CONTAINS
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> Back 1956 Sun Schedule <

1956 SESSIONS (5)
May 1, 1956 to May 31, 1956

Studio Session for Roy Orbison, Unknown Date 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1956 (1) / WELO Radio
Studio Session for The Miller Trio, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Miller Sisters, 1956 (1) / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Miller Sisters, 1956 (2) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Sonny Burgess, May 2, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, May 8, 1956 / Sun Records
Advertising Session for Carl Perkins (Overton Park Shell), 1956

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
  
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1956

Johnny Cash signed with Bob Neal's new booking agency, Stars Incorporated, 1916 Sterick Boulevard, Memphis, Tennessee.

Sun 245, Billy Riley's ''Trouble Bound'' b/w ''Rock With Me Baby'' is issued.

MAY 1956

Although mos Sun artists came from the Tri-State area (Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas), the label's allure brought Roy Orbison from west Texas, and, in Orbison's wake came Wade Moore and Dick Penner, the pair who'd written Orbison's first hit, ''Ooby Dooby''. There's no better illustration of the studio at work than the two very different takes of Penner's ''Don't Need Your Lovin' Baby''. Another Penner song, ''Cindy Lou'', sported a guitar lick curiously similar to Tommy Blake's ''Lordy Hoody''. Guitarist Don Dow Gililland (yes, it's spelled that way) earns an occasional mention in vintage guitar mags for his work on Penner's recordings. It was exotic, spooky stuff for 1957. Partially sighted since birth, Gililland cowrote Sid Kings'''Sag, Drag And Fall'' and became a jazz guitarist in Dallas while holding down a day job at Dallas Area Rapid Transit. Trivia note: he was in ''Rock Baby, Rock It'', the movie that starred Johnny Carroll and Rosco Gordon.

Roy Orbison never played as much guitar as he did on Sun. Not as spiky or inventive as Gililland or some of the other pickers on Sun, Orbison was no slough on the six strings. Only toward the end of his life did Orbison see any merit in the music he recorded at Sun, but ''Cat Called Domino'' would have been his best record on Sun if it had been released. The guy in the song was everything that Orbison wasn't. ''Domino'' also featured Orbison's finest guitar playing. Crudely overdubbed, it first appeared on a 1962 budget LP, ''Orbiting With Orbison''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Although mos Sun artists came from the Tri-State area (Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas), the label's allure brought Roy Orbison from west Texas, and, in Orbison's wake came Wade Moore and Dick Penner, the pair who'd written Orbison's first hit, ''Ooby Dooby''. There's no better illustration of the studio at work than the two very different takes of Penner's ''Don't Need Your Lovin' Baby''. Another Penner song, ''Cindy Lou'', sported a guitar lick curiously similar to Tommy Blake's ''Lordy Hoody''. Guitarist Don Dow Gililland (yes, it's spelled that way) earns an occasional mention in vintage guitar mags for his work on Penner's recordings. It was exotic, spooky stuff for 1957. Partially sighted since birth, Gililland cowrote Sid Kings'''Sag, Drag And Fall'' and became a jazz guitarist in Dallas while holding down a day job at Dallas Area Rapid Transit. Trivia note: he was in ''Rock Baby, Rock It'', the movie that starred Johnny Carroll and Rosco Gordon.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY ORBISON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

The first artist Sam Phillips' let Jack Clement work with on his own was Roy Orbison. Like Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison was unable to find a follow-up to his first hit. He recorded "Rock House", a song that another aspiring Sun act, Harold Jenkins (a.k.a. Conway Twitty), had worked up as a theme song for his group, the Rockhousers. It was coupled with Johnny Cash's execrable song, "You're My Baby", originally "Little Woolly Booger". Billboard once again was effusive in its praise of Orbison's "sock showmanship", but its recommendation failed to take account of the fact that "Rock House", released in September 1956, was already behind the times.

Roy Orbison makes a return engagement as a rockabilly singer here, but failed to capitalize on the momentum of "Ooby Dooby". Despite his prowess as a songwriter, Orbison turned to outsiders for this both sides of this disc. Its plain that he knew his way around the bluesy stop rhythm of "You're My Baby". In contrast, there is nothing funnier in the Sun archives than listening to Johnny Cash stumble his awkward way through the original demo of this tune.

''You're My Baby'' was an uncharacteristic song for its writer, Johnny Cash. Its verses consist of 8 bars of stop-rhythm and then proceed into the chorus. At the end of the stop-rhythm segment, Ellis's rimshots announce that the chorus is about to start. Otherwise, his drumming is pretty subdued - keeping time, marking the stops, and little else until the second guitar solo. But as that solo progresses, the drumming gets more energized, and reaches a peak behind the final vocal verse. That dramatic crescendo brings the record to an exciting climax, and it's all due to Billy Pat Ellis's drumming.

01 - YOU'RE MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Johnny R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 220 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - September 24, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 251-A < mono
YOU'RE MY BABY / ROCK HOUSE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

There was a welcome surprise on MCA's recent Conway Twitty box: the original version of "Rock House". It really existed, and it revealed, among other things, that Roy Orbison had earned his half-share of the composer credit. He had more-or-less rewritten Twitty's themesong, although that did nothing to stop Twitty from griping at the time and for years after. The tune became the title track for Orbison's lone LP on the original Sun label, a compilation the singer reviled to his dying day.

