CONTAINS
For music(standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

1953 SESSIONS 11
November 1, 1953 to November 30, 1953

Studio Session for Rudy Grayzell, November 1953 / Abbott Records
Studio Session for Rudy Grayzell, 1953/1954 / Abbott Records
Studio Session for A.C. Moohah Williams, November 1953 / Starmaker Records
Studio Session for Onie Wheeler, November 22, 1953 / Okeh Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 1953

On November 14, Sam Phillips paid Junior Parker and (Blue Flames leader) William Johnson $50.12 in royalties. Two days later, he paid Floyd Murphy and Kenneth Banks for a Junior Parker session for a share of Parker royalties. On November 18, Phillips paid Houston Stokes two dollars for taxi fare in conjunction with a Parker session in addition to a session fee, and paid James Wheeler a session fee nothing ''Blue Flames session''. Sun 192 was issued on November 1, so it's possibly that one or more of the Parker titles listed below were recorded on November 14, 16, or 18.

Junior Parker joins a package tour of Southern one-nighters headlined by Willie Mae Thornton and Johnny Ace. B.B. King joins them for a big Thanksgiving Day concert in Houston, Texas.

''Ebony'' magazine profiles the Prisonaires, a four-page spread extolling the manner in which the group was acting ''as goodwill ambassadors for a revolutionary and sometimes condemned prison rehabilitation program''.

Jud Phillips is in Atlanta, reports that Southland Distributors want 1,000 copies of Sun 192 "Mystery Train", and urges Sam Phillips to press up in significant quantities in anticipation of a major hit.

Jud Phillips moves through Nashville to New York. He talks to Broadcast Music Inc. (BMI), in New York about Sun starting its own publishing company. So far, Sun has assigned most original copyrights to Delta Music or its affiliates, owned by Jim Bulleit.

Thus far, Sun has assigned most of its original copyrights to Jim Bulleit's Delta Music or its affiliates.

Jud Phillips also reports that distribution of Sun Records via Nashville is becoming too intricately tied in with Bulleit's promotion of his own Delta and J-B product.

David James Mattis, founder of Duke Records, announced that he will launch Starmaker Records, possibly in conjunction with WDIA, which calls itself the ''starmaker station''.

NOVEMBER 1953

By the fall of 1953, even though Sam Phillips was again riding the kind of wave he had enjoyed with ''Rocket 88'' two summers earlier, he had not found the prosperity he had doubtless anticipated. Phillips' margin per single was small; his profit was tied up in repressions, and with slow-paying distributors.

After ''Bear Cat'' broke, Sam's first move had been to bring his brother Jud into the picture. Jud had the knack for promotion that Sam had for production. He was gregarious, flamboyant, and, given half an opportunity, extravagant. By the time he joined Sam, Jud had worked as a singer, a gospel promoter, a front man for Roy Acuff's tent show, and a production assistant to Jimmy Durante.

In November 1953 Jud was on the road by himself, where he learned that some of the deals Bulleit had cut were not necessarily in Sun's best interest. From Richmond, Virginia, Jud wrote, ''we've found the same thing here that I've found in several other places. Jim has promised them (distributors) free Sun records to compensate for the bad stock they were caught with on his other labels such as J-B. They were very fed up with the way Jim had given them the runaround since he had been with Sun''.

By the end of 1953, Sam and Jud Phillips were pressuring Bulleit to sell his share of Sun Records. In February 1954 Jud borrowed the money to buy him out. The amount, Bulleit later recalled, was ''twelve hundred dollars, but it really wasn't worth any more than that''. During that same month Sam and Jud got a license from BMI to form their own publishing company, Hi-Lo Music, so they wouldn't have to place their copyrights through Bulleit.

The infrastructure that Sam and Jud had created-reliable distributors, accommodating disc jockeys, and so on, was built on the assumption that the hits ' would keep on coming. As it happened, they didn't. Junior Parker left for greener pastures in Houston, Rufus Thomas could not recapture the novelty appeal of ''Bear Cat'' and the Prisonaires, unable to support their records with many personal appearances, found their popularity hard to sustain. The new artists that Phillips recorded did not have the allure of those faded or departed
hitmakers. The most prolific artists during the demise of the blues era at Sun were Little Milton and Billy ''The Kid'' Emerson.

