CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (2/2)
February 1, 1958 to February 28, 1958

Studio Session for Warren Smith, February 23, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Barbara Pittman, February 24, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, February/March 1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 17, 1958 MONDAY

''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen'' brings Johnny Cash to number 1 on the Billboard country singles chart.

Ricky Nelson performs ''I'm Confessin''' and ''Boppin' The Blues'', during the week's episode of the ABC sitcom ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

Jimmy Martin recorded ''Rock Hearts''.

FEBRUARY 20, 1958 THURSDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis performs as part of the ''Big Gold Record Tour'' with Buddy Holly, The Everly Brothers, Bill Haley and others in Florida. The local newspaper in Florida reports, ''Even on vacation, some people find it difficult to evaporate completely from the rock and roll scene.

Last week, this writer was enjoying the mild temperature of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, when along came a package of rock and rollers under the collective tag of ''The Big Gold Record Stars''.

''The troupe, consisting of the Everly Brothers, Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Holly and the Crickets, the Royal Teens and Bill Haley and the Comets, played the War Memorial Auditorium there in the wind-up date of a Southern tour and thru the good offices of local promoter Hatty Smythe, we got a first hand look at the show''.

An other article says, ''A prediction we have made in the past in print just about came true during the session. Jerry Lee Lewis with the craziest vest you ever saw (trimmed with leopard skin) and combing his hair frantically between numbers, was particularly rough on the piano. We've long expected to see a piano crack up under his special kind of pounding. Sure enough, the tired looking instrument couldn't take it. Interrupting his act, Lewis informed the audience, ''Well man, I guess this piano had it'', while assistants rushed on stage to try to repair the damaged strings. Lewis got a solid reception for his wild act, but top scores with the nearly 3,000 fans at the second show, were the Everly Brothers and Buddy Holly and the Crickets''.

An article in the Daytona Beach newspaper reported that, Harry Smythe, operator of Buck Lake Ranch, Angola, Ind., one of the nation's top summer hillbilly locations, has a rockabilly package featuring the Everly Brothers, Bill Haley and His Comets, Jimmie Rodgers, Buddy Holly and the Cricketts, and Jerry Lee Lewis set for a string of Florida dates, opening with two performances at Peabody Auditorium here February 20.

Unit follows with the Fort Hesterly Armory, Tamps, February 21; The National Guard Armory, Jacksonville, February 22; Connie Mack Field, West Palm Beach, February 23; Dade County Auditorium, February 24 and War Memorial Auditorium, Fort Lauderdale, February 25. Two performances are skedded for each spot.

FEBRUARY 21, 1958 FRIDAY

Mary Chapin Carpenter is born in Princeton, New Jersey. Her folk-tinged brand of country makes her one of the most thoughtful artists of the 1990s while she garners hits with ''Down At The Twist And Shout'', ''I Feel Lucky'' and ''Shut Up And Kiss Me''.

Patsy Cline guests on ABC's Country Music Jubilee'', formerly called ''Ozak Jubilee''.

FEBRUARY 22, 1958 SATURDAY

This night, brought an event to remembered. Jud Phillips had arranged for tickets for himself and for Sun employee Barbara Barnes for the dress rehearsal for the Dick Clark show at the Little Theatre on West Forty- Fourth Street at Broadway. They had access to the production floor, and it was a thrill to Barbara, the radio- TV college major, to see how the cameras and the set were arranged and how the crew was working. Unlike his weekday show from Philadelphia, this thirty-minute production had no dancing. They sat with the rest of the audience in the theater seats, and Barbara didn't meet Dick Clark or any of the guests.

Chuck Berry's ''Sweet Little Sixteen'' stole the show for her. Though she was past the age of identifying with his clever lyrics of teenage love, car races, and school hassles, she found this performer a sight to behold. Chuck was very dark, with pleasant chiseled features, and a body as flexible as a sapling. His little duckwalk across the entire stage was humorous.

Chuck was similar to Elvis and the other current rock and rollers in that he played the guitar, sang to and for teenagers, and produced hits one after the other, yet he wasn't reviled by the puritanical critics the way Elvis and the other white players were. There wasn't as much to criticize, maybe. In contrast to Jerry Lee Lewis, he didn't deal much in suggestive lyrics, and he had shaken off the lowdown images of the rhythm and blues that went before rock and roll. You could understand his lyrics, some said Elvis and others mumbled, and they sounded more playful than sexy. Finally, he was black, not a white man sounding black. A convoluted prejudice made it worse for a white man to sound black.

Still, Chuck Berry was a bridge between black and white cultures, for he had cultivated a big white following in his native St. Louis, just as Fats Domino had done in New Orleans. At one time Berry had played rhythm and blues and country music, but now he was strictly writing songs for teens to dance to.

