CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1957 Sun Schedule <

1957 SESSIONS (10)
October 1, 1957 to October 31, 1957

Studio Session for Ernie Chaffin, Probably October 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Warren Smith, October 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Kenneth Parchman, October 5, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Malcolm Yelvington, October 5, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Malcolm Yelvington, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, October/October 8, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Rudy Grayzell, October 15, 16, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Warren Smith, October 16, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Roy Orbison, October 16, 17, 19, 21, 22, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Wayne Powers (Cogswell), Various Dates
October 21, 23, 1957, May 17 & June 10, 19581958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Emerson, October 23, 1957 / Vee-Jay Records
Studio Session for Narvel Felts, October 1957 / Mercury Records
Studio Session for Carl McVoy, October/November 1957 / Hi Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Most Sun tracks can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

OCTOBER 1957

Back in Memphis, Tennessee, just as Billy Riley's "Red Hot" was breaking, Riley sauntered into the Sun studio at 706 Union Avenue. Only thirty-seven thousands copies were sold and Billy Riley was furious. To compound the insult, he had stood in the office one day only to hear Sam Phillips cancel orders for the record, telling distributors to work "Great Balls Of Fire" instead.

The upstart pianist who had played on "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll" was now usurping Riley's fleeting place as Phillips' Great White Hope. Riley drove over to West Memphis, bought a half-gallon of cheap wine, and returned to the studio drunk and vengeful. He started taking the studio apart, beginning by kicking a hole in the string bass and pouring some of his wine over the tape machines.

Sam Phillips was called in and his silver tongue said the words that Riley, through the haze, confusion, and vitriol, wanted to hear. "I'm looking at Sam's desk", recalled Riley, "and there's three telegrams open - one from Detroit, one from Chicago and one from New York. 10,000 records (of "Red Hot" ordered) on each one. Thirty thousand records, and these were initial orders. I'm going out of my mind. This is fantastic. I'm thrilled. I'm goin' crazy".

"Sam comes in and after he says hello he sits down and picks up the phone and he calls every one of these distributors. He tells them to get off "Red Hot" and get on Jerry Lee Lewis' "Great Balls Of Fire". "I should have killed him. I got so mad I left. I walked out, got in my car and just started driving. I stopped in West Memphis and bought what they call a Texas Fifth - that's about half a gallon. I started drinking it while I was driving all the way to Truman, Arkansas. I was pretty drunk by then and I turned around and came back to Memphis. I walked into Sun, it must have been about three o'clock, and I notice Sam's not there. I start screamin' and hollerin' at Sally Wilbourn and Sally don't know what to do. I get on the phone and I call the Musicians Union. I said, 'I want to have a special meeting. I want to show you what Sam Phillips has done. He's been working us down here and not paying us scale'. They knew I was drunk. They knew me".

"I got out on the street and started hollerin'. J.M. and a few other guys were around and they got embarassed and left. I was on my soapbox man, trying to get a crowd. I was gonna tell everyone hos bad Sam Phillips was".

"So I go in and sit in the studio. There was that big old bass fiddle there. I walked right through it, kicked the whole thing in. I still had about half of that Texas Fifth. I poured it all down in the piano and then I went in the control room and poured it all down in his Ampex. Right behind them things he had his filling cabinets. I tipped them over, split them all over the floor. Sally gets on the phone. 'Sam, you'd better get down here. Riley's on the warpath and he's going crazy'. Sam said, 'Lock the door and don't let him out".

"The charmer came down. He carries me back in that little office and he's got a fith of VAT 69. We both get to drinking his VAT 69. He's telling me what a great artist I am and that "Red Hot" is nothing. 'We've got bigger and better things planned for you. Let's get this 'Great Balls Of Fire' out of the way and we're gonna make you a star'. He charmed me. Drank all night", recalled Riley.

OCTOBER 1957

During 1957, with Robert Riley released from the Tennessee State Prison, and rarely available for co-writing, Johnny Bragg took to writing with another con, Leon Luallen, who was in prison for armed robbery. In October 1957 their song ''Don't Bug Me Baby'' was recorded at RCA studio in Nashville by Milton Allen.

A couple of months later local publisher Kenny Marlow was reporting to the trade press that a song written by Bragg, ''Linda Lou'', was recorded at Marlow's Fidelity recording studio downtown by singer Mark Taylor and seeing good action on Hi Records from Memphis.

While Johnny Bragg was doing most of his writing in his cell, Robert Riley was roaming free in Nashville, his home town. He'd been in prison since January 1950 but now he was coming to terms with writing on the outside. He wrote songs for Excello Records in Nashville and for the King and Todd labels who held sessions there. He would work on musical arrangements for Ernie Young at Excello, and he had an income-generation role too: blues singer Jerry McCain told interviewer David Nelson how Young, ''had this black dude there. His name was Robert Riley... What he would do is sit there and listen at the songs and everything, then he'd pick out a verse that he says is not strong enough. But in turn he writes him a verse that he want to insert in there so he can get writer's royalties. So Mr. Young says 'Jerry, Robert said it was a good song but the second verse ain't strong enough'. I said 'I ain't changing nothing', and Mr. Young said, 'well Jerry, see, there you go again. You supposed to go along with me'''.

Over at Tree Records, owners Jack Stapp and Buddy Killen had focused initially on country and popular songs but they took the decision to employ Riley to help broaden their range. He started a writing career with them that saw his songs appear on Okeh, Todd, Dial, Re-ORee, Sur Speed and other labels over a number of years. Riley wrote ''Baby Don't Leave Me, You Can't Care'' and ''Right Now'' for Joe Henderson on Todd and ''Him Instead Of Me'' and ''Top Of The World'' for Ted Taylor on Okeh. He joined Starday Records as a writer in the 1970s. Then he produced, wrote an arranged independently for local singer Levert Allison on SBI Records with ''My All Is You'' and on Boyd Records with ''Hear That River''.

Buddy Killen had mixed feelings about whether he did right to hire Robert Riley for Tree Records and for his Dial label. On the credit side Riley did write some good songs and, crucially, he introduced singer Joe Tex to Killen at the start of the singer's career. But then, on the debit side, Killen remembered: ''When Riley was released from prison he started coming around to Tree hoping to get some of his songs recorded. I signed him to Tree as a writer and ultimately hired him to work for the company. One day I asked him to take a check to Jack Stapp over at the radio station. The check for $1000 was for royalties from a Roger Miller song. Later that day... both the check and Riley were nowhere to be found. He had forged a signature, cashed the check, and gone to a convention in Chicago... I was furious. I'm going to have you arrested', I said. Riley began to cry and said that I was only going to prosecute him because he was black. That was utter nonsense and he knew it... I later found out that he had sold some of his songs for pocket change while under contract to write for Tree''. Killin's warning may have been one he didn't intend to pursue, but the threat of the Pen would have been very real to Robert Riley in those days.

OCTOBER 1957

Jack Nance quit Sonny Burgess and the Pacers out of economic necessity and he and Joe Lewis joined Conway Twitty's band. Nance later co-wrote "It's Only Make Believe" and many of Twitty's early MGM singles. Sun detail hounds may care to note that shortly before joining Twitty, Joe Lewis and Jack Nance recorded some unreleased songs at Sun under the name "Joe and Jack". Producer Jack Clement intended to overdub them for release, but they remained as bed tracks. One title, "My Baby Loves Me", has been included for later release.

As 1957 wore on, Carl Perkins saw Johnny Cash become the best-selling country artist of the year, and then saw Jerry Lee Lewis, who had begun his career at Sun playing backup on one of his sessions, become the hottest new property in rock and roll. Every time Perkins went to the Sun studio the talk was always of Jerry Lee: they were charting his airplay and logging his sales on a blackboard. Jud Phillips was cutting deals to get him on the Dick Clark show or an Alan Freed tour. It was galling, and no words from Sam Phillips' silver tongue could assuage the frustration that Perkins felt. In later years, Perkins would say that they were all pulling for each other, but Jimmie Lott, who played drums for Warren Smith on Bob Neal's package shows remembers differently: ''Warren and Carl Perkins constantly fought Jerry Lee Lewis. They'd sit around in the dressing room before on steel chairs with a fifth of Old Crow. Jerry would say, 'I got a big record out now, I'm going on last'. Clayton Perkins would stick his jaw out and say, If you're going on last, we're gonna fight'''.

OCTOBER 1957

Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis record songs for the movie "Jamboree", released in November.

The final blow came with the movie ''Jamboree''. Original titled ''The Big Record'', the project had been initiated while Carl was still a hot propert. He had been signed to the production as a star, and Jerry Lee Lewis as an afterthought. Otis Blackwell (who had written ''Don't Be Cruel'' and ''All Shook Up'' for Elvis Presley) was music director, and he sent down a set of dubs for Perkins and Lewis to consider for the movie. Carl Perkins reportedly passed on ''Great Balls Of Fire'' and chose instead to perform ''Glad All Over''. ''I thought both of them was junk!'' said Perkins.

