CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1957 Sun Schedule <

1957 SESSIONS (6)
June 1, 1957 to June 30, 1957

Studio Session for Bill Justis & Sid Manker, June 5, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Barbara Pittman, June 5, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl McVoy, June 6, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Wanda Ballman, June 17, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Patsy Holcomb, June 17, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Harold Dorman, March 16, 24 & 31 & June 17, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Carroll, June 23, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, June 1957
Studio Session for Barbara Pittman, June 24, 1957 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

JUNE 1957

The identifiable guitar sound of session man Sid Manker led into Bill Justis's unusual sax solos on the hit song ''Raunchy'', the disc that launched the Phillips International label in 1957 in some style. Justis had been hired to acts as musical director for the label and to develop artists who fit his musical vision and he preferred to work with members of his local gigging orchestra, guitarist Sid Manker, bassist Sid Lapworth, and saxophonist Vernon Drane and Jamieson Bryant, to which he liked to add Charlie Rich on piano. Various combinations of the green men and the Justis orchestra worked on Justis's sessions, trying to produce another instrumental hit like ''Raunchy'', or to make vocal magic with some of the young hopefuls he encouraged. One was Roger Fakes, who sang on ''Raunchy's'' flipside, ''The Midnite Man'', along with his group, the Spinners. Fakes would not have been out of place in the solo releases that Justis worked up in 1958 but he lost out in the bizarre lottery that decided who was released and who was not. In contrast, Justis used Billy Riley to provide the more raucous vocal on ''College Man'', something Riley decidedly was not.

JUNE 1, 1957 SATURDAY

The Everly Brothers join the Grand Ole Opry at Ryaman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The onslaught of rock and roll and its impact on the music scene in Memphis brought forth some strange new concerts. Few were stranger than Bill Justis and Sid Manker, and few less converted. Here it is, the record that put the fledging Phillips International label on the map. So popular was this disc in 1957 that it inspired cover versions by a host of artists including Ernie Freeman and Billy Vaughn.

At one point, Sam Phillips bought space in the trade papers beseeching the industry to listen to all versions and decide which was the original. Sam was on quite a roll in his defense of "Raunchy". He described counterclaims against Bill Justis' version as "uncouth" and went on to talk about the need for originality. He underlined the importance of never becoming "stereotyped and parasitic". Big words for a guy in the record business but he was right about one thing: PI 3519 was neither of those things.

In truth, the artist, Bill Justin, was far too hip (and technically skilled) for Sun. His hilarious between-takes exhortations to his fellow musicians are thankfully preserved on tape ("Come on, girls, let's get really bad now so we can sell some records:). In countless interviews, Justis maintained that his technically flawed sax work on this record (which only adds to its zany charm) stemmed from being out of practice. It may have been a mild musical embarrassment to him, but it kept Sam 'n Sun on center stage in the music business.

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILL JUSTIS & SID MANKER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JUNE 5, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILL JUSTIS & JACK CLEMENT

There's no shortage of cliches in rock and roll, in fact one of the most well-rodden myths concerns "the million-seller that was just an afterthought". In the case of "Raunchy" this was half-true. William Everette Justis was pushing thirty when he landed at Sun, an unlikely age for anyone to become a teenage idol. At the end of an uneventful vocal session, the Justis band worked on a riff, honing the results into what would become "Raunchy". Bill Justis was about to be launched as a pop star.

01(1) – "RAUNCHY" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - William Everette Justis-Sid Manker
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 309 Master
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard singles > PI 3519-A < mono
RAUNCHY / MIDNIGHT MAN
Other Sun releases: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 150805-3-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

In 1958 a then fourteen-year-old George Harrison performed the song to John Lennon and Paul McCartney on the top deck of a bus, and was so note-perfect Lennon decided to let him into his band, the Quarrymen, which later became the Beatles, despite earlier reservations about Harrison's age. In 1962, Bill Justis recorded another rendition of the song, in stereo and with considerably different guitar, for his album ''Bill Justis Plays 12 More Big Instrumental Hits''. He recorded it once more in 1969, for his album ''Raunchy & Other Great Instrumentals''.

Competing with Justis' release in 1957 were renditions of the song, by Billy Vaughn and Ernie Freeman. Freeman's version was his biggest solo success, reaching number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1957, number 1 on the Rhythm And Blues singles chart and number 11 on the Country singles chart in 1958. Soon after the hit, guitarist Duane Eddy and producer Lee Hazlewood took it upon themselves to develop that style to an ultimate degree. Far from a light lead guitar sound, they greatly enhanced the reverberation in their recordings. Eddy started with the big hit "Rebel Rouser" in 1958; he later made a recording of "Raunchy" for the RCA Records album ''Twangin' The Golden Hits in 1965''. "Raunchy" has been recorded by many groups, including the Ventures, Bill Black, Tom and Jerry (guitarists), Al Caiola, Ace Cannon, Billy Strange, Bill Smith Combo aka Tommy & the Tom Toms (Chess 1780), Santo and Johnny and the Incredible Bongo Band. Years later, while working on the Beatles Anthology project in 1994, the three surviving Beatles, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, played ''Raunchy'' during a jam session.