Dick Clark interviewed all his guests, including a rising ABC-TV performer, Johnny Carson, and the president of Jerry Lee Lewis's fan club, Elaine Berman. But the music was of course the main attraction, even though it was lip-synced. After the broadcast, The Sun employees Jud Phillips and Barbara Barnes went out with a couple of young women from the ABC network. They had drinks with them and with Bill Justis, who had also come up to appear on the show. His tunes ''Raunchy'' and ''College Man'' were featured, and Bill had looked cute in his little college beanie. Before ''College Man'', he had worn a toupee, or as he called it, a ''rug'', to cover his bald pate. He was flying back to Memphis early the next day, and went he said he had to leave, the party broke up. Concluded he was getting back to his wife, Yvonne, and his work on the brick barbeque pit and fence he was building in his backyard. As he put it, he was ''queer for bricks'', and brick masonry was his safety valve for the pressures of suddenly being a recording star.

Even though Bill Justis had performed ''College Man'' on the Dick Clark show, there hand't shipped it yet, and Barbara Barnes asked Bill about this when she next met in the Sun studio office. He said, ''Sam is holding off so won't interfere with the sales of ''Raunchy''. It's not a good idea to have two singles out at the same time.

But soon after the trip to New York, the follow-up record was sent to the sampling list and the orders started pouring in. Even so, ''Raunchy'' remained the hit, staying on the charts for 23 weeks, and went far beyond the million-seller it had been in 1957. But the phenomenal this was, two other artists also made the charts with their cover records of ''Raunchy''. Lew Chudd of Imperial Records on the West Coast put it out with Ernie Freeman, and it stayed on the charts, especially the rhythm and blues charts where Imperial was so strong, for several weeks. Randy Wood's Dot Records cover with the Billy Vaughn Orchestra was even more successful.

During one of Barbara daily phone conversations, Jud Phillips had told her about the flip side of Billy Vaughn's single. It was a sentimental ballad, ''Sail Along Silvery Moon'', and when he heard it and subsequently ran into Randy Wood on his travels, Jud said, ''Man, you are pushing the wrong side of that record''. Randy Wood took Jud's advice and laid ''Sail Along'', with the result that it went to number 5 on the Billboard pop chart and became one of the biggest sellers Dot Records had that year. In addition, Vaughn's ''Raunchy'' also made the charts for a double-sided hit. ''College Man'' sold a respectable number of records, but never made it into the top ten.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WARREN SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

''Uranium Rock'' now this is a mystery that will probably remain unsolved. Warren Smith recorded ''Uranium Rock'' in 1958, but it wasn't released until 1973, when it appeared on the first ''Sun Rockabilly's'' LP. How then can we account for the appearance of a very similar song, ''Sing Real Loud'', by Lloyd George, recorded on March 18, 1962 for Imperial Records and released later that year? The songs are so close that the similarity cannot be accidental. Lloyd George (his real name) aka Ken Marvin aka Lonzo of Lonzo & Oscar recorded between 1947 and 1962, scoring just one hit (''I'm My Own Grandpa'' in 1948). He was based in Nashville when Smith recorded ''Uranium Rock'' and was still there when he recorded for west coast-based Imperial Records. After Imperial dropped him, he eased performing and booked Bill Monroe. Most of Marvin/George's songs were novelties (''Cornbread And Lasses'', ''Tickle The Tom Cat's Tail'', ''There's A Hole In The Bottom Of The Sea'', etc.), and ''Uranium Rock'' is consistent with those. There's even a tape in the Sun vaults of him singing ''You Spurned A Love'' and ''Little Red Wagon'', so it's just possible that Marvin/George submitted ''Uranium Rock'' to Sun and that Warren Smith recorded it. Anyone who might remember anything about what happened is now dead, so the mystery will probably remain such. ''Uranium Rock'' is a nuclear age gold rush song. Buy a Geiger counter and head for the hills. Return to town with a truckload of radioactive uranium ore, cash out, and go visit the Cadillac dealer. Clearly Ken Marvin/Lloyd George or whoever wrote this song thought 'uranium rock' was a pretty good pun. Guitarist Al Hopson keeps the show together with a Bo Diddley lick that almost functions as the song's hook. In fact, the session could have used another guitarist to take a solo over the riff.

01 - "URANIUM ROCK" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Lloyd George
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 23, 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-8-1 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-1 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Al Hopson - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of Warren Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Warren Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BARBARA PITTMAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY FEBRUARY 24, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY STAN KESLER
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

Barbara Pittman debuted on Sun during the label's Golden Age in September 1956 with a flat-out rocker called ''I Need A Man'' (Sun 253). She was promptly dubbed ''Sun's answer to Janis Martin'' by the trade papers. But Pittman was far more than that and, in fact, resented being pigeon-holed. The production of her second release (Phillips International 3518) was turned over to Jack Clement and the results were far more gentle. Her third release, which recorded here, appeared in June 1958 and featured a Hank Williams song. Her performance showed off the ''torchy'' side of Pittman's balled style.

