CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1956 Sun Schedule <

1956 SESSIONS (12/2)
December 1, 1956 to December 31, 1956

Studio Session for The Heathens, December 8, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, December 11, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, December 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Scott, Late 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ernie Chaffin, December 12, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Artist, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, December 13, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Roy Orbison, Possible Late 1956 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 5, 1956 WEDNESDAY

The rock and roll movie, ''Rock, Rock, Rock'' opens nationally.

With the birth of ''Duke'' Stephenson, Kitty Wells becomes a grandmother at age 37.

Merle and Bettie Travis are awarded custody of her two sons from a previous marriage by a Los Angeles judge.

DECEMBER 6, 1956 TURSDAY

Carl Smith and June Carter divorce after four years of marriage.

DECEMBER 6, 1956 THURSDAY

Two days after the Million Dollar Quartet session at Sun Records, at 8:00 p.m. Elvis Presley returns to the Loew's State Theater for another viewing of "Love Me Tender". With his Las Vegas visitor, Marilyn Evans, and his Marine friend Red West, he entered the theater quietly from the alley door, but word soon spread up and down Main Street that he was in the theater and business immediately picked up. Once he went to the rest room, and a cluster of girls and women camped outside the door till he came out. He signed autographs for them, then sat in the balcony for the rest of the showing. As he left by the alley door a cluster of fans went with him, and he signed more autographs.

DECEMBER 7, 1956 FRIDAY

On December 7, 1956, Elvis Presley and George Klein attended the otherwise segregated WDIA black radio station’s annual fund-raiser for ''needy Negro children'' at Memphis' Ellis Auditorium. Firstly, in June 1956, The Memphis World newspaper reported, ''the rock and roll phenomenon cracked Memphis’s segregation laws' by attending the Memphis Fairgrounds amusement park ''during what is designated as ''colored night''.

Elvis performed alongside some of his own heroes, Ray Charles, B.B King, the Moonglows, Claudia Ivy, and Rufus Thomas. There was no doubt that Elvis was seen as a champion in the black Memphis, among others is community and his concert audiences were certainly not all white as is often believed. Although Elvis’ recording contract did not permit him to perform...

...at the fund-raiser for radio station WDIA, he set off a sensation. The Pittsburgh Courier described the reaction that night as, ''A thousand black, brown and beige teen-age girls in the audience blended their alto and soprano voices in one wild crescendo of sound that rent the rafters … and took off like scalded cats in the direction of Elvis Presley''.

The radio station called itself the ''Mother Station of the Negroes''. In the aftermath of the event, a number of Negro newspapers printed photographs of Elvis with both Rufus Thomas and B.B. King. (''Thanks, man, for all the early lessons you gave me'', were the words The Tri-State Defender reported he said to Mr. King). When he returned on December 6, 1957 night to the revue, a stylish shot of him ''talking shop'' with Little Junior Parker and Bobby Bland appeared in Memphis’s mainstream afternoon paper, The Press-Scimitar, accompanied by a short feature that made Elvis' feelings abundantly clear. ''It was the real thing'', he said, summing up both performance and audience response. ''Right from the heart''.

DECEMBER 7, 1956 FRIDAY

Drummer Carlos Vega is born in Cuba. In addition to working on pop albums by the likes of George Benson, James Taylor and Olivia Newton-John, he also appears on country hits by Willie Nelson, Vince Gill and Reba McEntire.

DECEMBER 8, 1956 SATURDAY

Rockabilly musician Dave Rich joins The Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport.

Studio session for five East High School students ''The Heathens'' for Sun Records.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE HEATHENS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY DECEMBER 8, 1956
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY JACK CLEMEND AND/OR MARION KEISKER

On Saturday, December 8, 1956, four days after Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, and Jerry Lee Lewis recorded the ''Million Dollar Quartet Session'', five East High School students known as The Heathens (named after 15 year-old lead singer Colin Heath) entered Sun Studio to record a song he had written with a female classmate (and rhythm guitar player) Kaye Garren called “Steady Girl”. Classmen Roger Fakes played lead guitar and Joe Bauer (later of The Youngbloods) played drums. David Gibson played piano on one of two takes. Sam Phillips was probably not there that day, so it is likely that Jack Clement or Marion Keisker produced the session, but there’s no way to ever know for certain.

Both takes were cut straight to a 78 rpm acetate disc (live with no overdubs and no mixing) as these teenagers banged away inside Sun Studio on that weekend afternoon. When the smoke cleared, both takes of “Steady Girl” were too raw even by Sun Records standards, so the Heathens were never called back and the lacquer master remained unheard. Sixty-three years later, it's easy to wax romantic about a lost and primitive rock and roll recording, but considering the time, place, energy, and innocence, I've never heard anything like this before. I consider this record to be the first garage rock recording of all time.

- Frank Bruno

01(1) – ''STEADY GIRL'' – B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Colin Heath-Kaye Garren
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - 78rpm Acetate Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 8, 1956
Released: - March 9, 2019
First appearance: - Black And Wyatt Records (S) 45rpm 111407-A mono
STEADY GIRL I / STEADY GIRL II

01(2) – ''STEADY GIRL'' – B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Colin Heath-Kaye Garren
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - 78rpm Acetate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 8, 1956
Released: - March 9, 2019
First appearance: - Black And Wyatt Records (S) 45rpm 111407-B mono
STEADY GIRL II / STEADY GIRL I

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Colin Heath - Vocals and Guitar
Kaye Garren - Rhythm Guitar
Roger Fakes - Lead Guitar
David Gibson - Piano
Joe Bauer - Drums

For Biography of The Heathens see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Heathens' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

(Above) Transferred and mastered by Memphis Record Pressing by engineer Jesse Mansfield from the original 78 rpm acetate disc cut at Sun Records, ''Steady Girl'' is being reissued in a limited edition of just over 500 copies by Black and Wyatt Records, a new Memphis label founded by a pair of doctors and music enthusiasts, Robert Jethro Wyatt (a pediatric nephrologist) and Dennis Black (a pediatric gastroenterologist).

The new record, an old-school 7-inch 45rpm that contains both takes of ''Steady Girl'', one per side, will be released during a ''Heathens Dance Party'' at 7 p.m. on March 9, 2019 at B-Side Bar Memphis logated at 1555 Madison in Minglewood Hall.

The rediscovery of the Heathens disc goes back about three years, when the pristine but fragile lacquer acetate was bought, unheard, from a California collector by Memphian Frank Bruno, a dedicated, some might say obsessed, collector of Memphis music and related memorabilia. When Bruno heard ''Steady Girl'', he was "blown away" by a performance he says was “too raw even by Sun Records standards.”