02 - ROCK HOUSE" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Harold Jenkins-Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 221 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - September 24, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 251-B < mono
ROCK HOUSE / YOU'RE MY BABY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

On ''Rock House'' Jack Clement put plenty of slapback on it (''It was really a sound effect, it was the only effect we had''), but Sam Phillips seemed satisfied with it. Jack took a somewhat dim view of Roy Orbison at the time. ''I thought he and his band were kind of pissy'', he told Memphis music writer John Floyd. ''Roy always had these crazy ideas. He wanted production numbers like he ultimately wound up doing. I told Roy he'd never make it as a balled singer. He never let me forget that either... But me and Roy got to be big buddies later''.

03(1) – "DOMINO" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Original Undubbed Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - May 1973
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 025-A4 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461 AH-11 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958

When designated as "Cat Called Domino", this untypical mumblefest from Roy Orbison nowaday's carries a co-writer credit for Norman Petty. Petty was Roy's original producer down in Clovis, New Mexico, and this tenuous sharing of the spoils is attributable to Roy recutting the song during a return visit to the Petty studio in 1957. Despite the strong performance here, the track was released - albeit with unnecessary overdubs - only after Roy Orbison had achieved international success.

"I was working with Roy Orbison", recalls Jack Clement, "and Sally Wilbourn brought Jerry Lee Lewis back to me. She said, 'I've got a fella here who says he plays piano like Chet Atkins'. I thought I'd better listen to that. He started playing things like "Wildwood Flower", and I believe he was playing piano with his right hand and drums with his left''. ''I finally made a tape with him because he was different. We recorded "Seasons Of My Heart", but I told him to forget about country because it wasn't happening at that time. I took his name and told him I'd let Sam hear the tape when he got back".

03(2) - "DOMINO" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Dubbed Master
Overdubbed in 1960 or 1961 and leased to budget companies.
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Design Records (LP) 33rpm DLP 164-4 mono
ORBITING WITH ROY ORBISON
Reissued: - 1986 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly 16-14 mono
THE BEST OF SUN ROCKABILLY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Johnny ''Peanuts'' Wilson - Guitar
James Morrow - Electric Mandolin
Jack Kennelly - Bass
Billy Pat Ellis - Drums

For Biography of Roy Orbison see: > The Sun Biographies <
Roy Orbison's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS

PROBABLY AT RADIO WELO STUDIO 1956
2214 SOUTH GLOSTER STREET, TUPELO, MISSISSIPPI
PRODUCER & RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Carl Simmons did not recall recording either "Guitar Boogie" or "Shake Rattle And Roll", but confirmed that both had probably been recorded either at radio station WELO (Jessie suggested possibly WCPC in Houston, Mississippi) or at the home of "a guy from Tupelo whose hobby was to record us whenever he could. I don't remember his name, but he had a little home recorder. We'd go over to his house to rehearse and record".

01 - "GUITAR BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Gene Simmons-Carl Simmons-Jessie Carter
Publisher: - SCopyright Control
Matrix number: - 2545
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1008 mono
I DONE TOLD YOU
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-18 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

02 - "SHAKE RATTLE AND ROLL" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Charles E. Calhoun
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 2446
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-513 mono
SUN RECORDS – THE ROCKING YEARS - ROCKIN' WITH MY BABY
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-12 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

"If I'm Not Wanted" is a song that rattled around Gene's head for some time. "I had it in mind for Elvis when I wrote it, but I never had a chance to play it for him", recalled Gene Simmons.

It is indeed a classic Elvisy Memphis ballad infused with strong elements of doo wop and pop gospel. It is cut from the same cloth as Stan Kesler's compositions "The Thrill Of Your Love" and Playing For Keeps", both recorded by Elvis Presley. Here an different version of Gene's song on a home demo featuring the Miller Sisters in support.

03 - "IF I'M NOT WANTED" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-7-10 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - THE CHAINS IN LOVE
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-17 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Jessie Carter - Upright Bass
Jo Miller - Vocal Chorus
Mildred Miller - Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The Miller Sisters recorded at Sun between 1954 and 1957. Although they were really sister-in-law, they had the unerring sibling harmony. Like Gene Simmons, they came from Tupelo, Mississippi. Singing sister acts were hot and the Millers were as good as the Fontane Sisters, McGuire Sisters, DeCastro Sisters, or any of the others, but simply couldn't grab the moment. ''Don't Let Me Dow'' probably featured Roy Millers as the third voice, and sounds like a home recording. On their last single, ''Ten Cats Down'', they were backed by Johnny Bernero's combo with Ace Cannon on saxophone.

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE MILLER TRIO
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "DON'T LET ME DOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 106 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313 HK-4-2 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elsie Jo Miller - Vocal
Mildred Wages - Vocal
Roy Miller - Vocal
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Gene Simmons or Roy Miller - Guitar
Jessie Carter - Bass

For Biography of The Miller Sisters see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Miller Sisters' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

One of Sam Phillips' lingering regrets about running Sun Records was his inability to produce a hit record by the Miller Sisters. He knew, probably from the first, how good and how versatile they were, but somehow things never clicked for them. The Miller Sisters made their final record for Sun in 1956. One side, "Ten Cats Down", shows their attempt to grapple with the undeniable forces of rock and roll.

By then, Sun was heavely committed to rockabilly and had a roster of artists more comfortable with the idiom than Jo and Millie. That contract was terminated in 1956. The Miller Sisters were essentially a pure country act at a time when pure country music was becoming harder to sell.

