CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1952 Sun Schedule <

1952 SESSIONS (1)
January 1 to January 31, 1952

Studio Session for Johnny Ace, Unknown Date(s) 1952
Studio Session for Joe Hill Louis, January 1952 / Modern Records
Studio Session for Billy Love, January 10, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Howlin' Wolf, January 23, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, January 23, 1952 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Houston Boines, January 23, 1952 / Blues & Rhythm
Studio Session for Boyd Gilmore, January 23, 1952 / Modern
Studio Session for Brother Bell (Johnny O'Neal), January 23, 1952 / Blues & Rhythm
Studio Session for Charlie Booker, January 23, 1952 / Blues & Rhythm
Studio Session for Bobby Bland, January 24, 1952 / Modern Records
Studio Session for Elmore James, January 25, 26, 1952 / Flair Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Chess/Modern/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1952

Despite the war in Korea Americans considered themselves to be prospering with average worker earning $3,400 per year, a college teacher could expect to earn $5,100 per year . Three out of 5 families owned a car, 2 out of 3 families now had a telephone, 1 in 3 homes had a television. The average woman in America would be married by 20 years of age looking forward to raising a family but few continued with a career after children were born. Fast Food restaurants were growing in popularity, but the scourge of Polio hit many thousands of families ( 50,000 estimated ) . Many more cars in America were now fitted with automatic gearboxes and gas cost 25 cents per gallon. The worlds first passenger jet The Comet is produced in UK signaling the start of faster and cheaper air travel in later years.

Eunice Kathleen Waymon (aka blues-singer Nina Simone) worked as a pianist for Arlene Smith, a voice teacher and takes piano lessons with Vladimir Sokhaloff.

Ralph Ellison's ''Invisible Man''.

1952

The success of Jackie Brenston, Howlin' Wolf, and Roscoe Gordon kept the arrangement between Chess and Sam Phillips healthy into 1952. But their relationship eventually became strained, as Phillips' later offerings failed to live up to their predecessors' sales. There were the inevitable squabbles about money. ''Confusion arose between Leonard Chess and me about what I was supposed to be paid'', Phillips recalls. ''I made some wrong moves with RPM and Chess. If I'd had my way, I'd rather have done only the creative end and left the business to other people, but once you set up in business you have to carry it through. I grew up on a handshake deal, which I guess is not a good thing to rely upon in business. Len and Phil Chess were not being honest with me. I have to say that. I was not being greedy. I'd have stayed with them, but I was working my ass off and I couldn't afford not to get what was due to me''.

There was another factor in the equation by early 1952. Where just a few years ago it had been empty, the Memphis recording scene was suddenly becoming rather crowded. Ike Turner was still scouting and recording for RPM/ Modern; meanwhile, a fourth Bihari, Lester, had recently returned to Memphis, intending to start a label that would attract the local talent, although he had a head start with a stash of RPM/Modern masters from Chicago. In addition, David James Mattis, production manager at WDIA, started Duke Records at around the same time in partnership with Bill Fitzgerald from Music Sales.

With these factors weighing heavily upon him, Phillips decided early in 1952 that he would start his own label, despite his personal preference for the creative side of the business. ''It truly did not want to open a record label'' he contends, ''but I was forced into it by those labels either coming to Memphis to record or taking my artists elsewhere. What people did not realize was the importance of producing records with the potential to be hits. Hit sounds. Good music. A guarantee of money to the Wolf or the others looked fine, but it was not the answer. It only raised everyone's expectations, and let everyone down on both sides when they didn't deliver''.

With the dismal experience of the Phillips label now two years distant, and with three national Rhythm & Blues hits under his belt, Phillips once again decided to start his own label. ''Sun Records was forced on me'', he says, ''but at the same time, it presented the opportunity to do exactly as I wanted''.

''The Sun to me, even as a kid back on the farm, was a universal kind of thing. A new day, a new opportunity'', said Sam Phillips, reflecting on the confluence of events that had brought him to the formation of his own label. ''I chose the name Sun right at the beginning of 1952, when I had determined to try to start issuing my own recordings. It was a frightening experience for me. I had a heavy workload already, and now here I was with lack of time, lack of know-how, and lack of liquidity''.

At the same time, having Sun Records meant that Phillips would have to answer only to himself for a record's success or failure. He could release music that others had deemed unworthy, he could hand-carry sample discs to every station within a five-hundred-mile radius, and he could exert pressure on his distributors''.

''Then, if the record succeeded, he would reap the rewards. He was no longer forced to second-guess Chess Records' accountings, or to fret that others had won the acclaim for his productions. By the same token, if one of his records bombed, there was only one scapegoat.

