CONTAINS
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1952 SESSIONS 5
May 1, 1952 to May 31, 1952

Studio Session for James Banister & Dennis Binder, May 3, 1952 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Woodrow Adams, May 24, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Billy Love, May 28, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Howlin' Wolf, Probably May or June 1952 / Chess Records
Demo Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, Summer 1952 / J&M Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1952

Sam Phillips records Woodrow Adams for Checker Records. Later in the month he cuts a session on Billy Love for Chess Records: one cut "My Teddy Bear Baby" is accepted.

Rosco Gordon's "Booted" drops out of the Rhythm and Blues charts after 13-weeks.

The Biharis make another Southern field trip and record several blues and rhythm and blues acts, including Ike Turner.

"Lawdy Miss Clawdy", a New Orleans-flavored rhythm and blues hit by Lloyd Price, with Fats Domino on piano, hits number 1.

MAY 1952

Charlie Rich joined the Air Force and married Margaret Ann Greene and they honeymooned in Memphis at the ritzy Peabody Hotel, courtesy of Rich's Uncle Jack. While they were in Memphis, they blew the $45 they had between them on records. Music was simply that important to both of them. As Margaret Ann would later recalls, ''The first piece of furniture in our house was a tape recorder''.

Air Force life took them to Enid, Oklahoma, where Charlie combined military duties, such as they were, with musical gigs. Charlie played piano and some sax with the Velvetones. The group featured solo vocals by Charlie as well as some hip duets by Charlie and Margaret Ann. When Charlie returned to Arkansas in 1955, he and Margaret Ann purchased a 500 acre farm near Forrest City. Although they had lived reasonably well on his Air Force salary and music income, the pr-chose price was largely subsidized by his uncle Jack. Even though a bumper cotton and soybean crop during the first year allowed Charlie to pay back much of the loan from his uncle, it was clear he was cut out to be a farmer. It is no accident that most farmers are asleep by 10:00pm and up with the down. Charlie was barely getting into Memphis's jazz clubs by then and sometimes got home just in time to see the dawn. He plainly was not going to be a poster boy for the Farmer's Union.

MAY 1952

Rhythm and blues magazine ""Beat'' reported: ''Jimmie Daniels, mrg. of Jackie Brenston, Rosco Gordon and Edna McRaney, busy as a bee setting dates for his string of blues artists. Poppa Stoppa, the New Orleans disc jockey, has booked them for his May 11 dance''.

The Shaw Agency has signed Rosco Gordon, the young rhythm and blues star whose ''Booted'' (Chess) and ''No More Doggin''' on the RPM label are both on the national charts.

MAY 2, 1952 FRIDAY

Myrna Loy stars in ''Belles On Their Toes'' as it premieres in New York. ''Georgia On My Mind'' songwriter Hoagy Carmichael also appears in the picture.

MAY 3, 1952 SATURDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels'' at the Castle Studio in Nashville during her first session for Decca Records.

Studio session for James Banister and Dennis Binder at 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In March 1951, Ike Turner had brought his band from Clarksdale, Mississippi, to 706 Union: this market the start of a whirlwind period when Ike was working for Sam Phillips, Chess Records, and Modern (but essentially for himself), putting bands and sessions together, and generally hustling the Memphis scene.

Not long after the success of "Rocket 88" Jackie Brenston upped and quit, whereupon Ike regrouped the band and continued bringing various aggregations along to Sam Phillips. This side emanated from a session in May 1952, which largely featured singer/drummer James Banister and singer/pianist Dennis Binder.

James Banister later years as a preacher up in Gary, Indiana and clearly lifted this number from the risqué blues favourite "Dirty Mother Fuyer", cleaning it up along the way: there is some jazzy piano in the stops, but this rhythmic gimmick soon becomes wearisome. The sloppy ending suggests that this was a far from final take.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JAMES BANISTER & DENNIS BINDER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: SATURDAY MAY 3, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "AIN'T GONNA TELL YOU NO LIE (SWEET LITTLE WOMAN*" - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - James Banister
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 3, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-5 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

02 - "JUG HEAD WOMAN"
Composer: - Dennis Binder
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 3, 1952

03 - "LOVE YOU LOVE YOU BABY**" – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Dennis Binder
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 3, 1951
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-6 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

This jumping track is essentially a loose pack age of blues clichés and raw tenor honking and squawking - the sax player Bobby Fields sounding truly wired, and contributing some wild primal screams. If it's the same guy who honked and screeched with experimental jazz man Sun Ra in the late 1950s, he got in some good practice here (and it could well be the same guy because Ra was recording songs like ''Great Balls Of Fire'' and ''Teenager's Letter Of Promises'' alongside freakier outings like ''Message To Earthman'').