''It’s easy to wax romantic about a lost and primitive rock and roll recording'', Bruno writes on the liner notes that are included with the new 45 rpm release,''but considering the time, place, energy, and innocence, I’ve never heard anything like this before. I consider this record to be the first garage rock recording of all time''.

The flat box containing the acetate listed the recording date and the personnel. In addition to Colin and Kaye, the Heathens consisted of Roger Fakes, lead guitar; Joe Bauer, drums; and David Gibson, piano (heard on only one of the takes).

Frank Bruno, 41, started searching for the band members. "I wanted to find them so bad''. Fakes and Bauer proved to be known quantities.

Joe Bauer, who went on to be the founding the drummer in The Youngbloods, a band that had a huge hit with "Get Together" in the late 1960s, had died in 1982 of a brain tumor.

Roger Fakes, a Sun session musician, sang lead vocals on the 1957 Bill Justis release of "The Midnite Man," but left music to be an executive in Auto-Chlor Systems, a Memphis commercial kitchen cleaning business. Frank Bruno interviewed him not long before his death on September16, 2018 at the age of 79, but Fakes had no memories of "Steady Girl''.

David Gibson, the only living Heathen, proved more elusive until reached by The Commercial Appeal. He said he remembers Colin and Kaye and the other musicians well; he remembers playing in various combos, he remembers performing on Wink Martindale's "Dance Party" on WHBQ-TV, but he did not remember recording with the Heathens. "Mark it down to age or whatever, I honestly don't remember this'', said Gibson, 80, professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Tennessee at Martin, who still plays piano as a hobby.

That leaves Colin and Kaye, the collective heart of the Heathens in more ways than one. As Frank Bruno discovered through Facebook sleuthing, the "Steady Girl" songwriters were partners in romance as well as music who played at parties and coffee houses throughout their marriage.

Described in the East High School Mustangs yearbook as "small in stature, great in mind,"the 5-foot-5 Colin never quit being an artist, even after entering the marketing and advertising fields. After his divorce from Kaye, he moved to Arkansas, built a round house, became a glass blower, and made puppets and metal sculptures. He died in 2013 at the age of 72.

After being contacted by Frank Bruno, Kaye penned a short autobiography for Black and Wyatt Records that is included as an insert in the new 7-inch record. Completed in December 2018, almost exactly a month before Kaye's death, the essay is a remarkable memoir of young love and youthful idealism, early rock 'n' roll, domestic compromise and free-spirited folk music adventurousness. Kaye Garren Heath Payne, died in November 2018 at the age of 77 in New Orleans.

Liner notes by John Beifuss, Memphis Commercial Appeal 2019

DECEMBER 9, 1956 SUNDAY

Sylvia Hutton is born in Koomo, Indiana. A secretary for record producer Tom Collins, she emerges with a series of glossy, pop-tinged recordings in the 1980s; topped by the million-selling ''Nobody''.

DECEMBER 10, 1956 MONDAY

Capitol released Sonny James' ''Young Love'' and its hit flip side, ''You're The Reason I'm In Love''.

Hank Thompson recorded ''Rockin' In The Congo'' at the Capitol Recording Studio in Hollywood during an afternoon session.

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''I'm Tired''.

DECEMBER 11, 1956 TUESDAY

Patsy Cline's father, Sam Hensley, dies of throat cancer in a West Virginia hospital.

Decca Records throws a birthday party for Brenda Lee, as she turns 12, at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

''FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL''

Guitarist Roland Janes confirms that he brought Indiana-born songwriter Ray Scott over to Riley's house so they could go through Ray's material and come up with a follow-up to ''Trouble Bound''. "We went through everything Ray had and is only one we took was ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll''. But it was a good one."

Scott was no stranger to the Sun studio but fancied himself as more of songwriter than a recording artist. Nevertheless, his several vintage recordings at sought today by collectors. Two of his demos for Sun appeared on Bear Family That'll Flat Git It (Sun) - Volume 17 (BCD 16405 AH). If you listen closely to these ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll'' sits, you'll hear an obvious separation between two different sessions. Alternates Take 1 to Take 6 were recorded before session pianist Jerry Lee Lewis joined on, and so the sound changes appreciably starting with Alternate Take 7. But along with that there's also a surprising key change. Prior to the addition of a piano, the boys rake the song in C, a most unlikely key for a rockabilly band. Once Lewis joins them, they take it up a half a tone to the key of D. D is an accessible key for a piano, guitar and bass. It's C that needs some explanation, and the best one is simply that without a piano or sax in the band, the stringed instruments only had to tune to each other - not to the outside world. In all likelihood, they thought they were playing in D at the first session. But Jerry Lee's instrument was less flexible, so at the second session the piano defined what D was. Riley's wife Joyce confirms that during the later years of his life, Billy performed the song in the key of C - a comfortably lower key for a more mature voice.

Riley fans may listen to Alternate Take 10 of ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll'' and wonder why we have included the original single among this collection of alternates. The answer is simple. It isn't the master. It's very close, but the difference tells quite a tale. This is the bed track upon which the master was based. It was overdubbed for release. So what was added to this nearly perfect piece of 1956 rock and roll? The answer is Screaming! This is the very opposite of 'sweetening', which later became the industry standard for overdubbing. Leave it to Sam Phillips and Sun Records.

No strings or choral voices were added. This was an attempt to unsweeten a track, if ever there was one. It's true that the original recording (Alternate Take 10) did have some screaming on it.

But not enough for Sam Phillips. And so more of Marvin Pepper's raucous screams were added before release. You don't believe it? Listen for yourself. Do a side buy side comparison between this track and Sun 260. Lord knows, we've done plenty of them The results are unmistakable.

Half a century later, we reluctant tim learn that not all that wild abandon we heard on the single was as spontaneous as we had hoped or assumed. Some of it had to be added after the fact.

In case you're wondering why anybody would go to all this trouble to layer in more screaming, think about the era. ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll'' was recorded in December, 1956. In January of that same year, Little Richard , the iconic screamer of rock and roll - hit the charts with ''Tutti Frutti''. Three months later, he was back with ''Long Tall Sally''. The era of screaming rock and roll had begun. Billy's vocal here already sounded like Richard Penniman. Why not add some screams and complete the picture? Another rockabilly record of the period that included screaming was Gene Vincent's ''B-I-Bickey-Bi, Bo-Bo-Go'' (Capitol 3678).

Billy Riley's attraction to Little Richard's musical style will be an in these notes. It was apparent in more than just the recording studio. Roland Janes recalls a road tour with Hayden Thompson. ''Every night Hayden would do a special set where he'd do nothing but Elvis songs and imitate his style. Billy would do the same thing with Little Richard songs. At the end of the show the two of them would come out onstage and do a grand finale so they'd have Elvis and Little Richard on stage together. It was something to see."