RAUNCHY TOLD BY BILL JUSTIS - Sometime in 1957 Bill Justis started playing a song adapted from a traditional tune known as ''Backwoods'', re-named for the 'now' phrase ''Raunchy''. He told Charlie Gillett, ''I'd been playing around Memphis with a territories-style jazz band. We were pretty loose. We'd give the people sixteen bars of melody, and then everybody in the band took off. We had one piece we called ''Backwoods'', and every time we played it the crowd would really move around. So after we'd been doing it about two months, I fixed up a recording session with four jazzmen and four rock and roll players''.

''My alto sax man got ill just before the session, so I had to play the lead. I had to borrow his alto, because I only had a tenor. I paid for that (''Raunchy'') session myself, though; the musicians, the studio, everything. It was my idea. On the ''Raunchy'' session I was out of shape on the sax and got an off-tone and I think that was what helped to sell it''.

Part of the charm of Justis' version of "Raunchy" missing in all the cover versions was the off-tone of his saxophone. It was not wholly intentional: Justis had called in another sax player who had begged off, forcing Justis to play the lead part himself. He hadn't touched the sax for a while, and his rusty chops accounted for the strange tone. Just what was "Raunchy"? Was it an uneasy truce between big band music and rockabilly? You know in the first four bars that you're in the presence of something. Sax man Vernon Drane recalled to Colin Escott, "I

We modelled ourselves on Count Basie and Shortly Rogers. After Bill went to Sun, I came with him. I actually named 'Raunchy''. ''I said, 'That's the raunchiest damn thing you've ever done. If you don't record it, you'll miss a million seller'. He gave me a hundred dollar bonus for naming it. The guitarist Sid Manker was really the guy that worked up that riff though. He was a crazy man, high on everything.

Hell of nice guy, though". Whatever its title, the overall concoction didn't have much precedent in 1950s popular music. Another hybrid is born at 706 Union.

01(2) – "RAUNCHY" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - William Everette Justis-Sid Manker
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-12-1 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - RAUNCHY
Reissued: - 1997 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8302-5 mono
706 UNION INSTRUMENTALS

03 - "THE MIDNIGHT MAN"** - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Bill Justis-Sid Manker
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 310 - Master - Vocal Roger Fakes and The Spinners
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3519-B < mono
MIDNIGHT MAN / RAUNCHY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

There's not much to be said about "Midnite Man". Roger Fakes and the Spinners offer a vocal that no one in the industry seemed to take very seriously. By the time Sam Phillips saw fit to issue a Bill Justis LP (the first on the PI label), this track was conspicuously omitted. What is frightening, though, is that early disc jockeys copies of the disc were mailed with "Midnite Man" marked as the hit side. What were they thinking?

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Justis - Alt Saxophone
Vernon Drane - Saxophone *
Jamieson Bryant - Saxophone
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Sidney Manker - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Lapworth - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Roger Fakes - Vocal and Guitar **
The Spinners - Vocal Chorus

Two Tenor Sax overdubs *

 For Biographies of Bill Justis and Sid Manker see > The Sun Biographies <
Bill Justis and Sid Manker's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BARBARA PITTMAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JUNE 5, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - JACK CLEMENT
RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES

Curiously, Barbara Pittman's lone Sun single, issued in September 1956 never had a follow-up, despite respectable sales and media attention. For some reason, Sun never saw fit to follow through on her "female Elvis" image, by billing her as a tough competitor to Janis Martin. Pittman was no stranger to the Sun studio in late 1956 and early 1957, but no further titles were issued until these sides, both of which are relatively gentle compared to the steaming "I Need A Man" on Sun Records.

"Two Young Fools In Love" features Jack Clement's acoustic guitar in support of Barbara's double-tracked vocal (a passing nod to Patti Page, who was a dominant force in the industry at this time). Hank Byers vocal provided further harmony. The song was a big regional hit in Memphis, but failed to break out beyond the mid south.

01(1) - "TWO YOUNG FOOLS IN LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-6-5 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

There was no doubt that Barbara Pittman had the wings of a dove when it came to vocal standing. She could flutter, trill and express her sentiments with a highly convincing timbre, especially when the material reflected her own young years, as was the case with this nascent Phillips International single.

01(2) - "TWO YOUNG FOOLS IN LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 303 Master
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3518-A < mono
TWO YOUNG FOOLS IN LOVE / I'M GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

On "Two Young Fools In Love", Pittman offers a fine multitracked performance of a melodic tune that told us as much about producer and composer Jack Clement as it did Ms. Pittman. Clement's acoustic guitar added a strong folkie feel to this venture that stood a real chance with the teenage marketplace in the fall of 1957. Granted, it was a very different segment of the record buying public than Barbara had appealed to with Sun 253, but things were beginning to chance.

Clement's lyric and its references to high school dances and wearing rings on chains are pointedly teen-oriented in contrast to most Sun fare, but they were commercial shrewd.

