly wide variety of material is recast nto a uniform body of work, what Robert Palmer terms an ''innovative transformation of source materials''. If he had written all of the songs, instead of just a few, it could not have been more consistent. Lewis was able to make almost any song into a supple vehicle for self-expression. For that reason alone, he didn't need to write. If Sam Phillips thought a song had merit and wanted to hear it another way, Lewis could change the time signature, the tempo, the key, his phrasing, even the lyrics, at the drop of a hat.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956/1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Amongst Jerry Lee Lewis' earliest recordings are two examples of early twentieth-century ''folk blues'', again demonstrating the broad range of the material which he so easily embraced and adapted to his own style. The opening passages of each of two takes of ''Deep Elem Blues'' are in very much the same vein but, once past the mid-point of each, Lewis draws upon discrete sets of lyrics. The less familiar of the two have greater poignancy and perhaps deserve to have been more widely heard, in preference to those on the reading of the song selected for release in September 1970 on the Sun International LP ''Ole Time Country Music''. The rather less disciplined piano solo may have counted against its prospects when Shelby Singleton reviewed the tapes; ot maybe, having heard the first half of the alternate take, no-one bothered to listen beyond the second verse.(*)

> DEEP ELEM BLUES (1) < 
Composer: - Bob Attlesey-Joe Attlesey
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:44)
Recorded: - November/December 1956
Released: 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD Charly 70-5 mono
RARE AND ROCKIN'
Reissued: - 1991 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUND 35-1/1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS THE ALTERNATE COLLECTION

The "Deep Elm Blues" is an American traditional song. The title of the tune refers to historical African American neighborhood in downtown Dallas, Texas, known as Deep Ellum, and a home to music legends Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Willie Johnson, Leadbelly, and Bill Neely. Sometimes the song's title is also spelled "Deep Elem" or "Deep Ellum."

The first known recording was made by the Cofer Brothers under the name of The Georgia Black Bottom on Okey Records. The Shelton Brothers recorded various versions of this song, the first being cut in 1933 with Leon Chappelear under the pseudonym of Lone Star Cowboys for Bluebird Records. They recorded it again in 1935 for Decca Records followed by "Deep Elm No. 2" and "Deep Elm No. 3". Les Paul (as Rhubarb Red) recorded "Deep Elem Blues" and "Deep Elem Blues No. 2" on Decca in 1936. The Sheltons also recorded it in the 1940s as "Deep Elm Boogie" for King Records. Other versions of the song were made between 1957 and 1958 by Jerry Lee Lewis for Sun Records; Mary McCoy and the Cyclones for Jin Records, and, later, by Jerry Garcia, the Grateful Dead, Levon Helm, the Infamous Stringdusters, Rory Gallegher and most recently by Redhorse Black.

In end 1962/early 1963 Charlie Feathers recorded ''Deep Elm Blues'' backed with ''Nobody's Darlin''' for Holiday Inn. Holiday Inn was owned by Sun's owner Sam Phillips, who bought shares in the hotel chain when it first began and most likely launched the label as a promotional device. Again, it's a very sought-after record, but only because it has Feathers' name is on it.

> DEEP ELEM BLUES (1) <
Composer: - Bob Attlesey-Joe Attlesey
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:43)
Recorded: - November/December 1956
Released: - September 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 121-B5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - OLE TYME COUNTRY MUSIC
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1/8 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

> SILVER THREADS AMONG THE GOLD <
Composer: – Eben E. Rexford-Hart Pease Danks
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take - Not Originally Issued (2:04)
Recorded: - November/December 1956
Released: - September 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 119-B5 mono **
JOHNNY CASH & JERRY LEE LEWIS - SUNDAY DOWN SOUTH
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1/ mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

One of the many songs recorded during his early months at Sun that wasn’t released until many years later, this ''Silver Threads Among The Gold'' is a beautiful version of an old country song. It was first released on Sun International’s ''Sunday Down South'' in 1970, an album of mostly gospel songs shared with Sun outtakes by Johnny Cash. The re-cut is given a mid-temp ''High Heel Sneakers'' beat, and backed by instruments that include horns and steel guitar, an interesting experiment that didn’t quite work. Recorded during the sessions for ''Southern Roots'', this was finally released in 1987 on Bear Family’s ''The Killer: 1973-1977'' box-set.

"Silver Threads Among The Gold", first copyrighted in 1873, was an extremely popular song in the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Today it is a standard of barbershop quartet singing. The lyrics are by Eben E. Rexford, and the music by Hart Pease Danks.

In 1930, an Associated Press story published in the New York Times gave some background on the writing of these lyrics. We quote the article: "Silver Threads Song Traced to Poet’s ''Re-Hash'' on Order'' Shiockton, Wisconsin. The love ballad, ''Silver Threads Among The Gold'', which has stirred the hearts of more than one generation, was not the inspiration of an aging poet but a ''re-hash'' produced on order. The story developed after the unveiling of a monument here in honor of the author of the words, Eben E. Rexford, who died in 1916. Rexford made a living by writing verse and flower and garden articles for magazines. When he was 18, he wrote and sold for $3 some verses entitled ''Growing Old''. Later, H. P. Danks, composer of the music for ''Silver Threads'', wrote to him requesting words for a song. Rexford dug into his scrapbook and revised ''Growing Old''.

When Rexford spoke about the song, he explained that he worked his way through college by writing, and it was when he was in college that Danks sent him a request for lyrics, offering to pay three dollars for each song. Rexford submitted nine songs and received $18.00, but no accounting of which six had been accepted or which three had been rejected. In telling the story of the song, Rexford said that he didn't know whether he had been paid $3.00 for it or nothing, since he didn't know if it had been among the six accepted or the three rejected. Rexford first heard the song when a company of Oneida Indians gave a concert in Shiocton, Wisconsin and sang it there. The sheer popularity of the song can be illustrated, among other ways, by news stories which continued to reference it for many years. For example, in 1932, it won a poll of WABC (AM) (New York) listeners asked to name their favorite songs, despite it already being 60 years old.