NOVEMBER 1953

Cambodia declares its independence from France during November of 1953. King Sihanouk, having previously pushed for independence, took over as the country’s leader. Starting in 1946, Cambodian resistance fighters had launched armed attacks against French occupation in a push for independence. Cambodia had been under French-colonial rule for ninety years prior to its independence. After achieving independence the country remained the Kingdom of Cambodia until 1970 when Norodom Sihanouk was overthrown in a United States backed military coup.

NOVEMBER 1, 1953 SUNDAY

The singles Sun 191 ''A Prisoner's Prayer'' b/w ''I Know'' released by The Prisonaires, this one with accompaniment on one side by Ike Turner on guitar, but despite the continued allure of Johnny Bragg's voice, and Sun 192 ''Mystery Train'' b/w ''Love My Baby'' by Little Junior's Blue Flames are released. Action is split between the two sides of 192, although Billboard picks out "Mystery Train" as the likely hit. ''Mystery Train'' become a rhythm and blues hit for Elvis Presley two years later.

Jud Phillips was out for over a month promoting the two singles. Jud's letters continue to show a steady pattern of success both in collecting money owed and reorganizing the distribution system, most of all in helping to restore Sun's good name. ''I don't plan to leave a stone unturned'', Jud wrote on November 15, describing the pervasive sense of mistrust ''of any organization that Jim Bulleit was connected to''. It might look to Sam Phillips like he was ''taking a lot of time in each location'', he continued, ''but I'm taking no more than I feel is absolutely required''. But there is no sign of any emotional reciprocity on Sam's part.

Songwriter Max D. Barnes marries Patsy. Barnes' credits include Vern Gosdin's ''Chiseled In Stone'', Conway Twitty's ''Red Neckin' Love Makin; Night'' and George Jones' ''Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes''.

Producer/songwriter Keith Stegall is born in Wichita Falls, Texas. Stegall produces Alan Jackson, The Zac Brown Band and Craig Campbell, and writes such hits as ''Don't Rock The Jukebox'', Minkey Gilley's ''Lonely Nights'', Glen Campbell's ''A Lady Like You'' and Mark Wills' ''I Do (Cherish You)''.

NOVEMBER 2, 1953 MONDAY

Pee Wee King appears on NBC-TV's daytime show ''The Kate Smith Hour''.

NOVEMBER 3, 1953 TUESDAY

Pee Wee King recorded ''Bimbo'' and ''Changing Partners'' in an afternoon session at the RCA Studios in New York.

Gene Autry and Smiley Burnette both perform in the debut of ''Last Of The Pony Riders'', a western built around the Pony Express. It's the last movie to feature Autry as a singing cowboy.

NOVEMBER 4, 1953 WEDNESDAY

Pee Wee King debuts a weekly program on WEWS-TV in Cleveland, Ohio.

Van Stephenson is born in Hamilton, Ohio. He writes Lee Greenwood's ''You've Got A Good Love Comin''' and Restless Heart's ''Bluest Eyes In Texas'', and has a pop hit as an artist with ''Modern Day Delilah'' before joining the 1990's trio BlackHawk.

NOVEMBER 5, 1953 THURSDAY

Elton Britt begins a daily radio show on WCOP in Boston.

NOVEMBER 6, 1953 FRIDAY

The Osborne Brothers perform publicity for the first time.