OCTOBER 2, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Ricky Nelson sings ''Be-Bop Baby'' and ''Have I Told You Lately That I Love You'' on the ABC sitcom ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

OCTOBER 3, 1957 THURSDAY

ABC-TV debuts the rural-based sitcom ''The Real McCoys''. During the run of the show, star Walter Brennan earns a country hit with his recitation ''Old Rivers''.

OCTOBER 4, 1957 FRIDAY

Jackie Wilson sings ''Reet Petite'' on American Bandstand.

The Soviet Union launches Sputnik I, the first artificial satellite to orbit the earth.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR ERNIE CHAFFIN

GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY OCTOBER 1957
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PEE WEE MADDUX
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN

On this session, Ernie Chaffin recorded "My Heart Tells Me" and "No Fool Like An Old Fool". This is not going to make anyone's Top Ten Ernie Chaffin lists, but it is part of the Ernie's Sun vaults and needs some attention. This tape originated in Gulfport and features Ernie's vocal and Pee Wee's acoustic guitar. It was mailed to Jack Clement at Sun on August 12, 1957, just three days before Chaffin's second single was released by the label. Nothing about the two performances or the material itself seems noteworthy, given what we know about these men and their capabilities.

01 - "MY HEART TELLS ME" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably October 1957
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16780-14 mono
ERNIE CHAFFIN - THE SUN YEARS

The demo of "No Fool Like An Old Fool" appeared on the same tape as ''My Heart Tells Me". This one at least shows a bit of energy and cleverness. Still, it is hard to imagine either of these songs impressing the folks at 706 Union Avenue very much.

02 - "NO FOOL LIKE AN OLD FOOL" - B.M.I. - 1:20
Composer: - Pee Wee Maddux
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably October 1957
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16780-15 mono
ERNIE CHAFFIN - THE SUN YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Chaffin - Vocal
Murphy Pee Wee Maddux - Acoustic Guitar

For Biography of Ernie Chaffin see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ernie Chaffin's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WARREN SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE OCTOBER 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "DEAR JOHN" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Tex Ritter-Aubry Gass
Publisher: - Micheal H. Goldsen Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Starts - Complete Rehearsal Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-6-13 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15514-20 mono
WARREN SMITH - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

This minor hillbilly classic was first penned by Aubrey Gass in 1949. Hank Williams revived it two years later and probably discovered it on the flip side of ''Cold Cold Heart. The song's roots are well and truly obscured by Smith's treatment which replaced the jaunty hillbilly beat with a liberal dose of the blues, especially from the lead guitar. At first the bluesy intensity of the guitar carries the song but there is a hole after the first 12-bar solo. The song meanders for another 12 bars which suggests that a sax overdub was contemplated. Smith's vocal performance is first rate and a fair amount of tape was expended on this cut, suggesting it was a candidate for release at some point. Perhaps it was consigned to storage when Phillips realised that he was not recording a Hi-Lo copyright but, rather, stood to give 3 cents a side to another publisher.

01(2) - "DEAR JOHN" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Tex Ritter-Aubry Gass
Publisher: - Micheal H. Goldsen Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1031-12 mono
COUNTRY ROCK SIDES
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15514-20 mono
WARREN SMITH - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

01(3) - "DEAR JOHN" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Tex Ritter-Aubry Gass
Publisher: - Micheal H. Goldsen Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - Sun Unissued

A lifelong opponent of rock and roll, Hank Snow was nevertheless one of its most important precursors. His songs obviously made a deep impact upon many rock and rollers with their contagious rhythm and nonsense lyrics (''While Madam Mazonga was teaching the conga...''). This tribute to the diminutive Canadian cowboy is a medley of ''I'm Movin' On'', ''The Golden Rocket'' and ''The Rhumba Boogie''. Smith even imitates Snow's high-pitched nasal vocal in places. The lightly stated beat of Snow's originals has been replaced by a sledgehammer but, for all that, Smith has retained the ''fun'' element in Snow's writing. This is an alternative take to those previously issued as ''The Golden Rocket''.

02 - "HANK SNOW MEDLEY" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Clarence E. Snow
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-34 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Do I Love You'' features an unusually full sound for Warren Smith. The sax lends an added dimension to the proceeding but the song is not an unqualified success. The major problem is the gimmick embodied in the song itself. In fact, one of the little catch-phrases used in the song, ''Has a cat got a tail''? was used in a trade paper advertisement for ''Raunchy'' towards the end of 1957: ''Is 'Raunchy' big? Has a cat got a tail? Will Ike play golf tomorrow''? These questions were from a long tradition of folk saying that included ''Is the Pope a Catholic''? and ''Does a wild bear shit in the wood''.

03 - "DO I LOVE YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30115-B-5 mono
SUN THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 8 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1986 Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-35 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar

Probably:
John "Ace" Cannon - Tenor Sax
Al Hopson - Guitar
Marcus Van Story or Sid Manker - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton or Jimmie Lott - Drums

For Biography of Warren Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Warren Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR KENNETH PARCHMAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY OCTOBER 5, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORING ENGINEER - BILL JUSTIS

01(1) - "YOU CALL EVERYBODY DARLIN'" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Kenneth Parchman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 5, 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-4-7 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - I FEEL LIKE ROCKIN'
Reissued: - May 27, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-3-7 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

The pop classic ''You Call Everybody Darling'' was written by Sam Martin, Ben Trace and Glenn Watts and was first published in 1946. It was number 1 hit in 1948 for Al Trace and his Orchestra, and in the rock and roll era it was revived by Bill Haley and Fabian.

Several versions were recorded that charted in 1948 (mostly recorded that year, but at least one possibly in the previously year) by Al Trace (Clem Watts' real name; the biggest-selling version), Anne Vincent, Jack Smith, The Andrew Sisters, Jerry Wayne, and Jack Lathrop. The song was also recorded by Art Lund that year.

The Al Trace recording was released by Regent Records as catalog number 117. The record first reached the Billboard charts on June 18, 1948 and lasted 22 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 1. A seperate Al Trace recording, recorded 1946 for Sterling 3023, reached number 21 in Billboard's ''Most Played In Juke Boxes'' survey in a 3-week chart run. Bob Vincent sang lead on both versions.

The Anne Vincent recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 5155. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on July 23, 1948 and lasted 12 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 13.

The Jack Smith recording was recorded about December 30, 1947 and released by Capitol Records as catalog number 15155. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on August 13, 1948 and lasted 9 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 13.

The Andrew Sisters recording was recorded on July 26, 1948 and released by Decca Records as catalog number 24490. The flip side was ''Underneath The Arches''. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on August 27, 1948 and lasted 9 weeks on the chart, peaning at number 16.

The Jerry Wayne recording was recorded on July 7, 1948 and released by Columbia Records as catalog number 38286. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on September 10, 1948 and lasted 1 week on the chart, at number 26.

The Jack Lathrop recording was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-3109. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on September 17, 1948 and lasted 2 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 27.

The Art Lund version was recorded on July 16, 1948 and released by MGM Records as catalog number 10258.

Country singer Lamar Morris revived the tune as a minor country chart song in 1973. American country music artist K.T. Oslin covered the song on her 1990 album, ''Love In A Small Town''. It was the fourth single released from the project and reached number 69 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles and Tracks chart.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Kenny Parchman - Vocal & Guitar
Richard Page - Guitar
Lemon Carroll or Willie Stephenson - Bass
Bobby Cash or Ronnie Parchman - Drums
Jerry Lee Smith - Piano

At the end of 1957 or early 1958, Parchman back to the Sun studio for the penultimate time to re-cut a few songs. He also laid down one new number, ''Tennessee Zip'' with Carl Perkins' influence shining through. Sometime early in 1958, Kenny Parchman received an offer from Lonnie Blackwell to record for Blackwell's Lu label, headquarted in Jackson. The songs were ''Get It Off Your Mind'' b/w ''Satellite Hop''.

After Smoochy Smith left the band, he relocated to Memphis and worked as a session musician around the city. He recorded with Billy Riley, Rayburn Anthony, Warren Smith, and others. Often, he insists that he wasn't listed on the session sheets filed with the union. He went on to become a founding member of both the Markeys (he played on their big hit, ''Last Night'') and later The Sun Rhythm Section with Jimmy Van Eaton (subsequently D.J. Fontana), Stan Kesler, Sonny Burgess and Paul Burlison. With the Rhythm Section, he toured Europeon several occasions.