In an 1989 conversation, Barbara recalled "Roland Janes engineered the session and forget to use echo. At first Jack was very mad at him, but then he listened to it and decided he liked it better without the echo. That's the way they released it". In May 1994, convened in the control room of the original Sun studio, where she spoke amongst other things about cutting demos for Elvis and her regard for the talents of Jack Clement.

02 - "INTERVIEW BARBARA PITTMAN" - 1:21
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-9 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 – 2002

"I'm Getting Better All The Time", is represented here by its original version as well as a surprisingly effective, yet mellow demo version.

03(1) - "I'M GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME" - B.M.I. - 1:33
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15359-12 mono
I NEED A MAN
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-28 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

03(2) - "I'M GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15359-16 mono
I NEED A MAN
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-7 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

03(3) - "I'M GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8319-24 mono
BARBARA PITTMAN - GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME

03(4) - "I'M GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8319-27 mono
BARBARA PITTMAN - GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME

03(5) - "I'M GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 304 Master Take 5
Recorded: - June 5, 1957
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3518-B < mono
I'M GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME / TWO YOUNG FOOLS IN LOVE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

On this side, written by Sun alumnus Stan Kesler, comes far closer to the sound and feel of vintage rockabilly, yet it too is muted by comparison. Gone is the maniacal energy and slap bass of Sun 253, replaced by a more subdued, neo-huffle rhythm and bopping chorus (which probably includes Barbara's voice overdubbed). Roland Janes takes a wonderfully melodic 16 bar solo and shows off a style rarely in evidence on his more famous work with Jerry Lee. Barbara has a really distinctive voice, with a smoky edge and undeniably sexy quality. It is well suited to the theme of this surprisingly risque work. "I may not be the best lover in the world, honey, but if we keep doing it, I'm going to get better and better". What good ole boy couldn't smile at a deal like that?

04 - "I FORGOT TO REMEMBER TO FORGET" - B.M.I. - 3:04
Composer: - Stan Kesler-Charlie Feathers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - 1957 - Demo
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15359-17 mono
I NEED A MAN
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-24 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

05 - "TAKE MY SYMPATHY" - B.M.I. - 1:10
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - 1957 - Demo
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15359-15 mono
I NEED A MAN
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-6-14 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

06 - "CARELESS LOVE" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued - Incomplete
Recorded: - June 5, 1957 - Demo

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Barbara Pittman - Vocal
Roland Janes - Lead Guitar
Jack Clement - Acoustic Guitar
Jerry Lee Lewis or Jimmy Wilson - Piano
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Stan Kesler - Bass
Billy Riley - Bass
Hank Byers - Vocal and Trumpet

For Biography of Barbara Pittman see > The Sun Biographies <
Barbara Pittman's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MCVOY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JUNE 6, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY JACK CLEMENT

4 UNKNOWN TITLES
(Sun Unissued)

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl McVoy - Vocal & Piano
Sid Manker - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Billy Weirr - Drums

For the Biography of Carl McVoy see > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1957

There was another new employee at Sun this summer in another, newly created position. Barbara Barnes is employed, part-time and then, on January 6, 1958 full-time, as promotions and publication assistant at Sun Records until 1960. She was a twenty-four-year-old University of Alabama graduate from Corinth, Mississippi, who had been working in telephone sales at WMCT TV, after interviewing with the newswire service UPI for a job. Leo Soroka, the head of Memphis' UPI bureau, whom Sam Phillips had called along with Bob Johnson to witness the Million Dollar Quartet session, hadn't had a position for her at the time, but he remembered her when Sam mentioned that he was looking for someone to handle the ever-increasing volume of copy writing and publicity generated by the label. Sam Phillips was immediately impressed by this accomplished and ambitious young woman, who would go on to become a college English professor, and offered her a job on the spot. Barnes for her part was not so sure. Although she found Sam himself to be ''the most interesting person, full of energy, with that intense stare that he had'', she felt that she didn't know enough about either him or the record business to cast her lot with Sun for life, even though, in his low-key but decidedly evangelical way, that was exactly what he seemed to want her to do. But she could, certainly, commit herself to working for him in a temporary position, writing liner notes for the long-playing albums Sam was planning to release on Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins in the fall, the company's first, and, under his direction, putting together the text for the brochure that Sam was assembling for his new Phillips International label, which would provide an introduction both the label and to him.

The singles, Sun 272, Ray Harris' ''Greenback Dollar, Watch And Chain'' b/w ''Foolish Heart'' and Sun 273, Mack Self ''Every Day'' b/w ''Easy To Love'' released.

JUNE 1, 1957 SATURDAY

The Everly Brothers join the Grand Ole Opry.

JUNE 3, 1957 MONDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis' new record (Sun 267) enter the national pop charts, selling up to thirteen hundred copies a week in Memphis alone before hitting number 1 on Billboard's Territorial Best Seller list. ''The platter is taking off like wildfire'', Billboard reported in a Country and Western Best Buys review, ''Tho in release only a short while, all areas list it as a top seller''.

JUNE 6, 1957 THURSDAY

After more than 20 years with Columbia, Gene Autry holds his final recording session for the label.