The overall feel of Binder's record approximates a jam session which builds to a roaring climax, wh atever this racket is, it sure's hell ain't blues. The overall feel is one of a loose jam, which builds to a roaring climax: it was no doubt hugely enjoyable for the musicians involved, but is considerably less so for the listener. It could just be coincidence, but Rosco Gordon recorded a very similars song a few months earlier, ''I Love You Better Than I Love Myself (''I love, love you baby better than I love myself...''). As Rosco's cut was unissued, it's hard to know how Binder could have heard it, although both songs might have had a common ancestor.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
James Banister - Vocal* (1) and Drums
Bobby Field - Tenor Saxophone
Dennis Binder - Piano and Vocal**(3)
Johnny Smith - Bass

For Biographies of James Banister and Dennis Binder see: > The Sun Biographies <
James Banister and Dennis Binder's recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 4, 1952 SUNDAY

J.L. Frank dies in Detroit hotel room, where he's been laid up with strep throat. Referred to as ''Flo Ziegfeld of country music'', he was the first major promoter and manager in the genre, working with Pee Wee King, Roy Acuff and Minnie Pearl in a career that will place him in the Country Music Hall of Fame.

MAY 8, 1952 THURSDAY

Western-swing vocalist Leon Huff dies of a heart attack near Eufaula, Oklahoma, while riding Johnnie Lee Will's bus. He sang with Bob Wills and The Light Crust Doughboys in addition to Johnnie Lee.

MAY 10, 1952 SATURDAY

Hank Thompson takes over the number 1 position in the Billboard country chart with ''The Wild Side Of Life''.

MAY 13, 1952 TUESDAY

Hank Thompson recorded ''The New Side Off Too Fast'' during an afternoon session at Capitol's Studio on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, California.

MAY 14, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Tex Ritter recorded the theme song to ''High Noon'' at the Capitol Studios on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, California.

MAY 15, 1952 THURSDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''A Full Time Job'' at Brown Brothers Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Woody Guthrie attacks his wife at home in Manhattan with a pair of scissors. He does not hurt her, but police are called to the scene. The episode is an early sign of his illness, eventually diagnosed as Huntington's chorea.

MAY 16, 1952 FRIDAY

Hank Williams performs at the Last Frontier, kicking off his first Las Vegas stint. Williams is booked for two weeks, though he ultimately plays just one week.

One day after a domestic quarrel, Woody Guthrie checks into Jings County Hospital in New York to undergo an alcohol treatment program. He is suffering, however, not from alcoholism, but from a rare, undiagnosed disease, Huntington's chorea.

MAY 17, 1952 SATURDAY

Guitarist Pat Flynn is born in Los Angeles, California. He joins the progressive New Grass Revival in 1981, eventually becoming a studio musician and playing on hits by Lee Ann Womack, Kathy Mattea, George Strait and Conway Twitty, among others.

Johnny Horton debuts on The Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport.

A marked turning point for Chicago blues. Chess Records launched the subsidiary label Checker, and the early fruits of the tie-up with Sam Phillips were being enjoyed. Inevitably this gave new impetus to the revived taste for unalloyed, rural-based southern blues.

MAY 18, 1952 SUNDAY

George Strait is born in Poteet, Texas. The authentic cowboy becomes a voice for traditional country beginning in 1981, accruin more than 25 gold albums and membership in the Country Music Hall of Fame.

MAY 19, 1952 MONDAY

Hank Snow recorded ''(Now And Then) A Fool Such As I'' during an evening session in Nashville.

MAY 20, 1952 TUESDAY

Burl Ives voluntarily testifies before a congressional subcommittee in Washington, D.C., as the entertainment industry comes under political scrutiny for Communist ties. Ives denies any connection to the party.

MAY 23, 1952 FRIDAY

Hank Williams' two-week engagement at Las Vegas' Last Frontier is cancelled after just one week.

MAY 24, 1952 SATURDAY

Guitar player Rusty York and his family move from Harlan County, Kentucky, to Cincinnati on his 17th birthday. He plays on Jimmie Skinner's 1958 hit ''What Makes A Man Wander''.

Studio session for Woodrow Adams at the Memphis Recording Service for Checker Records.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WOODROW ADAMS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1951

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: SATURDAY MAY 24, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING SERVICE - SAM C. PHILLIPS

With Howlin' Wolf presumably selling well, Sam Phillips pitched Woodrow Adams to Chess Records, and Chess took one single. Like Wolf, Adams worked in a riff-driven groove with flashes of falsetto, but Adams lone Checker single sold so poorly that must one copy is known to survive. For one thing, Adams doesn't have Wolf's commanding presence. The eerie falsetto is straight out of Tommy Johnson via Howlin' Wolf, although Adams told David Evans that he wasn't familiar with Johnson. ''Pretty Baby Blues'' breaks down at the end, and it's quite easy to visualize Phillips in the control room gesticulating wildly to get Adams and the 3 Bs to bring the song to a halt. Three minutes and ten seconds was about the limit of a 78rpm disc in those days. Adams name checks Sylvester Hayes at one point, confirming his presence.