NOVEMBER 7, 1953 SATURDAY

Rosco Gordon's single ''Ain't No Use'' (Duke 114) enters the local charts in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Sam Phillips lost Little Junior Parker to Don Robey at Duke Records in December. Junior had been out on tour with Duke artists Johnny Ace and Big Mama Thornton since the beginning of September, which Sam Phillips had originally thought could be a big boost to Little Junior's career. But then it was reported in Cash Box on this date, just as ''Mystery Train'' was beginning to break, that the ''terrific little blues belter currently being groomed by Peacock and Duke prexy Don Robey for mighty big things''. Sam immediately made a person-to-person call to Robey, his nemesis in the ''Bear cat'' lawsuit, but Robey was not one to be easily deterred, and Sam heard that he had Little Junior in the Duke studio in December. At this point Sam Phillips had his lawyer, Roy Scott, fly to Houston to confront Robey directly, and when that, too, failed and there was a subsequent announcement in Cash Box in December that Robey had signed Little Junior and the Blue Flames to an exclusive recording contract, Sam informed Cash Box that ''such a contract could not legally exist and that Sun Records Co., Inc. would take whatever action was necessary to protect our rights''. Which Sam followed up on with a $100,000 lawsuit.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RUDY GRAYZELL
FOR ABBOTT RECORDS 1953

KWKH STUDIO
327 TEXAS, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
ABBOTT SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE NOVEMBER 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER – FABOR ROBISON
RECORDING ENGINEER – BOB SULLIVAN

There were two more singles for Rudy Grayzell on Abbott. The second coupled another of Rudy's songs, ''Bonita Chiquita'', with Jack Rhodes' ''I'm Gone Again'' (Rhodes, for those who don't inspect composer credits, was the writer of several songs for Gene Vincent as well as country classics like ''A Satisfied Mind'' and ''Silver Threads And Golden Needles'').

01 – ''BONITA CHIQUITA'' – B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Rudy Grazell
Publisher: - American Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 147 A
Recorded: - Unknown Date November 1953
Released: - November 14, 1953
First appearance: Abbott Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Abbott 147-A mono
BONITA CHIQUITA / I'M GONE AGAIN
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-25 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

02 – ''I'M GONE AGAIN'' – B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Jack Rhodes-Lucille Dean
Publisher: - American Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 147 B
Recorded: - Unknown Date November 1953
Released: - November 14, 1953
First appearance: Abbott Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Abbott 147-B mono
I'M GONE AGAIN / BONITA CHIQUITA
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-26 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

Name (or. No. Of Instruments)
Rudy Grayzell – Vocal & Rhythm Guitar (Possibly)
Tommy Bishop – Guitar
Jim Reeves – Rhythm Guitar
James Clayton ''Jimmy'' Day – Steel Guitar
Don Davis or Kenny Hill – Bass
Kenneth ''Little Red'' Hayes – Fiddle
Floyd Cramer - Piano

For Biography of Rudy Grayzell see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RUDY GRAYZELL
FOR ABBOTT RECORDS 1953/1954

KWKH STUDIO
327 TEXAS, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
ABBOTT SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1953/1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER – FABOR ROBISON
RECORDING ENGINEER – BOB SULLIVAN

Future Sun recording artist, Rudy Grayzell's third single for Abbott coupled ''Ocean Paradise'' (a song that Rudy wrote with his pal Tommy Jennings) with ''It Ain't My Baby (And I Ain't Gonna Rock It)''. The latter was a salty little song by Johnny Hicks, the emcee of The Big D Jamboree in Dallas, Texas, where Rudy performed occasionally. Again for those who don't memorize composer credits. Hicks wrote Charline Arthur's ''Honey Bun''. Producer Fabor Robison had just justifiably high hopes for ''It Ain't My Baby'' because it was a catchy bar-room singalong, and he had equally high hopes for ''Ocean Paradise'' because it worked the same groove as another of his big records, Mitchell Torok's ''Caribbean'', but neither took off, and Rudy either quit Abbott Records or was dropped after one year.

Unlike most of those associated with Fabor Robison, Rudy has nothing but fond memories of him. ''He was fantastic'', he says. ''He got the most out of me. He'd say, 'Rudy, do this, 'Rudy do that'. He was all the time thinking how to get the best performance''. If Rudy had scored a major hit on Abbott and tried to extract money from Fabor, as Jim Reeves and the Browns tried to do, his opinion might have been a little more jaded. Reeves reportedly left his house one night intending to shoot Fabor, while Maxine Brown called him ''the sorriest bastard then infesting the industry''. Fabor Robison sold his label (more than once) and spent some time laying low in Brazil.