The song was the most frequently recorded song of the acoustic recording era, starting with its first known recording by Richard Jose in 1903. Later 20th century recordings of the song include those of John McCormack, Bing Crosby (1948), Jerry Lee Lewis (1956 and 1973), Georg Ots (in Estonian language and Finnish language, 1958), Tapio Rautavaara (in Finnish, 1967) and Jo Stafford with Paul Weston's Orchestra and the Gaslight Singers (1969).

> CRAWDAD SONG <
Composer: - Woody Guthrie
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Pont Neuf Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take - Not Originally Issued (1:48)
Recorded: - November/December 1956
Released: - September 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 121-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - OLE TYME COUNTRY MUSIC
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1/12 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

The frantic 1956 ''Crawdad Song'' (first released on the ''Olde Tyme Country Music'' album in 1970) has a real party atmosphere with screams and yelps in the background, reminiscent of some of Gene Vincent’s early sides. The 1975 version is very different, with a slow and bluesy “High Heel Sneakers” beat and prominent harmonica, though both versions are great in their own way. Whenever Jerry’s very occasionally performed the song ‘live’ (such as on the 1987 ''Live In Italy''album, and at London’s 100 Club as recent as 2008) he usually chooses a tempo somewhere between the two studio versions.

''Crawdad Song'' aka ''Sweet Thing'' was written by Woody Guthrie and recorded his version of the song on April 24, 1944 on an Smithsonian 10”Shellac Acetate 1635, backing with with Cisco Houston on guitar and Sonny Terry on harmonica.

Crawdads are known to some people as crayfish and crawfish; they are eaten by both humans and fish, and among Cajuns they are a delicacy. Crawdads are essential to some people's livelihoods and possibly survival as their basic food source; this song has been popular even where crawdads are scarce. It was a playparty song (a dance where the closest a man gets to a woman is holding hands or locking arms at the elbow), and among African Americans it was a blues. "Sweet Thing" was the blues from which the song came; fiddlers and banjo pickers adapted to their tempo and the lyrics became more satirical about poverty. There was a time when most young men in Texas and Oklahoma knew the song. The first known recording to be issued was by Honeyboy and Sassafras (Brunswick 417), cut in Dallas, Texas, in 1929, followed by Girls of the Golden West, Lone Star Cowboys, The Tune Wranglers, and a few others. In his unpublished manuscript, "Woody and Lefty Lou's One Thousand and One Laffs and Your Free Gift of One Hundred and One Songs," dated April 1938, Woody typed fourteen lines for individual verses; for lyrics for the best-known version.

''Singing The Blues'', this 1956 version is typical of his early Sun recordings, with superb “pumping” piano and a youthful energetic feel. It wouldn’t have sounded out of place on an early album, and no doubt would’ve been released if Sam Phillips had released more of them (only two albums were released during Jerry’s 1956-1963 Sun period, and one of those was a semi “hits” collection), but instead had to wait until Sun International’s ''Monsters'' collection in 1970. The 1973 version is taken at a more sedate pace, and is notable for some superb slide bottle-neck guitar. Recorded at the all-star London sessions, it somehow wasn’t included on ''The Session'', and had to wait until Bear Family’s ''The Complete Session Volume Two'' album in 1986. Personally I’ve always found ''The Session'' a little overrated, but this is one of the more enjoyable recordings from those January 1973 sessions.

> SINGING THE BLUES <
Composer: - Melvin Endsley
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Acuff Rose World
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take - Not Originally Issued (2:06)
Recorded: - November/December 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1971
First appearance: Sun International (LP) 33rpm SUN 124-B-5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - MONSTERS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2/18 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Singing The Blues" is a popular song written by Melvin Endsley and published in 1956. The song was first recorded and released by Marty Robbins in 1956. (It is not related to the 1920 jazz song "Singin' The Blues" recorded by Frank Trumbauer and Bix Beiderbecke in 1927.) Robbins version made it to number one on the Billboard Country and Western Best Sellers chart for 13 weeks in late 1956 and early 1957 and peaked at number seventeen on the US pop chart.

The best-known recording was released in October 1956 by Guy Mitchell and spent ten weeks at number 1 on the U.S. Billboard chart from December 8, 1956, to February 2, 1957. An example of the U.S. recording is on Columbia 40769, dated 1956, with the Ray Conniff Orchestra. Mitchell's version was also number 1 in the UK Singles Chart for three (non-consecutive) weeks in early 1957, one of only four singles to return to number 1 on three separate occasions, with the other three being "I Believe" by Frankie Laine, "Happy" by Pharrell Williams and "What Do You Mean?" by Justin Bieber. Tommy Steele recorded his version of "Singing the Blues" made number 1 in the UK Singles Chart for one week on 11 January 1957, sandwiched by two of the weeks that Guy Mitchell's version of the same song topped the charts. Steele's recording of the song was not a chart success in the US. In 1983, Gail Davies recorded a cover version, taking her version into the top 20 of the Hot Country Singles chart in the spring of 1983. The song is often revived, and on three occasions new recordings of "Singing the Blues" have become UK Top 40 hits. These latter-day hit versions were by Dave Edmunds (1980), Daniel O'Donnell (1994), and Cliff Richard & the Shadows (2009).

''Honey Hush'' must be the unluckiest song in Jerry’s repertoire, as all three versions didn’t see the light of day until many years later (a further cut for Elektra in 1980 hasn’t been released at all!). A Big Joe Turner jump-blues tune, lyrics such as “If you don’t leave me alone I’ll knock you down with a base-ball bat” were hardly suitable for the 1950s pop charts. Nevertheless, all cuts sound inspired. This 1956/1957 version wasn’t released until the 1971 ''Monsters'' album, while the 1973 ''Southern Roots'' outtake (with none other than Carl Perkins on guitar) wasn’t released until the late 1980s, the same as the ''Boogie Woogie Country Man'' reject from the following year. All three are more than worthy versions.