For Biography of Kenny Parchman see: > The Sun Biographies <
Kenny Parman's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MALCOLM YELVINGTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY OCTOBER 5, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORING ENGINEER - BILL JUSTIS

For Malcom Yelvington's second Sun session in 1957, which produced two songs, the hesitant Bubba Winn was apparently replaced by Sun's star session guitarist, Roland Janes, and the guitarist's spacey, ringing sound comes to the fore. It is just possible that Gordon Mashburn was back on this session, but the union payments went to Janes.

The songs Yelvington cut in 1957 were mostly upbeat ballads written by Louie Moore, a young man from Alabama, who turned up at the Sun studio with a file full of good unpublished songs.

01(1) - "GOODBYE MARIE" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Louie Newton Moore
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 5, 1957
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30150-7 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL - TENNESSEE COUNTRY
Reissued: - 2006 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-22 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS

This is a strong, extremely melodic and bluesy song. Unfortunately, this version does not keep pace with the material, despite the presence of session stalwarts Roland Janes and Jimmy Van Eaton. The lack of planning is clearest during the pointlessly extended guitar solo and thereafter. It is really a shame that this song never received the careful reading that it deserved.

01(2) - "GOODBYE MARIE" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Louie Newton Moore
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 5, 1957
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-17 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS

This session producing wonderful takes of two memorable Louie Moore songs, the clever "It's My Trumpet", and "Goodbye Marie", where Yelvington really sings his heart out. "I didn't try to imitate Elvis", Yelvington declared defiantly. "That's the one thing I didn't do that all the younger guys came in and did. I had been playing music my way for years. I couldn't have done it if I'd wanted to. I wanted to be on Sun Records. I was trying to do something upbeat that would be new to Sam Phillips. I called it boogie-woogie. Later, they called it rockabilly".

02(1) - "IT'S MY TRUMPET" - B.M.I. - 1:22
Composer: - Louie Newton Moore
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 5, 1957
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-23 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS

The sharp lyrics and brisk tempo are offset by Malcolm's engaging bullfrog baritone. "Trumpet" (or to given the song its proper title, "Got Me A Trumpet") is written by Louie Newton Moore, a gospel and country songwriter from Alabama who turned up a Sun one day with a handful of songs.

02(2) - "IT'S MY TRUMPET" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Louie Newton Moore
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally
Recorded: - October 5, 1957
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-12 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS

By Malcolm Yelvington's own recollection, this was one of the strongest tracks that he recorded at Sun. Produced by Bill Justis, it was apparently considered as a single, but in the event was left in the can. Certainly, Justis expended a lot of tape on the song. The overall performance bears an uncanny resemblance to some of Onie Wheeler's Sun output, recorded at approximately the same time. Yelvington's vocal takes on an echoey and plaintive feel evoked by Wheeler. Also, the timbre of the lead guitar is virtually identical to the guitar on ''Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox''. Indeed, ''Trumpet'' is a fine bluesy rocker with enough primitive energy and country charm to have appealed to many different markets.

02(3) - "IT'S MY TRUMPET" - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Louie Newton Moore
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 5, 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm 1030-8 mono
ROCKIN' ROLLIN' COUNTRY STYLE
Reissued: - 2006 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-16 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Malcolm Yelvington - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Bass
Otis Jett - Drums
Frank Tolley - Piano

For Biography of Malcolm Yelvington see: > The Sun Biographies <
Malcolm Yelvington's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1957

There was still no sign of Sun Records getting an Andy Anderson disc on the marked so Anderson signed with Murray Nash at MNA Productions in Nashville who came up with a recording deal on the Felsted label owned by London Records. Nash had seen Anderson and the Rolling Stones at the Mid South Fair Talent Contest that month and quickly arranged for Nashville producer Owen Bradley to record Andy on another new version of ''Johnny Valentine'', backed by a team of Nashville musicians rather than his own band. Although they didn't play on the record, the Rolling Stones were a hot act for a while.

A show poster from February 1, 1958 says, ''Let's go to the world premiere of ''Johnny Valentine'' on Felsted Records. Andy Anderson and Rolling Stones - big parade down Capitol street 2 p.m. followed by shows at Wrights Music store, WLBT Teen Tempos, and the Rock House Inn on Highway 51 at 9 p.m.

Personal managers: Mabel McQueen and Jimmie Ammons of Delta recording''. Ammons remembered years later, ''after the release of this record the booking price for the band went from $35 to over $400. The band played at colleges and Universities throughout the South''.

OCTOBER 6, 1957 SUNDAY

The Everly Brothers performs ''Wake Up Little Susie'' during their third appearance of the year on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Also appearing, Danny Thomas, Kate Smith and Eva Marie Saint.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Malcolm Yelvington continued to play his music through the later 1950s at Memphis area clubs like the Wayside Inn, the Wagon Wheel, and the Gay Duck. As he moved into the 1960s, the opportunities started to dry up for his band and he eventually quit in 1961 to concentrate on his regular job as a welder, on his developing passion for ten-pin bowling, and on his family of five. Just before he gave up, he had been working on a song called "Disappointed", written years before by Reece Fleming, that was recorded in a local studio but not released.

While Yelvington was apparently out of music, in fact Malcolm kept his hand in all along, in gospel music. He joined a group Called the Carpenter's Crew at his local church, and even made some cassettes of their performances in 1993. He was also in a gospel group called the Dempsey's with Jimmy Van Eaton and Mark Bell.

STUDIO SESSION FOR MALCOLM YELVINGTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Malcolm Yelvington left two vocal/guitar demos behind at Sun and they are the least typical of any songs he ever cut there. This also sounds wholly unlike any composition that ever emanated from Sun's little pool of writers. It is possible that Yelvington was demo'ing material for another writer or that ''Going To Sea'' or ''Let The Moon Say Goodbye'' were songs that he recalled from way back. The best that can be said about this little discovery is that it it interesting.

01 - "OCEAN (GOING TO THE SEA)" - B.M.I. - 1:20
Composer: - Louie Newton Moore
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-3-11 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

02 - "LET THE MOON SAY GOODNIGHT" - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Reece Fleming
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1010 mono
GONNA HAVE MY SELF BALL
Reissued: - 2006 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-19 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Malcolm Yelvington - Vocal and Guitar

Then, in 1988, six months before his seventieth birthday, on the back of a decade of Sun reissues, he was invited to play some rockabilly revival shows in England and Holland. These were performed with Dave Travis's fine band to great acclaim from European fans of the Sun sound, most of whom were young enough to be Malcolm's grandchildren. The music was captured by Collector Records in Holland and issued three years later on the CD "A Tennessee Saturday Night". The disc enabled Malcom to record "Disappointed", at last.

This kick-strated something of a Yelvington revival, and when the old Sun Records studio was revamped and opened to tourists, Malcolm took his turn with others at showing people round, hanging out, and generally being revered. He continued to play special revival shows and local events. For instance, in July 1998, when he appeared at the Lauderdale County Tomato Festival, headlining with blues singer Little Milton, another veteran of Sun and Meteor Records.

Malcom Yelvington died at Memphis Baptist Hospital on February 21, 2001, press reports variously blaming cancer, heart failure, or pneumonia but in truth it was all three. His funeral service in Bartlett, Tennessee, included recordings of Malcolm's Christian songs, and was attended by his five children, eleven grandchildren, and two great grandchildren as well as friends and fellow musicians.

Remarkably, and pleasingly, there is still an audience out there for Malcolm's music, rooted in Southern country styles and recorded over half a century ago by a local band trying to tailor their style to the popular demands of the moment. Malcolm Yelvington and the Star Rhythm Boys created an effortless blend of western-swing and country blues that was badged under rock and roll at the time, and is still well worth reviving today.

For Biography of Malcolm Yelvington see: > The Sun Biographies <
Malcolm Yelvington's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 7, 1957 MONDAY

''The Jim Reeves Show'' debuts on the ABC Radio Network. The one-hour show airs on weekdays for three weeks. His first guests, Marty Robbins and The Jordanaires.

ABC-TV introduces ''The Guy Mitchell Show'', featuring a theme song familiar to Marty Robbins fans, ''Singing The Blues''.

George Hamilton IV recorded the pop hit ''Why They Don't Understand'' at the Capitol studios in New York City.

OCTOBER 8, 1957 TUESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis recorded ''Great Balls Of Fire'' at the Sun studio in Memphis, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: OCTOBER/PROBABLY OCTOBER 8, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

1(1) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - 2 False Starts - Take 1
Recorded: - October 8, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-15 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(2) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (2) - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - October 8, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-9-24 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-16 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(3) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 3
Recorded: - October 8, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-17 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

01 - ''STUDIO CHATTER'' (2) - 0:50
Recorded: - October 8, 1957
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-18 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(4) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - October 8, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-1 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''Great Balls Of Fire'' (1957 version, 1963 version, 1975 version, 1988 version, Jerry’s biggest and most famous hit. It’s incredible to believe that there are only two instruments on the Sun single cut; just piano and drums (no bass or guitar), unlike the 1963 ''Golden Hits'' re-cut which features at least 3 times as many people, and is probably the weakest of all the re-cuts on this album. The 1975 version is very different, being given a sort of “ragtime” treatment! This (probably wisely) wasn’t deemed releasable at the time and wasn’t issued until the late 1980s. Lastly but by no means least is the “movie” version, for the 1989 ''Great Balls Of Fire''! movie and soundtrack album. This is nearly twice as long as the original, and features much inspired piano playing, as well as a guitar solo.