''The Lone Ranger'' ends on TV this day and is an American western drama television series that aired on the ABC Television network from 1949 to 1957, withClayton Moore in the starring role. Jay Silverheels, a member of the Mohawk Aboriginal people in Canada, played The Lone Ranger's Native Americancompanion Tonto.

John Hart replaced Moore in the title role from 1952 to 1954 due to a contract dispute. The live-action series initially featured Gerald Mohr as the narrator. Fred Foy was both narrator and announcer of the radio series from 1948 until its ending and then became announcer of the television version, for which narration of the story was dropped. The Lone Ranger was the highest-rated television program on ABC in the early 1950s and its first true "hit". The series finished number 7 in theNielsen ratings for the 1950-1951 season, number 18 for 1951-1952 and number 29 for 1952-1953.

JUNE 7, 1956 FRIDAY

''Trooper Hook'' opens, starring Joel McCrea and Barbara Stanwyck, with Sheb Wooley in a minor role. Tex Ritter sings the title track.

Not too shabby for an afternoon's work, singer/songwriter Don Gibson writes two country classics, ''I Can't Stop Loving You'' and ''Oh Lonesome Me'', at his home in an East Tennessee trailer park.

Webb Pierce recorded ''Let Forgiveness In''.

JUNE 9, 1957 SUNDAY

''Calypso Joe'' debuts in American theaters, with a cast that includes Herb Jeffries, Angie Dickinson and songwriter Terry Gilkyson, who wrote Tennessee Ernie Ford's 1950 hit ''The Call Of The Wild Goose''.

JUNE 10, 1957 MONDAY

Marty Robbins is in fashion, ''A White Sport Coat (And A Pink Carnation)'' takes the number 1 spot on the Billboard country singles chart.

The Platters play a sold out show in California's Oakland Auditorium.

JUNE 11, 1957 TUESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear'' backed by ''Loving You''. (RCA Victor 47-7000)

JUNE 12, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis' "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On" entered the national country charts. Two weeks later, it entered the Hot 100 at number 70.

JUNE 14, 1957 FRIDAY

Filming wraps in Los Angeles on Elvis Presley's movie ''Jailhouse Rock''.

JUNE 16, 1957 SUNDAY

Rusty Draper guests on CBS-TV's ''The Ed Sullivan Show'' alongside Johnny Mathis, John Raitt and Polly Bergen.

JUNE 17, 1957 MONDAY

Columbia released Ray Price's ''My Shoes Keep Walking Back''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

For many years Wanda Ballman was best known to Sun Records aficionados as the composer of Carl Perkins' "I'm Sorry I'm Not Sorry". However, a deeper dig into the vaults revealed that Ms. Ballman had a fairly long lasting affiliation with Sun Records. Even a single was contemplated at some point. Over the years she continued to pitch material to Sun and Sam and actually had two sessions of her own at 706 Union during 1957, during which five of her compositions were recorded.

We have resurrected four of those titles - a fifth appears to be lost. Wanda gave it a shot during which time she revealed herself to be a honky tonk singer at heart.

STUDIO SESSION FOR WANDA BALLMAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 17, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "AIN'T GOT A WORRY ON MY MIND" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 17, 1957
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8182-8 mono
HILLBILLY FILLIES & ROCKIN' CHICKS
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-6 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

02 - ''HEARTBREAK GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1986
Recorded: - Probably June 17, 1957
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-10-19 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-3-3 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

03 - "HONEY, TELL ME SOME MORE" - B.M.I. - 1:32
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 17, 1957
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-3-4 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

04 - "50 YEARS FROM NOW ON"
Composer: - Wanda Ballman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably June 17, 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wanda Ballman - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

For Biography of Wanda Ballman see > The Sun Biographies <
Wanda Ballman's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1957

Patsy Halcomb, on the other hand, remains completely unknown. She was paired with Sun's session guys, but when she returned from whence she came her tapes were stashed away. It sounds as if she might have participated in two sessions. ''Someone To Love'' has a different sound from ''Ooh That's Good'' and ''I Wanna Rock'', and sports a saxophone. The one session sheet with her name on it mentions just, Janes, Kesler, Wilson, and Van Eaton.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

There was a time in 1956 or 1957 when every major record label felt it had to have its own "female Elvis". Decca had Brenda Lee, Capitol had Wanda Jackson, Columbia had Lorrie Collins, RCA Victor had Janis Martin. Perhaps Sun, which had instigated the whole rockabilly trend in the first place, didn't feel they had enough coverage with only Barbara Pittman, although her 1956 single "I Need A Man" was certainly a step in the right direction.