He returned to the United States in the early 1960s and promoted a song he'd produced in 1957, Ned Miller's ''From A Jack To A King''. After it became a hit on its second g-round, he sunk the profits into the Fabor Sunbathing Capsule. According to some reports, the capsule was used in an episode of ''Star Trek'', and was featured on the cover of ''Life'' magazine modeled by George Hamilton. Skin cancer scares bankrupted him, and he died in Shreveport, Louisiana in 1986.

01 – ''IT AIN'T MY BABY (AND I AIN'T GONNA ROCK IT)'' – B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Johnny Hicks-Jim Leisy
Publisher: - American Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 157 A
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1953/1954
Released: - March 27, 1954
First appearance: Abbott Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Abbott 157-A mono
IT AIN'T MY BABY (AND I AIN'T GONNA ROCK IT / OCEAN PARADISE
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-22 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

02 – ''OCEAN PARADISE'' – B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Rudy Grayzell-Tom Jennings
Publisher: - American Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 157 B
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1953/1954
Released: - March 27, 1954
First appearance: Abbott Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Abbott 157-B mono
OCEAN PARADISE / IT AIN'T MY BABY (AND I AIN'T GONNA ROCK IT
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-24 mono
RUDY GRAZELL - LET'S GET WILD

Name (or. No. Of Instruments)
Rudy Grayzell – Vocal
Tommy Bishop – Guitar
Jim Reeves – Rhythm Guitar
James Clayton ''Jimmy'' Day – Steel Guitar
Don Davis or Kenny Hill – Bass
Kenneth ''Little Red'' Hayes – Fiddle
Floyd Cramer – Piano
Ace Lewis – Percussion

Note: Abbott 147 and Abbott 157 may have been recorded at one session.

For Biography of Rudy Grayzell see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR A.C. MOOHAH WILLIAMS
AT RADIO STATION WDIA FOR STARMAKER RECORDS 1953

WDIA STUDIO
2074 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: NOVEMBER 1953
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Rufus Thomas's fellow WDIA disc jockey and announcer was A.C. "Moohah" Williams, who had the Eheelin' On Beale show. Williams was still a biology teacher at Manassas High School whown he started at WDIA in 1949, but he soon became the first full time black employee of the station working on promotion and organization of events as well as hosting shows. He set up the Teen Town Singers group that changed personnel each year to include the best talent from all seven of the local black High Schools.

His recorded below features a band of musicians led by tenor saxophonist Bill Fort that often worked with Rufus Thomas, and because it adds another chapter to the "Answer" song saga in Memphis, Tennessee.

01 - "ALL SHOOK OUT" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - David James Mattis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - WDIA 203
Recorded: - November 1953
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Starmaker Records (S) 78rpm single Starmaker 501 mono
ALL SHOOK OUT / CANDY
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16695-25 mono
RUFUS THOMAS – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Moohah's comical song "All Shook Out" seems to have been the Answer to Faye Adams' number one rhythm and blues hit "Shake A Hand" on Herald Records. Adams disc had entered the charts that August and stayed for five months. In their response, Moohah and Mattis had clearly taken the blueprint from "Bear Cat", perhaps hoping that Starmaker Records could be launched into serious competition with Sun. The song may also have had secondary reference to the glad-handing that went on during the annual WDIA Goodwill Revue.

"All Shook Out" and its other side, "Candy" were both driving rhythm and blues honkers in the tradition of Wynomie Harris, Roy Brown and other blues shouters. "All Shook Out" opens deceptively slowly but soon stomps along in support of Moohah's nonsense lyric about the perils of hand shaking.

There is a storming sax solo midway by Bill Fort and his tight band propels the whole performance with piano and drums to the fore. Actually the song was not Moohah's but was written by David James Mattis, as was the flipside. On the record, "Candy" is about the girl who sweet-talks Moohah out of his mind, but David James said he originally wrote the song about his dog.