> HONEY HUSH <
Composer: - Lou Willie Turner
Publisher: - B.M.I. - ATV Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take - Not Originally Issued (2:04)
Recorded: - November/December 1956
Released: - April 1971
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 124-B-4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - MONSTERS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1/11 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Big Joe Turner, although he assigned the rights to his wife, Lou Willie Turner, and recorded ''Honey Hush'' in May 1953 in New Orleans, Louisiana and released that August by Atlantic Records. It was a number 1 song on the U.S. Rhythm and Blues chart for eight weeks, and number 23 on the pop chart.

Turner, a big Kansas City blues shouter, had been spending all his time out on the road, while Atlantic's Ahmet Ertegün was getting nervous that his backlog of Turner recordings was running low. When Turner was near New Orleans, Ertegün insisted he record. Atlantic's New Orleans recording studio was booked up, so Turner recorded some sides in the studio of a radio station, WSDU. He did not have his own band but was able to round up the raucous trombonist Pluma Davis and his band, The Rockers, as well as the wild boogie rhythm pianist, James Tolliver. Other musicians on the recording were Lee Allen on tenor saxophone and Alvin "Red" Tyler on baritone saxophone.

Like the session, the song is largely adlibbed traditional blues verses with various incongruous lines thrown in to a standard 12-bar blues. It opens with the bold statement, "Aw let 'em roll like a big wheel in a Georgia cotton field, Honey hush''! The title in this song Turner revealed his typical attitude toward a woman who will not do what he tells her to do, while the tailgate trombone gives the woman's raucous answers back. Although his songs talk about relationships as misery, his emotion in the song is upbeat. To quote Arnold Shaw in his book Honkers and Shouters.

The advent of rock and roll narrowed the content of songs to adolescent preoccupations and made simple the complicated rhythms of rhythm and blues. The explicitly sexual content was too adult, as was the singer's strong voice tone as well as his raw assumptions about life. A year later, in 1954, a Turner song very similar to this one, "Shake, Rattle and Roll," with its boogie-woogie rhythm and squawking saxophone was cleaned up by Bill Haley to become a huge hit as rock and roll changed the face of music. Turner turned to recording songs by rock and roll writers, but his blues shouter voice betrayed him and his career faded.

However, not long after the rock and roll craze hit, a new audience of intellectuals, college students, and eventually beatniks, and then another with European blues fans joining in, gave singers in partial retirement or obscurity new opportunities although they had to clean up some to fit the new role of authenticity, fueled by the writings of Samuel Charters, demanded by these new audiences. For urban blues singers, having grown up in cities, it was convenient to be labelled as country singers to fit the criteria of purity.

In 1959, Turner re-recorded "a much tamer, lamer, teenage rock and roll version of "Honey Hush" for Atlantic which was a mild hit and his last one. Turner returned to performing with jazz combos as the rock and roll founders settled in to please the suddenly important teenage market. Early covers include the 1956 version by Johnny Burnette's The Rock and Roll Trio (Coral 61719) and the song has since been covered by Jerry Lee Lewis, Screaming Lord Sutch, Foghat, Paul McCartney, Coco Montoya, Fleetwood Mac, George Jones, Elvis Costello, NRBQ, and John Lindberg Trio, and others.

> GOODNIGHT IRENE (1) <
Composer: - Huddie Ledbetter-John Avery Lomax
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Red Balloon Technology
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (3:08)
Recorded: - November/December 1956
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-1/12 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Jerry Lee's four recordings of Leadbelly's ''Goodnight Irene'' demand some attention. In the first alternate, the most telling diagnostic element is the exceptional use, at 2 minutes 24 seconds, of the determiner ''that'', as opposed to ''the'' ahead of ''river''. Take 2 serves up sufficient contrasts to the others courtesy of the much busier than usual right-hand on the keyboard providing background fills. One might then listen concurrently to the first one hundred seconds of both the un-dubbed tape of the issued master and the final alternate wondering just how to tell them apart, before Jerry Lee motions to bring the latter to a premature halt. It turns out he's just changing gear; an early example of the technique he would use to good effect on several later occasions in his recording career.(*)

> GOODNIGHT IRENE (1) <
Composer: - Huddie Ledbetter-John Avery Lomax
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Red Balloon Technology
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:59)
Recorded: - November/December 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-1-B5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-1/13 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

> GOODNIGHT IRENE (1) <
Composer: - Huddie Ledbetter-John Avery Lomax
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Red Balloon Technology
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 Undubbed EP Master (2:53)
Recorded: - November/December 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-1-B6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1/10 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

> GOODNIGHT IRENE** (1) <
Composer: - Huddie Ledbetter-John Avery Lomax
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Red Balloon Technology
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 Overdubbed EP Master (2:54)
Recorded: - November/December 1956
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 108-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4/5 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

> GOODNIGHT IRENE (1) <
Composer: - Huddie Ledbetter-John Avery Lomax
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Red Balloon Technology
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 Slow to Fast (3:03)
Recorded: - November/December 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-1-B6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1/9 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Before Jerry had any big hits, ''Goodnight Irene'' was overdubbed with a vocal group for Jerry’s first album ''Jerry Lee Lewis'' (Sun LP 1230) the following year. This is performed very respectfully at a slow tempo (though one of the alternate takes from the session is partly rocked-up), unlike the far sprightly 1975 re-cut for the ''Odd Man In'' album. Unfortunately the latter is marred by a rather distracting 2nd vocal in the background, which “bled” into the piano microphone prior to him doing a vocal overdub.