And so on June 17, 1957, Miss Patsy Holcomb (or Halcomb, as some sources have it) entered the studio at 706 Union Avenue along with the usual pickers and grinners (Roland Janes, J.M. Van Eaton, Stan Kesler) and produced - or at least worked extensively on - two sides for single release. For reasons now lost to history, "I Wanna Rock" and "Ooh, That's Good" were never issued, although various versions of them have certainly been resurrected by latter day Sun archaeologists. Halcomb also tried her hand at two other titles that have been far less reissue interest; in fact, it is not clear these titles have been general release anywhere. Aurally-speaking, with the sound board at 706 Union being set for balance on a semi-permanent basis, there was often little distinction between demos and master sessions. In this instance the somewhat embryonic material, fashioned by Patsy Halcomb's adolescent phrasing, points to the former. Even so there's a genuinely committed approach from the musicians, in particular Roland Janes, whose flowing stratopheric guitar break adds a crucial authority to the side.

STUDIO SESSION FOR PATSY HALCOMB (HOLCOMB)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 17, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY JACK CLEMENT

01 - "OOH, THAT'S GOOD" - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Patsy Halcomb
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 17, 1957
Released: - 1996
First appearance: – Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8182-10 mono
HILLBILLY FILLIES & ROCKIN' CHICKS
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-27 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-6-6 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

02 - "OOH, THAT'S GOOD" - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Patsy Halcomb
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 17, 1957
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-8 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

03 - "I WANNA ROCK/
FALSE START OOH, THAT'S GOOD" - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Patsy Halcomb
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - 'Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 17, 1957
Released: - 1996
False Start of ''Ooh Thats Good'' released by mistake on BCD 17313-6-5
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8182-4 mono
HILLBILLY FILLIES & ROCKIN' CHICKS
Reissued: - 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-26 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

04 - "I WANNA ROCK" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Patsy Holcomb
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 17, 1957
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-11 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

The next track obviously stems from a later and very different session and is far less mannered and frantic than the previous titles.

05 - "SOMEONE TO LOVE*" - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally issued
Recorded: – Unknown Date Late 1950s
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-7 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-6-7 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

The next track shows that Holcomb was doing some serious listening to Patsy Cline as well as some of the blues-oriented country hits by Marty Robbins from the same era (1959-1960). Some tape damage on the latter title has probably to the obscurity of the track.

06 - "YOU'RE FREE TO GO" B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Patsy Halcomb
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: – Probably June 17, 1957
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-18 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Patsy Holcomb - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson – Piano
Martin Willis* - Saxophone

For Biography of Patsy Holcomb see > The Sun Biographies <
Patsy Holcomb's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAROLD DORMAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE MID-1957
MARCH 16, 24 & 31 & JUNE 17, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY JACK CLEMENT

Harold Dorman cut four audition recordings for Sun Records in Mid-1957 including numerous cuts of the ballads ''I'm Stepping Aside'', ''Spark Of Love'' and ''To Be With You'' but Sam Phillips nothing to be released.

01 - "I'M STEPPING ASIDE'' - B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Mid-1957
Released: - 1998
First appearance: – Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-20 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTER

02 - "SPARK OF LOVE'' - B.M.I. - 3:30
Composer: - Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Mid-1957
Released: - 1996
First appearance: – Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8161-20 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 3
Reissued: - 1999 Dressed To Kil (CD) 500/200rpm DTKBOX66 mono
THE SUN GODS

03 - "TO BE WITH YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Mid-1957
Released: - 1997
First appearance: – Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8236-20 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 4
Reissued: - SAAR Records (CD) 500/200rpm Saar 41008 mono
THE BEST OF SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Harold Dorman - Vocal & Guitar
Other Details Unknown

For Biography of Harold Dorman see > The Sun Biographies <
Harold Dorman's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 18, 1957 TUESDAY

Grady Nutt marries his collegiate sweetheart, Eleanor Wilson. The Baptist minister goes on to be a member of the ''Hee Haw'' cast.

JUNE 19, 1957 WEDNESDAY

David Ragsdale is accidentally shot in the back at a San Mateo, California, bar. A year later, Ragsdale files a $500,000 suit against Ray Price, reasoning that if Price hadn't been singing, he wouldn't have been at the bar.

Gene Vincent recorded the pop hit ''Lotta Lovin''' at the Capitol Tower in Los Angeles with a band that includes Buck Owens.

Sam Phillips announced that he had hired his brother Jud Phillips as national Sales and Promotion Director and, with understandable misgiving, and the same tincture of love and irritation that Jud always seemed to bring out in him, gave his brother the credit cards that he needed for the job.

JUNE 20, 1957 THURSDAY

The House of Representatives passes a bill levying a 10% tax on tape and wire recorders, players and recorder players. Records had already been subjected to this tax.

JUNE 22, 1957 SATURDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis appears on the Big D Jamboree" in Dallas.

Another Texan, Johnny Carroll, contacted Sam Phillips after meeting Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill in Shreveport after playing the Louisiana Hayride renewing an acquaintance. Carroll began playing lead guitar under Moore's tuition and it was Scotty or Bill who suggested that he ought to approach distributor Bill Emerson about a record deal with Sun.

Carroll sold a few songs to Phillips, two of which appeared in the first batch of Phillips International releases in 1957. An unissued song ''Rock Baby, Rock It'' titled the low budget teen flick made in Texas with Carroll, Rosco Gordon, and Don Gililland. Carrol's song was paint-numbers rock and roll with none of the blinding originality heard elsewhere.