1(5) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 5
Recorded: - October 8, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-11-5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-20 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(6) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (2) - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Take 6
Recorded: - October 8, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-21 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Unknown - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Unknown - Drums

Collectors of Jerry Lee's recorded output will recall this next segment of the discussion between Jerry Lee and Sam Phillips (with vocal punctuation by session man Billy Riley). The original tape runs for an additional three minutes, during which Sam and his fledgling artist debate the virtues of fundamentalist religion. Like most discussions of this nature, neither participant persuades the other to change his mind. The amazing thing about this particular exchange is that it was followed, almost immediately, by the recording of Jerry Lee's rock and roll anthem, the decidedly un-Christian "Great Balls Of Fire".

1 - "RELIGIOUS DISCUSSION (SERMON)" (2) - B.M.I. - 3:58
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 8, 1957
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm LP 100 mono
GOOD ROCKIN' TONIGHT
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Record (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-3 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Sam Phillips, Billy Riley, and Jerry Lee Lewis were setting up to make "Great Balls Of Fire", the follow-up to "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On", Sun biggest record. In 1949, as a kid in Ferriday, he had talked his way onto a bandstand for a chance to bang out "Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee", but the road to Sun took him through the Southwest Bible College in Waxahachie, Texas; like all Sun rockabilly ravers, he was raised on the gospel.

Sitting here in Phillips' studio, reading over the lead sheet for "Great Balls Of Fire", the meaning of the image must have hit him. "Great Balls Of Fire"; that was a Pentecostal image, that meant Judgment Day - and now Sam Phillips wanted Jerry Lee to turn that image into a smutty joke, to defile it. Jerry Lee rebelled:

Jerry Lee Lewis: H-E-L-L!
Sam Phillips: I Don't believe it.
Jerry Lee Lewis: Great Godamighty, great balls of fire!
Billy Riley: That's right.
Sam Phillips: I Don't believe it.
Jerry Lee Lewis: It says, WAKE, MAN! TO the Joy of God! But when it comes to wordly music - that's rock and roll -
Billy Riley: Rock it out!
Jerry Lee Lewis: Or anything like that, you have done brought yourself into the world, and you're in the world, and you hadn't come on out of the world, and you're still a sinner. You're a sinner - and when you be saved - and borned again - and be made as a little child - And walk before God- And be holy- And brother, I mean that you got to be so pure! No sin shall enter there: No sin! For it says, No sin! It doesn't say just a little bit, it says, NO SIN SHALL ENTER THERE-brother, not one little bit! You've got to walk and talk with God to go to Heaven. You've got to be so good.
Billy Riley: Hallalujah.
Sam Phillips: All right. Now, look, Jerry. Religious conviction - doesn't mean anything - resembling extremism. (Phillips suddenly goes on the offensive). Do you mean to tell me that you're gonna take the Bible, you're gonna take God's word, and you're gonna revolutionize the whole universe? Now, listen! Jesus Christ was sent here by God Almighty. Did He convince, did He save, all the people in the world?
Jerry Lee Lewis: Naw, but He tried to!
Sam Phillips: He sure did. NOW WAIT JUST A MINUTE! Jesus Christ - came into this world. He tolerated man. He didn't preach from one pulpit. He went around, and He did good.
Jerry Lee Lewis: That's right! He preached everywhere!
Sam Phillips: Everywhere!
Jerry Lee Lewis: He preached on land!
Sam Phillips: Everywhere! That's right! That's right!
Jerry Lee Lewis: He preached on the water!
Sam Phillips: That's right, that's exactly right! Now-
Jerry Lee Lewis: And then He done everything! He healed!
Sam Phillips: Now, now - here's, here's the difference-
Jerry Lee Lewis: (speaking as if horns have prouted on Phillips head): Are you followin' those that heal? Like Jesus Christ?
Sam Phillips: (confused): Whatta you mean. I, I, what-
Jerry Lee Lewis: (triumphant): Well, its happening every day! The blind had eyes opened. The lame were made to walk.
Sam Phillips: Jerry-
Jerry Lee Lewis: The crippled were made to walk.
Sam Phillips: All right mow. Jesus Christ, in my opinion, is just as real today, as He was when He came into this world.
Jerry Lee Lewis: Right, right, you're so right you don't know what you're sayin'.
Sam Phillips: (back on the offensive): Now then! I will say, more so-
Billy Riley: Aw, let's cut it.
Sam Phillips: Wait, wait, wait lust a minute, we can't we got to - now look. Now, listen. I'm tellin' you outta my heart. I have studied the Bible, a little bit-
Jerry Lee Lewis: Well, I have too.
Sam Phillips: I've studied it through and through and through and through and Jerry, Jerry, if you think, that you can't can't do good, if you're a rock and roll exponent-
Jerry Lee Lewis: You can do good, Mr. Phillips, don't get me wrong-
Sam Phillips: Now, wait, wait - listen, when I say do good-
Jerry Lee Lewis: YOU CAN HAVWE A KIND HEART!
Sam Phillips: (suddenly angry): I don't mean, I don't mean just-
Jerry Lee Lewis: You can help people!
Sam Phillips: YOU CAN SAVE SOULS!
Jerry Lee Lewis: (appalled): NO, NO! No, no!
Sam Phillips: Yes!
Jerry Lee Lewis: How can the Devil save souls? What are you talkin' about?
Sam Phillips: Lissen, lissen-
Jerry Lee Lewis: I have the Devil in me! If I didn't I'd be a Christian!
Sam Phillips: Well, you may have him-
Jerry Lee Lewis: (Fighting for his life): JESUS! heal this man! He cast the Devil out, the Devil says, Where can I go? He says, Can I go into this swine? He says, Yeah, go into him. Didn't he go into him?
Sam Phillips: Jerry, The point I'm tryin' to make is - if you believe in what you're singin' - you got no alternative whatsever - out of - LISTEN! - out of-
Jerry Lee Lewis: Mr. Phillips! I don't care, it ain't what you believe, its (as if explaining to a child), its what's written in the Bible!
Sam Phillips: Well, wait a minute.
Jerry Lee Lewis : Its what is there, Mr. Phillips.
Sam Phillips: No, no.
Jerry Lee Lewis: Its just what's there.
Sam Phillips: No, by gosh, if its not what you believe (and Phillips hits the clincher), then how do you interpret the Bible!.
Billy Riley: Man alive...
Sam Phillips: Huh! How do you interpret the Bible if its not what you believe!
Jerry Lee Lewis: (confused): Well, its just not what you believe, you just can't-
Billy Riley: Let's cut it, man...

And so they did: "Good Rockin' Tonight", the bootleg from Holland on which this conversation first appeared, follows it with a furious take of "Great Balls Of Fire"- a take that, one might say, outsins the version Sam Phillips released to the public.

"Sam's crazy", Jerry Lee told John Grissim many years later. "Nutty as a fox squirrel. He's just like me, he ain't got no sense. Birds of a feather flock together. It took all of us to screw up the world. We've done it". ''We were discussing religion, who was right, who was wrong, we done everything but fist-fight, so to speak. And come to find out, he was wrong, and I was too, because there is no such thing as religion. The word 'religion' is not even in the Bible. It's salvation. Sanctification. Are you sanctified? Then you're Christian''.

New York publisher, Paul Case, gave Jack Hammer's irresistible title to Otis Blackwell, who came up with an entirely new discourse.

After agreeing to cut the song, Jerry Lee initially wrestled with his conscience over the tone of the lyrics. The deliberation was worth it because many highlights resulted, particularly his demarcating piano solo that shamelessly hocks the bass riff from Little Richard's "Lucille".

"Great Balls Of Fire" was no song Jerry had plucked from his reliquary, though; nor was it dashed off in one or two takes. It was a conscious attempt to produce a hit record for the lucrative teen market, which Jerry Lee had just shown he was capable of penetrating.

The song had been pitched first to Carl Perkins then Lewis as part of a deal in which they would appear in the movie "Jamboree". Then, in a move wholly untypical of Sam Phillips, he decided to forego the publishing on the flip side as well.