"Goodnight Irene" or "Irene Goodnight'', is a 20th-century American folk standard, written in 3/4 time and first recorded by American blues musician Huddie ''Leadbelly'' Ledbetter in 1933. The lyrics tell of the singer's troubled past with his love, Irene, and express his sadness and frustration. Several verses make explicit references to suicidal fantasies, most famously in the line "sometimes I take a great notion to jump in the river and drown'', which was the inspiration for the 1964 Ken Kesey novel Sometimes A Great Notion and a song of the same name from John Mellencamp's 1989 album, ''Big Daddy'', itself strongly informed by traditional American folk music.

The specific origins of "Goodnight Irene" are unclear. Leadbelly was singing a version of the song from as early as 1908, which he claimed to have learned from his uncles Terell and Bob. An 1892 song by Gussie L. Davis has several lyrical and structural similarities to the latter song; a copy of the sheet music is available from the Library of Congress. Some evidence suggests the 1892 song was itself based on an even earlier song which has not survived. Regardless of where he first heard it, by the 1930s Leadbelly had made the song his own, modifying the rhythm and rewriting most of the verses.

Leadbelly continued performing the song during his various prison terms, and it was while incarcerated at the Louisiana State Penitentiary that he encountered musicologists John and Alan Lomax who would go on to record hours of Leadbelly's performances. A few months prior to his release in 1934, Leadbelly recorded a number of his songs, including "Goodnight Irene", for the Library of Congress. An extended version of the song that includes narratives connecting the verses appears in Negro Folk Songs as Sung by Leadbelly. "Goodnight Irene" remained a staple of Leadbelly's performances throughout the 1930s and 1940s. However, despite popularity within the New York blues community, the song was never commercially successful during his lifetime. In 2002, Leadbelly's 1936 Library of Congress recording received a Grammy Hall of Fame Award.

In 1950, one year after Leadbelly's death, the American folk band The Weavers recorded a version of "Goodnight, Irene". The single first reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on June 30, 1950 and lasted 25 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 1. Although generally faithful, the Weavers chose to omit some of Leadbelly's more controversial lyrics, leading Time magazine to label it a "dehydrated" and "prettied up" version of the original. Due to the recording's popularity, however, The Weavers' lyrics are the ones generally used today. Billboard ranked this version as the number 1 song of 1950.

The Weavers' enormous success inspired many other artists to release their own versions of the song, many of which were themselves commercially successful across several genres. Frank Sinatra's cover, released only a month after The Weavers', lasted nine weeks on the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on July 10, peaking at number 5. Later that same year, Ernest Tubb and Red Foley had a number 1 country music record with the song, and the Alexander Brothers, Dennis Day and Jo Stafford released versions which made the Best Seller chart, peaking at number 26, number 17 and number 9 respectively. Moon Mullican had a number 5 country hit with it in 1950, and a version by Paul Gayten and his Orchestra reached number 6 on the Billboard Rhythm And Blues chart in the same year. On the Cash Box chart, where all available versions were combined in the standings, the song reached a peak position of number 1 on September 2, 1950, and lasted at number 1 for 13 weeks. The song was the basis for the 1950 parody called "Please Say Goodnight To The Guy, Irene" by Ziggy Talent. It also inspired the 1954 "answer" record "Wake Up, Irene" by Hank Thompson, a number 1 on Billboard's country chart. In 1958 Jim Reeves covered the song for his LP "Girls I've Known''. In 1959, Billy Williams version reached number 75 on the US Billboard pop chart. And in 1962 the version of Jerry Reed reached number 79 on the US pop chart. In 2015 Keith Richards recorded the song, and gives praise to Leadbelly in several interviews.

"Goodnight Irene" is sung by supporters of English football team Bristol Rovers. It was first sung at a fireworks display at the Stadium the night before a Home game against Plymouth Argyle in 1950. During the game the following day, Rovers were winning quite comfortably and the few Argyle supporters present began to leave early prompting a chorus of "Goodnight Argyle" from the Rovers supporters, the tune stuck and "Goodnight Irene" became the club song.

> THE MARINES HYMN <
Composer: - Jacques Offenbach- Arranged by Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Instrumental - Unknown Take (2:23)
Recorded: - November/December 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 1975
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30007-B2 mono
RARE JERRY LEE LEWIS - VOLUME 1
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1/14 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Even some French comic opera, ''The Gendarmes' Duet'' from Jacques Offenbach's ''Genevieve de Brabance''. Jerry Lee would, of course, have known the tune of the lattermost in its much more familiar guise as ''The Marine's Hymn'', named here as such, the melody having been pillaged by the US Armed Forces in the 1890s. Though it's odds-on that Offenbach himself copied it from a Spanish folk song; nothing much is truly original. The vast scope that these disparate musical forms represent was in no way indicative of a lack of a sense of direction in Lewis's nascent recording career, conversely, it was the spontaneous parading of the immense breadth of his musical heritage. (*)

Note: The "Marines' Hymn" is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps, introduced by the first Director of USMC Band, Francesco Maria Scala. It is the oldest official song in the United States Armed Forces. The "Marines' Hymn" is typically sung at the position of attention as a gesture of respect. However, the third verse is also used as a toast during formal events, such as the birthday ball and other ceremonies.

The lyrics are contained in the book Rhymes of the Rookies published in 1917. The author of these poems was W.E. Christian. The book is available online in several formats. The book consists of a series of poems regarding military life prior to World War I.