''The Jimmy Dean Show'' makes its prime-time debut on CBS-TV 11 weeks after the network first started airing it as a six days-a-week daytime program.

Patsy Cline performs ''Walkin' After Midnight'' on ABC's ''Ozak Jubilee''.

JUNE 23, 1957 SUNDAY

Happy trails from the network: ''The Roy Rogers Show'' makes its final prime-time appearance on NBC-TV. The show also features Dale Evans and Pat Brady, with Rogers and Evans singing the theme song ''Happy Trails''.

Songwriter Keith Palmer is born in Hyatt, Missouri. He writes Reba McEntire's ''For My Broken Heart'' and Johnny Rodriguez' ''I Didn't (Every Chance I Had).

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Given the rich talent pool on his doorstep in Memphis, it is surprising that Sam Phillips saw fit to sign Texas resident Johnny Lewis Carroll, and its still not entirely clear how or why Carroll made their way onto Phillips' new Phillips International label. Sam Phillips would have been aware of Carroll because he had been on Decca in 1956 and he'd covered "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby". Carroll had also appeared in a sub-B movie called "Rock Baby, Rock It" with another Sun artist, Rosco Gordon.

Johnny Carroll has an interesting story about Phillips International that may or may not be true. This is the way he related it to Bill Millar: "I flew to Memphis 'cause Sam wanted to talk to me. He said he was gonna start this new label and spend a tremendous amount of money on it. He said that Phillips the electronic company were planning on coming to the USA, and - provided he established his label with one or two hits - they'd have to buy him out. He said, 'You can go ahead and be released on Sun, or you can wait a couple of months and go on Phillips International''.

''I'm gonna release five discs in one package and whichever one the jockeys start playing, I'm gonna put everything behind that one record and go with it as hard as I can. 'So I took my chances and went on Phillips International. You know the rest; the jockeys picked up on "Raunchy'".

Sam Phillips eventually folded Phillips International in 1963, ceding rights to Philips BV in Holland, so perhaps Carroll's story is not so far-fetched.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CARROLL
AT THE CLIFF HERRING STUDIO, FORTH WORTH, TEXAS

SESSION: SUNDAY JUNE 23, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CLIFF HERRING
AND JOHNNY TIGER

"Rock Baby Rock It" was the title of a juvenile movie that had such a marginal showing, it has become better known in recent years than at the time of its release. The song was one of four sides cut by Johnny Carroll in Texas and dispatched to Sam Phillips for possible licensing consideration. Two of the more commercial submissions from the session made it on to a single, whilst this tour de force, which was much nearer to his Decca sides from a year previous, languished in its tape box.

01 - "ROCK BABY ROCK IT" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Johnny Carroll
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 23, 1957
Released: - 1980
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Instant INS 5040-17 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 2 - ROCKABILLY RHYTHM
Reissued: - 2002 Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-4-24 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

To the abouced point, there sold to Sam Phillips by Johnny G. Tiger (a.k.a. Jack Goldman) as part of a projected movie soundtrack, and after they fell out he worked the Louisiana Hayride with Scotty and Bill. Apparently, it was Bill Black who suggested to Johnny Carroll that he contact Sam Phillips, and Phillips bought a four-song session that Carroll had recorded in Fort Worth, Texas.

In "That's The Way I Love" his sole single for Phillips International, the "ba ba diddle it" chant was an unashamed lift from the Cadillacs "Speedo", the doo wop smash from a couple of seasons previous.

02 - "THAT'S THE WAY I LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Johnny Carroll
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 307 Master
Recorded: - June 23, 1957
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3520-A < mono
THAT'S THE WAY I LOVE / I'LL WAIT
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

The vocal riff on "That's The Way I Love" owes a considerable debt to the Cadillacs' Speedoo, and there's a case to be made for saying that Carroll borrowed more than a vocal lick or two. The stop-line release was also lifted almost note-for-note from "Speedoo". Its a cinch that Sam Phillips knew nothing of the New York doo wop scene or he wouldn't have touched these sides with a ten foot pole. In the unlikely event they had sold or received northern airplay, Phillips International would have been approached by New York lawyers bearing writs rather than Dutchmen bearing cheques.

Johnny Carroll went on to become a fan favorite in Europe in the 1970s and beyond, and many were saddened to hear of his death in February 1995 following a liver transplant.

03 - "I'LL WAIT" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Johnny Carroll
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 308 Master
Recorded: - June 23, 1957
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3520-B < mono
I'LL WAIT / THAT'S THE WAY I LOVE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

04 - "YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Joseph McCarthy-James V. Monaco
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 23, 1957
Released: - 1981
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CFM 501 mono
ROCK, BAY, ROCK IT
Reissued: 1985 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30241 mono
JOHNNY CARROLL - CRAZY HOT ROCK