OVERDUB SESSION: OCTOBER 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

1(6) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (2) - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 277 - Take 6 Master
Additional drums (rimshots) may have been overdubbed
Recorded: - October 8, 1957
Released: - November 3, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 281-A < mono
GREAT BALLS OF FIRE / YOU WIN AGAIN
Reached number 2 on the Billboard's Pop charts; number 3 on the Rhythm and Blues charts.
Reissued - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

He believed Jerry Lee could interpret Hank Williams songs and sell them to the country market. It was a lucrative discovery that would not be forgotten by anyone associated with Jerry Lee's career.

(2d) - "YOU WIN AGAIN" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 276 - Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - October 8, 1957
Released: - November 3, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 281-B < mono
YOU WIN AGAIN / GREAT BALLS OF FIRE
Reached number 95 on the Billboard's Pop charts.
Reissued - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Overdubbed Session:
Unknown - Vocal overdub
Unknown - Drums on ''Great Balls Of Fire''
Electric bass largely inaudible on tape but audible in rehearsal between cuts.

THE GREAT BALLS OF FIRE – Evidently, Phillips quickly warmed up to the number and, certain of its sales potential, poured all of his resources into its marketing. He wasn't disappointed, especially when, in October 1957, Jerry Lee Lewis followed ''Whole Lotta Shakin'' with an even bigger, and more lascivious, hit. ''Great Balls Of Fire'', which he performed in the rock and roll film Jamboree, went all the way to number one in the United Kingdom while reaching number two in the United States. Again, Jack Clement was sitting behind the console, as he was for Lewis's other major successes, ''Breathless'' and ''High School Confidential''.

''He performed ''Great Balls Of Fire'' on the new piano and it took several sessions to get it right'', Clement recalls. ''We knew it was a hit, so we kept messing with it until we got what we wanted. Still, it was pretty straightforward and working with Jerry was usually fun. He had a good sense of humour and I loved his playing. It was unique''.

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis. See: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 10, 1957 THURSDAY

Songwriter Tony Arata is born in Savannah, Georgia. His credits include Garth Brooks' ''The Dance'', Clay Walker's ''Dreaming With My Eyes Wide Open'', Patty Loveless' ''Here I Am'' and Jim Glaser's ''Man In The Mirror''.

Don and Mary Sue Everly have their first child, Mary E. Everly, who dies the same day she is born.

''The Most Happy Fella'' featuring Frederick ''Shorty\\ Long, ends its 17-month run at New York's Imperial Theater. During its Broadway booking, Long took part in the Elvis Presley sessions that yielded ''Hound Dog'' and ''Don't Be Cruel''.

OCTOBER 11, 1957 FRIDAY

Sun SLP 1220 ''With His Hot And Blue Guitar'' by Johnny Cash issued.

Jerry Lee Lewis plays on the American Bandstand TV show hosted by Dick Clark.

OCTOBER 12, 1957 SATURDAY

Sun 280, Dickey Lee and The Collegiates ''Memories Never Grow Old'' b/w ''Good Lovin''' released.

During a show in Sydney, Australia, Little Richard announces he's quitting rock and roll, saying ''God doesn't like it''. The decision comes just months after he recorded ''Lucille'', a future Waylon Jennings hit.

OCTOBER 13, 1957 SUNDAY

In Sydney, Australia Little Richard announces he is quitting rock and roll. He plans to be baptized in to the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

OCTOBER 14, 1957 MONDAY

The Everly Brothers earn a number 1 country single in Billboard with ''Wake Up Little Susie''.

TV producer Danny Petraits is born in Red Bank, New Jersey. He sings in the mass stdio choir on Brooks and Dunn's ''Rock My World (Little Country Girl)'' and plays harmonica on Johnny Cash's ''Red Hot - Country'' track ''Forever Young''.

OCTOBER 15, 1957 TUESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's fourth studio album and his first Christmas album (RCA Victor LOC 1935).

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

By the time he came to Sun Records in 1957, Rudy Jiminez Grayzell had already made his mark in country and rockabilly circles, recording for Talent, Abbott, Starday, and Capitol. Disc jockey Charlie Walker was the intermediary who set up a one-single Sun deal and Bill Justis, in one of his first productions for the label, took charge of the session that produced the breathless "Judy". Compared to most Sun rockabillies, Grayzell's vocal style was rather bubbly and mannered.

Even the lyric to "Judy" contains self-conscious reference to hits by Larry Williams and Little Richard. There was one session spread over two days in October 1957 with what Rudy described as Jerry Lee Lewis' band without Jerry Lee. He remembered that Bill Justis was the arranger. One single hit the market six months later. ''Potent teenage deck'', said Cash Box while Billboard praised ''Judy'', ''frantic sound'', but neither side clicked.

For some reasons, the 78s showed Grayzell as the composer of both songs whereas the 45s were credited to Paiz/Ketner on ''Judy''. The likeliest explanation is that Rudy was trying to duck a prior publishing commitment to either Starday or American.

STUDIO SESSION FOR RUDY GRAYZELL
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY/WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15, 16, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILL JUSTIS

01(1) - "JUDY" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Paiz-Dick Ketner-Rudy Grayzell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 15, 16, 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1029 mono
SHAKE AROUND
Reissued: - 2 010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-15 mono
RUDY GRAYZELL – LET'S GET WILD

01(2) – "JUDY" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Paiz-Dick Ketner-Rudy Grayzell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 295 - Master Take 2
Recorded: - October 15, 16, 1957
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 290-A < mono
JUDY / I THINK OF YOU
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Despite this gimmeckry, "Judy" rolls along in an engaging groove, largely assisted by fine work from Roland Janes and Jimmy Wilson, on guitar and piano. The last two bars of "Judy" are an instrumental highpoint. Sun was apparently over its early period of awkward studio fades, and now featured some of the tightest endings in rockabilly music. Along with "Flying Saucer Rock And Roll" and "So Long I'm Gone", Grayzell's record of "Judy" closes with instrumental power and precision that almost redeems it.

01(3) - "JUDY" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Paiz-Dick Ketner-Rudy Grayzell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 15, 16, 1957
Released: - 2010
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-17 mono
RUDY GRAYZELL - LET'S GET WILD

02 - "I THINK OF YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Rudy Grayzell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 294 - Master
Recorded: - October 15, 16, 1957
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 290-B < mono
I THINK OF YOU / JUDY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Billboard noted that Grayzell had a "frantic sound", and even had kind words for "I Think Of You", about this ballad.

03 - "I WON'T BE THE FOOL" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Rudy Grayzell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 15, 16, 1957
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Sun Jay Records (CD) 500/200rpm SJ 70601 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN ARTISTS - PART 1
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-18 mono
RUDY GRAYZELL - LET'S GET WILD

04 - "REMEMBER WHEN" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Rudy Grayzell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 15, 16, 1957
Released: - March 5, 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-27 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS
Reissued: - 2010 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16837-16 mono
RUDY GRAYZELL -– LET'S GET WILD

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rudy Grayzell - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Jimmy Smith - Piano
Dick Ketner - Bass
Otis Jett - Drums

For Biography of Rudy Grayzell see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rudy Grazell's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WARREN SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 16, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN

OVERDUB SESSION: OCTOBER 20, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

For the second time in less than three years, a Sun rockabilly artist turned to the Nashville Excello label in search of rhythm and blues material to transform. Obviously, those orange and blue Excello releases were a source of inspiration throughout the deep south, and Warren Smith was as easily compelled here as Elvis Presley had been back in 1955 when he transformed Arthur Gunter's "Baby Let's Play House" into a rockabilly anthem.

01 - "I'VE GOT LOVE IF YOU WANT IT"** - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - James Moore
Publisher: - Excellorec Music
Matrix number: - U 286 - Master
Recorded: - October 16, 1957
Released: - December 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 286-A < mono
I'VE GOT LOVE IF YOU WANT IT / I FELL IN LOVE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

This is not so much a cover, this was more a spirited revival of the Slim Harpo tune from six months earlier which had caught Warren Smith's ear over radio station WDIA in Memphis. Taken in a higher key and with a major hike in tempo, the arrangement was purposely detailed for teenage ears. For once all of the elements seemed to be in place for Warren to break through, except to say that most of Sun's promotional energies by late 1957 were totally geared towards the latest singles by Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis.

Among the song that Warren Smith heard on the car radio was Slim Harpo's "Got Love If You Want It". In Harpo's hand it was a mellow mid paced blues, delivered in a laconic bayou country drawl to a pseudorhumba beat. In Smith's hand it became another celebration of joyous, primal rockabilly. Al Hopson and Roland Janes trated licks on the intro and the solo (Hopson taking the lead and Janes the response).

Smith contributed a hugely confident vocal and made some minor lyrical changes in deference to prevailing mores: "Your fine brown frame" became "You fine looking thing", for example.