Some lyrics were popular phrases before the song was written. The line "To the shores of Tripoli" refers to the First Barbary War, and specifically the Battle of Derne in 1805. After Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon and his Marines hoisted the American flag over the Old World for the first time, the phrase was added to the flag of the United States Marine Corps. "The Halls of Montezuma" refers to the Battle of Chapultepec on 12/13 September 1847 during the Mexican-American War, where a force of Marines stormed Chapultepec Castle. While the lyrics are said to date from the 19th century, no pre-20th century text is known. The author of the lyrics is likewise unknown. Legend has it that a Marine on duty in Mexico penned the hymn. The unknown author transposed the phrases in the motto on the Colors so that the first two lines of the Hymn would read: "From the Halls of Montezuma, to the Shores of Tripoli", favoring euphony over chronology. The music is from the Gendarmes' Duet (the "bold gendarmes") from the revision in 1867 of the Jacques Offenbach opera Geneviève de Brabant, which debuted in Paris in 1859.

Some websites claim that the Marine Corps secured a copyright on the song on 19 August 1891, but this is in error; the copyright was vested on 18 August 1919. In 1929, the Commandant of the Marine Corps authorized the three verses of the Marines' Hymn as the official version. This older version can be heard in the 1950 film Halls of Montezuma. On 21 November 1942, Commandant Thomas Holcomb approved a change in the words of the first verse's fourth line from "On the land as on the sea" to "In the air, on land, and sea" to reflect the addition of aviation to the Corps' arsenal. Various people over the years wrote unofficial or semi-unofficial extra verses to commemorate later battles and actions, for example, this verse commemorating the occupation of Iceland during World War II.

> DIXIE <
Composer: - Daniel Decatur Emmett-Arranged by Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Public Domain
Matrix number: - None - Instrumental - Unknown Take (1:30)
Recorded: - November/December 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300002-A4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AND HIS PUMPING PIANO
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1/13 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''Dixie'' written on Sunday, April 3, 1859 for a minstrel show. The next night, the song was introduced by the Bryant Minstrels in New York City at Mechanics Hall. "Dixie" was first performed in the South in Charleston and Newcomb. Before General Pick - the troops' morale. Abraham Lincoln requested that the song be played by the Union band upon hearing the news of General Lee's surrender at the Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. "Dixie" was one of several tunes played by the U.S. Army band as Elvis Presley boarded the USS General Randall to sail to West Germany in 1958.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

** - Overdubbed Session April 4 and/or 8, 1958
Vocal Chorus Overdubbed
Ed Bruce, Vernon Drane, Charlie Rich,
Lee Holt, Bobby Thompson,
Ben Strong and Alive Rumple

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 21, 1956 FRIDAY

Lee Roy Parnell is born in Abilene, Texas. The singer/slide guitarist combines country and blues to yield a soulful series of recordings in the 1990s, including ''Love Without Mercy'', ''On The Road'' and ''What Kind Of Fool Do You Think I Am''.

Review in Billboard magazine says, ''An exceptionally strong entrant by a new artist is this flavor-packed disc. His reading of ''Crazy Arms'' (Sun 259) shows a powerful feeling for country blues, and his sock warbling is accompanied by a Domino-type piano backing which brings a distinct New Orleans feeling to the rendition. The flip, ''End Of The Road'' is another honey, right in the rhythm groove and abetted by the same piano beat. Distinctly smart wax''.

DECEMBER 25, 1956 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley spends Christmas at his parents home on Audubon Drive in Memphis, where he receives numerous presents from fans, including a bevy of teddy bears. The artificial tree is made of white nylon.

Steel guitarist Lloyd Green moves to Nashville, from Mobile, Alabama. He becomes a prominent studio musician, playing on Tammy Wynette's ''D-I-V-O-R-C-E'', Alan Jackson's ''Remember When'' and John Anderson's ''Wild And Blue'', among others.

DECEMBER 27, 1956 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley plays touch football at Memphis' Dave Wells Community Center. Pictures of the game actually appear in the newspaper.

DECEMBER 28, 1956 FRIDAY

Charley Pride marries Rozene Cockren.

George Morgan resigns from the Grand Ole Opry to host his own radio show on WLAC and to appear on ''The Ozark Jubilee''. He returns to the Opry three years later.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR GLENN HONEYCUTT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY DECEMBER 28, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

In some ways, this is one of the strangest Sun Records ever. Not strange bad like Winnie The Parakeet, but strangely unexpected. After nearly six months of demoing rockers in the Sun studio, Glenn Honeycutt marched on this day and recorded two ballads. Both bear the unmistakable stamp of the Presley ballad style. In that way, they are standard Memphis fare for the day and time. What makes the record curious is that both sides feature slow songs. A two-sided mellow record, Memphis style circa 1956. Because his style is molded so closely on Elvis Presley's, Honeycutt brings an undeniable gospel sound, or what Billboard called "a touch of sacred feeling" to the proceedings.

> I'LL BE AROUND <
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 240 - Master (2:46)
Recorded: - December 28, 1956
Released: - January 24, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 264-A mono
I'LL BE AROUND / I'LL WAIT FOREVER
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3/21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

"I'll Wait Forever" is actually a very powerful song. Honeycutt is aided by female voices that remained anonymous for many years, until a mid-1980s interview with the Millers' career, Sam Phillips used them as studio singers twice. Their impressive efforts with Cast King on country gospel material sadly remained unissued until Bear Family's Sun Country Box (BFX 15211). Their work here is the only issued sample of their backup style. Honeycutt returned to the Sun studio once more in early 1958, but this remains his only Sun release.