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY DECEMBER 11, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

With a record on the market, Billy Riley needed to put a band together. Jack Clement was too busy engineering at Sun and to be playing clubs and Bernero had always been temporary. That left only guitarist Roland Janes. Billy Riley and Roland Janes had met a teenage drummer, James M. Van Eaton had been down at Sun with another group. He was quickly drafted into the fold, as was upright bassist Marvin Pepper. By the end of 1956, Riley's group had been co-opted as the house band at Sun Records.

During November and December 1956 Billy Riley and his group worked up their second single. Two weeks before Christmas they were joined by Jerry Lee Lewis who, ten days earlier, had cut his first single with the help of Roland Janes and James M. Van Eaton. On December 11, they cut one of the all-time rockabilly masterpieces, "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll".

01(1) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-12 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

According to Billy Riley, ''When we did ''Flying Saucer Rock And roll'', that night Sam gave our band its name. He said, 'We'll call you the Little Green Men'. So he put the name on the record, and we just lived with it''. That upstart piano player would be gone by the time Riley cut the second of his records (''Red Hot''). By then Jerry Lee Lewis was out on the road in support of his own emerging hit called ''Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On''.

01(2) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-13 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(3) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-14 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(4) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-15 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(5) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-16 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(6) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-1 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1960
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-17 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

This embryonic version of "Flying Saucer", is much slower then the released version, and the piano is absent. As is the case with Elvis Presley's Sun out-takes, the earlier version is evidence aplenty of how material was radically reworked at Sun over the course of many studio hours, ironically culminating in white hot versions that sounded totally spontaneous.

Riley's guitarist, Roland Janes, remembered a song called "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll" he had heard on a demo tape from Ray Scott, who later recorded one single for Satellite (the precursor of Stax).

With Jerry Lee Lewis on piano and Janes thrashing his tremolobar, Riley delivered the song in a newfound rasping voice that owed more than a passing nod to Little Richard. It is still not entirely clear how the tune found its way into Riley's repertoire. Roland Janes claims that they were actively searching for a follow-up.

He knew Ray Scott and brought him over to Riley's house, whereupon Scott presented a number of songs including "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll" (misprinted as "Saucers" on the record label). However, Riley remembers that Sam Phillips had a demo of the song and claims that Sam Phillips was the one who suggested recording it. "We made it a special sound", emphasized Riley. "Sam said, 'I want something kind of like a space...' He was half drunk at the time. He was in the studio pushing buttons, saying 'Make it sound like little green men. Have a drink. The drunker you get, the spacier you get".

According to Riley, both he and Van Eaton were pretty drunk (as was the case on most of the sessions). That night, the band was collectively dubbed the Billy Riley and the Little Green Men by Sam Phillips and it was under that sobriquet that the single was issued in January 1957.

01(7) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 7 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-18 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(8) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter & Take 8 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-19 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(9) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 9 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-20 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(10) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 0:07
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-21 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(11) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 10 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-22 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

When Sam Phillips pressed the red button on his Ampex tape machine to record Billy Riley's single, he was taking the plot of a sci-fi drive-in movie and turning it into a mesmeric rock and roll classic. The elements that he'd gathered together were right on target. Riley's hoarse throat vocal, Jerry Lee's freestyling at the studio upright and Roland Janes, with his eerily-echoed whammy bar, were enough to frighten anyone's horses.

No wonder they were dubbed "The Little Green Men". Billy Riley performs what has become a rockabilly anthem. His raspy vocal on "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll" soars over a frenetic musical sound anchored by newly recruited session pianist Jerry Lee Lewis.

The guitar breaks by Riley and session man Roland Janes have become models for aspiring rockabilly guitarists, but it is James M. Van Eaton who steal the show with some of the tastiest drumming in rockabilly history.

His work during the spacy four bar intro, with that brief foray on to the tom-tom are permanently ingrained in the consciousness of most Sun fans. Similarly, the last ten seconds of this record are an eye-opener. The snare roll during the last sustained chord might have been enough, but the unexpected bass drum stomp raises the record to brilliance.

01(12) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 233 - Overdubbed Master Take 10
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - January 23, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 260-A < mono
FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL / I WANT YOU BABY
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

The song was topical. Buchanan and Goodman had concocted their "Flying Saucer" pastchi earlier in the fall of 1956 (undoubtedly where Ray Scott found some of his inspiration). And, as Riley explained, "That was the time they were supposedly sighting flying saucers all over. Things were happening in space. It was a good time for that record. It could have done something". And might have if every press over which Sam Phillips had a degree of control had not been cranking out "Whole Lot Of Shakin' Goin' On".

Topicality aside, the song functions as a tongue-in-cheek rock and roll creation myth with little green men teaching us how to do the bop and bringing the music all the way from Mars.

Ray Scott's lyrics also indulge both the Southerner's and rock and roll innate capacity for fantasy. On one level, it is totally absurd ("the cats jumped out and started a band...") but the outrageous lines get their impact from the sheer ludicrousness of it all.

The recording starts with a call and response between Roland Janes working the whammy bar on his Fender Stratocaster (one of the first uses of a whammy bar on record) and James M. Van Eaton pounding the daylights out of his cymbal (they did not have separate crash and ride cymbals at that time; if you wanted a "crash", you simply hit it harder). Sam Phillips had said, "Make it spacy" - and Roland Janes and James M. Van Eaton did their best.

Throughout the record, Van Eaton gets a deadened sound on his tom-toms by taping billfolds onto them. He was also using a bass drum with unborn calf skin on the front head which imparted a completely muffled sound. "We didn't tune (the drums)", stressed Riley. "We had that dead sound, that cardboard box sound like the old blues". At Sam Phillips' behest, Marvin Pepper contributed the blood curdling screams heard in the eighth bar of all three verses and in the fourth bar of the first guitar solo. Riley's vocal epitomized the half crazed rockabilly fool, going for broke as if his life depended upon it. Both guitar solos are classic double string blues based rockabilly. Roland Janes' Stratocaster has a wonderfully vibrant, live sound which contrast magically with the deadened drum sound. Riley's acoustic Martin Dreadnought underpins everything. The record ends with Jerry Lee Lewis holding down the sustain pedal on the piano, letting the final chord ring for a good ten seconds.

01(13) - "FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL/
I WANT YOU BABY (STUDIO TALK WITH FALSE START)" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-4-27 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

''I WANT YOU BABY''

If you were a song, even one as sweet as ''I Want You Baby'', how'd you like to get stuck on the flipside of ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll''? Talk about being invisible! It is very easy to underestimate to this record. The lyrics won't make anybody forget about Cole Porter. The sound has that "live in the studio, cooked up spontaneously" quality. The results are endearing but just as easy to discount. Sun couldn't havepicked a more perfect B-side for ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll''. It would have been a rare disc jockey who listened to this and decided to divert his attention from the A-side.