''My first step'', he continues, ''was to sketch out a label design and take it to Memphis Engraving on North Second Street. A man named Jay Parker I had known and played with in the Coffee H igh School, class of '44, who had played sousaphone in the marching band, was there. We had a good laugh over that, and I explained to him just what I wanted to convey with the name and the label. It had to be real, and it had to be simple, and it had to reflect the sun, with a rooster crowing for a new day''.

''When he came back the next day, Parker had almost exactly what I had in mind, using a single color (for economy and simplicity) against the bright golden paper he had chosen to announce the label's name''.

There were eleven shaded sun rays surrounded by a staff of musical notes encircling all but the bottom part of the label's outer edge. The notes were in the same burnt umber as all the lettering except SUN (at the top) RECORD COMPANY (across the spindle hole), and MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE (on the bottom crescent of the circle), with each yellow letters set off by the same ''rusty brown'' shadowing (S-U-N) or backdrop. The only thing missing was the rooster.

''I said, Í got to have room for this, I wanted that rooster in the center, 'but I don't want it too crowded'. So he drew my rooster for me and realized some notes and the staff around it, and that label never changed, except I did not anticipate 45s, we were dealing with 78s, with the little hole in the middle, so in the end I had to drop my little rooster''!

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY ACE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1952

PROBABLY MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1952
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

In 1986 Sun researcher Colin Escott told readers in Goldmine that back in 1972 he and Martin Hawkins, while cataloging tapes recorded at Sun Studio in Memphis, had discovered two songs probably recorded by Johnny Ace. These songs ''(Remember I Love You) Midnight Hours Journey'' and ''I Cried (Last Night)'' were in an unmarked box of tape that disappeared over the next ten years, he explained, before they could be given another listen for inclusion in the Sun Blues Box. One of these songs, however, emerged in the 1989 as ''the last unreleased Johnny Ace title in the various artists album The Original Memphis Blues Bothers.

Ray Topping, who wrote the jacket notes, claimed to have found the master ''I Cried Last Night'' by Johnny Ace. The song was on a small reel of tape, he said, stripped away of all the other masters and stored in an unmarked tape box ''hidden away in a dusty corner'' at the Modern Records tape archive. Topping provided no evidence at all that the vocalist of ''I Cried (Last Night)'' is Johnny Ace, and, indeed, no one familiar with Ace's voice could ever make so preposterous a claim.

Worse, the album graphics created non-existent documents to suggest that the annotator had done his research among them a concocted telegram (''your son Johnny shot and killed himself tonight'') from Evelyn Johnson to Mrs. Leslie Alexander, dated 12:43 A.M. On 25 December – reporting Ace's death almost twenty-two hours before it happened'.

01 - ''(REMEMBER I LOVE YOU) MIDNIGHT HOURS JOURNEY'' – B.M.I. - 3:29
Composer: - Johnny Alexander
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1952
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Ace Records (LP) 33rpm CHAD 265 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE ORIGINAL MEMPHIS BLUES BROTHERS

02 - ''I CRIED (LAST NIGHT)'' – B.M.I. - 4:21
Composer: - Johnny Alexander
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1952
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Ace Records (LP) 33rpm CHAD 265 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - THE ORIGINAL MEMPHIS BLUES BROTHERS

03 - ''FOLLOW THE RULE'' - B.M.I. 2:30
Composer: - Johnny Alexander
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1952
Released: - 2008
First appearance: - Proper Records (CD) 500/200rpm Properbox 143-16 mono
ROCKIN' MEMPHIS

04 - ''BURLEY CUTIE'' - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Johnny Alexander
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1952
Released: - 2008
First appearance: - Proper Records (CD) 500/200rpm Properbox 143-25 mono
ROCKIN' MEMPHIS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Beale Streeters
Johnny Ace – Vocal & Piano
Earl Forest - Drums
Bobby Bland - Guitar
Billy Duncan - Saxophone

Rosco Gordon - Organ

For Biographies of Johnny Ace see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Ace recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE HILL LOUIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR MODERN RECORDS 1952

PROBABLY MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JANUARY 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABY SAM C. PHILLIPS

Joe did get entangled in the Chess-Bihari-Phillips wars and new research makes it apparent that the Biharis recorded his sixth and final Modern record in early 1952 during their own field (?) recordings. It is notable that the usual spark and enthusiasm is absent in ''Peace Of Mind'' and ''Chocolate Blonde''.