Sam Phillips failed to renew Johnny Carroll's one-session contract and the singer remained in Dallas under the care of Ed McLemore, a new manager who also booked acts on to KRLD's Big D Jamboree. Carroll met Gene Vincent in McLemore's office at the Dallas Sportatorium. He was impressed with Vincent's intense, even dysfunctional lifestyle and mightily influenced by his singing, especially those shimmering, high-voiced ballads like ''Peace Of Mind''. The two men became fast friends and for a while their lack of good fortune was intertwined. Carroll stayed at Vincent's house in Dallas, drove him around and went on tour with Vincent when he wasn't working himself.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Carroll - Vocal and Guitar
Bill ''Billy'' Buntin - Bass
George "Mickey" Jones - Drums
Jay Salam - Lead Guitar
Bill Hennen – Piano

For Biography of Johnny Carroll see > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Carroll's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY JUNE 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Back in the mid-1930s, while Gene Autry was appearing on "The Old Barn Dance" radio show, he began receiving love letters from a woman in Iowa. After several months the woman's doctor wrote to Autry and told him she was mentally disturbed. The physician requested that Autry write to her and tell her that he was not at all interested in her romantic overtures. In the last letter Autry received from the woman, she described being alone. After hearing Autry on the radio she walked outside and stared at the night sky. She wrote: "I looked at the stars in the heavens. I saw millions of them, but you're the only star in my blue heaven". That line inspired Autry to write the song "You're The Only Star (In My Blue Heaven)". His recording (conqueror 9098) was released in December 1935. Roy Acuff had a popular 1936 recording of the song (ARC-7-04-51). Autry sang the song in his movie "The Old Barn Dance" (1938). Here an highlight from Jerry in 3 excellent takes behind his pumping piano.

1(1) - "YOU'RE THE ONLY STAR IN MY BLUE HEAVEN" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Gene Autry
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein & Corporation
Matrix number: - None – Chords - Fast Take 1
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-7-2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

In a further three readings of Gene Audry's ''You're The Only Star In My Blue Heaven'' there are plenty of clues to help separate them, leaving aside the question of the tempo employed on each take. Observe how in two of the three, the solos are preceded by the phrase ''...I'm waiting just for you'' while at this juncture in the third Jerry Lee sings ''… and you're shining just for me''. Use of the same personal pronouns is then maintained through to the conclusion of the song on each run through. In one of the two which share the corresponding lyric, the instrumental passage is announced with the interjection ''one time'' while in the each of the solos one can discern variations in the use of glissandi.(*)

1(2) - "YOU'RE THE ONLY STAR IN MY BLUE HEAVEN" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Gene Autry
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein & Corporation
Matrix number: - None – Fast Take 2
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1-17 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

01(3) - "YOU'RE THE ONLY STAR IN MY BLUE HEAVEN" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Gene Autry
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein & Corporation
Matrix number: - None – Fast Take 3
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun 121-A6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - OLE TYME COUNTRY MUSIC
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Jerry Lee Lewis also turned his hand during his first summer at Sun to The Dominoes' 1951 hit ''Sixty Minute Man'', leaving three recordings of this risqué number with no prospect of the song being released. While all three takes are performed in essentially the same way, there are several reference points to tell them apart. The repeated opening chord of the first is hammered in a lower register than as heard in the other two. Of the latter, one features the wording ''lord, I rock and roll them'' in the first verse; the other ''I rock and I roll them''. Any doubters can always relish the spontaneity shown in the piano solos from one take to the next.(*)

2(1) - "SIXTY MINUTE MAN" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - William ''Billy'' Ward-Rose Marks
Publisher: - Windswept Music
Matrix number: - None – Take 1
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - March 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD Charly 70-20 mono
RARE AND ROCKIN'
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Although considered far too risqué to be released at the time, ''Sixty Minute Man'' is a tremendous recording with a very inspired and flamboyant vocal and superb piano playing (not forgetting the contributions from guitarist Roland Janes and drummer James Van Eaton, two very important elements of most of his 1950s recordings). Even Sun International during their prolific 1969-1971 releases somehow overlooked this track, and instead it had to wait until the 1974 United Kingdom ''Rockin’ And Free'' collection. The 1973 cut isn’t bad, but lacks the energy of the earlier version, and at over 3 and half minutes (almost exactly twice the length of the 1957 cut) it’s a little over-long.

2(2) - "SIXTY MINUTE MAN" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - William ''Billy'' Ward-Rose Marks
Publisher: - Windswept Music
Matrix number: - None – Take 2
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-3-A4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1-26 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

2(3) - "SIXTY MINUTE MAN" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - William ''Billy'' Ward-Rose Marks
Publisher: - Windswept Music
Matrix number: - None – Take 3
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-10 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Written by group member Billy Ward and his collaborator and business partner Rose Marks, this is an early doo-wop classic that held up to many rock and roll records that emerged later in the 1950s. The song is rooted in blues music, and follows the frequent blues theme of the singer bragging about his sexual prowess. This song had more of an rhythm and blues sound and was an early influence on rock music.

With lead vocals by Billy Ward, this was one of the first double-entendre hits, one of the first rhythm and blues hits to cross over to the pop charts, and one of the seminal songs that helped shape the newly emerging rock and roll.