Warren Smith omitted Harpo's final verses and substituted lines adapted from another Slim Harpo record, "I'm A King Bee". Coupled with a lovely ballad by Al Hopson, "I Fell In Love", there was no reason that the record should not have been a hit - except that it was issued in the same month as Jerry Lee Lewis' "Great Balls Of Fire".

According to Sun's royalty statement, the record had only sold a shade over 7000 copies by the following June. Warren Smith was disgusted, and his band began to lose the faith. Marcus Van Story dropped out, to be replaced by Al Hopson's brother, Will. Jimmie Lott also packed his bags and headed back to Memphis.

02 - "I FELL IN LOVE"* - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Al Hopson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 287 - Master
Recorded: - October 16, 1957
Released: - December 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 286-B < mono
I FELL IN LOVE / I'VE GOT LOVE IF YOU WANT IT
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Here, Warren Smith and company transform Slim Harpo's debut single on Excello (both this and its flipside "I'm A King Bee" were hits in 1957) into a storming uptempo rocker. In fact, Smith has taken lyrics from both sides of Harpo's single, turning this into the ultimate cover record. He's also reshaped the material for a white audience. Gone are such lyrical treasures as "Quit teasin' me baby / with your fine brown frame". Harpo's rhumba-tinged original version, while highly distinctive, had none of the fury of Smith's cover. From the opening four bars of Smith's record, you can tell these country boys have their own vision of the song. Roland Janes and Al Hopson have a wonderful time trading guitar licks, while the rhythm is propelled by Jimmie Lott's powerhouse drumming and Will Hopson's prominently miked acoustic bass.

As on his first Sun outing, Smith's rockabilly stylings are paired with a country effort. Only this time, the sound of country music has been softened to welcome the burgeoning pop crossover market. In its own way, "I Fell In Love" is, as Billboard used to say, "potent stuff". Smith's vocal is beautiful recorded, surrounded by a tastefully arranged male chorus. This time, drum support is confined to rather assertively miked brushwork. In a somewhat daring step, Smith's singing is left to stand a cappella during the last line. Its a rather eyeopening way to close a highly effective arrangement. During the first verse, Smith sings the curious phrase "Just to be made feel blue", a form of English spoken nowhere on the planet, including the deep south.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Al Hopson - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Will Hopson - Bass
Jimmie Lott** - Drums
Sid Manker* - Bass
Otis Jett* - Drums

Overdub Session
Vernon Drake - Vocals
Asa Wilkerson - Vocals
Lee Holt – Vocals

For Biography of Warren Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Warren Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Roy Orbison stayed in Memphis after the Teen Kings left. It was the studio rather than the stage that became his true medium. He worked sessions at Sun for other artists, performed on commercials and radio spots for Sam Phillips, and pitched one of his songs, ''So Long I'm Gone'', to Warren Smith. ''I don't think people know how good a guitar player Ray was'', said Phillips. ''He used the bass strings and played combination string stuff. He also had the best ear for a beat of anyone I recorded outside of Jerry Lee Lewis. If we had a session going, Roy would come in early and pick an awful lot just warming up and getting his fingers working. His timing would amaze me. He'd play lead and fill in with rhythm licks. I'd kid him and say, 'Roy, you're trying to get rid of the band and do it all yourself'. He just hated to lay his guitar down. He was either writing or developing a beat. He was totally preoccupied with making records''.

It's hard to know how long Roy hung around Memphis. ''Basically I don't really have anything. I'd just love to stay in town'', he told Phillips. As Phillips remembered it, he said, ''No problem. Nobody around here's going to bed hungry. I don't usually invite my artist out to my house, I want to get away from you damn fools. I brought him to my house. This is when he brought Claudette in. I said, 'We can make room for her, too'. They weren't married at the time and they didn't sleep together. They stayed a long time''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROY ORBISON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: OCTOBER 16, 17, 19, 21 & 22, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS & JACK CLEMENT
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

01 - "FOOLS HALL OF FAME" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Danny Wolfe
Publisher: - Golden West Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 028-14 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - VOLUME 4 - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-11 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

02 - "A TRUE LOVE GOODBYE" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Norman Petty-Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Wren Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 028-15 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - VOLUME 4 - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-1-12 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

03(1) - "CHICKEN-HEARTED" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Roy Orbison-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 282 - Master
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - December 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 284-B < mono
CHICKEN-HEARTED / I LIKE LOVE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

The change in direction and the fuller sound did nothing to revive Orbison's sales, so Sun's new musical director, Bill Justis, gave Roy Orbison one of his first efforts at rock and roll compositions, "Chicken Heard". It was a novelty song, the quintessential nerd's lament. Roland Jones, who played guitar on the sessions, recalled that Orbison was bitterly unhappy with the material - and with good reason - but didn't complain.

"Chicken-Hearted", has always been a bit of an enigma to Sun and Orbison fans alike. More a sax instrumental (probably by Bill Justis rather than the credited Martin Willis) than a vocal track, it wails along in a groove that has survived the ravages of time rather well. The instrumental work is uniformly fine, including some excellent drumming by Otis Jett and driving piano work by one of Sun's resident Jimmys: either Wilson or Smith. When Orbison isn't singing, this is a well done, even typical late-1950s saxled instrumental that reminds one more of Duane Eddy or The Champs than the gang at 706 Union.

03(2) - ''CHICKEN-HEARTED" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Roy Orbison-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Semi Spoken Vocal - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1956
Released: - 2001
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-2-5 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

04 - "I LIKE LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 283 - Master
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - December 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 284-A < mono
I LIKE LOVE / CHICKEN-HEARTED
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Can this be the same Roy Orbison who became the operatic balladeer of the 1960s? However atypical of Orbison's later sound, "I Like Love" was as trite as its title suggests, rocks at a fine pace and the surprising sax solo at the close following a run of piano triplets leads the song to a strong fade. Released in December 1957, the single was Orbison's last shot on Sun as a contracted artist.

05(1) - "MEAN LITTLE MAMA" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Dubbed Master
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1260-10 mono
ROY ORBISON AT THE ROCKHOUSE
Reissued: - 1984 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 4 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS

05(2) - "MEAN LITTLE MAMA" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Sam C. Phillips
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461-15 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958

06(1) - "PROBLEM CHILD" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15461-17 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS 1956 - 1958

06(2) - "PROBLEM CHILD" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Dubbed Master
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1260-1 mono
ROY ORBISON AT THE ROCKHOUSE
Reissued: - 1989 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDX 4 mono
ROY ORBISON - THE SUN YEARS

06(3) - "PROBLEM CHILD" – B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1957
Released: - June 1988
First appearance: - Zu-Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Z 2006 mono
PROBLEM CHILD
Reissued: - 2001 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16423-2-6 mono
ROY ORBISON - ORBISON 1955 - 1966

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Roy Orbison - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Sid Manker - Bass October 22
Otis Jett - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano October 16
Jimmy Smith - Piano October 17
Bill Justis - Tenor Saxophone
C. Buehl - Unknown

Roy Orbison was disillusioned with the way Sam Phillips was handling his career as a recording artist. He was locked into recording rock and roll novelties and, with hindsight, would even come to look askance at Sun's primitive recording conditions. "We had to make do", he recalled. "I had to write the songs, sing the songs, arrange the songs, and play the guitar". Yet to Orbison it was that independence that, he would reflect later, enabled his musical ideas to start taking shape in his own mind - even if they never crystallized in the Sun studio. Many years later, he would say, "I'm glad now there was no one to call on". Perhaps he had a point; one of his favorite stories involved a warning from Jack Clement that he should stay away from ballads - that he would never make it as a ballad zinger.

For Biography of Roy Orbison see: > The Sun Biographies <
Roy Orbison's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 17, 1957 THURSDAY

''Jailhouse Rock'', Elvis Presley's third motion picture premiers at the Loew's State Theater in Memphis. As a high school student Presley had been an usher there. The movie opens at theaters on November 8, 1957. "Jailhouse Rock", considered the best rock film, starring Elvis Presley introduces a precursor to the rock video, as the title song has an elaborate setting in a jail cell choreographed by Presley himself.

The Osborne Brothers and Red Allen recorded ''Once More'' in Nashville at the Methodist Television, Radio and Film Commission studio.

OCTOBER 18, 1957 FRIDAY

Little Richard fulfills his recording contract with Specialty Records by recording a half dozen songs in a three hour session at Master Recorders. It will be six years before he records again.

Paul McCartney makes his first appearance with The Quarry Men at the New Clubmoor Hall in Liverpool, England. The group goes on to become The Beatles, and several of their songs emerge as country hits.

OCTOBER 18-23, 1957

Jerry Lee Lewis plays shows with Johnny Cash, George Jones and Bobby Helms.

OCTOBER 19, 1957 SATURDAY

Sonny James recorded ''Uh-Huh-mm''.