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE MILLER SISTERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION 1: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Here was a prime opportunity for Sun to tap into the growing teenage market rather than service a faltering country audience. Sax replaced fiddle as the sidemen, this time largely made up of players from Johnny Bernero's band, worked hard to make the track jump accordingly. Vocally-speaking the girls exude a great deal of savvy which gained them an entirely new mantle, far removed from the indigenous harmonies that had set the standard on their earlier releases. "Ten Cats Down" was about as close as the Sisters ever came to rock and roll. They were, first and foremost, a country act and while they had an admirable feeling for the blues (listen their version of "Got You On My Mind") they were never fated to climb onto the emerging rock bandwagon. Even Ace Cannon's sax meanderings sound curiously stilted.

01(1) - "TEN CATS DOWN" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 212 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 255-A < mono
TEN CATS DOWN / FINDERS KEEPERS
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

And of course, Sam Phillips hedged his bets on the Miller Sisters last record by pairing the lovely ballad ''Finders Keepers'' with the girls one attempt at a solid rocker. ''Ten Cats Down'' was as close as the ladies came to rockabilly but their sound was really illequipped for it. It seems as though women and rockabilly have always had an unsteady romance, despite notable exceptions such as Wanda Jackson and Janis Martin. Arguably, the Miller Sisters were too country, too pure sounding to sound convincing on this type of song. The song needs a raging river and the girls are like a crystal stream. Nevertheless, this track is of considerable interest because it represent a previously unissued alternate take of the version issued on Sun 225. If anything, this version is closer to jazz than rock and roll and pushes the proceedings in the direction of western swing, which was surely not Phillips' intension in 1956. It marked the end of Quinton Claunch and Bill Cantrell's association with Sam Phillips, and Cantrell remembered it with a wince.

01(2) - "TEN CATS DOWN" - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Chatter - Alternate Take
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-10 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-5 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-19/20 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elsie Jo Miller - Vocal
Mildred Wages - Vocal
Buddy Holobaugh - Guitar
Jan Ledbetter - Bass
Johnny Bernero - Drums
Johnny Ace Cannon - Saxophone

For Biography of The Miller Sisters see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Miller Sisters' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE MILLER SISTERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION 2: UNKNOWN DATE 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

SUN 255 combiness an uptempo rocker with a heartbreaking balled that might have cashed in on the nascent pop-country sweetstakes. As it did on Sun 253, the sweet blend of Bill Taylor's trumpet and Stan Kesler's steel grace "Finders Keepers" and add an unorthodox but lovely sound. The duo never sang prettier than on this ballad, although Billboard called the effort "run of the mill". The buying public was similarly unimpressed, and the sides barely made it past the tri-state area. Other than some backup work for other singers, the Miller Sisters never again recorded for Sun.

01(1) - "FINDERS KEEPERS" - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 213 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 255-B < mono
FINDERS KEEPERS / TEN CATS DOWN
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Between the takes, the girls offer their usual seamless vocal with crystalline harmonies. The backing is an unorthodox combination of sounds. Stan Kesler's beautiful played steel guitar predominates and is abetted by Bill Taylor's totally affecting trumpet which shines through in an unexpected 4-bar solo. There is an interesting similarity between this record and ''No Matter Who's To Blame'' by Barbara Pittman which appears in the same release schedule. That song also featured an unusual trumpet/steel guitar mix. Both also had their sights firmly set on the pop and country charts and failed to reach either.

01(2) - "FINDERS KEEPERS" - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown date 1956
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-5-19 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

The remaining tracks represent various failed experiments with the Sisters recorded but not released by Sam Phillips. Obviously Phillips believed this as more than a dozen attempts were made to record the song. The decision not to release the track may have stemmed more from issues surrounding copyright infringement than musical quality.

Despite appearances to the contrary, ''My Isle Of Golden Dreams'' is not a traditional Hawaiian song nor it was it composed for the Miller Sisters by one of the resident Tupelo or Memphis tunesmiths. Rather, the song comes from Tin Pan Alley in New York and dates from 1934 rather than 1954. It has been recorded by Marty Robbins and innumerable others. Nevertheless, it is hard to outclass the Miller Sisters and their stellar performance showcases their clairvoyant vocal rapport. Performers have either been scared away or attracted by the yodel in the song's release (''I hear the voice..."') and it clear that the girls rose to the occasion. As Millie said nearly thirty years later, ''We had to do some tall singing on that one''. Indeed they did. Unfortunately, the only flaw in the recording is the band's uneasiness with the song's unconventional chord changes during the lines ''Somebody cries, somebody sighs...''. The bass player in particular loses his way completely.

02 - "MY ISLE OF GOLDEN DREAMS" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Gus Kahn-Walter Blaufuss
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-4 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1959 - 1959

03 - "IT ONLY HURTS FOR A LITTLE WHILE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Mack David-Fred Spielman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1956
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-11 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-6 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1959 - 1959

Similarly, the girls version of "It Only Hurts For A Little While", the 1956 pop hit by the Ames Brothers was pure country class. It would have been fine fodder for an LP, but Sam Phillips hated to make money for someone else by placing their copyrights on his single. It at all possible, the rule at Sun was to use songs published by Hi-Lo and Knox Music, companies Phillips owned. By that reckoning, it's anybody's guess why "Chains Of Love" never saw the light of day. This song was written by fellow Tupelo native Gene Simmons, who also recorded for Sun Records.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elsie Jo Miller - Vocal
Mildred Wages - Vocal
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Unknown - Bass, Drums, Piano
Bill Taylor - Trumpet

For Biography of The Miller Sisters see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Miller Sisters' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1956

When singers such as Warren Smith forsook rockabilly, they usually reverted back to their first love - country music. Sonny Burgess was the exception. His first love was rhythm and blues. He had a true rhythm and blues voice, like a tenor sax in full cry - short on subtlety and delicate shadings, but a magnificent rock and roll instrument.