Here in the 21st century, we no longer have that problem. All of Riley's 12 Sun sides, along with their alternates, are now equal contenders. So let's give this song some long overdue attention and see what we have. Starting with the original 45 version, this unassuming little baby cooks. Two of the biggest reasons are Jerry Lee's piano, which really drives things along and fills out the midrange, and J.M. Van Eaton's drumming.

If J.M played this well when he was a teenager, you have to wonder what he would have become if he remained a professional musician. Here, he kicks at everything near him. Listen to it. He doesn't just finish lines, he drives counter rhythms right back at them. That accenting is all over the original single version, as well as some of the alternates we have included here. If you take away Jerrie Lee's piano and J.M. accented playing, this becomes a pretty ordinary record in a hurry.

The other ingredient that elevates this playing far beyond the ordinary is Roland Janes guitar work. Those simple slides at the end of each vocal line (I want you baby BAH BAH) make a big difference. They first appear on Alternate Take 3. You can hear how important they are by listening to Alternate 1 and 2. You can also hear how those little changes in balance and tempo that accompany a new session make a big difference. Listen to the changeover at the start of Alternate Take 9.

02(1) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-23 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(2) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-24 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(3) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-25 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(4) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-26 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(5) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 0:08
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-27 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(6) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-2 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-28 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(7) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-29 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(8) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 0:10
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-30 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(9) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter & Take 7 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-31 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(10) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 0:14
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter & False Start 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-32 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(11) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 0:14
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start 4 & Chatter - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-33 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(12) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 8 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-34 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(13) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 9 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-35 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(14) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 10 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-36 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(15) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 11 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-37 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(16) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 12 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

As happened with ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll'' the earlie alternates are played a half-tone lower than the intended key. Only when Jerry Lee Lewis joined up on Alternate Take 11 does the band play in A; the first ten takes by the all-string band were really recorded in the unlikely key of A-flat. False starts 3 and 4 reveal how the band continued to struggle with tempo.

Ask yourself: What category of music is this? Everyone knows that Sun produced hybrids, but how would you label this track? Is this country? Rock and roll? Pop? A large part of that confusion stems from Roland's wonderful guitar playing. Some of the alternate takes push the results closer to either country or rock, but the original 45 contains just the perfect measure of confusion.

On the master of "I Want You Baby", Riley and company also shine on this undervalued midtempo gem. The smooth guitar work and pleading vocal reveal an exceptionally talented performer. Once again, it is James Van Eaton, whose tasty licks and accenting raise this fine record to excellence.

02(17) - "I WANT YOU BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:52
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 234 Master
Recorded: - December 11, 1956
Released: - January 23, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 260-B < mono
I WANT YOU BABY / FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jerry Lee Lewis – Piano

For Biography of Billy Riley see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Riley's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE DECEMBER 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS

''PEARLY LEE''

''Pearly Lee'' is probably better known as the flip side of ''Red Hot'' than as a great record in its own right. Nevertheless, those listeners who are familiar with its released version on Sun 277 are in for some surprises and some treats as they hear the alternate versions included here.

One inspiration for ''Pearly Lee'' is obviously Little Richard's record, ''The Girl Can't Help It'' (Specialty 591) which broke into the Billboard Top 100 just about the time that ''Pearly Lee'' was recorded.

On both, the lead vocalist sings a line and several voices respond in unison to remind him of the song's title. The responding voices do not appear on the four all versions here, but they are part of Sun 277. Riley also adopted a word from ''The Girl Can't Help It''. Little Richard begins, "If she walks by the menfolks get engrossed". On all the alternates (but not Sun 277), Riley sings, "When she walks by the menfolks stop and look''. Are there any other rock and roll songs that include the word, 'menfolks'? Luckily, Riley didn't decide to use the word ''engrossed''.

01(1) - "PEARLY LEE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-39 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

01(2) - "PEARLY LEE" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-40 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

All the versions of ''Pearly Lee'' begin with what most people have taken to be a Jerry Lee Lewis piano introduction. In fact, it's Jimmy Wilson playing what Jerry Lee used as the intro on ''End Of The Road'' (Sun 259) and used again on ''Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On'' (Sun 267). By the time ''Pearly Lee'' was cut, Jerry Lee's days as a scuffling session musician were over. Wilson's playing behind the vocal continues to sound like what Jerry Lee usually did, including his backup work on ''Flying Saucer Rock And Roll''. All four alternates, recorded within weeks of each other, have piano solos. Wilson begins those solos pretty much as Jerry Lee began his opening solo on ''Whole Lotta Shakin' On'', his right hand pounding away on one chord for a while. Putting all that together with Riley's raspy vocal, this track becomes a Jerry Lee Lewis meets Little Richard event. And it's got all the energy you'd expect from such a meeting.

01(3) - "PEARLY LEE" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1956
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-41 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

It turns out that energy developed as the sessions progressed. Alternate Take 1 has a slower, fir more tentative feel on both piano and guitar. Roland Janes' guitar solo is certainly a lot closer to country than rock and roll (asked about this more than half a century later, Janes replied in his typically humorous and self-effacing manner, 'Im just a country boy".

By Alternate Take 2, things have livened up a bit - Janes's solo has a harder attack, Van Eaton's drumming is more prominent, and Jimmy Wilson throws in a Jerry Lee-style glissando. On Alternate Take 3 that pattern is continued. Alternate Take 4 continues the trend, with Janes now playing boogie lines behind the vocal during the verses.

Another observation: The electric bass (as opposed to a stand-up slapped instrument) makes a strong contribution here. It not only anchors the bottom range, but you can hear individual notes under the piano and guitar. We should point out that Bowman & Johnson's liner notes mistakenly identify Disc 2, Track 4 as the bed track for the released version of ''Pearly Lee''.

It is interesting to look at the ways in which the alternates differ from Sun 277. We already mentioned the word, 'menfolks'. A bigger lyrical change is that all the alternates include an entire verse ("She's got Cadillac cars and diamonds on her hands'') that does not appear on Sun 277. In addition, the instrumental solos are organized differently on the alternates and Sun 277. On the released version there is first a guitar solo and then Ace Cannon's saxophone solo, but there's no piano solo. On all the alternates, though, the guitar solo is second and it follows a distinctly rockabilly-sounding piano solo, but there is no sax solo. During the Sun 277 saxophone solo, Jimmy Wilson completely changes style and 'comps' behind the sax as if this were a jump blues session rather than a rockabilly record; he never sounds anything like that on the four alternates.