02 – "CANDY" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - David James Mattis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - WDIA 204
Recorded: - November 1953
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Starmaker Records (S) 78rpm single Starmaker 501 mono
CANDY / ALL SHOOK OUT
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16695-26 mono
RUFUS THOMAS – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Original radio excerpts courtesy of Tim Davies, Radio WDIA, Memphis, Tennessee. Moohah's recordings were issued on Starmaker 501 among the new rhythm and blues releases at the en of November, just in time for the Goodwill Revue. There was also a Starmaker 502 which contained two blues ballads by Memphis singer Dick Cole recording under the name Danny Day, "You Scare Me" and "Wishing", issued at the same time. There was also one gospel release by Bessie Griffin, "Too Close To Heaven", Starmaker 101, but these three seem to be all that the label issued. David James told researcher George Moonoogian that the label failed because a WDIA secretary was too zealous in chaing up debts and threatened all his distributor contacts with legal action. Mattis was not the only one to try to get into the rhythm and blues business in Memphis in the middle 1950s.

B.B. King had the Blues Boy Kingdom label and there was another short lived label called Tan Town Records that issued recordings by the popular Spirit of Memphis Quartet and others.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
A.C. "Moohah" Williams - Vocal
Bill Fort - Tenor Saxophone
Unknown - Alto Saxophone
Unknown - Piano
Unknown - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Unknown - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

A.C. "MOOHAH" WILLIAMS - A.C. "Moohah" Williams was hired in 1949 as the first black employee of Radio WDIA in Memphis, Tennessee, the only station he ever worked for, when station owners decided to make the switch to an all-black on-air staff. He stayed at the station until 1983. Williams, who said his nickname was Indian for "the mighty", founded the "Teen Town Singers" a rotating group of Memphis teenagers who had a Saturday morning show on the station. Williams was also a songwriter and the inspiration for Otis Redding's "Mr. Pitiful", which Redding co-wrote with Steve Cropper.

Williams had dubbed Redding "Mr. Pitiful" because of the singer's anguished delivery. Memphis legend "Moohah" Williams died at the age of 87 in December 2, 2004.

NOVEMBER 7, 1953 SATURDAY

Richmond, Virginia, radio station WXGI bans Webb Pierce's ''There Stands The Glass'' from its airwaves, suggesting the song's alcohol message would negatively influence younger listeners.

NOVEMBER 8, 1953 SUNDAY

Buddy Holly makes his radio debut, performing Hank Williams' ''Your Cheatin' Heart'' on ''The Buddy And Jack Show'' on KDAV in Lubbock, Texas.

NOVEMBER 9, 1953 MONDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''My Everything'' at RCA's New York studio.

Capitol released Hank Thompson's ''Wake Up, Irene''.

NOVEMBER 10, 1953 TUESDAY

Buddy Holly makes his first recording, playing guitar as one-half of Buddy and Jack at the studios as country station KDAV in Lubbock. Holly becomes the first to produce a session on Waylon Jennings.

NOVEMBER 12, 1953 THURSDAY

Drummer Steve Potts is born in Memphis, Tennessee. After appearing with such rhythm and blues figures as Al Green and Rufus Thomas, he lays down the backbeat for Wynonna's 2003 hit ''What The Worlds Needs Now''.

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans adopt a two-year-old Choctaw girl, Mary Little Doe, nicknamed Dodie.

NOVEMBER 13, 1953 FRIDAY

Del Wood joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

NOVEMBER 14, 1953 SATURDAY

The Carlisles join the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Pat Boone marries Shirley Foley, the daughter of country singer Red Foley. The union produces another country hitmaker, Debbie Boone.

Bing Crosby recorded a pop version of Arlie Duff's country hit ''Y'all Come'' with Speedy West on guitar.

NOVEMBER 16, 9153 MONDAY

Decca released Red Foley's seasonal ''Put Christ Back Into Christmas''.

NOVEMBER 17, 1953 TUESDAY

Lefty Frizzell recorded ''Run 'Em Off'' during an afternoon session at the Jim Beck Studio in Dallas, Texas.