Burgess' vocals were complemented by his guitar playing: rough, intense, and blues-drenched. Based in Newport, Arkansas, Burgess formed one of the hottest working bands in the mid-South. Rarely venturing to Memphis, he nevertheless cut several sessions for Sun over a four-year period.

As with Billy Riley and Warren Smith, success often seemed very close for Burgess. Yet when the equation produced the wrong answer, Burgess accepted the verdict of the marketplace with good grace and returned to a salesman's job in Newport.

His musical career was a paradox: his Sun records suggest a life lived constantly on the edge - nights spent playing gin mills, followed by drunken chases down dirt roads, firing off bottle rockets, and throwing up on the neighbor's car at dawn. In person, Burgess was, and is, an almost painfully shy and self-effacing family man. He's still prone to make the occasional comment hinting at more turbulent waters, but Burgess hasn't lived the life one might anticipate from his lyrics: ''Out to the dance hall, cut a little rug / We're runnin' like wildfire and hittin' that jug...''.

Sonny Burgess started playing on a semiprofessional basis as front man for a group called the Moonlighter in 1954. After working as a support act for Elvis Presley in 1955, the Moonlighters edged closer to rhythm and blues. They auditioned at Sun, but Phillips wanted a fuller sound. Merging his band with another led by Jack Nance, Burgess assembled a new group, rechristened the Pacers, that would back him on most of his sessions at Sun.

On May 2, 1956, they drove to Memphis and auditioned at Sun. Impressed Sam Phillips cut their debut single that afternoon. ''We Wanna Boogie'' and ''Red Headed Woman'' stand among the rawest recordings released during the first flowering of rock and roll. The lyrics were almost unintelligible and the accompaniment teetered on the edge of atonality, giving the record an atmosphere of total abandon. It sounded as though the studio floor should have been littered with liquor bottles, although Burgess maintains that they were stonecold sober, even nervous. Despite being almost totally unmarketable according to established precept, ''We Wanna Boogie'' reportedly sold over ninety thousand copies, and charted in some unlikely places, such as Boston.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

It is doubtful that any record exudes more unfettered energy and joyous enthusiasm than Sonny Burgess' debut single on Sun Records. Burgess was a true wildman, a free spirit whose allegiance to rhythm and blues was in better evidence than his hillbilly roots.

A cursory listen to some Sonny Burgess' records suggests a life lived close to the edge, nights spent olaying gin mills followed by drunken chases down dirt roads, firing off bottle rockets and puking over the neighbour's car at dawn. In person, though, Burgess is a somewhat shy and self-effacing family man. The occasional comment will hint at more turbulent waters but he hasn't lived the life one might anticipate from some of his lyrics, which is just as well, otherwise there might not be a Sonny Burgess to talk to.

STUDIO SESSION FOR SONNY BURGESS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY MAY 2, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) - "WE WANNA BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - May 1973
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 025-A8 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - VOLUME 1 - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: -1981 Sun England (LP) 33rpm CFM 10 503-5 mono
FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL

01(2) - "WE WANNA BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1022-6 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313 HK-4-11 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

01(3) - "WE WANNA BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 3 - Actual Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525 BH-1-4 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

It wasn't too long ago that folks out to have a good time would refer to a night on the town as - "cuttin' a rug". When the rock and roll generation came into being, particularly south of the Mason Dixon line, the lingo got a tad more boisterous and mutated into "climbin' the wall". Growing up in Newport, Arkansas, Sonny Burgess understood such parlance and when the chance came to record at Sun, he conjured up in the mood perfectly with his all-pervading "We Wanna Boogie".

There is nothing particularly original about Burgess' work and his lyrics here are barely intelligible. Nevertheless, the first 12 bars of "We Wanna Boogie" establish an irresistible groove that elevates this record to greatness, although "Red Headed Woman" was the designated A-side. Once again, Sam Phillips knew what he was doing when he chose these sides to unleash on an unsuspecting world. Billboard commented that the record was "shouted and orked with plenty of spirit". Right they were.

01(4) - "WE WANNA BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 199 Master 
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 247-B < mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE / RED HEADED WOMAN
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

When Sam Phillips played the tracks back for the them, Sonny and the rest of the band cringed and begged Sam to let them redo it. Sonny didn't like the distortion on the guitar, he didn't like the tone of the trumpet, he knew they could do better. But Sam said none of that mattered, it was the feel that counted. ''What he wanted to do in that studio was to play like we were doing a show'', said Sonny. ''He wanted that enthusiasm, he thought folks could hear that on the tape. So that's how we did it. We played for Sam. He was our audience, and we tried to impress him the same way we did an audience''. According to Sam, ''They were a working band who knew what they were doing, and they had a sound like I've never heard. Maybe Sonny's sound was too raw, I don't know, but I tell you this. They were pure rock and roll''.

My song "We Wanna Boogie" was inspired by what we did in Newport, Arkansas, on a Saturday night. Elvis played the clubs there, near Memphis, and so did I. Back then, you could go up to Elvis or anybody else and just talk. The crowds really got into the music then. They were there to have a good time. I was playing country music back in the 1950s, as well as stuff by Joe Turner and Jimmy Reed. So much feeling there. And I did Hank William's songs too. Nobody could beat them, not even today. Of course, Elvis came along and we all decided we also wanted to be rockers. We had three clubs in Newport then. I first saw him at Porky's Roof Top, playing with Scotty and Bill. Man, they knocked me out! "That's All Right" had just been released on Sun Records about that time, when our band was playing songs by Moon Mullican, Merrill Moore and Hank.