OCTOBER 21, 1957 MONDAY

Guitarist Steve Lukather is born in Los Angeles. A founding member of the rock band Toto, he also plays on the Kenny Rogers hit ''All My Life''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WAYNE POWERS (COGSWELL)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: VARIOUS DATES
OCTOBER 21, 23, 1957 / MAY 17 & JUNE 10, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Here's Wayne Cogswell, whom he first encountered playing lead guitar for Ray Harris. If the best Sun records are hybrids, then this one should be on anybody's Top Ten list.

01 - "POINT OF VIEW" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Wayne Cogswell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 316 - Master
Recorded: - Various Dates
October 21, 23, 1957 / May 17 & June 10, 1958
Released: - March 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3523-B < mono
POINT OF VIEW / MY LOVE SONG
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

"Point Of View" keeps an aggressive rhythm guitar at its center, adds some melodic high string picking by either Roland Janes or Sid Manker, and caps the whole thing with a doo wop chorus featuring the Memphis version of Jimmy Jones (who was singing doo wop much like this in New York at the time prior to his solo hit "Handy Man" in 1960). Stan Kesler misses a few of the changes on his bass and sounds quite tentative throughout, which suggests that a few more takes might have taken this otherwise strong record to perfection.

Cogswell comes even closer to crooning on this side. Listen to that voice. Could this really have been the guy wailing away on guitar behind Ray Harris on Sun 254. The answer is yes, suggesting that Phillips International was, on some occasions at least, being used to explore the "pop" niche of the marketplace, while Sun Records remained the haven for unrepentant wildmen.

02 - "MY LOVE SONG" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Wayne Cogswell
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 315 - Master
Recorded: - Various Dates
October 21, 23, 1957 / May 17 & June 10, 1958
Released: - March 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3523-A < mono
MY LOVE SONG / POINT OF VIEW
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

03 - ''NO LOVE IS MINE''
Composer: - Wayne Cogswell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Various Dates
October 21, 23, 1957 / May 17 & June 10, 1958

04 - ''WHAT WILL I DO?'' - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Wayne Cogswell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Various Dates
October 21, 23, 1957 / May 17 & June 10, 1958
Released: - 1999
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8353 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL – VOLUME 3

05 - ''BALLAD OF A TEENAGE QUEEN''
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Various Dates
October 21, 23, 1957 / May 17 & June 10, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wayne Powers - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Robert Talley - Drums

The Montclairs - Vocals

For Biography of Wayne Powers see: > The Sun Biographies <
Wayne Powers' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

UNTOLD SUN STORIES BY WAYNE POWERS – "I was born in Maine about two miles from the Canadian border, but we moved to Rhode Island when I was young. Got my start playing nightclubs there. I moved to Memphis in 1955. My sister Louise lived there, and my brotherin- law's daddy awned a stockyard. I wanted to start a business hauling cattle''. ''First time I went I was selling Kirby vacuum cleaners door-to-door. Sold one to Sam Phillips. Cost him $285.00! Then I started Cogswell Livestock Trucking Company. I was picking up cattle in Texas and Missouri and hauling them to Nashville. Then I went into business with my brother-in-law, still hauling cattle".

"I went to Sun, met Sam, and he mentioned to me that Ray Harris was looking for a guitar player, so I went and worked with Ray. We went back to Sam, auditioned and cut those records. Then I took him two songs, "Point Of View" and "My Love Song". I think he heard something in them. He said they needed something to fill out the sound, so I put an ad in the paper and four guys responded. They were maybe 13 or 14 years old. Black guys. I called them the Montclairs.

We all went to Sam and auditioned again and Sam was real enthused. He was the one that changed my name from Winston Cogswell to Wayne Powers. He thought my real name stunk. The first time I used the new name was on Wink Martendale's television show".

"Then around 1959 I wrote "Tennsville". I recorded it for Sun, but I wouldn't let Sam put it out. I sent it to Chet Atkins at RCA, and he recorded it, and it was a hit. The last part of 1959, I left Memphis for Rhode island and started Wye Records with another guy named Ray Petersonn. The president was a guy named Kenneth Dutton who owned the studio. Me and ray Peterson wrote and recorded an instrumental called "Night Theme". We issued it as by the Mark II, and it was a Hot 100 hit. It started to break and we got offers from Warner Bros. and Roulette. We went with Roulette, cause they were in New York. Big mistake. So many people have recorded that tune. Al Hirt, Ernie Freeman, Bob Crosby, 101 Strings. I ran Wye Records for a while, and carried on making demos. I wrote "Someday, Someday" that was a hit for Skeeter Davis, and I'm still kinda in the business".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

On October 23, 1957, former Sun blues whopper, Billy ''The Kid'' Emerson made his final session for Vee-Jay. The songs that would form his last release on the label were ''Do Yourself A Favor'', where Emerson urges his girl to come back to him above a catchy and interesting arrangement, and ''You Never Miss Your Water'', a blues with a firm beat and riffing horns and which sports an excellent guitar solo from Lefty Bates, a musician often associated with Emerson in the studio and on the road in those days.

It has been listed in various publications that Emerson recorded two other titles at this session: ''Lucinda'' and ''When It Rains It Pours''. In fact, he did not. A song called ''Lucinda'' has been catalogued by Vee-Jay as being by Emerson but it features a different vocalist altogether. Vee-Jay has also listed ''When It Rain It Pours'' on the Emerson master tapes, but the recording turns out to be a reference dub taken off a Sun 45.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY EMERSON
FOR VEE JAY RECORDS 1957

UNIVERSAL RECORDING STUDIO
46 EAST WALTON STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
VEE JAY SESSION: WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 23, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – CALVIN CARTER

01 – ''DO YOURSELF A FAVOR'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Conrad Music
Matrix number: - 57-762
Recorded: - October 23, 1957
Released: - December 1957
First appearance: - Vee-Jay Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single VJ 261 mono
DO YOURSELF A FAVOR / YOU NEVER MISS YOUR WATER
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-24 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

In December 1957, ''You Never Miss Your Water'' and ''Do Yourself A Favor'' were issued on Vee-Jay 261, and in January the trade papers were reporting that the disc was ''starting to climb''. However, once again, the climb was not as fast, as steep or as sustained as Emerson felt was his due. The events of his leaving Sun Records were repeated, and he said: ''I got mad with VJ because here I am with a record that's bust wide open in New Orleans and Texas and everywhere I had a stronghold, but they wouldn't put any money behind the record. Anyhow, I left and I went to Chess''.

02 – ''YOU NEVER MISS YUR WATER'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Conrad Music
Matrix number: - 57-763
Recorded: - October 23, 1957
Released: - December 1957
First appearance: - Vee-Jay Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single VJ 261 mono
YOU NEVER MISS YOUR WATER / DO YOURSELF A FAVOR
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-25 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Robert Emerson – Vocal & Piano
with Al Smith's Orchestra
William ''Lefty'' Bates – Guitar
Quin Wilson – Bass
Al Duncan – Drums
Earl Washington - Piano
McKinley Easton – Baritone Saxophone
Lucius Washington – Tenor Saxophone
George ''Sonny'' Cohn – Trumpet

In November 1957, Billboard reported that Billy Emerson was at the Coliseum in Joliet, Illinois headlining a show with Lefty Bates, Magic Sam and others. He was also at Chicago's Regal Theater on a show with Joe Turner, B.B. King, Jackie Wilson and The Dells, and then in December with The Five Satins and Jackie Wilson.

For Biography of Billy Emerson see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Emerson's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 24, 1957 THURSDAY

Five years after his first wife's death, Bing Crosby marries Kathryn Grant at St. Ann's Catholic Church in Las Vegas. In 1944, the influential pop singer earned a country hit by teaming with The Andrews Sisters on ''Pistol Packin' Mama''.

OCTOBER 26, 1957 SATURDAY

A month after guitarist Scotty Moore and bass player Bill Black resigned, Elvis Presley employs them again, beginning with a show in San Francisco. They receive raises, from $200-per-show to $250.

Gene Vincent appears on "American Bandstand''.

OCTOBER 28, 1957 MONDAY

Elvis Presley makes his first appearance in Hollywood at the Pan-Pacific Auditorium. Actor Alan Ladd is angered by the concert, which The Los Angeles Mirror-News says is ''not basically music but a sex show''.

''IS 'RAUNCHY' A HIT?'' Phillips International Records demanded in a red-and-black half-page ad edition of Billboard, just as the pop version by Billy Vaughn and the rhythm and blues one by Ernie Freeman were beginning to get attention.

In the end Sam Phillips' faith was amply rewarded. He shipped two million copies of ''Raunchy'' in the first two months of its release, but no matter the sales outcome, he would have won the competition hands down because he held the publishing on a song that went to number 2 pop in Bill Justis' version, number 4 in Ernie Freeman's, reached number 6 on the country charts (Justis), number 1 on the rhythm and blues (both), and got at least another million sales as the B-side of Billy Vaughn's pop hit ''Sail On Silvery Moon', which itself went to number 5, while ''Raunchy'' got to number 10 in his version.