01 - "PRETTY BABY BLUES" - B.M.I. - 3:13
Composer: - Woodrow Adams
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1030 Master
Recorded: - May 24, 1952
Only one copy is known to survive
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Checker 757-A < mono
PRETTY BABY BLUES / SHE'S DONE COME AND DONE
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-1-27 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

On ''She's Done Come And Gone'', this time, Adams and the Three Bs (Boogie Blues Blasters) take on Elmore James, randomly stringing together lines from other songs. In a bar on a Saturday night with a buzz from an adult beverage or two, this might sound pretty fine. In the cold light of day, Adams shortcomings come into sharper focus, and hardly need pointing out. Woodrow Adams was pretty much doomed to local stardom around Robinsville, Mississippi, where he could be seen on weekends well into the 1970s.

02 - "SHE'S DONE COME AND GONE" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Woodrow Adams
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - C 1031 Master
Recorded: - May 24, 1952
Only one copy is known to survive
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Checker 757-B < mono
SHE'S DONE COME AND DONE / PRETTY BABY BLUES
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-1-28 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

03 - "IF YOU DON'T WANT ME" - B.M.I. - 1:03
Composer: - Woodrow Adams
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 24, 1952
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 29 mono
THE SUN ARCHIVES VOLUME 1 - BLUE GUITAR
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-9 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

''If You Don't Want Me'', this minute-long fragment is the second half of a song that tends to underline Adams' avowal that he prepared for this session by writing down the words, practising each piece and timing then. Without Hayes' harmonica, his guitar-work follows a fairly tight boogie pattern with a couple of forays into lead lines that have a prepared air about them.

This session rivals that by L.B. Lawson and James Scott Jr. for the most primitive that Sam Phillips ever recorded. Woodrow doesn't seem to be too concerned that his guitar is out of tune, so perhaps we shouldn't either. He's taken the tune from "Bottle Up And Go" and put together some "Dirty Dozens"-style verses.

Having told us there are two kinds of people he just can't stand - "a nappy-headed woman and a bald-headed man" - he goes on: "I woke up this mornin'/I woke up soon/saw a bald-headed man/and I thought it was the moon". Sylvester Hayes blows some mean amplified harmonica, while Fiddlin' Joe Martin kicks Billy-be-damned out of his bass drum.

04 - "THE LAST TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Woodrow Adams
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 24, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Krazy Kat Records (LP) 33rpm KK 7427 mono
MEMPHIS BLUES - UNISSUED TITLES FROM THE 1950
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-10 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

''Last Time'' is a standard 12-bar blues that's played in time and in key. That's the good news. The bad news is that it is utterly undistinguished. It features the familiar blues theme of a cheating woman and the singer needing to set some limits on how badly she can continue to treat him. The record has absolutely no bottom. Occasional audible slaps suggest that a bass player may have been present on the session, although he might have been standing out on Union Avenue for all we can hear him. As on many of these stock arrangement goes to hell in a hurry when it comes time to end the track. It's plain these boys have not discussed the realistic possibility that after two and a half minutes they may actually have to stop playing.

05 - "(THE) TRAIN IS COMIN'" - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Woodrow Adams
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 24, 1952
Release: - August 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30127-B-1 mono
THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 12 – UNION AVENUE BREAKDOWN
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-8 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

This standard train blues is a bit tidier, helped no doubt by the slower tempo. "Porter blow the whistle/fireman rung the bell/you know ever time I think about my baby/my poor heart begin to swell". Woodrow has picked up his slide and has a fair stab at the riff which was soon to patented by Elmore James. Since he knew both Robert Nighthawk and Houston Stackhouse, its tempting to speculate on what other slide pieces were in his repertoire. In the second of his solo choruses, Sylvester Hayes plays a couple of Rice Miller licks in between imitating the train whistle.

Once again, the ending unravels before out very eyes. You should feel honored: this recording wasn't intended to be heard by the outside world. I was never a candidate for release.

06 - "TRAIN TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Woodrow Adams
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 24, 1952
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - P-Vine Records (LP) 33rpm P-Vine PLP 350 mono
MEMPHIS HARP & PIANO JAM
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-3-10 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Essentially, this is another take of "Train Is Comin'", with Hayes doing a very brief train imitation before the bands starts. This time around, "I hear the whistle blow/it blow just like me baby is coming home", whereas in the previous take, his baby was about to leave. There are some other minor textual-differences but the principal distinction is the better understanding between the three musicians. Where was Sam Phillips while all this was going on? You'd think he would have come out from behind the glass to talk to these guys, trying to stir them from their lethargy, assuming, of course, he hadn't nodded off while the tape was rolling.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Woodrow Adams - Vocal and Guitar
Sylvester Hayes - Harmonica
Fiddlin' Joe Martin - Drums

For Biographies of Woodrow Adams see: > The Sun Biographies <
Woodrow Adams' Checker 
recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 25, 1952 SUNDAY

Charlie Rich marries Margaret Ann Greene in Enid, Oklahoma.