01(4) - "PEARLY LEE" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Billy Riley
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date December 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-4 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-1-42 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

The changes from the alternate takes (where Arc Cannon was not present) to the released master are considerable - lyrics, style, instrumentation and arrangement. ''Pearly Lee'' represents the product of a lot more thought and work than we knew.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal & Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of Billy Riley see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Riley's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SCOTT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS PROBABLY END 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Memphis singer/songwriter Ray Scott is assured of eternal recognition in the rockabilly Hall of fame as the composer of Billy Riley's "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll". He also saw his name on several small Memphis labels, including an early Satellite (soon to become Stax Records) release, and composed one side of Thomas Wayne's first Fernwood record - the rocker "You're The One That Done It".

As these next demos reveal, however, Scott's heart was a lot closer to the country side of rockabilly. On these sides, which have remained unissued in the Sun Vault for 45 years. The original demo of "Tonight Will Be The Last Night", a song he managed to place with Warren Smith. Smith's version, cut in 1956, remained unissued until the golden era of rockabilly archaeology in the 1970s. "I'm Gonna Make You Love Me" fared less well and has remained unrecorded (by others) and unreleased until now.

Its a stone country song in a style that would have been at home on a Hank Williams session, but also features the kind of rhythmic energy that pointed the way to rockabilly. The melody is quite catchy but the song is undercut by some awkward rhymes. Scott paints himself into a lyrical corner when he chooses to use "hug my neck" as a payoff line for "bottom of the deck".

Material like this, despite all its rural charm, was not going to thrive in the country or rockabilly marketplace in 1956. If anyone could get away with such hackneyed rhymes it was Elvis, which is precisely what the King did two years hence, "Won't you wear my ring / around your neck / to show the world / I'm yours by heck".

01 - "BOPPIN' WIGWAM WILLIE" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP8913-1 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-1 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

02 - "BOYS MEET GIRLS" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Cedarwood Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label (Netherlands LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-3 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-15 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

03 - "FOOL HE USED TO BE" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-7 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

04 - ''I JUST DON'T FIGURE" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - All Rock Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-4 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-17 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

05 - "I'M GONNA MAKE YOU LOVE ME" - B.M.I. - 1:18
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-9 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT - VOLUME 17

06 - "JUST BEHIND YOUR SMILE" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-11 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-7 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

07 - "MY LIFE'S DESIRE" - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-14 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: 1988 Magnum Force (LP) 33rpm MFLP062-2 mono
RED HOT MEMPHIS ROCKABILLY VOLUME 6

08 - "SAN ANTONE" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - All Rock Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-13 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-19 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

09 - ''SO LONG, I'M GONE'' - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-17 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-9 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

10 - "TONIGHT WILL BE THE LAST TIME" - B.M.I. - 1:28
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-2 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-16 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

11 - "THE TRAIN'S DONE GONE" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-10 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-6 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

12 - "WEDDING BELLS" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-16 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

13 - "WHISPERING WINDS" - B.M.I. 2:29
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-6 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-18 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

14 - "YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY'' - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - White Label Netherlands (LP) 33rpm WLP 8913-12 mono
RAY SCOTT - MR. YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY
Reissued: - 1993 Collector Records (CD) 500/200rpm CLCD 4412-8 mono
RAY SCOTT - YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Scott - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Jimmy Van Eaton - Drums
Unknown - Saxophone

Born as Harold Raymond Scott on March 26, 1929 in Bicknell, Indiana. Though his heart was closer to the country music than to rock and roll, Ray Scott's place in rock and roll history is assured as the writer of "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll" and the performer, composer of "Boppin' Wigwam Willie" and "You Drive Me Crazy".

Ray Scott was a somewhat reclusive character, whose musical career began around 1953, when he started writing songs. In an interview with Now Dig This (issue 143, February 1995), Scott recalled how he came to write "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll". Standing outside his car at a drive-in movie, Ray saw an UFO flying in 1952.

"It was very high and I found out later that it was seen 300 miles to the South and 350 miles North at the same time I saw it. It was all lit up and it was shaped like a cigar. It was travelling at a speed unknown at that time, I'd been in the Navy and nobody had anything flying that fast back then. It disappeared in the East in what seemed like 30/40 seconds. I never reported it, but I read about it in the papers the next day."

Ray Scott wrote the song in 1956 and the next year it was recorded by Billy Riley (Sun 260). A genuine rockabilly anthem. From Indiana, Ray settled in Memphis in the mid-1950s and sent several demos to Sam Phillips. One of his compositions, "Tonight Will Be The Last Night", was recorded by Warren Smith in 1956, though it was not released until the 1970s, the golden decade for rockabilly archaeology. Ray's demo of this song can be heard on "That'll Flat Git It, Vol. 17" (Bear Family BCD 16405), after lingering in the Sun vaults for 45 years.

Another well-known composition by Ray is "You're The One That Done It", Thomas Wayne's first record for Fernwood Records in 1958, also released on Mercury. Lattie Moore recorded "100,000 Women Can't Be Wrong", which he co-wrote with Ray Scott. So much for Ray Scott as a songwriter. In 1957, he made his first recording as a singer. Issued on Marshall Ellis's Erwin label, "Bopping Wig Wam Willie" came out in August 1957. A fine slab of rock and roll, which has been reissued on many compilations.

The backing was supplied by Roland Janes (guitar), Marvin Pepper (bass), Jimmy Wilson (piano), Jimmy Van Eaton (drums) and Ray's own guitar. Probably the same session men accompanied him on the fast moving "You Drive Me Crazy" (Satellite 104), an excellent rocker, released in late 1958. Satellite was then a tiny label that would later develop into the mighty Stax Records.

Scott next appeared on another local Memphis label, Stomper Time, with his own version of the song that Warren Smith had picked up, though the title was now slightly different, "Tonite Will Be The Last Time". The flip was "Boy Meets Girl", which was also recorded by Dale Hawkins (first issued on the 1998 Ace CD "Rock 'n' Roll Tornado"). Writing credit for "Boy Meets Girl" goes to Scott on his Stomper Time single, to Hawkins on the Ace CD and to Ray Scott and Eddie Bond in the BMI database.

A second Erwin release followed in 1960, "The Train's Done Gone", but that was more or less Ray's swansong as a rocker. He founded his own record company, RCT Records, for which he recorded country songs, but this only ran for a few years. Disillusioned, Ray retired from the entertainment business around 1971 and started running his own taxi company. Cees Klop managed to release an entire LP of Ray Scott recordings in 1986, "Mr. You Drive Me Crazy" (White Label 8913, 17 tracks). This set included several unissued Sun demos by Scott. An expanded CD version was issued in 1993 ("You Drive Me Crazy", Collector CD 4412, 24 tracks). Ray Scott died on October 17, 1999 in Indiana, of a heart attack at the aged of 70.