So we sat down and decided to start playing rock, about 1956, a little after Elvis' first records came out. He was real hot by then. A group of us formed The Pacers and I wrote "We Wanna Boogie" and "Red Headed Woman." We were considered pretty wild and animated then, but we would be tame today. We had what I would call a three-ring circus on stage. We laid down on the big old bass, straddled each other, and did the bug dance. Ever hear of it? It was fun. The bug dance is when you're itchin' and scratchin', and each musician acts like he's throwing a bug on another guy. Then he throws it into the corner, into the crowd. Then the band jumps into the crowd and sings. One time, we did the bug dance and my guitar hit me right in the mouth. What days those were. So much energy, so much fun. That is a time in history that we will never see again, in my opinion. That's before things got so wild. We had fun, but it was the right kind of fun on stage.

We guys on Sun Records were just poor boys, so playing music was fun for us. Getting paid, well, that was the icing on the cake for us. In those days, the one thing I was really good at was picking musicians. Man, I had some good ones, too. Most people don't realize that I played my own guitar. I'd play rhythm, then switch to lead. On record, though, the guitar part dropped out while I made the quick switch. These days, people ask me what it was like to be on Sun in those crazy times. They remember me, for some reason. Everybody talks about my red hair, about my red this and my red that. How that happened was I had a candy apple red guitar, the first ever made by Fender, a Stratocaster. Then I had a red suit and black tux pants. My red hair came about when we toured with Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison, and whoever else we happened to hook up with. One day I tried to put peroxide on my hair to turn it white, and for some reason my hair came out red. So I was stuck with it for a time. That image of me has somehow stuck over time, too. Anyway, in those days we didn't even know how to record. Nobody ever told us what to do. We just played as if we were playing for a crowd. We thought we were big record stars then, but we were really only known in our home areas. Sun did have a few stars, the rest of us were just a bunch of local players. Now, after we're all past the prime of our lives, we're getting some attention. In 1960, I got out of the business altogether. Some vocalists wanted the band to go to California. I didn't want to. Since then, I've been working at a company - well, since the 1970s - and playing a little music on the side. We tour with some other Memphis fellows in the Original Sun Rhythm Section. We may never be big stars, but then, who knows? We made a little money and had a good time.

Liner notes by Sonny Burgess

02(1) - "RED HEADED WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - SSS Netherlands (LP) 33rpm HJS 224 mono
ROCKING AND STOMPING
Reissued: - 1981 Sun England (LP) 33rpm CFM 503 mono
FLYING SAUCER ROCK AND ROLL

02(2) - "RED HEADED WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1022-5 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525 BH-1-5 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

Allowing for some serious competition, Sonny Burgess boasted one of the wildest stage acts of all rockabilly performers. He endorsed this first Sun single by dying his hair a full-blooded crimson and working up an outlandish routine to get the message across.

"We Wanna Boogie" and "Red Headed Woman" stand among the rawest recordings released during the first flowering of rock and roll. The lyrics were almost unintelligible (although they repay close attention with some very funny couplets), and the instrumentation teetered on the edge of atonality. It was a record that sported an air of total abandon, sounding as if it had been created under the heavy burden of alcohol, although Sonny Burgess remembers that everyone was stone cold sober, and nervous to the point of apprehension. Despite being almost unmarketable according to established precept, "Red Headed Woman" reportedly sold over 90,000 copies. It did especially well in Boston, although Burgess was unaware of that fact until Jack Nance and Joe Lewis toured there a few years later with Conway Twitty.

02(3) - "RED HEADED WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 198 Master
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - August 3, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 247-A < mono
RED HEADED WOMAN / WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-2-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

03 - "INTERVIEW SONNY BURGESS" - B.M.I. - 2:12
This interview during his first UK visit in April 1984, he was more than eager to
impart his role in the label's story.
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-1 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

04(1) - "THE PRISONER'S SONG" - B.M.I. - 3:02
Composer: - Guy Massey
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 - Mistitled "Wings Of An Angel"- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1022-2 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Other Sun releases: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525 BH-1-3 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

04(2) - "THE PRISONER'S SONG" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Guy Massey
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate 2 – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525 BH-1-6 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

05 - "ALL LONG NIGHT"** - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - 1985 Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1022-4 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525 BH-1-7 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

At six feet, Joe Lewis cut an imposing figure as the joint frontman of Sonny Burgess' Pacers. He picked a solid rhythm guitar and carried the reputation of being a popular figure whitin the band. In other words it made good sense for Sam Phillips to investigate his capabilities when he brought Sonny in to tape his maiden sides, and the finesse rolled over into this wild high-stepper. Sadly the title proved to be portentous, as the gangly musicians lost his life in a car wreck during the 1970s.

06 - "LIFE'S TOO SHORT TO LIVE**" - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Joe Lewis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 2, 1956
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1022-3 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525 BH-1-8 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1959

While it is immediately clear that Joe Lewis was not going to take away anybody's job as vocalist, the sound of the track just bristies with energy. The lyric is surpridingly rural ( a reference to round and square dancing that immediately calls to mind Carl Perkins "Gone, Gone, Gone"). Yet it also quotes "Womp Bomp Alooma..." from Little Richard's "Tutti Frutti". Rock and roll was truly becoming a cultural melting pot.

But if Lewis' lyric is semi-rural, the instrumental work surely isn't. Following a tame, almost Orienttal 4-bar intro, Burgess's hard edged electric guitar virtually tears through the speakers during his first solo.

The second break is even more dramatic. The solo starts with four empty bars that leave you wondering if someone forgot to turn on his amplifier. Then suddenly, Wham! Sonny is again putting your tweeters at risk. This is precisely the approach that Carl Perkins used on "Gone, Gone, Gone" - a record that seems to have influenced this track in more ways than just its lyrics.