Certainly it featured the fullest arrangement of any of her recordings for the label. She had come a long way from the girl who grew up in the projects with Elvis Presley and sang country and rockabilly with Clyde Leoppard and the Snearly Ranch Boys at the Cotton Club in West Memphis, Arkansas.

01 - "COLD COLD HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 321 - Master
Recorded: - February 24, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3527-B < mono
COLD COLD HEARET / EVERLASTING LOVE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Barbara, remains her favorite to this day: "I think "Cold Cold Heart" is the best record I ever did. I think its my best singing, but its also the best arrangement. The Gene Lowery Singers sang on it, but just the guys. They were more restrained without the soprano. That one guy, Cowboy Vernon Drane, had a beautiful bass voice. And Bill Justis was so pleased with the session. It was the only time I've ever seen an engineer come out of the control room crying. It really touched him. He loved it and I loved it, too. I also like the flip side, "Everlasting Love". I particularly like the ending of it. That was Bill Justis' band with Sid Manker on lead guitar".

"Cold Cold Heart" recorded here by Barbara Pittman on this session, is a country song, written by Hank Williams. This blues ballad is both a classic of honky-tonk and an entry in the Great American Songbook.

Williams adapted the melody for the song from T. Texas Tyler's 1945 recording of "You'll Still Be In My Heart," written by Ted West in 1943. The song achingly and artfully describes frustration that the singer's love and trust is unreciprocated due to a prior bad experience in the other's past. Stories of the song's origins vary. In the Williams episode of American Masters, country music historian Colin Escott states that Williams was moved to write the song after visiting his wife Audrey in the hospital, who was suffering from an infection brought on by an abortion she had carried out at their home unbeknownst to Hank. Escott also speculates that Audrey, who carried on extramarital affairs as Hank did on the road, may have suspected the baby was not her husband's. Florida bandleader Pappy Neil McCormick claims to have witnessed the encounter: "According to McCormick, Hank went to the hospital and bent down to kiss Audrey, but she wouldn't let him. 'You sorry son of a bitch,' she is supposed to have said, 'it was you that caused me to suffer like this'. Hank went home and told the children's governess, Miss Ragland, that Audrey had a 'cold, cold heart,' and then, as so often in the past, realized the bitterness in his heart held commercial promise''.
The first draft of the song is dated November 23, 1950 and was recorded with an unknown band on May 5, 1951. Like his earlier masterpiece "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry'', it was released as the B-side (MGM10904B) to "Dear John" (MGM-10904A), since it was an unwritten rule in the country music industry that the faster numbers sold best. "Dear John" peaked at number 8 after only a brief four-week run on Billboard magazine's country music charts, but "Cold Cold Heart" proved to be a favorite of disc jockeys and jukebox listeners, whose enthusiasm for the song catapulted it to number 1 on the country music charts. Williams featured the song on his Mother's Best radio shows at the time of its release and performed the song on the Kate Smith Evening Hour on April 23, 1952, which ran from September 1951 to June 1952; the appearance remains one of the few existing film clips of the singer performing live. He is introduced by his idol Roy Acuff. Although a notorious binge drinker, Williams appears remarkably at ease on front of the cameras, with one critic noting, "He stared at the camera during his performance of ''Cold Cold Heart'' with a cockiness and self-confidence that bordered on arrogance''.

The song would become a pop hit for Tony Bennett, paving the way for country songs to make inroads into the lucrative pop market. In the liner notes to the 1990 Polygram compilation Hank Williams: The Original Single Collection, Fred Rose's son Wesley states, "Hank earned two major distinctions as a songwriter: he was the first writer on a regular basis to make country music national music; and he was the first country songwriter accepted by pop artists, and pop A&R men''.

That same year, it was recorded in a pop version by Tony Bennett with a light orchestral arrangement from Percy Faith. This recording was released by Columbia Records as catalog number 39449. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on July 20, 1951 and lasted 27 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 1. The popularity of Bennett's version has been credited with helping to expose both Williams and country music to a wider national audience. Allmusic writer Bill Janovitz discusses this unlikely combination: "That a young Italian singing waiter from Queens could find common ground with a country singer from Alabama's backwoods is testament both to Williams' skills as a writer and to Bennett's imagination and artist's ear''.

Williams subsequently telephoned Bennett to say, "Tony, why did you ruin my song''? But that was a prank, in fact, Williams liked Bennett's version and played it on jukeboxes whenever he could. In his autobiography ''The Good Life'', Bennett described playing "Cold Cold Heart" at the Grand Ole Opry later in the 1950s. He had brought his usual arrangement charts to give to the house musicians who would be backing him, but their instrumentation was different and they declined the charts. "You sing and we'll follow you'', they said, and Bennett says they did so beautifully, once again recreating an unlikely artistic merger.

The story of the Williams-Bennett telephone conversation is often related with mirth by Bennett in interviews and on stage; he still performs the song in concert. In 1997, the first installment of A&E's Live By Request featuring Bennett (who was also the show's creator), special guest Clint Black performed the song, after which Bennett recounted it. A Google Doodle featured Bennett's recording of the song on its Valentine's Day doodle in February 2012.