01 - ''PEACE OF MIND" – B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1750 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date January 1952
Released: - January 1952
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Modern 856-A < mono
PEACE OF MIND / CHOCOLATE BLONDE
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803-19 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - BOOGIE IN THE PARK

02 - ''CHOCOLATE BLONDE" – B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1751 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date January 1952
Released: - January 1952
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Modern 856-B < mono
CHOCOLATE BLONDE / PEACE ON MIND
Reissued: - 2001 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDCHD 803-20 mono
JOE HILL LOUIS - BOOGIE IN THE PARK

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Hill Louis - Vocal, Guitar; more details unknown

For Biography of Joe Hill Louis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Joe Hill Louis' Modern/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1952

Renegade white country & western swing band Bill Haley & The Saddlemen record "Rock The Joint", the first white rock song of note.

Biography Published for Historical Reasons

Bill Haley was born July 6, 1925 in Highland Park, Michigan as William John Clifton Haley. Because of the effects of the Great Depression on the Detroit area, his father moved the family to Boothwyn, near Chester, Pennsylvania, when Bill was seven years old. Haley's father William Albert Haley was from Kentucky and played the banjo and mandolin, and his mother, Maude Green, who was originally from Ulverston in Cumbria, England, was a technically accomplished keyboardist with classical training. Haley told the story that when he made a simulated guitar out of cardboard, his parents bought him a real one.

Bill got his first professional job at the age of 13, playing and entertaining at an auction for the fee of $1 a night. Very soon after this he formed a group of equally enthusiastic youngsters and managed to get quite a few local bookings for his band. When Bill Haley was fifteen (1940) he left home with his guitar and very little else and set out on the hard road to fame and fortune. The next few years, continuing this story in a fairy-tale manner, were hard and poverty-stricken, but crammed full of useful experience. Apart from learning how to exist on one meal a day and other artistic exercises, he worked at an open-air park show, sang and yodelled with any band that would have him, and worked with a traveling medicine show. Eventually he got a job with a popular group known as the "Down Homers" while they were in Hartford, Connecticut. Soon after this he decided, as all successful people must decide at some time or another, to be his own boss again, and he has been that ever since. These notes fail to account for his early band, known as the Four Aces of Western Swing. During the 1940s Haley was considered one of the top cowboy yodelers in America as "Silver Yodeling Bill Haley.

For six years Bill Haley was a musical director of Radio Station WPWA in Chester, Pennsylvania, and led his own band all through this period. It was then known as Bill Haley's Saddlemen, indicating their definite leaning toward the tough Western style. They continued playing in clubs as well as over the radio around Philadelphia, and in 1951 made their first recordings on Ed Wilson's Keystone Records in Philadelphia. On June 14, 1951 the Saddlemen recorded a cover of Jackie Brenston's Sun/Chess recording "Rocket 88". Many rock historians regard this song, with its fusion of African-American Rhythm & Blues as the very first "rock and roll" recording.

During the Labor Day weekend in 1952, the Saddlemen were renamed Bill Haley with Haley's Comets (inspired by the supposedly official pronunciation of Halley's Comet, a name suggested by the disk jockey Alan Freed), and in 1953, Haley's recording of "Crazy Man, Crazy" (co-written by him and his bass player, Marshall Lytle, although Lytle would not receive credit until 2001) became the first rock and roll song to hit the American charts, peaking at number 15 on Billboard and number11 on Cash Box. Soon after, the band's name was revised to Bill Haley & His Comets.

In 1953, a song called "Rock Around The Clock" was written for Haley. He was unable to record it until April 12, 1954. Initially, it was relatively unsuccessful, peaking at number 23 on the Billboard pop singles chart and staying on the charts for only one week.

Haley soon scored a major worldwide hit with a cover version of Big Joe Turner's "Shake, Rattle And Roll", which went on to sell a million copies and was the first ever rock and roll song to enter the British singles charts in December 1954, becoming a Gold Record. He retained elements of the original, but threw some country music aspects into the song (specifically, Western swing) and cleaned up the lyrics. Haley and his band were important in launching the music known as "rock and roll" to a wider, mostly white audience after a period of it being considered an underground genre.

When "Rock Around The Clock" appeared as the theme song of the 1955 film Blackboard Jungle starring Glenn Ford, it soared to the top of the American Billboard chart for eight weeks. The single is commonly used as a convenient line of demarcation between the "rock era" and the music industry that preceded it. Billboard separated its statistical tabulations into 1954 and 1955 present. After the record rose to number one, Haley was quickly given the title "Father Of Rock And Roll" by the media, and by teenagers who had come to embrace the new style of music. With the song's success, the age of rock music began overnight and instantly ended the dominance of the jazz and pop standards performed by Frank Sinatra, Jo Stafford, Perry Como, Bing Crosby and others.