On SUN 224, Perkins actually scats his way through the first four bars of his final solo, seemingly going nowhere on guitar, before tearing into a startling 4-7 chord and bringing the track back to life. Joe Lewis and Sonny seem to have borrowed the tric perfectly here. Through it all, Russ Smith's drumming is all over the place. His playing crosses the line between assertive and aggressive, yet the sound of his snare is curiously dead - the same sound we hear on the early session that produced "We Wanna Boogie".

Joe Lewis joined (and named) Burgess' band The Pacers and was on hand for their second audition at Sun and their earliest recording sessions. He and fellow band member (trumpet'drums) Jack Nance later toured with Conway Twitty. Nance made more of the affiliation, co-writing a number of Twitty releases including the mega-hit "It's Only Make Believe". Before leaving Sun, Joe Lewis recorded seven vocal duet titles with Jack Nance.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocals and Guitar
Joe Lewis - Guitar and Vocals**
Johnny Ray Hubbard - Bass
Russell Smith - Drums
Ray Kern Kennedy - Piano
Jack Nance - Trumpet

For Biography of Sonny Burgess see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sonny Burgess' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 3, 1956 THURSDAY

The Louvin Brothers recorded ''Knoxville Girl'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

Dallas record producer and studio owner Jim Beck dies after inhaling cleaning solution while maintaining a tape machine. Beck influenced the careers of Lefty Frizzell and Ray Price, and had Decca thinking of moving its country operations to Dallas, Texas.

The Broadway production ''The Most Happy Fella'' opens at New York's Imperial Theater. Cast member Frederick ''Shorty'' Long heads into the studio with Elvis Presley during the shows run to play piano on ''Don't Be Cruel'' and ''Hound Dog''.

MAY 4, 1956 FRIDAY

The Louvin Brothers records ''Cash On The Barrel Head'' in Nashville.

Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps recorded ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

RCA Victor leased Elvis Presley's ''I Want You, I Need You, I Love You'' backed with ''My Baby Left Me'' (RCA Victor 47-6540).

George Gobel, a former star of radio's ''National Barn Dance'', is featured on the cover of TV Guide.

MAY 5, 1956 SATURDAY

Carl Perkins resolved that he would not go back on the road before his wife had given birth to their third child, but the pressure from promotors grew too intense. With Jay Perkins still in hospital, Carl hit the road and returns to the "Big D Jamboree" as a regular. His booking fee was as high as fifteen hundred dollars a night.

Perry Como held the invitation open for Perkins to appear on the show, but Perkins would not fulfill the engagement until Jay was ready to perform. They eventually worked the Como show with Jay sporting a neck brace.

MAY 8, 1956 TUESDAY

Recording session for Johnny Cash at Sun Records, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

It was a long seven months before Johnny Cash's next record hit the marketplace. Such was the continuing success of "I Walk The Line", that Sam Phillips wanted to wring every last play and sale it afforded before releasing Cash's next effort. The wait was worth it. This is a truly superb two-sided record, revealing all the dimensions of Cash as a performer and composer.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MAY 8, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) - "TRAIN OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Scheduled for inclusion and shown as included on
Sunbox 103 but omited due to tape compilation error.
Recorded: - May 8, 1956
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-10-1 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-1-19 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

This remains one of Johnny Cash's most powerful and striking train songs. The overall effect of this slightly faster alternate version is perhaps less brooding, but the guitar part of Luther Perkins is more interesting. The simple guitar figure he uses is borrowed from the song's melody. He opens and closes with it and bases his solo on it as well. Although it's not what we're used to hearing, this approach is certainly not without merit.

01(2) - "TRAIN OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 8, 1956
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517 EH-1-25 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-1-20 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

Of the two alternate takes of "Train Of Love" featured here, the first is similar to the released take but it is the second that stands out. Taken at a slightly faster tempo there are noticeable differences in Luther's playing. He opens and closes the song with a totally different guitar figure and it leaves you wondering whose decision it was to abandon this style for the simpler work that featured on the released version.

"Train Of Love" establishes Cash's love of train songs and rhythms better than virtually anything in his catalogue. His tiny, barely functional band turns in a taut performance and Phillips has miked the trio for maximum effect. Cash has written himself a perfect melody line replete with flatted thirds, within which his lonesome voice can soar without revealing its limitations.

01(3) - "TRAIN OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 226 Master Take 2
Recorded: - May 8, 1956
Released: - November 21, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 258-A < mono
TRAIN OF LOVE / THERE YOU GO
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

NEWSPAPER LINES

This Is Johnny Cash... who first captured your attention with "Cry, Cry, Cry" and "Hey Porter"... became a nationally recognized artist with "Folsom Prison" and "So Doggone Lonesome"... then proved his amazing versatility with "Get Rhythm" and "I Walk The Line" - proved, too, that a fine talent, combined with a fresh approach and an understanding heart creates music that knows no categorical limits, no barriers, but draws a warm response from all.

This Is Johnny Cash... who until 1955, never wrote a song, played a musical instrument, or made a professional appearance; and today is regarded by the disc jockey's of America - according to four separately conducted, impartial surveys - the most outstanding new male singer of 1956 - the fellow most likely to succeed in carving a permanent and very special place for himself in music's Hall of fame.

This Is Johnny Cash... handsome, dark, and intense... with the look of a dreamer in his eyes and a haunting, lonely quality to his voice that reaches into every heart and shares its secrets.