Other siginificant recordings there are including Louis Armstrong recorded "Cold Cold Heart" on September 17, 1951, and released it on Decca Records; Donald Peers recorded it on October 5, 1951, released EMI via His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 10158; Dinah Washington recorded it in 1951; Petula Clark and Gene Autry sang the song in the 1952 movie Apache Country; Jerry Lee Lewis released the song as a single on Sun Records in 1961 and included another version on the 1969 LP ''Sings the Country Music Hall of Fame Hits, Volume 2''; Jazz singer Norah Jones included a sultry swing version on her 2002 album ''Come Away With Me'', which was seen as "reintroducing" modern audiences to the song.

02(1) - "EVERLASTING LOVE" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Crystal Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 322  - Master
Recorded: - February 24, 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3527-A < mono
EVERLASTING LOVE / COLD COLD HEART
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5
 
Sun's house-bass player Stan Kesler, became Barbara Pittman's representative knowing full well that the company had yet to launch a successful female act. After his artist's debut single was released, he set about reorganising her status with the result that Barbara signed to the Phillips International imprint simply because "the label looked pretty". "Everlasting Love" the second of her three fine singles, was a cover of Don Hosea's original on the Kesler-owned Crystal label.
 
02(2) - "EVERLASTING LOVE" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Crystal Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 24, 1958
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8319-17 mono
BARBARA PITTMAN - GETTING BETTER ALL THE TIME
 
03 - "HIDE MY TEARS''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - February 24, 1958
 
04 - "I WANNA BE LOVED''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - February 24, 1958
 
05 - "JUST ONE DAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 24, 1958
Released: - 1983
First appearance: Rockhouse Records (LP) 33rpm Rockhouse 8307 mono
THE ORIGINAL SUN SIDES - BARBARA PITTMAN
Reissued: 1989 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15359 mono
I NEED A MAN - BARBARA PITTMAN
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Barbara Pittman - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar and Bass
James M. Van Eaton
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Bill Justis - Tenor Saxophone
 
 Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt, Vocal Chorus
 
Note: Drummer Billy Weir says that he played on this session with Stan Kesler on bass.
 
For Biography of Barbara Pittman see: > The Sun Biographies <
Barbara Pittman's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on her playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 24, 1958 MONDAY

Sammy Kershaw is born in Kaplan, Louisiana. A resonance similar to George Jones brings him into prominence during the 1990s behind such hits as ''Cadillac Style'', ''She Don't Know She's Beautiful'' and ''National Working Woman's Holiday''.

FEBRUARY 26, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Marty Robbins recorded ''Stairway Of Love'' and ''Just Married'' at the Columbia Recording Studio in New York City.

FEBRUARY 27, 1958 THURSDAY

Don Gibson recorded ''Look Who's Blue'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY FEBRUARY/MARCH 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

This session previously dated September 5, 1957, with Otis Jett and Sidney Manker. This seems highly unlikely because of similarities with early 1958 sessions featuring a more regular line up.

His classic 5th single, and the title track from the movie of the same name which features Jerry and his band performing the song over the opening and closing credits. Although it was 25 years before we knew it, Sam Phillips spliced the ending from a different take onto the original release (the unspliced take was finally issued on ''The Sun Years'' box-set in 1983). Like several of his hits, this song was re-cut both for 1963’s ''Golden Hits'' and the 1989 (recorded 1988) ''Great Balls Of Fire''! movie soundtrack album. Incidentally there’s also an instrumental version of the song on ''The Session'' from 1973, but this does NOT feature Jerry Lee Lewis.

1(1) - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Penron Music
Matrix number: - U 306 - Master
Recorded: - February/March 1958
Released: - May 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 296-A < mono
HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL / FOOLS LIKE ME
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

SUN 296 reached at number 21 on the Billboard's Pop charts; at number 5 on Billboard's Rhythm and Blues chart, and number 9 on the Billboard's Country and Western charts. The single reached number 13 on the Canadian charts. The single was also certified Gold by the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America).

Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a live version of the song with the British band The Nashville Teens on the landmark 1964 live album ''Live At the Star Club, Hamburg'', regarded critically as one of the greatest live albums in rock and roll history. The song was performed by Jerry Lee Lewis in the 1972 concert at Wembley Stadium in the United Kingdom and appeared in the 1973 documentary of the concert entitled ''The London Rock And Roll Show''. The song is featured in the 1983 film Breathless starring Richard Gere and Valerie Kaprisky. "High School Confidential" was performed live on a 1983 Dick Clark TV special featuring Jerry Lee Lewis on piano and vocals, Keith Richards on guitar, Mick Fleetwood on drums, and Gary Busey on vocals. The song appeared in the 1989 Orion Pictures biopic ''Great Balls of Fire!'' in a new recording by Jerry Lee Lewis. The song also appeared on the motion picture soundtrack album on Polydor Records.