For Biography of Ray Scott see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ray Scott's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

END 1956

By this point, Quinton Claunch and Bill Cantrell were becoming disillusioned with their deal at Sun Records. They had worked with Carl Perkins on a song called ''Sure To Fall'' that was to be placed on the flip side of ''Blue Suede Shoes''. At the last moment, Phillips decided to replace ''Sure To FaIl'' with another rocker, ''Honey Don't''. ''Sure To Fall'' was re-scheduled with ''Tennessee'' on an all country single that was never released. Cantrell estimates that he lost $140,000 from that decision. At roughly the same time that ''Blue Suede Shoes'' was sitting near the top of all three trade charts, Claunch and Cantrell received a statement of earnings from Phillips that reported that Sun had overpaid them on the first Charlie Feathers single, and consequently owed them only $21.75 for sales on Maggie Sue Wimberly record, and the second Feathers single.

''From that moment on'', recalled Cantrell, ''Quinton and I decided that we should put our songs on the back of every record we could. The only way to control this was to have our own record company''. In partnership with a failed rockabilly singer, Ray Harris, and a local record store owner, Joe Cuoghi, Claunch and Cantrell formed Hi Records in 1957. Their first big seller, Bill Black's ''Smokie, Part 2'', came in 1959.

Cantrell stuck with Hi through good times and bad, eventually quitting his job with the city of Memphis and becoming a full-time vice president. By the time Hi was sold in 1976, he and Cuoghi's lawyer were the only partners remaining from 1957. Claunch left Hi with considerable ill will on all sides in 1960 after he recorded a Bill Black sound-alike for another label. He eventually formed Goldwax Records, which for a brief period came close to rivaling both Stax and Hi.

The records by the Miller Sisters and Charlie Feathers, along with Carl Perkins' early recordings, exemplified all that was best in the last flowering of hillbilly music. The painfully intense vocals were matched by beautifully executed steel guitar solos from Stan Kesler and percussive electric guitar parts from Quinton Claunch. Drums were still taboo in country music productions, so Claunch accented the rhythm by thumping on the muted bass strings of his electric guitar. ''We had a pretty good country house band'', asserted Phillips, ''but I knew that cutting Nashville-style country music was not what I wanted. I knew I could cut it, but I knew it wasn't what I hoped to get''.

After the rock and roll explosion, Phillips continued to record country music sporadically. He rarely stuck with an artist for more than one release, though, and virtually none of his latter-day country acts had the stilling quality of Charlie Feathers or the Miller Sisters. The best of the new crop was Ernie Chaffin.

DECEMBER 1956

Ernie Chaffin came to Sun Records in the Fall of 1956 when the rockabilly bloom was still on the rose. Sun was not recording or releasing much of anything but rockabilly. Even artists like Warren Smith - whose country leanings were undeniable - were recording material like "Ubangi Stomp". It was in this climate that Ernie Chaffin first set foot in the Sun studio. He was a good looking white boy from Mississippi who played the guitar, but the similarities to Elvis disappeared pretty quickly after that. One can only imagine how impressed Sam Phillips was with Chaffin to spend Sun's time and resources on such a contra-trend country boy.

DECEMBER 12, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Ernest Tubb and his second wife, Olene, have their first son, Ernest Tubb Jr.

Tennessee Ernie Ford is celebrated in an episode of NBC-TV's ''This Is Your Life''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Ernie Chaffin brought a totally unique sound to Sun. Certainly, his earlier recordings for Hickory and Fine were no predictor of what lay in store at Sun. In its way, Ernie's style was every bit as unique as Johnny Cash's. In fact, both depended upon a repeated, percussive rhythmic pattern and minimal instrumentation. Unlike Cash's work, however, Chaffin's songs (most often composed by Pee Wee Maddux) were highly melodic and his voice had considerable range. While the songs were lyrically more conventional than the stark lonesome ballads of Cash, Chaffin's songs drew much of their power from unusual chord changes.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ERNIE CHAFFIN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY DECEMBER 12, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

Note: This session possibly held as early as October/November 1956.

After 1956 the character of country music changed. The success of country boys such as Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Sonny James, and Marty Robbins in the pop charts held out the alluring promise of crossover. The country music that Sam Phillips and virtually everyone else released after 1956 was recorded with a least one eye on potential crossover sales. When Sam Phillips Ernie Chaffin in 1956 he found a singer whose voice had few alienating hillbilly edges and thus seemed ripe with pop potential.

This is one of two breathtakingly beautiful records Ernie Chaffin recorded for Sam Phillips. Chaffin had recorded before he came to Sam Phillips. His work for Hickory Records was enjoyable, but rather ordinary. What he accomplished just before Christmas in 1956, and again a month later in the tiny Sun studio, was to produce a haunting and unique sound. The basis of the magic is elusive. Chaffin's voice is unusual, but it is not the whole story.

Like Johnny Cash's best Sun records, Chaffin's band is essentially a rhythm section. Chaffin did have one ace in the hole: a steel guitar that soared over the precision movement of his rhythm
track.

Ernie Chaffin was one of the last country artists to see consistent releases on Sun Records. Through the height of the rockabilly era Ernie produced four singles and a clutch of rejected masters that were identifiably country music with remarkably few compromises in any direction. At least three classics emerged from those sessions, "Feelin' Low", "I'm Lonesome" and "Please Don't Ever Leave Me". They were haunting country music that was, at the same time, contemporary and eminently saleable.

01(1) - "FEELIN' LOW" - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 12, 1956
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16780-13 mono
ERNIE CHAFFIN - THE SUN YEARS

Fortunately, we do have snippets of earlier takes at Sun to provide some insight into how the arrangement evolved. "Feelin' Low" is particularly noteworthy. On both alternate takes Chaffin's vocal is less confident and his words are more clipped than on the issued version. Although the steel is buried deeper in the mix than on the issued version, we can hear that Ernie Harvey is playing different fills than he would ultimately arrive at on the final take.

When Chaffin sings "Might as well..." the chords behind him are different from on the single version. There is also more reverb on these earlier takes and the war drum-like rhythm on the song's hook )"Makes me mad/Makes me sad") is more pronounced. It took some mighty deep digging to unearth those previously unreleased glimpses of Ernie Chaffin at work. It speaks volumes about how undervalued Chaffin has been by Sun collectors for these tapes to have remained buried in the vaults after more than thirty years of Sun archaeology.