I'LL WAIT FOREVER
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 28, 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1036-7 mono
MORE SUNDOWN ROCKERS

> I'LL WAIT FOREVER < 
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 241 - Master (2:36)
Recorded: - December 28, 1956
Released: - January 24, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Sun 264-B mono
I'LL WAIT FOREVER / I'LL BE AROUND
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3/22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

> ROCK ALL NIGHT <
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued (2:03)
Recorded: - December 28, 1956
Released: - 1981
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm CFM 504-5 mono
ALL NIGHT ROCK
Reissued: - 1986 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly 36-18 mono
THE BEST OF SUN ROCKABILLY - VOLUME 2

 

ROCK ALL NIGHT
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 28, 1956
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-1-15 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON

> ROCK ALL NIGHT <
Composer: - Glenn Honeycutt
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued (2:01)
Recorded: - December 28, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1015 mono
HOP FLOP AND FLY
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-1 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

"Rock All Night" was intended to be the first single, but it was considered too risqué and was bounced in favor of the two other songs.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Glenn Honeycutt - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

The Miller Sisters - Tracks 1 & 2
Elsie Jo Miller - Vocal Chorus
Mildred Wages - Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Glenn Honeycutt see: > The Sun Biographies <
Glenn Honeycutt's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Glenn Honeycutt kept his day job with the United States Postal Service in Memphis, and might have been a footnote in history had it not been for fellow country artist Randy Rich, who brought Honeycutt's name to Rhythm Bomb Records, a London-based rockabilly revival label, the result was a tour of Germany and Sweden, on which Honeycutt proved he could still deliver musically, and the recording of Honeycutt's first album, 40 years after he entered the business. And just to prove that Honeycutt still had what it took after all of those years, of the 12 songs on ''Mr. All Night Rock'', there were 11 originals.

(See: The Sun Biographies: Glenn Honeycutt)

DECEMBER 30, 1956 SUNDAY

Suzy Bogguss is born in Aledo, Illinois. She earns respect for her easy-going vocal skills and adept song selection in the 1990s, gaining thoughtful hits with ''Outbound Plane'', ''Just Like The Weather'', ''Aces'' and ''Letting Go''.

DECEMBER 31, 1956 MONDAY

Capitol released Faron Young's double-barreled hit, ''I Miss You Already (And You're Not Even Gone)'' and its flip side, ''I'm Gonna Live Some Before I Die''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN TRIO
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON OR JACK CLEMENT

There were three demos of non-original tunes submitted by this unidentified trio. This trio had obviously done their share of listening to the Browns and modeled their pleasant vocal style that popular threesome. Their version of the 1956 Harry Belafonte hit "Day-O" (not included here) suggests the date of these recordings. Had the trio done their homework about Sun, they would have also provided some original material in their attempt to impress Sam Phillips.

HOW'S THE WORLD TREATING YOU
Composer: - Chet Atkins-Boudleaux Bryant
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-3/23 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Elvis Presley recorded ''How's The World Treating You'' on September 1, 1956 at RCAs Nashville Studios. Take 7 was released on Elvis second LP ''Elvis. It is now available on the box set The King Of Rock And Roll - The Complete 50s Masters.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Unknown Trio
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN SINGER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON OR JACK CLEMENT

Our unknown friend tries her luck with the approach and succeeds moderately well, although a poorly recorded demo doesn't help her case. There actually is a band on this session, although you'd hardly know it from the recording.

MEXICAN ROCK 'N' ROLL
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Demo - Not Originally Issued (1:47)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1956
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-19 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Unknown Singer
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAROLD JENKINS (CONWAY TWITTY)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY DECEMBER 31, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS

One curio left in the vaults of Sun Records when Twitty departed from Sun was a demo of a song called "Just In Time". Around this time, Twitty and the Rockhousers were working at The Browns' Trio club in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Jim Ed, Maxine and Bonnie Brown were a middlingly successful country act, certainly successful enough to ask for a share of the composer credit on three songs they took from Twitty and Bill Harris. In addition to "Just In Time", the Browns took "The Table Next To Me" from Twitty and "Crazy Dreams" from Harris. They cut Twitty's songs in December 1956 and Harris's in July the following year. Twitty's demo of "Just In Time" was a spare haunting country performance without any of the vocal gimmicks he drew upon when he was singing rock and roll. The demo later emerged, wrongly credited to Warren Smith, on Charly Records CR 30104 in the 1976 as ''Blue Days And Sleepless Nights''.

> JUST IN TIME <
Composer: - Jim Edward Brown-Maxine Brown-Harold Jenkins
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:46)
Recorded: - December 31, 1956
Released: - 1976 - Wrongly credited to Warren Smith
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30104-B-4 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 4 - COTTON CITY COUNTRY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16112-1/5 mono
CONWAY TWITTY - THE ROCK AND ROLL YEARS 1956 - 1964

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Harold Jenkins - Vocal and Guitar
Jimmy Ray Paulman - Guitar
Bill Harris or Jimmy Evans - Bass
Billy Weir – Drums

For Biography of harold Jenkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Harold Jenkins' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR J.R. & J.W. BROWN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956/1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: LATE 1956 - EARLY 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGENEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Here two of Jerry Lee Lewis's associates J.R and J.W Brown on a curious dialogue titled ''Drunk''.

> DRUNK <
Composer: - J.R. & J.W. Brown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Memphis Music Incoporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (1:58)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Late 1956 - Early 1957
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30117-A-8 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 10 - SUN COUNTRY
Reissued: 2012 Internet iTunes MP3-32 mono
THE ROOSTS OF ROCK - THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CLASSICS ROCK SONGS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
J.R. Brown - Vocal - Guitar
J.W. Brown - Vocal - Bass

For Biography of J.R. & J.W. Brown see: > The Sun Biographies <
J.R. & J.W. Brown's Sun recording can be heard on 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN ARTIST PROBABLY CHUCK STACY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956/1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN ARTIST / UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

We enter the land of the truly obscure. There are several tapes boxes in the Sun vaults with Buddy Blake on the spine; one of them has "What A Beat" on it. Now Buddy Blake was Buddy Cunningham who had a record out on Sun in 1954 and another on Phillips International in 1957.

Clearly, this is not Buddy Cunningham, but around the time this was recorded, Cunningham took a leaf out of Sam Phillips' book and started a label, Cover Records. One of the artists he signed was Marlon Grisham, and the singer on "What A Beat" sounds somewhat like Marlon Grisham.