This Is Johnny Cash... at his superlative best in two and beautiful songs "Train Of Love" and "There You Go"

(Sun 258)

Likewise, "There You Go" is a flawless effort by all. The song is plainly a more conventional 'pop' outing, yet Cash's unique sound and integrity as a country artist are never compromised. In his later career, Johnny Cash may have occasionally reached this level of artistic success, but he never surpassed it. A gem.

02(1) - "THERE YOU GO" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - Take 1
Recorded: - May 8, 1956
Released: - Sun Unissued

02(2) - "THERE YOU GO" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 222 Master Take 2
Recorded: - May 8, 1956
Released: - November 21, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 258-B < mono
THERE YOU GO / TRAIN OF LOVE
Reissued - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1956

With their popularity, Johnny Cash and The Tennessee Two spreading most of their time was spent out on the road and it was hard to find time to go back to Memphis and recorded any new material. Between June 1956 and April 1957 they only managed two sessions and these only produced a couple of tracks.

MAY 9, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Buck Owens' third son, Johnny Dale Owens, is born in California.

MAY 10, 1956 THURSDAY

Randy Goodman is born. He becomes the chief of Disney's Lyric Street label when it opens in Nashville in 1977. Lyric Street artists will include Rascal Flatts, SheDaisy, Aron Tippin, and Josh Gracin.

MAY 11, 1956 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley's ''Heartbreak Hotel'' enters the UK record charts, his first hit on the HMV label, and reaches number two. Janis Martin known as the Female Elvis, recorded ''Ooby Dooby'' for RCA Victor with Hill & Range credited as the publisher.

''The Pinky Lee Show'' ends a two-year run as a daily kids program on NBC-TV. The cancellation provides a little scheduling freedom for cast member Molly Bee.

MAY 13, 1956 SUNDAY

Gene Autry's ''Melody Ranch'' airs for the last time on CBS Radio. The show's cast includes Johnny Bond.

Harry, Abe and Jack Warner sell Warner Bross. Pictures for $22 million. The next day, Jack Warner buys it back. Within two years, the company adds a record label, eventually associated with Randy Travis, Hank Williams Jr. and Faith Hill.

MAY 14, 1956 MONDAY

''True Love Ways'' songwriter Buddy Holly receives a prescription for contacts from his doctor. Holly finds them uncomfortable and chooses to continue wearing his black glasses, which become a personal trademark.

Columbia released Carl Smith's double-sided single, ''You Are The One'' and ''Doorstep To Heaven''.

MAY 15, 1956 TUESDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Casey Jones (The Brave Engineer)'' at New York's Webster Hall.

MAY 16, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Drummer Billy ''Bun'' Wilson join the American Federation of Musicians Local 257 in Nashville. He plays on Ernest Tubb's 1961 hit ''Thoughts Of A Fool''.

MAY 19, 1956 SATURDAY

Chess Records released Chuck Berry's rock and roll hit ''Roll Over Beethoven'', which name checks Carl Perkins' ''Blue Suede Shoes''.

MAY 21, 1956 MONDAY

Brenda Lee signs her first recording contract, with Decca Records.

Capitol released Sonny James' ''Twenty Feet Of Muddy Water''.

MID 1956

BILLBOARD REVIEWS

Carl Perkins, with his Gold Record for "Blue Suede Shoes" (Ssun 234) now a treasured possession, will be out with a new Sun release which you should be hearing on your favorite disc jockey shows tomorrow. Carl had a hand in writing both sides. One, in collaboration with Johnny Cash of Memphis, recording star in his own right, is called "All Mama's Children". Its a rock and roll version of the Old Woman Who Lived in a shoe. This particular shoe is a blue suede one. The flip is "Boppin' The Blues", written by Carl in collaboration with Curly Griffin of Jackson, Tennessee. Intended to capture the essence of the new music, instead it showed how close Perkins was tied to the country tradition.

By contrast, Elvis Presley's second record, ''I Want You, I Need You, I Love You'', fit no known definition of country music. ''Boppin' The Blues'' reached number 9 in the country charts, but did no more than dart in and out of the lowest reaches of the pop charts while Presley's song jumped straight to the top.

Carl will be on the Como show Saturday night, and of course he'll sing, "Blue Suede Shoes". He'll also no doubt take advantage of any opportunity he gets to plug his new release. Sam Phillips, owner of Sun Records, said, "Blue Suede Shoes" actually hit the million mark about two weeks ago".

He looks for it to level off at a little over 1,200,000. In a business where fantastic claims are frequently made about record sales. Sam says he carefully held of until the million mark was actually hit, the figure represents actual sales and not just shipments.

Sun is moving right along, got two out of three places in Billboard's Review Spotlight last week, with Johnny Cash's number one, "I Walk The Line" and "Get Rhythm", which Billboard termed a "top-notch pairing" which "generates a load of excitement", and Roy Orbison's "Ooby Dooby" and "Go! Go! Go!", which Billboard said had "spectacular, untamed quality" and "impressive primitive flavor". Warren Smith's "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby" on Sun is getting good play.

MAY 22, 1956 TUESDAY

After recording for several years in Dallas, Lefty Frizzell holds his first Nashville session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

MAY 23, 1956 WEDNESDAY

Woody Guthrie is arrested for vagrancy in New Yersey. He is instititionalized at Greystone Park in Morris Plains, where he spends his next five years, suffering from Huntington's chorea.