OCTOBER 29, 1957 TUESDAY

On his second night at Hollywood's Pan-Pacific Auditorium, Elvis Presley's concert attracts Yul Brynner. A post-show part is attended by Carol Channing, Ricky Nelson and Sammy Davis Jr.

After recording for Columbia and Capitol, Roy Acuff holds his first recording session for Hickory Records.

Bobby Helms recorded ''Jingle Bell Rock'', destined to become a Christmas classic, just days before Halloween at the Bradley Film and Recording studio in Nashville.

Roy Acuff Recorded ''Once More'' in Nashville.

OCTOBER 30, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Johnny Park is born in Arlington, Texas. A member of the 1990's duo Archer Park, he authors Easton Corbin's 2010 hit ''Roll With It''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Narvel Felts remembered that on his second Mercury session in Nashville, he and his band recorded an instrumental that featured Jerry Tuttle on saxophone, called ''Rocket Ride''. ''That record came out and really started getting some action, this was early 1958'', he said. ''The story goes that Art Talmadge heard a radio station in Chicago play ''Rocket Ride'' on a slow speed and it sounded like a stroll record to him, and they had a hit at the time with the Diamonds ''The Stroll'', and so he slowed it down, and it was re-issued very quickly as ''Rocket Ride Stroll''.

''That was actually a re-recording and I believe it was Sil Austin and the Orchestra who recorded ''Rocket Ride Stroll'' and they issued it under my name. The original ''Rocket Ride'' was just us, the Rockets. We did that at RCA Studio B in Nashville in October of 1957, featuring Jerry Tuttle on saxophone''.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR NARVEL FELTS
FOR MERCURY RECORDS 1957

RCA STUDIO B
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
MERCURY SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE OCTOBER 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – BOB CLOUD & ART TALMADGE

01 - ''DREAM WORLD''* - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Narvel Felts-Jerry Tuttle-McMillan
Publisher: - Mayflower Music
Matrix number: - YW 16306
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1957
Released: - January 2, 1958
First appearance: - Mercury Records (S) 45rpm standard single Mercury 71249-A mono
DREAM WORLD / ROCKET RIDE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-23 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

This two recordings released in 1958 in which the A-side "Dream World" is a typical period ballad style that fellow rocker-turned-countryman Conway Twitty would specialize in. You already know if you like that kind of thing or not and while it's not too bad, the credit ''vocal by Narvel Felts with the Anita Kerr Singers'' might sound warning bells in some of you. However, "Rocket Ride (Stroll)" is indeed a nice surprise. It's a brassy instrumental with a slow-walkin' beat and lots of blazin' saxophone and ol' Narvel gets to kick in a few tasty guitar licks midway through. This kind of makes me wonder if anything else Narvel Felts recorded during this period is worth laying ears to.

02 – ''ROCKET RIDE (STROLL)'' - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Narvel Felts-J.W. Grubbs-Leon Barrett-Bob Taylor-Jerry Tuttle
Publisher: - Mayflower Music
Matrix number: - YW 16307
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1957
Released: - January 2, 1958
First appearance: - Mercury Records (S) 45rpm standard single Mercury 71249-B mono
ROCKET RIDE / DREAM WORLD
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-24 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Narvel Felts - Vocal & Guitar
Leon Barrett - Guitar
J.W. Grubbs - Bass
Bob Taylor - Drums
Jerry Tuttle - Saxophone
Chet Atkins - Rhythm Guitar
Floyd Cramer - Piano

* - The Anita Kerr Singers consisting of
Anita Kerr, Dottie Dillard,
Gil Wright, Louis Nunley - Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Narvel Felts see: > The Sun Biographies <
Narvel Felts' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1957

Ray Harris's second record ''Greenback Dollar, Watch And Chain'' appeared at the same time as ''Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On''. Every fibre of Sun's tiny operation was geared to Jerry Lee Lewis. ''Greenback Dollar'' sank without a trace. Even before ''Greenback Dollar'' hit the streets Ray Harris had decided that his future lay the other side of the studio glass. ''I knew Carl McVoy. He was Jerry Lee Lewis's cousin and he was working construction with me''.

''He played some dances with my group and he'd worked up a rock and roll arrangement of the old Jimmie Davis song, ''You Are My Sunshine''. So, I took McVoy to this old lady's house down on Poplar Avenue. She had an upright piano and a tape recorder''.

''I gave her $3.50 and we cut ''You Are My Sunshine'' and Tootsie''. I had two partners, Bill Cantrell and Quinton Claunch. We said, 'Well, we got the know-how but who's got the money'? We went down to Poplar Tunes which was owned by Joe Cuogi and he remembered me on account of ''Greenback Dollar''. The four of us came to an agreement and formed a little company, went to Nashville with the money we'd raised and re-cut those tunes by McVoy with Chet Atkins and all the Nashville studio men''.

Joe Cuoghi hit on the name Hi Records. He thought it would conjure up images of a record high on the charts. McVoy debut hit the streets to a good response but Hi didn't have much distribution so the partners sold the masters to Sam Phillips for $2.600. The money was used to rent the Royal Theater on South Lauderdale Street and buy an Ampex single track recorder, six microphones and two Altec boards. Bill Cantrell strung the primitive equipment together. The Hi Records studio was born. And so began the second act of Ray Harris's career in the music business. It would be infinitely more successful than the first. After a shaky start, Hi hit its stride with the Bill Black Combo and Ace Cannon. Harris remained with the label until 1970 when he sold his share to Willie Mitchell and returned to Tupelo, Mississippi. He was sick of music and sick of the record business. He had spent no more than four of five hours each day at home for years. In addition to cutting most of the Hi sessions he was engineering custom sessions for Mercury, Backbeat, United Artists and other labels (he remembers Chuck Berry, Junior Parker, Ike & Tina Turner, Slim Harpo, among others).

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

No sooner did the fledgling Hi label get its first release into the marketplace, but it appeared that they might have a hit record on their hands. Totally ill-quipment to deal with such a possibility on the national level, the master to "You Are My Sunshine" was sold to Sam Phillips in April 1958, who promptly issued it on his new label and watched it virtually fall out of orbit. So much for this little tale.

Only what happened before the record was released is actually more interesting. For one thing, pianist and vocalist Carl McVoy can lay claim to being one of the true musical influences on his cousin Jerry Lee Lewis. For another, its fair to say that the Hi label began because of this record.

Think about the influence of Hi recordings on popular music in the 1960s and 1970s. Curiously enough, it all began when Ray Harris (along with Sun alumni Quinton Claunch and Bill Cantrell) invested the princely sum of ten bucks in a McVoy demo of "Sunshine", which sufficiently interested record store owner Joe Cuoghi to start his own label with McVoy as his premiere artist. In short, ithere is a lot of history surrounding this disc which, ironically, went absolutely nowhere.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MCVOY
FOR HI RECORDS 1957

RCA STUDIO B
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLY TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: PROBABLY OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – CHET ATKINS
AND/OR RAY HARRIS

When the single encountered distribution problems, the tapes were sold to Sam Phillips for $2600 who reissued the some six months later on Phillips International. Chet Atkins took charge of the production as well as leading the rhythm section which swings like a clock, right down to the Dixieland ending.

01 - "TOOTSIE" - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - 2002 - Master
Recorded: - Probably October/November 1957
Released: - June 16, 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3526-A < mono
TOOTSIE / YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

02* - "YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Jimmy Davis-Charles Mitchell
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - 2003
Recorded: - Probably October/November 1957
Released: - June 16, 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3526-B < mono
YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE / TOOTSIE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

03 - ''BE HONEST WITH ME'' – B.M.I. - 1:46
Composer: - Carl McVoy
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably October/November 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm CFM 10 512-6 mono
THE SWINGIN' BLAST
Reissued: Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8352-14 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 6

04 - "MY CRAZY DREAM
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably October/November 1957

05 - ''OH YEAH'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Carl McVoy
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably October/November 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: Redita Records (LP) 33rpm Redita 125-12 mono
ROCK 'N' ROLL FEVER
Reissued: - 1997 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8236-13 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 4

06 - ''LONELY HEART'' – B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Carl McVoy
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably October/November 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: Redita Records (LP) 33rpm Redita 125-13 mono
ROCK 'N' ROLL FEVER
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8161 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl McVoy - Vocal and Piano
Chet Atkins - Guitar
Johnny Ace Cannon - Tenor Sax
* - The Jordanaires - Vocal Chorus
* - Millie Kirkham - Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Carl McVoy see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl McVoy's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©