Billy Ward and His Dominoes were a big deal in the 1950s, being one of the best-selling acts of that decade and having three Billboard Top 40 hits by the end of the decade. It was an integrated group, named for the black and white on dominoes. Billy Ward, who played piano for the group, lived to the ripe old age of 80.

"Sixty Minute Man" was used in the soundtrack to the 1988 film Bull Durham. It was also performed as a kind of promotional joke by Ed Bradley, reporter for the TV news magazine, what else?, 60 Minutes.

3 - "I'LL KEEP ON LOVING YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Floyd Tillman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 121-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - OLE TYME COUNTRY MUSIC
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1-23 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Issued as "If The World Keeps On Turning" on LP 121.

4(1) - "LEWIS BOOGIE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 1
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-3-A1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-1-18 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Lewis Boogie" (Sun 301) is written by Jerry Lee Lewis in 1956 and released as a single in June 1958 on Sun Records and backed with "The Return of Jerry Lee". The recording was reissued in 1979 as a 7" 45 single as Sun 29 as part of the Sun Golden Treasure Series. The song was also released in the United Kingdom and Canada as a single. The first edition of the single listed "The Return of Jerry Lee" on both sides and was credited to "Louis" rather than "Lewis". The editing and recording of "The Return of Jerry Lee" was done by Jack Clement and George Klein on May 30, 1958. The single of "Lewis Boogie" was also released in the United Kingdom as a 45 single in 1964 on London Records as London HLS 9867 backed with "Bonnie B". The song was also released in Canada in 1958 as a 45 single on Quality Records.

Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a live version of the song with the British band The Nashville Teens on the landmark 1964 live album ''Live At the Star Club, Hamburg'', regarded critically as one of the greatest live albums in rock and roll history.

The track appeared on the 1984 Rhino Records collection 18 Original Sun Greatest Hits which featured the most successful recordings by Jerry Lee Lewis on the Sun label. The song appeared in a new recording by Jerry Lee Lewis in the 1989 Orion Pictures biopic ''Great Balls of Fire''! during the closing credits. "Lewis Boogie" is featured in the 2005 Johnny Cash biopic ''Walk The Line''. It was performed by Waylon Payne in the film and its soundtrack. In 2007, the song was featured on the live album ''Last Man Standing Live'', recorded in 2006 in collaboration with other musicians.

Robert Palmer writes that the song "was a mixture of local black influences, the hillbilly boogie and rhythm and blues that were so popular on Southern jukeboxes when he was growing up, and - the most crucial ingredient - the Killer's individual musical genius''. Charlie Gillett writes that at "his best-as in..."Lewis Boogie (1958)"-Lewis epitomized the careless confidence that some people liked rock and roll for."

4(2) - "LEWIS BOOGIE" (1) – B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 315 Take 2 Master
Recorded: - June 1957 – Not Originally Issued
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 301-B < mono
LEWIS BOOGIE / THE RETURN OF JERRY LEE
Reissued - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

For this flipside (SUN 301), Sun resurrected one of Jerry Lee's throwaway studio jams from this summer. In retrospect, it is the unpretentious "Lewis Boogie" that has endeared the record to collectors over the years.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

 For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BARBARA PITTMAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 24, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY JACK CLEMENT

UNKNOWN TITLES (SUN UNISSUED)

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Barbara Pittman - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Smokey Joe Baugh - Drums

For Biography of Barbara Pittman see > The Sun Biographies <
Barbara Pittman's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 24, 1957 MONDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''Two Shadows On Your Window'' during the afternoon at RCA's Nashville Studios.

JUNE 26, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Don Gibson recorded ''Blue Blue Day'' during the evening at the Methodist Television, Radio and Film Commission in Nashville.

JUNE 26, 1957 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley sleeps for the first time at Graceland Mansion, his primary home for the remainder of his life.

Tony King is born in North Carolina. A member of the short-lived 1990's trio Matthews, Wright and King, he tours for several years in Vince Gill's band and writes the Ricky Van Shelton hit ''I've Cried My Last Tear For You''.

Radio station WJJC signs on the air in Commerce, Georgia. Among the disc jockeys for the station's first day is afternoon personality Bill Anderson.

Webb Pierce recorded ''Don't Do It Darlin''' during the afternoon at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

JUNE 27, 1957 THURSDAY

Hurricane Audrey hits the shores of Louisiana and Texas. Hurricane Audrey came early in the hurricane season and formed on the 25th of June. It was one of the most devastating hurricanes on record and caused large amounts of damage in the Gulf coastal region, especially in Southern Louisiana and South Eastern Texas. It is estimated that around 500 people died as a result of the storm and it caused over $100 million in damage to the towns that were hit by it.

JUNE 28, 1957 FRIDAY

Hank Locklin recorded ''Geisha Girl'', ''Livin' Alone'' and ''Send Me The Pillow You Dream On'' at the RCA Studios on McGavock Street in Nashville, Tennessee.

JUNE 30, 1957 SUNDAY

The Everly Brothers make their national TV debut, singing ''Bye Bye Love'' on ''The Ed Sullivan Show'', live from New York. Bonnie Guitar also appears on the CBS program, performing ''Dark Moon''.

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©