> WHAT A BEAT* <
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:00)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957
Released: - August 1997
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-29 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14
Reissued: - June 25, 2006 Charly Records MP2 iTunes Music 1 mono
CHUCK STACY'S BETWEEN HERE AND THERE

Other labels operating at this time, especially major labels, were a model of organization, but their attempts to record rockabilly were stilted. Jack Clement and Bill Justis tried to bring some elements of organization to Sam Phillips' ramshackle empire, but they were ultimately thwarted.

Its the looseness and informality that made the music great, though. Most of it is in the state of becoming. Phillips was listening for something, anything that sounded original and exciting to him. Clearly, he didn't hear it in these songs, but we might be inclined to be a little more generous.

> BETWEEN HERE AND THERE* <
Composer: - Unknown
Composer: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:05)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957
Released: - 1999
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-6 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16
Reissued: - June 25, 2006 Charly Records MP2 iTunes Music 4 mono
CHUCK STACY'S BETWEEN HERE AND THERE

We don't know the identity of the artist who recorded "Between Here And There" and "I'll Be Rockin'" here. Cunningham later recorded a rockabilly singer named Marlon Grisham who sounds somewhat like the artist here, but it could as easily be someone else. All we know is that the music justifies inclusion, even if the artist remains forever unknown to us.

> I'LL BE ROCKIN'* <
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:14)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957
Released: - 1999
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-16 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16
Reissued: - June 25, 2006 Charly Records MP2 iTunes Music 5 mono
CHUCK STACY'S BETWEEN HERE AND THERE

> MY BABY SHE'S CRAZY* < 
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:07)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records MP2 iTunes Music 3 mono
CHUCK STACY'S BETWEEN HERE AND THERE

> DOGGONE I'M BLUE* <
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (1:44)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records MP2 iTunes Music 2 mono
CHUCK STACY'S BETWEEN HERE AND THERE

> GET YOU OFF MY MIND* <
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:01)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records MP2 iTunes Music 6 mono
CHUCK STACY'S BETWEEN HERE AND THERE

ROCKIN' SCHOOL
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

> ROCK ON* <
Composer: - Chuck Stacy
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (1:12)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957
Released: 2021
First appearance: Sun Entertainment Internet Spotify Sample-9 mono
THE SUN RECORDS DANCE PARTY

Name. (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Chuck Stacy - Vocal & Guitar
Unknown Musicians
Probably band of Buddy Blake

For Biography of Chuck Stacy see: > The Sun Biographies <
Chuck Stacy's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY ARNOLD
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956-1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956-1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Texan Jerry Arnold will be known to fans and collectors as one of the second tier of 1950s rockabillies. His singles on the Security label (owned by Burton Harris) routinely fetch small fortunes at auction. Both Arnold and label-owner Harris wanted more for Arnold than the small East Texas label could provide, and attempts were made to place him with more mainstream labels (there was some success with Cameo and Challenge). It is in this context that Jerry Arnold and Sun records crossed paths.

Tapes of both "High Class Baby" and "Little Boy Blue" were delivered to 706 Union Avenue some around 1956 or 1957, and both still reside in the Sun archives to this day - rejected but retained. Both of these titles have turned up on rockabilly anthologies released in various countries over the years.

There are two reasons for including them here: (1) they both spent their early years as Sun demos, and (2) they are both damn fine records.

> CAN'T DO WITHOUT YOU <
Composer: - Jerry Arnold
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:17)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956-1957
Released: - 1995
First appearance: - Club England (LP) 33rpm PR PRLP 008-7 mono
PURE ROCKABILLY - VOLUME 8
Reissued: - Chief Netherlands (CD) 500/200rpm CCD 1156513-28 mono
ULTRA RARE ROCKABILLY'S - VOLUME 13

> LITTLE BOY BLUE <
Composer: - Jerry Arnold-Clyde Turner
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:39)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956-1957
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Challange Records (S) 45rpm Challange 59014 mono
LITTLE BOY BLUE / YOU GAVE ME
Reissued: - August 2000 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-21 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

"Little Boy Blue" is a fine record - representing the gentler side of rockabilly. The repeated four note (3-5-6-8) instrumental figure behind the vocal makes the track quite memorable, and the melodic release ("Monday, Tuesday") also addes to the song's strenght.

There is a strong Elvises feeling here without the performance ever becoming frantic. Huelyn Duvall recorded a cover version of the song for Challange which may have earned Arnold some money from airplay, but the record never sold in sufficient quantities to earn him a serious payday. This recording should not be confused with the 1959 RCA release of "Little Boy Blue" by Hoyt Johnson, an effective but altogether different song.

"High Class Baby" is a great rocker about social class differences that must have hit a resonant chord with many first generation rockabillies. The arrangement is quite catchy; this is one of the rare times that a vocal chorus adds to rather than detracting from a rockabilly record. The handclapping during the guitar solo adds energy and verve to the sound. Arnold's vocal chops are just fine as well. He has clearly done his share of listening to Elvis Presley and practicing in the mirror.

> HIGH CLASS BABY <
Composer: - Bob Milsap
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:29)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956-1957
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Security Records (S) 45rpm Security 107-A mono
HIGH CLASS BABY / GIRL IN THE MIST
Reissued: - August 2000 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-31 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

Its likely that the artist who recorded the next track will never be known to us. The distortion on the recording suggest that it wasn't even a Sun recording, but a demo tape dropped off at the studio. Later researches suggest that the singer is Jimmy Arnold, and whoever he was, has some timing problems with the song's unusual structure. The half-tempo ending was a device that Elvis had popularized on songs like ''Got A Lot Of Livin' To Do'' and a television version of ''Hound Dog'', so this likely comes from the same era 1956 or 1957.