The Beatles performed and recorded the song live at the Get Back/Let It Be sessions in Twickenham Film studios on January 6 and 26, 1969. Both Adam Faith and Cliff Richard recorded the song in 1958. The Refreshments recorded the song in 2008. The song was also recorded by Johnny Worth, Mike Berry, Marty Wilde, The Blasters, Johnny Hallyday, Brian Setzer, Sha Na Na, Fairport Convention on the album Moat on the Ledge: Live at Broughton Castle, August '81, Mike Smith, Alan Mills, and Siggi Fassl in 2011.

Until the ill-fated bioflick "Great Balls Of Fire" hit the big screen in the early 1990s, this was Jerry Lee's closest flirtation with Hollywood. In retrospect, all it did was saddle him with a contrived piece of material and an association with a slapdash exploitation film that did about as much for his career as for Mamie Van Doren's. "High School Confidential" was written by Ron Hargrave, with Jerry Lee cut in for half by his manager, but neither of them could manage the trick of actually including the title in the song.

2 - "JERRY LEE LEWIS TALKS ABOUT HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" - 2:17
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-27 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

As a bonus, we've included the contents of a promo disc that Jerry Lee did for the movie. No one at Sun had got this kind of treatment before - and no one would again. A lot of hopes were being pinned on Jerry Lee Lewis, which makes the famous debacle - now only a few weeks distant - that much more tragic.

3 - "HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis-Ron Hargrave
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Movie Version - Undubbed recording not found
Recorded: - February/March 1958
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-18-29 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

This take without guitar, may have been recorded during either session January 21 or February 15, 1958. Various overdubs onto unknown Take for movie ''High School Confidential'' Restored from two different parts in the movie.

2(1) - "KEEP YOUR HANDS OFF OF IT" (1) - B.M.I. - 0:14
Composer: - Jay McShann
Publisher: - Conrad Music
Matrix number: - None – False Start - Unknown Take
Recorded: - February/March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-3-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-19 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''Keep Your Hands Off It'' was originally written as "Hands Off'', later known as "Keeps Your Hands Off Her", is a 1955 song written and recorded by Jay McShann. The single, on the Vee-Jay label, was the most successful Jay McShann release on the Billboard rhythm and blues chart. "Hands Off", with vocals performed by Priscilla Bowman, was number one on the rhythm and blues best seller chart for three weeks. The single is notable because this was the last single to hit number one on the rhythm and blues chart without making the Billboard Hot 100 until 1976: For the next twenty-one years, all singles which made the top spot on the Billboard rhythm and blues chart would make the Hot 100.

In 1961, Damita Jo DeBlance recorded her version of "Keeps Your Hands Off Her" for Mercury Records (Mercury 71760). Elvis Presley recorded and worked in a jam with "Got My Mojo Working", but not before Elvis interpolated "Keep Your Hands Off Her" during his sessions in June 1970 at RCA Studio B. in Nashville, Tennessee. ''We grew up on this mediocre shit man'', Elvis declared enthusiastically. ''It's the type of material that's not good or bad, it's just mediocre shit, you know''. But it was ''mediocre shit'' with which he was totally comfortable, for which he had great respect, and that he would always love.

3 - "ROCKIN' WITH RED" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Willie Lee Perryman (aka Piano Red)
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – False Start - Unknown Take
Recorded: - February/March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-3-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-19 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

William "Willie" Lee Perryman, usually known professionally as Piano Red and later in life as Dr. Feelgood, was an American blues musician, the first to hit the pop music charts. He was a self-taught pianist who played in the barrelhouse blues style (a loud percussive type of blues piano suitable for noisy bars or taverns). His performing and recording careers emerged during the period of transition from completely segregated "race music", to "rhythm and blues", which was marketed to white audiences. Some music historians credit Perryman's 1950 recording "Rockin' With Red" for the popularization of the term rock and roll in Atlanta. His simple, hard-pounding left hand and his percussive right hand, coupled with his cheerful shout, brought him considerable success over three decades like Jerry Lee Lewis pumping piano style.

Perryman was born October 19, 1911 on a farm near Hampton, Georgia, where his parents Ada and Henry Perryman sharecropped. He was part of a large family, though sources differ on exactly how many brothers and sisters he had. Perryman was an albino African American, as was his older brother Rufus, who also had a blues piano career as "Speckled Red".

When Perryman was six years old, his father gave up farming and moved the family to Atlanta to work in a factory. Not much is known about Perryman's education or early life, but he recalled that his mother bought a piano for her two albino sons. Both brothers had very poor vision, an effect of their albinism, so neither took formal music lessons, but they developed their barrelhouse style through playing by ear. Perryman sometimes recalled imitating Rufus's style after watching him play, but it is doubtful that his brother was a major influence. Rufus, nineteen years older than Perryman, left Georgia in 1925 and did not return until a 1960 visit. Another influence that Perryman cited in interviews was Fats Waller, whose records his mother brought home. Other influences were likely the local blues pianists playing at "house" or "rent" parties, which were common community fund-raisers of that era.