01(2) - "FEELIN' LOW" - B.M.I. - 3:03
Composer: - Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 12, 1956
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16780-27 mono
ERNIE CHAFFIN - THE SUN YEARS

In its way, Ernie Chaffin's Sun debut, "Feelin' Low", is as good as any other country record issued on Sun. Breezy and hypnotic, its unusual chord changes underpin a warm, understated vocal. "Feelin' Low" did well in some markets, encouraging Chaffin to record another three singles. Yet, as Chaffin himself put it, "I always felt like the Lord came first, my family came second, and my career came third".

In October, Billboard reported that Sam Phillips was excited about acquiring Ernie Chaffin and that "Feelin' Low" had been recorded. The session was officially logged on December 12 and the record was shipped early in the new year.

"Feelin' Low" was Ernie Chaffin's biggest selling record on Sun. He heard that it had sold a quarter of a million copies and that it had sold particularly well in New York. However, like many Sun artists from that period, Ernie feels that his material could have sold a lot better and that Sam and Judd Phillips concentrated on Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash.

01(3) - "FEELIN' LOW" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 227 Master
Recorded: - December 12, 1956
Released: - January 23, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 262-A < mono
FEELIN' LOW / LONESOME FOR MY BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

02(1) - "LONESOME FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 12, 1956
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16780-24 mono
ERNIE CHAFFIN - THE SUN YEARS

Ernie Harvey, a seasoned professional steel guitar player, who had worked with Lefty Frizzell, took some mighty fine, yet simple solos on the steel. Finally, the songs themselves, are powerful. The 6-minor chord in "Feelin' Low" is an unusual ingredient for country music in general and Sun in particular.

02(2) - "LONESOME FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 12, 1956
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm LP 400 mono
GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS

Billboard was mightily impressed with these sides. In the February 16 1957 review they observed, "Sun Records may have another big time artist in Ernie Chaffin. He warbles in the earthy Presley groove, with plenty of feeling, interesting phrasing and spontaneous sounding vitality". Nearly 40 years later, it is a bit hard to see the Presley connection, but on all other counts it is clear that Billboard saw the virtue in this Mississippi singer.

"Ernie Chaffin was from Mississippi. Now, he was good", recalled Sam Phillips, "he had one marvellous song - 'you sure got your man feelin' low' - we had a kind of a beat on that thing that was very interesting''.

''It was an upbeat, I don't mean uptempo, and offbeat lick on the thing that made it very nice. Ernie came to me with Pee Wee Maddux. Pee Wee was from Mississippi also, down on the coast, and I'm a little chagrinned that I didn't do more with them".

02(3) - "LONESOME FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Murphy "Pee Wee" Maddux
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 228 Master
Recorded: - December 12, 1956
Released: - January 23, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 262-B < mono
LONESOME FOR MY BABY / FEELIN' LOW
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

In this song, Chaffin first established the use of the flatted 7-chord in his material. We don't have to wait too long for it. ''Pretty girls all around'' and we've slipped from A to G. The song features a repeated 1-5, 1-5 musical riff throughout that serves a every bit as much of a hook as the title phrase.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal and Guitar
Murphy "Pee Wee" Muddux - Acoustic Guitar
Ernie Harvey - Steel Guitar
Leo Ladner - Bass

Bass player Leo Ladner recalls about the session, "We got there on a Sunday. I remember that because we had to look all over to get me a bass. I didn't even own one at the time. The one I was using, I had borrowed from Harmony Owen, Jim's wife. But at the time of the session, she and Pee Wee had had a little falling out over something, and she wouldn't let him use it. So we had to find me one for the session''.

''I remember when we got to Memphis it took us a couple of hours before we could come up with something. We never did find an electric bass and I ended up using an upright. Man! I had blisters on my fingers''.

''We were joking about it all the way home. I had tape all over my fingers. Another thing that stands out in my mind is that Ernie Harvey was dissatisfied at some point, maybe early in the session, with how loud his steel guitar was in the mix. He thought it needed to come up a lot.

He griped about it for a while and I think they got it right before we did the final version. Jack Clement was engineering the Ernie sessions, I did at Sun; producing I guess you could say".

Ladner remember Pee Wee Maddux as "a real talented guy". "He was the driving force behind all of this. He was the reason we made the trip to Sun. Pee Wee must have had a clear idea of what he wanted to do at the session, but we never did a lot of practicing beforehand. In fact, I remember him asking me to go to Memphis with him, maybe the day before. He told me one day and we were on the road the next. I'm not sure what he might have worked out with Ernie Harvey for the steel part, but I learned the songs that day in the studio. The whole thing got put together right there on the spot".

For Biography of Ernie Chaffin see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ernie Chaffin's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

ABOUT CHAFFIN - After Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley showed the path to commercial salvation for Sun Records, Sam Phillips recorded remarkably little pure country music. Despite the fact that Johnny Cash became a staple of his album catalog (seven of the twelve original Sun albums were by Cash), Sam Phillips was rarely tempted to try and repeat his success with Cash in the country market. Between Ernie Chaffin's last single in April 1959 and Dane Stinit's first single seven years later there were only a few isolated experiments with country music.

"I think", Sam Phillips concluded in 1985, "I could have had a darn good country label. Had I stayed in country music alone and dedicated myself to it, then I had the nucleus of several fine artists who could have made it - in particular Ernie Chaffin and Charlie Feathers.

I just loved stylists. People you knew the minute you heard them on record. That's what its all about. I had a different sound in country music, and I knew I would have had difficulty in orienting the taste of people and getting the radio play".

The fact that RCA signed Elvis Presley with the firm intention of marketing him as something other than a country music act started to turn Phillips' head away from country music. Then, in the early months of 1956, he gained firsthand experience of the difference that pop sales made to a country product when "Blue Suede Shoes" started to sell outside the country market. Sun Records' brief fling as a country music label had effectively ended.

Ernie Chaffin has fond recollections of his days at Sun. "Sun was flamboyant. You'd go in there and start pickin' and then the first thing you know you'd be recording. You might be sitting on a vacuum cleaner or anything you could find, but that's the way it was at Sun back when Sam Phillips was in charge. I remember that we went out to Sam's house for dinner and little parties with Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis and we enjoyed the times we had together there. It was a time when you could just see the excitement growing and we knew that sooner or later someone would make it big - and they did.

Sam Phillips, Bill Justis and Jack Clement all had an input into the records I did. Bill Justis produced a couple of things include "My Love For You". They were always giving suggestions to Pee Wee and Pee Wee was a good listener but he had some good ideas of his own".

"When we went in we always had the intension of recording four songs but we never knew which song would be released. I definitely remember "I'll Walk Alone". I thought that we had a real good cut on that and we thought it would be released.