MAY 28, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Forty days after he was hired for the second time, Elvis Presley is fired from the Loewe's State Theater in Memphis for fighting with a fellow employee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY LOVE
AT MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS PROBABLY 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY MAY 28, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Through 1952 Billy Love continued to work sessions at Phillips's studio and seems to have been well-regarded and possibly used as a musical arranger as well as a pianist. In April he played behind Willie Nix on the Checker single ''Truckin' Little Woman'' which may be why Sam Phillips gave him a $20 cheque from Chess, who owned Checker, on May 17. Love was also paid $41.25 in a Chess cheque on April 29, for leading the band on the Rufus Thomas session earlier that month that produced a classic drinking song, ''Decorate The Counter'', and an atmospheric blues about ''Juanita''.

01 – ''I'VE HAD TOO MUCH''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 28, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued/Lost

By the end of May, Love's recording of ''Drop Top'' had been out for two months and Chess apparently requested a second single from him. On May 28 he recorded two songs and on June 10, he made at least two more, resulting in masters of ''Poor Man'' and ''My Teddy Bear Baby'' being sent to Chess on June 11, for release as Chess 1516. The May session featured what may well have been Love's 'usual' band, consisting of friends from Florida Street - Richard Sanders on baritone sax, Willie Wilkes on tenor sax and John Murry Daley on drums. Love and Daley carry the rhythm themselves without need for guitar or bass players. A song called ''I've Had Too Much'' was recorded but has never been found. It may have been a drinking song and if so the fact that Phillips loaned Love a dollar that day, possibly for alcohol, was appropriate. Chess later sent a cheque for $20
for the session. The session focused on six takes of a song called ''She Takes My Appetite''.

02 – ''SHE TAKES MY APPETITE''
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - May 28, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued/Lost

One version of this was pulled out for release and retitled ''My Teddy Bear Baby''; the other versions have not survived. ''My Teddy Bear Baby'' shimmies up to us in similar style to the cute girl Billy describes in his song. This is a clever lyric about a woman who "takes Billy's appetite", the prettiest woman he's ever seen in his life. This is all very endearing until we realize the significance of the descriptions he uses. Her pretty, smooth, skin is just like an elephant's hide, her walk wobbles all over the street on oversized feet, and her cute face is like a bald teddy bear! There is a jazzy sax solo from Willie Wilkes and in all this is a very appealing track.

03 – ''MY TEDDY BEAR BABY'' - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - 1033 Master
Recorded: - May 28, 1952
Released: - August 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1516-A < mono
MY TEDDY BEAR BABY / POOR MAN
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149 mono
GEE... I WISH

Note: The song released as ''My Teddy Bear Baby'' was apparently the same song as ''She Takes My Appetite''.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Love – Vocal & Piano
John Murry Daley – Drums
Richard Sanders – Baritone Saxophone
Willie Wikes – Tenor Saxophone

For Biographies of Billy Love see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Love's Chess/Sun 
recordings can be heard on his playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOWLIN' WOLF
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MAY/JUNE 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

MOST OF THE REPERTOIRE ON THIS SESSION WAS DUBBED
FROM ACETATE OR DISC SOURCE
MANY OF THE ORIGINAL MASTER TAPES HAVE BEEN LOST

01 - "WORRIED ALL THE TIME" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - 1029 Master
Recorded: - Probably May-June 1952
Released: - Approx July 1, 1952. Definitely not part of April 17 session.
First appearance: - Chess Record (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1515-B < mono
WORRIED ALL THE TIME / SADDLE MY PONY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-8 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2

Noted as "How Many More Times" in Phillips' log.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Howlin' Wolf - Vocal, Harmonica and Guitar
Willie Johnson - Guitar
Willie Steele - Drums
William Johnson – Piano

For Biographies of Howlin' Wolf see: > The Sun Biographies <
Howlin' Wolf's Chess 
recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 30, 1952 SUNDAY

''Apache Country'' debuts in movie houses, with Gene Autry coming to the rescue of a native tribe that's being manipulated with alcohol by deceptive white men. Pat Buttram makes his standard appearance. Autry sings ''Cold, Cold Heart''.

Troy Ruttman wins the Indianapolis 500 auto race. Among the fans in attendance, country hitmaker Tiny Hill.

MAY 31, 1952 MONDAY

Rosco Gordon's new rhythm and blues single ''Hey, Fat Girl'' b/w ''Tell Daddy'' (Duke R 101) released.

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©