By the early 1930s, Perryman was playing at house parties, juke joints, and barrelhouses in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee. He developed his percussive playing style and harsh singing style to compensate for the lack of sound systems and to overcome the noise of people talking in venues. He worked these circuits with other Georgia bluesmen, including Barbecue Bob, Charlie Hicks, Curley Weaver, and "Blind Willie" McTell.

Perryman married in the early 1930s, and he and his wife Flora had two daughters. He obtained seasonal employment performing in Brevard, North Carolina, a mountain resort town, and commuted back and forth between there and Atlanta. The Brevard job brought him before white audiences; by 1934 he had also begun to play at white clubs in Atlanta. In Atlanta he would play at a white club until midnight and then head over to an African American club, where he would play until 4 am. Perryman developed a repertoire of pop standards, which were more popular among the white audiences, while continuing his blues sets in the African American clubs.

Around 1936 he began to be billed as 'Piano Red', and made his first recordings with McTell in Augusta for Vocalion Records, although these were never released. He also began working as an upholsterer, a trade which he occasionally maintained through later years.

In 1950, after spending the previous 14 years upholstering and playing music on weekends, Perryman recorded "Rockin' With Red" and "Red's Boogie" at the WGST radio studios in Atlanta for RCA Victor. Both songs became national hits, reaching numbers five and three respectively on the Billboard Rhythm And Blues chart, and "Rockin' With Red" has since been covered many times under many titles. This success, along with further hits "The Wrong Yo Yo" (allegedly written by Speckled Red), "Laying The Boogie" and "Just Right Bounce", allowed him to resume an active performing schedule. He also recorded sessions in New York City and Nashville during the early 1950s.

Red played for white teenagers' high school parties in peoples homes in Atlanta. You would arrange for him to be picked up at his home and returned and providing a "bottle" of booze for him as well as a very nominal fee. During the mid-1950s Perryman also worked as a disc jockey on radio stations WGST and WAOK in Atlanta, broadcasting 'The Piano Red Show' (later 'The Dr. Feelgood Show') directly from a small shack in his back yard. A young James Brown made an appearance on his show in the late 1950s. Perryman's involvement had him appearing on a flatbed truck in many parades, which led to his song "Peachtree Parade".

From the mid-1950s until the late 1960s, he recorded for several record labels, including Columbia, for whom he made several records, Checker, for whom he recorded eight sides with Willie Dixon on bass, and Groove Records, a subsidiary of RCA Victor, producing the first hit for that label.

Signed to Okeh Records in 1961, Perryman began using the name Dr. Feelgood and the Interns, releasing several hits, including the much-covered "Doctor Feelgood". The persona was one he had initially adopted on his radio shows. The new career was short-lived, though, and Piano Red was never able to regain his former stature. In 1963, The Merseybeats recorded a cover of the b-side of "Doctor Feelgood'', titled "Mr. Moonlight" (written by Roy Lee Johnson) as the B-side of their United Kindom top 5 hit ''I Think of You''. It was also recorded by the Beatles and appeared on the album ''Beatles For Sale'' in the United Kingdom and on the ''Beatles '65'' album in the United States. In 1966, The Lovin' Spoonful recorded his song "Bald Headed Lena" on their second album, Daydream.

Perryman continued to be a popular performer in Underground Atlanta, and had several European tours late in his career, including appearances at the Montreux Jazz Festival, Berlin Jazz Festival, Chancellor Helmut Schmidt's inauguration, and on BBC Radio. During this time, he was befriended by Bill Wyman, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger, Eric Clapton, and Paul McCartney, and Pete Ham of Badfinger wrote a song in his honor.

Muhlenbrink's Saloon closed in 1979 and Perryman found himself without a regular job. That lasted until 1981, when he was hired to perform five nights a week at The Excelsior Mill in Atlanta. In 1984, he asked co-owner Michael Reeves to arrange a live recording and Reeves arranged for a mobile recording in October of that year.

In 1985, Red charted the song "Yo Yo", a duet with Danny Shirley, who would later become lead singer of Confederate Railroad. Perryman was diagnosed with cancer that same year and died on July 25, 1985 at Dekalb General Hospital in Decatur, Georgia. Among those who attended his funeral were the Governor of Georgia and the Mayor of Atlanta. The tapes from the Excelsior Mill remained in Michael Reeves's possession for twenty-five years. In April 2010, he formed a partnership with author and producer David Fulmer to release a CD of the recording under the title The Lost Atlanta Tapes. The CD was released by Landslide Records on August 17, 2010.