> SLEWFOOT SUE <
Composer: - Jerry Arnold
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:15)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956-1957
Released: - 1999
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-8 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16
Reissued: - 2005 Norton Records (LP) 33rpm ED 312-7 mono
KICKSVILLE - VOLUME 3 - RAW ROCKABILLY ACETATES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Arnold - Vocal and Guitar
Musicians Unknown

For Biography of Jerry Arnold see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Arnold's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

LATE FALL 1956

Future Sun artist Roy Hall was of Decca and looking fo a label again. He recorded again for Fortune Records and later their subsidiary labels, Strate 8 and Hi-Q.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RUDY GRAYZELL
FOR STARDAY RECORDS 1956

GOLD STAR RECORDING STUDIO
5628 BROCK STREET, HOUSTON, TEXAS
CAPITOL SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE FALL 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER – H.W. PAPPY DAILY
RECORDING ENGINEER – BILL QUINN

YOU HURT ME SO
Composer: - Joe Grayzell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - 2487 - Master (2:56)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1956
Released: - November 1956
First appearance: - Starday Records (S) 45rpm standard single Starday 270-A mono
YOU HURT ME SO / JAG-GA-LEE-GA
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-6 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

JAG-GA-LEE-GA
Composer: - Joe Grayzell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - 2488 - Master (2:17)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1956
Released: - November 1956
First appearance: - Starday Records (S) 45rpm standard single Starday 270-B mono
JAG-GA-LEE-GA / YOU HURT ME SO
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-5 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

JAG-GA-LEE-GA
Composer: - Joe Grayzell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - 2488 – Alternate Take – Not Originally Issued (2:14)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Fall 1956
Released: - 2010
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-31 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

Name (or. No. Of Instruments)
Rudy Grayzell – Vocal
Dave Sullivan or Charlie Harris – Guitar
Joe Pruneda or Bobby Brown - Bass
Gerald Carnes – Drums
Greg Nanus – Piano
The Imperials – Vocal Chorus

Future Sun recording artist Rudy Grayzell's single ''Duck Tail'' follow-up, ''Jag-Ga-Lee-Ga''/''You Hurt Me So'', featured a black vocal group, the Imperials, that Rudy had met in San Antonio. It was the closest that Starday came to doo-wop. Over the course of three singles, Rudy had morphed from hillbilly to rockabilly to -doo-wop. Starting in 1975, Starday had a deal with Mercury Records that allowed Mercury to cherry pick Starday releases and issue them on a co-branded label, Mercury-Starday. Mercury picked ''Let's Get Wild'' for a national, but it's unclear if it was actually. ''Let's Get Wild'' was issued or reissued on Starday to disappointing results. ''We didn't get much airplay on it. I kinda think it was too wild for radio at the time'', he told Dan Davidson. Probably so.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RUDY GRAYZELL
FOR STARDAY RECORDS 1957

GOLD STAR RECORDING STUDIO
5628 BROCK STREET, HOUSTON, TEXAS
CAPITOL SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER – H.W. PAPPY DAILY
RECORDING ENGINEER – BILL QUINN

I LOVE YOU SO
Composer: - Joe Grayzell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - 14963 - 2626 - Master (2:09)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1957
First appearance: - Starday Records (S) 45rpm standard single Starday 321 Mercury 71138 mono
I LOVE YOU SO / LET'S GET WILD
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-2 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

LET'S GET WILD
Composer: - Joe Grayzell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - 14964 – Complete Version (2:48)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1957
First appearance: - Starday Records (S) 45rpm standard single Mercury 71138 mono
LET'S GET WILD / I LOVE YOU SO
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-1 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

LET'S GET WILD
Composer: - Joe Grayzell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - 2627 – Abbreviated Version (2:00)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1957
First appearance: - Starday Records (S) 45rpm standard single Starday 321 mono
LET'S GET WILD / I LOVE YOU SO

Note: Mercury assigned a release number to the ''Let's Get Wild'' single, but did not release it.

Name (or. No. Of Instruments)
Rudy Grayzell – Vocal
Charlie Harris – Guitar
Joe Pruneda or Bobby Brown – Bass
Gerald Carnes – Drum
Greg Nanus – Piano
The Imperials – Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1956-1957

Around 1956-1957, Curtis Hobock began playing music with a local band the Stardusters, eventually taking them over as his backing group. They worked in local joints within driving distance of Jackson. Hobock mostly sang other people's songs, notably those of Jim Reeves, and drove to Memphis to appear on WHBQ's Talent Party with George Klein and Wink Martindale. He first recorded for Lu Records in Jackson, a label owned by Lamar Davis and Lonny Blackwell and named for Lamar's wife, Marilu. Hobock's first single on Lu Records appeared in June 1959, coupling ''The Whole Town's Talking'' b/w ''Do You Think''. The following month, Lu issued ''Tom Dooley Rock And Roll'' b/w ''China Rock''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MILTON MITT ADDINGTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

BURNED FINGERS
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

HALF AS MUCH
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

LONELY AGAIN
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

Probably Tape Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mitt Addington - Vocal
Unknown Group

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MILTON MITT ADDINGTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

THE DEADBEAT SONG*
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956

STICK AROUND AWHILE*
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956

KISS ME**
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956

Probably Tape Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mitt Addington - Vocal, Guitar* & Piano**

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MILTON MITT ADDINGTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956/57

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956/1957
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

OLD ENOUGH TO KNOW BETTER
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

I WANT TO GO
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

HABITS
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

NEON SOCKS
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

LET'S TRY LOVE TONIGHT
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

SUNDAY JEALOUS
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

HE'LL NEVER TURN YOU DOWN
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

TWO YOUNG FOOLS IN LOVE
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956/1957

Probably Tape Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mitt Addington - Vocal, Guitar

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