NOVEMBER 21, 1953 SATURDAY

I'll drink to that, Webb Pierce collects a number 1 country single in Billboard with ''There Stands The Glass''.

NOVEMBER 22, 1953 SUNDAY

John Jennings is born in Harrisburg, Virginia. He works as a producer and guitarist for Mary Chapin Carpenter during her peak commercial years, contributing to ''Shut Up And Kiss Me'', ''I Take My Chances'' and ''I Feel Lucky'', among others.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR ONIE WHEELER
FOR OKEH RECORDS 1953

CASTLE RECORDING STUDIO, TULANE HOTEL
EIGHT AVENUE / CHURCH STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
OKEH SESSION: SUNDAY NOVEMBER 22, 1953
SESSION HOURS: 19:00-22:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – DON LAW

Future Sun Records recording star, Onie Wheeler's early work there was often a blurred tonality between sacred and secular music: honky tonk anthems like ''When We All Get There'' (August 29, 1953) and ''Closing Time'' were treated with gospelstyled harmonies on the chorus. Incidentally, ''Closing Time'' was a song dating back to Onie's days in Odessa, when Miss Mack who owned the bar and dancehall would walk from the bar into the dancehall at 1:00 am and shout, ''It's closin' time''. There were also some nods in stranger directions: ''My Home Is Not A Home At All'' seemed to have a distinct Celtic overtone.

Taken as a whole, Onie's early recordings were works of uncompromising beauty. The sacred songs had the feel of pure church, and the secular material had a loose-jointed swing and bristled with subtle humour. Onie's low pitched vocals were often complemented by bass strings runs from Alton J. Nelson. The endless nights on the bandstand gave the group a telepathic ability to frame each others' work to the point where recording appeared effortless. With the Nelson brothers beside him and rock and roll just barely on the horizon, Onie couldn't put a foot wrong. Rockabilly fans may have a soft spot for some of Onie's later sides, but make no mistake, these are the truly great recordings that Onie Wheeler made.

01 – ''I TRIED AND I TRIED'' – B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Onie Wheeler-Tracy Lee
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1745 / CO 50455
Recorded: - November 22, 1953
Released: - 1956
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Columbia 21500-4 mono
I TRIED AND I TRIED / NO, I DON'T GUESS I WILL
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-24 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

02 – ''CLOSING TIME'' – B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Onie Wheeler-Tracy Lee
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1746 / CO 50456
Recorded: - November 22, 1953
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Okeh 18037-4 mono
CLOSING TIME / I'LL SWEAR YOU DON'T LOVE ME
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-23 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

03 – ''LOVE ME LIKE YOU USED TO DO'' – B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Onie Wheeler-Tracy Lee
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1747 / CO 50457
Recorded: - November 22, 1953
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Okeh 18049-4 mono
LOVE ME LIKE YOU USED TO DO / LITTLE MAMA
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-26 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

04 – ''I'LL SWEAR YOU DON'T LOVE ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Onie Wheeler-Tracy Lee
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1748 / CO 50458
Recorded: - November 22, 1953
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Okeh 18037-4 mono
I'LL SWEAR YOU DON'T LOVE ME / CLOSING TIME
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-25 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Onie Wheeler – Vocal, Harmonica, Guitar
Alden J. Nelson – Lead Guitar, Vocals
Doyal Nelson – Rhythm Guitar, Vocals
Benny Martin – Fiddle
Ernest G. Thompson - Drums

For Biography of Onie Wheeler see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 28, 1953 SATURDAY

Hank Locklin makes his Grand Ole Opry debut, performing ''Let Me Be The One'' at the Ryman Auditorium.

NOVEMBER 29, 1953 SUNDAY

In his fourth attempt at the song, Webb Pierce recorded ''Slowly'' during an evening session at Nashville's Castle Studio. He also cuts ''Even 'Tho''.

NOVEMBER 30, 1953 MONDAY

June Pointer, of The Pointer Sisters, is born in Oakland. Primarily a pop act, The Pointer Sisters win a country Grammy award for their performance on ''Fairytale''.

Decca released Kitty Wells' ''Cheatin' A Sin''.

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©