4(1) - "MATCHBOX" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Undubbed LP Master
Recorded: - February/March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-3-B5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-20 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

4(1) - "MATCHBOX" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:42
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Overdubbed LP Master
Recorded: - February/March 1958
Released: - May 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1230-B5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-20 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Note: vocal chorus overdubbed Master (Ed Bruce, Vernon Drane, Charlie Rich, Lee Holt, Bobby Thompson, Ben Strong and Alice Rumple) added at an overdub session on April 4 or 8, 1958.

4(2) - "MATCHBOX" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - February/March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-3-B6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-21 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

"Matchbox" is a rockabilly song written and recorded by Carl Perkins in December 1956. It shares some lyrics with 1920s blues songs by Ma Rainey and Blind Lemon Jefferson. Sam Phillips and Sun Records released the song as the B-side to "Your True Love". Although only the A-side became a record chart hit in 1957, "Matchbox" is one of Perkins' best-known recordings. A variety of musicians have recorded the song, including the Beatles.

Ma Rainey recorded "Lost Wandering Blues" in Chicago in March 1924. Paramount Records issued it on the standard ten-inch 78rpm single (12098). Her lyrics include the matchbox as a suitcase reference. Subsequently, the song was recorded by several blues and country swing musicians, such as Leadbelly, Big Bill Broonzy, the Shelton Brothers, and Roy Newman and His Boys.

After recording "Your True Love" at Sun Records studio, Carl Perkins's father Buck suggested that he write a song based on snatches of lyrics that he remembered. Buck knew only a few lines from the song from the recordings by Blind Lemon Jefferson or the Shelton Brothers. As Perkins sang the few words his father had suggested, Jerry Lee Lewis, who was at that time the session piano player at Sun Studios, began a restrained boogie-woogie riff. Carl began picking out a melody on the guitar and improvised lyrics.

Perkins maintained that he had never heard Jefferson's song when he recorded "Matchbox". The songs are musically, thematically, and lyrically totally different. Jefferson's song is about a mean spirited woman; Perkins' is about a lovelorn "poor boy" with limited prospects. The "Matchbox" recording session is historically significant as a milestone in rock and roll history because later that day, Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, and Lewis were all in the Sun Studio with Sam Phillips with Carl Perkins and his band. The impromptu group formed at this jam session became known as the Million Dollar Quartet.

Carl Perkins performed the song on ABC-TV's Ozark Jubilee on February 2, 1957. Perkins and his band also performed the song on the syndicated TV show Ranch Party hosted by Tex Ritter in 1957. There was also a promo ad for the release of the Sun single in Billboard magazine.

"Matchbox" is covered by Robert Britton Lyons portraying Carl Perkins in the Broadway production Million Dollar Quartet and on the original Broadway cast recording. Lee Ferris also covers the song and portrays Carl Perkins in the First National Touring Production of Million Dollar Quartet. The song is also included in the Paul McCartney live album ''Tripping The Live Fantastic'' as a soundcheck tune between concert songs; it has been performed by McCartney in every tour as a soundcheck song. McCartney also released a live soundcheck recording of the song as a bonus Back in the U.S. DVD release in 2002.

In 1985 it was played at the ''Blue Suede Shoes: A Rockabilly Session'' made-for-TV concert in London, with Carl Perkins, Ringo Starr and Eric Clapton alternating the lead vocal. McCartney also performed the song during his ''Unplugged'' concert for MTV in 1991 (although the song does not appear on the album). Jerry Lee Lewis released his version of the song on his 1958 eponymous Sun LP, SLP 1230, and as a Sun EP, EPA-110. The recording also appears on the 1984 Rhino Records greatest hits compilation ''Jerry Lee Lewis: 18 Original Sun Greatest Hits''. Jerry Lee Lewis also recorded a live version in 1964 on the landmark ''Live At The Star Club, Hamburg'' album, regarded critically as one of the greatest live albums ever released.

Ronnie Hawkins recorded the song in 1970 with Duane Allman on slide guitar and released it as a 45 single, "Matchbox" backed with "Little Bird" on Hawk, IT 301, in Canada. The song was originally released on the eponymous 1970 Ronnie Hawkins LP, Cotillion SD 9019. Johnny Rivers recorded the song in 1998. Bob Dylan has recorded several versions of the song which have not been released officially and has performed the song live in concert. Derek and the Dominos featuring Eric Clapton performed and recorded the song with Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash on The Johnny Cash Show on ABC-TV on November 5, 1970. The performance by Derek and the Dominos, Carl Perkins, and Johnny Cash appears on the 40th anniversary edition of the Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, which won the 2011 Grammy Award for Best Surround Sound. Carl Perkins performed the song live at the 1990 Farm Aid benefit concert. Ringo Starr performed the song on the 2014 CBS TV special ''The Night That Changed America: A Grammy Salute to The Beatles''. Paul McCartney's publishing company MPL Communications administers the rights to the song, which was originally published by Knox Music, Inc., BMI.