MAY 25, 1956 FRIDAY

The first Eurovision Song Contest is held at Lugano, Switzerland. The Eurovision Song Contest is a televised event that invited countries across Europe to each submit original songs. Competitors go up against singers from other European nations for the title of best original song by performing their songs on television and being judged. The first competition featured 2 songs each from 7 countries and Lys Assia from Switzerland won first place for her song “Refrain.” The show was popular and has continued every year since 1956, inviting as many as 43 countries to participate. It is still one of the world’s longest running and most watched television shows.

MAY 26, 1956 SATURDAY

Carl Perkins makes a guest appearance on "The Perry Como Show on NBC-TV. Perkins had been on his way to appear on the show in March 1955 when he was involved in an auto accident. ''Blue Suede Shoes'' peaks on the national Honor Rock of Hits at number 4.

Champagne king and former country hitmaker Lawrence Welk joins Alice Lon on the cover of TV Guide.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

ADVERTISING SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - ''CARL PERKINS IN MEMPHIS (ADVERTISING SPOT)'' – B.M.I. - 1:04
More details unknown
Released: - May 29, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313 HK-5 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

This advertising is for the June 1, 1956 concert at Overton Park Shell in Memphis featuring Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash and Warren Smith. All were signed to manager Bob Neal's company called Stars Incorporated. Tickets were $1. The show was the start of their summer tour and Elvis Presley came to see. Elvis' was impressed with Orbison and remained a lifelong fan. The tour is highlighted in the Johnny Cash movie "Walk The Line" in scenes such as Roy and Johnny blowing up homemade firework bombs. Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison had their clothes ripped off by masses of teenage girls many times. They were banned from towns, started riots, and had police escort them to the county line or face arrest. Next Year's tour, 1957, included Jerry Lee Lewis in the lineup.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bob Neal announcing a forthcoming Stars Inc. Stage Show

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 27, 1956 SUNDAY

Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash featured at 8:00pm at the Overton Shell in Memphis, Tennessee. The Commercial Appeal in Memphis review on his issue from May 27, "Rock 'N' Roll Show At Shell On Friday. The first big popular music show of the summer will rock and roll around in the Overton Park Shell beginning at 8 p.m. Friday, sponsor Bob Neal said yesterday. Headlining the musicale will be Carl Perkins of "Blue Suede Shoes" fame, featured on his return from the Perry Como television show last night.

Costarred will be Johnny Cash, the other top hit-maker of our local Sun Records Company. Cash and Perkins will be climaxing a week-long tour with the Memphis show. Others in the cast here will be Warren Smith, Eddy Bond, and Roy Orbison and his Teen Kings. Orbison, a 20-year-old from West Texas, is making a big league entry into the field with his "Ooby Dooby", already one of the three top discs here and climbing fast all over the country.

Only 4,000 tickets will be sold, Neal said, so that all patrons may have good seats. And the memory of the turn away crowd at the last show of last season indicates advance buying might be wise. Tickets are on sale at Bob Neal Record Shop, 50 South Main.

MAY 28, 1956 MONDAY

Dobro player Jerry Douglas is born in Warren, Ohio. A member of Alison Kraus and Union Station, he plays on such country hits as Randy Travis'''Diggin' Up Bones'', Sara Evans' ''Born To Fly'', Little Big Town's ''Boondocks'' and Chriss Hillman and Roger McGuin's ''You Ain't Going Nowhere''.

Studio musician Brent Rowan is born in Waxahachie, Texas. He wins the Academy of Country Music's Top Guitarist in 1989, first playing on John Contee's ''Friday Night Blues'', then working with Alabama, Blake Shelton and Shania Twain, among others.

Capitol released Faron Young's double-sided single, ''Sweet Dreams'' backed with ''Until I Met You''.

MAY 29, 1956 TUESDAY

Roy Orbison's single (Sun 242) ''Ooby Dooby'' b/w ''Go! Go! Go!'' released by Sun Records, and Carl Perkins' third Sun disc (Sun 243) "Boppin' The Blues" b/w ''All Mama's Children'', the follow-up to ''Blue Suede Shoes'' is released, but it far outsold Carl's record, for which Sam Phillips had such high expectations. It went on, in fact, to sell some two hundred thousand copies, entering the Billboard pop charts in the middle of June, spurred by a spiffy half-page ad that Sam Phillips had crudely drafted, then marked up, as he did all of his ads. In this one, the title was block-printed in red nine times at an angle, once horizontally, with ''OOBY DOOBY HAS CAUGHT FIRE'' at the center in black, as grayish flames threatened to smother the letters.

MAY 31, 1956 THURSDAY

Hank Snow recorded ''Conscience I'm Guilty''.

The John Wayne movie ''The Searchers'' opens in Lubbock, Texas. A frequent line from the film, ''That'll be the day'', inspires Buddy Holly to write a classic.

NEWSPAPER LINED - Blue Shoes Step Toward Shell. Carl Perkins Stars Friday Night.

Carl Perkins, Memphis' second big homegrown singing star of the past year, will warn Memphians not to step on his "Blue Suede Shoes" in an under-the-blue rock and roll show Friday night at 8 in the Overton Park Shell.

Bob Neal's Stars, Incorporated, will present Perkins, Johnny Cash with the Tennessee Two, Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings, Warren Smith, and Eddy Bond and his Stompers in the first of a series of outdoor shows he plans for the summer.

Perkins' Memphis appearance will climax a tour that started Saturday night when he gueststarred on the Perry Como TV Show. Besides "Blue Suede Shoes" which just hit the million sales markt for the Sun label of Memphis, Perkins will feature his new Sun release, "Boppin' The Blues" and "All Mama's Chillun Gonna Rock".

Tickets for the Shell show are now on sale at the Bob Neal Record Shop, 50 South Mean, at $1 for adults and 50 cents for children.

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