Sam and Jack Clement were always trying to get me to do rockabilly but apart from that "Linda" thing I never did anything that would come close. I never did like rockabilly. I'm a country boy and I sing country music. I just never did care to sing rockabilly. It would probably have been profitable if I had, but I didn't".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN ARTIST
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Appearing unexpectedly in the middle of a mislabelled Ernie Chaffin tape, this track is one of those discoveries that keep Sun archaeology a rewarding adventure. We have no idea who played on this brief track. It may well have been a session warm-up, but nothing stored anywhere else in this out-take box offers a clue. The track has a simple elegance and bluesy power to it in a style not altogether removed from Lonnie Mark's. The occasional missteps that are present here would have easily been rectified with a few more takes. But we found none. Instead there is barely 1:30 of instrumental jam that only hints at how good this track might have been.

01 - "DRIVING HOME" - B.M.I. - 1:22
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-32 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Unknown Artist
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 12, 1956 WEDNESDAY

The importance of songwriting had been doubly underlined this day when Johnny Bragg and Robert Riley had been presented with an award from BMI for ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'' being one of the most played songs of the year. They had been invited to the swish New York award's ceremony but of course Bragg had to send his regrets on account of being in prison. Instead Joe Johnson of publisher Golden West Melodies and the new prison warden, Lynn Bomar, presented the award in the prison, ensuring the local press were there to capture the event.

DECEMBER 13, 1956

On December 13, two days before Elvis Presley appeared a concert at the Louisiana Hayride, appeared an extraordinary article in "The Shreveport Times." Under the headline "Elvis wants to meet Japanese counterpart" reported Hayride director, Horace Logan, that a particular phone in a room of the Youth Center was installed, so that Elvis via an overseas cable could speak with Kazuya Kosaka, a Japanese singer, who occurred in the “famed-Elvis-the-Pelvis-Style”. In the article it was said that Elvis has 15 million fans in Japan. (Independently, in any of the following concert reviews was not reported whether the call had taken place or not).

Elvis Presley hosts Hal Kanter, a screenwriter employed by movie producer Hal Wallis, for dinner in Memphis. Kanter goes with him the next day to Shreveport, for Presley's final appearance on ''The Louisiana Hayride''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY DECEMBER 13, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "I LOVE YOU BECAUSE" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Leon Payne
Publisher: - Bourne Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 13, 1956
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 103-2 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-1-29 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 – 1958

The Leon Payne composition "I Love You Because" had been recorded by Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis and it seemed inevitable that Cash would also turn his attention to the song. Like the previous session this only resulted in one song being recorded. On its release it was subjected to an overdubbed chorus that added nothing to the track and is possibly the worst overdub of any of cash's recordings from this period. On this undubbed master you can hear more clearly the piano work which is credited to Jerry Lee Lewis although this cannot be confirmed.

As subsequent archaeology has shown, the original bed track of "I Love You Because" lies within the credible range. The problem lies in the shrill, insensitive choral work that was grafted on to this exercise. If there ever was a market for music that sounds like this, it mercifully died with Lawrence Welk.

01(2) - "I LOVE YOU BECAUSE" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Leon Payne
Publisher: - Bourne Music
Matrix number: - U 387 Take 1 Master
Overdubbed with a vocal chorus before release.
Recorded: - December 13, 1956
Released: - December 31, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 334-B < mono
I LOVE YOU BECAUSE / STRAIGHT AS IN LOVE
Reissued - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

01(3) - "I LOVE YOU BECAUSE" - B.M.I
Composer: - Leon Payne
Publisher: - Bourne Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - December 13, 1956
Released: - Sun Unissued

With no bottom in sight, Sam Phillips continued to mine the Johnny Cash tape vault at Sun a year after his artist had departed for greener pastures. This outing couples an old Gene Autry ballad (featuring a fairly adventurous Jerry Lee Lewis on piano. "Goodbye Little Darling" was first recorded by Autry in 1940 as "Goodbye Little Darlin', Goodbye" for his South Of The Border movie. Cash's version, when Jerry Lee Lewis was still paying the rent as a session pianist. His work here ranges from barrelhouse rolling chords to some gentle boogie. In truth, if Cash had stayed at Sun, material like this stood little change of being released at all, much less as a single. As it was, the track made its way to number 22 on the country charts.

02(1) - "GOODBYE LITTLE DARLING" - A.S.C.A.P.
Composer: - Gene Autry-Johnny Marvin
Publisher: - Chappell & Company Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - December 13, 1956
Released: - Sun Unissued

02(2) - "GOODBYE LITTLE DARLING" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:12
Composer: - Gene Autry-Johnny Marvin
Publisher: - Chappell & Company Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 379 Master
Overdubbed with a vocal chorus before release.
Recorded: - December 13, 1956
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 331-B < mono
GOODBYE LITTLE DARLING / YOU TELL ME
Reissued - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

"Straight As In Love" is as close to rock and roll as Johnny Cash would come during his association with Sun Records. It is also as close as he would come to writing a bad song. It showed, in no uncertain terms, that for all his artistry, Cash was no poet of teenage angst. Better to leave adolescent hi-jinx to their natural spokesmen like Chuck Berry, and get on with songs about trains and Big Rivers. The basic premise is fine: most folks can identify with horniness interfering with their studies, but phrases like "a swinging mate" and "a snook at books" aren't going to help your case. The track sat in the can for just over three years before slipping out at the start of 1960. Surprisingly, it reached number 16 on the country charts and, more amazingly, number 84 in pop before deservedly sinking into obscurity.

03(1) - "STRAIGHT AS IN LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Johnny Cash Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 386 Take 1
Recorded: - December 13, 1956
Released: - December 31, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 334-A < mono
STRAIGHT AS IN LOVE / I LOVE YOU BECAUSE
Reissued - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

03(2) - "STRAIGHT AS IN LOVE" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Johnny Cash Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - December 13, 1956
Released: - Sun Unissued

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass
Unknown - Drums
Jerry Lee Lewis – Piano

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY ORBISON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS POSSIBLE 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: POSSIBLE LATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

At this juncture Roy Orbison was also following the mesmeric lead of Elvis Presley. Small wonder then that his petulant "The Cause Of It All" abounds in a sea of vocal hiccups that bounce all around the slapback. To drive the point home one can sense he even curls his lip. Although undocumented, Roy's band The Teen Kings were almost certainly present on this occasion, which was likely to have been little more than a run through at demo level. This would account for the song's haphazard conclusion.

01 - THE CAUSE OF IT ALL" - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Roy K. Orbison-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Possible Late 1956
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 028-16 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - VOLUME 4 - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461-19 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Probably Johnny ''Peanuts'' Wilson - Guitar
Probably Jack Kennelly - Bass
Probably Billy Pat Ellis

For Biography of Roy Orbison see: > The Sun Biographies <
Roy Orbison's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

> Page Up <

> Continued: 1956 Sessions 12 (3) <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©