5 - "UBANGI STOMP" - B.M.I. - 1:45
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - EP Master
Recorded: - February/March 1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA 109-A1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-22 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

At one of Jerry's many "you ain't hear nothin' yet" sessions, the pumpin' piano man rubbed maximum salt in the wound by reworking Warren Smith's two recognised calling cards, "Rock And Ruby" and "Ubangi Stomp". The "Stomp" title (which surfaced on both an extended player and as part of the Jerry Lee Lewis album) achieves supremacy thanks to the "engine-room drive" of the rhythm section, fortifying the artist in the manner to which he's accustomed.

"Ubangi Stomp" is an American rockabilly song written by Sun producer Charles Underwood and first recorded and released on record (Sun 250) by Warren Smith in September 1956, the song did not chart, but went on to become a rockabilly standard, covered by many artists. ''Ubangi Stomp'', usually Smith's recording, appears on many compilation albums, including ''The Sun Records Collection'' and ''The Best of Bob Dylan's Theme Time Radio Hour''.

''Ubangi Stomp'' is a straighforward uptempo rock and roll song; the lyrics, of no great literary depth "Ubangi stomp ubangi style / When the beat just drives a cool cat wild", tell in first person the story of a sailor who goes to Africa ("I rocked through Africa and... Seen them cats doin' the Ubangi stomp") and, enamored of the local music and dance, jumps ship to go native ("Then the captain said son, we gotta go / I said that's alright, you go right ahead / I'm gonna Ubangi-stomp 'till I roll over dead"). Some mixing of cultural stereotypes is seen when supposed Native American terms ("heap big", tom-tom) are mixed into the ostensibly African setting.

The Ubangi Stomp Festival, an annual international exposition of America roots and rockabilly music, takes its name from the song, as does the Ubangi Stomp Club, a Dublin organization that organizes and promotes roots concerts and gigs. Saxophonist Earl Bostic released an instrumental piece titled "Ubangi Stomp" in 1954, but this has no relation to Underwood's song beyond the title.

The song has been covered by many other artists, including the Juke Joints (on their album 20 years), the Top Cats, on their album ''Full Throttle Rockabilly''; The Slippers on their album ''Ubangi Stomp''; The Sundowners on the B-side of their 1959 single "Snake Eyed Woman"; The Velaires on the B-side of their 1961 single "It's Almost Tomorrow",; Bobby Taylor on the B-side of his 1962 single "Seven Steps To An Angel"; and many others. Rory Storm and the Hurricanes recorded the song at Abbey Road Studios in 1964, but this version was never released.

6 - ROCK 'N' ROLL RUBY" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Johnny R. Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - February/March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-B3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-23 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

The provenance of "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby" is in some doubt. It is credited to Johnny Cash but Warren Smith asserted that George Jones had written the song and sold it to Cash for $40.00. Johnny Cash cut a primitive demo in the breathless baritone he reserved for uptempo numbers at some point in late 1955 or early 1956. The acetate ended up in the hands of Clyde Leoppard, probably in order that he could rehearse the band. By the time Smith and the Snearly Ranch Boys (with Johnny Bernero replacing the barely proficient Leoppard on drums) wrapped up "Rock 'N' Roll Ruby", it was obvious that Sam Phillips had, as Billboard put it, "another contender in the Rock-a-Billy sweepstakes".

7 - "SO LONG I'M GONE" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Fragment Unissued - Unknown Take
Recorded: - February/March 1958 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-B11 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-24 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

With the momentum of his career sagging a little, Warren Smith returned to Memphis early in 1956 to work on his third single. Roy Orbison pitched a song called "So Long I'm Gone" that - in Smith's hand - effortlessly crossed between country and pop. However, for many it was eclipsed by the 'B' side to end all 'B' sides, "Miss Froggie".

With its quasi-military marching band beat, takes a simple Roy Orbison composition to unexpected heights. "So Long I'm Gone" sat just behind "Gone" and "White Sport Coat" on the Memphis charts in June, and actually made it to the pop charts in that far off summer of 1957, thus giving Smith a passing taste of fame. Unfortunately for him, Sun's meager promotional efforts were redirected into the whirlwind success of "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin On". In any case, the final sustained 1-7 chord of "So Long I'm Gone" is a stroke of understated brilliance and retains its power nearly four decades later.

"So Long I'm Gone" made a fleeting appearance in the Hot 100 but had the misfortune to start breaking at the same time as Jerry Lee Lewis' "Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On". Sam Phillips placed his eggs in one basket, much to Smith's disgust. There was now constant squabbling on the Stars Incorporated, tours about who should top of the bill. Jimmie Lott remembered: "Warren and Carl Perkins constantly fought Jerry Lee Lewis. They'd sit around in the dressing room before the show on steel chairs with a fifth of Old Crow. Jerry would say, 'I got a big record out now. I'm going on last'. Clayton Perkins would stick his jaw out and say, 'If you're going on last, we're gonna fights".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes and/or Billy Riley - Guitar
Jay W. Brown - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

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