Success came at somewhat of a price as the new music confused and horrified most people over the age of 30, leading to Cold War-fueled suspicion that rock and roll was part of a communist plot to corrupt the minds of American teenagers. FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover attempted to dig up incriminating material on Bill Haley, who took to carrying a gun with him on tours for his own safety.

"Rock Around The Clock" was the first record ever to sell over one million copies in both Britain and Germany and, in 1957, Haley became the first major American rock singer to tour Europe. Haley continued to score hits throughout the 1950s such as "See You Later, Alligator" and he starred in the first rock and roll musical films ''Rock Around The Clock'' and ''Don't Knock The Rock'', both in 1956. Haley was already 30 years old and so he was soon eclipsed in the United States by the younger, sexier Elvis Presley, but continued to enjoy great popularity in Latin America, Europe and Australia during the 1960s.

Bill Haley and the Comets performed "Rock Around The Clock" on the Texaco Star Theater hosted by Milton Berle on May 31, 1955 on NBC in an a cappella and lip-synched version. Berle predicted that the song would go number. "A group of entertainers who are going right to the top''. Berle also sang and danced to the song which was performed by the entire cast of the show. This was one of the earliest nationally televised performances by a rock and roll band and provided the new musical genre called "rock and roll" a much wider audience.

Bill Haley and the Comets were the first rock and roll act to appear on the iconic American musical variety series the Ed Sullivan Show on Sunday, August 7, 1955 on CBS in a broadcast that originated from the Shakespeare Festival Theater in Hartford, Connecticut. They performed a live version of "Rock Around The Clock" with Franny Beecher on lead guitar and Dick Richards on drums. The band made their second appearance on the show on Sunday, April 28, 1957 performing the songs "Rudy's Rock" and "Forty Cups Of Coffee".

Bill Haley and the Comets appeared on American Bandstand hosted by Dick Clark on ABC twice in 1957, on the prime time show October 28, 1957 and on the regular daytime show on November 27, 1957. The band also appeared on Dick Clark's Saturday Night Beechnut Show, also known as The Dick Clark Show, a prime-time TV series from New York on March 22, 1958 during the first season and on February 20, 1960, performing "Rock Around The Clock", "Shake, Rattle, And Roll", and "Tamiami".

A self-admitted alcoholic (as indicated in a 1974 radio interview for the BBC), Haley fought a battle with alcohol into the 1970s. Nonetheless, he and his band continued to be a popular touring act, benefiting from a 1950s nostalgia movement that began in the late 1960s and the signing of a lucrative record deal with the European Sonet label. After performing for Queen Elizabeth II at the Royal Variety Performance on November 10, 1979, Haley made his final performances in South Africa in May and June 1980. Before the South African tour, he was diagnosed with a brain tumor, and a planned tour of Germany in the autumn of 1980 was cancelled.

The October 25, 1980 edition of the German paper Bild reported that Haley had a brain tumor. It quoted British manager Patrick Maylan as saying that Haley "had taken a fit and went over the seat. He didn't recognize anyone anymore" after being taken to his home in Beverly Hills. It also reported that a doctor at the clinic where Haley had been taken said, ''The tumor can't be operated on anymore''.

The Berliner Zeitung reported a few days later that Haley had collapsed after a performance in Texas and been taken to the hospital in his home town of Harlingen, Texas. However, this account is questionable as Bill Haley did not perform in the United States at all in 1980.

Despite his ill health, Haley began compiling notes for possible use as a basis for either a biographical film based on his life, or a published autobiography (accounts differ), and there were plans for him to record an album in Memphis, Tennessee, when the brain tumor began affecting his behavior and he went back to his home in Harlingen, where he died early in the morning of February 9, 1981.

1952

Johnny Ace, a former piano player with the Beale Streeters, a group that included blues legends B.B. King and Bobby "Blue" Bland, records his first record in Memphis and watches it hit number 1 launching him as a major rhythm and blues star.

Fats Domino's own "Goin' Home" hits number 1 on the rhythm and blues charts and becomes one of the first rock songs to scrape the Pop Charts as well, reaching number 30.

Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, still in their late teens, write their first hit "Hard Times" for rhythm and blues star Charles Brown, as well as the rock classic "Kansas City". Their work as writers and producers over the next decade will result in countless hits for dozens of musical legends.

1952

Hit singer Johnnie Ray was so over-the-top histrionic that he's sometimes called the first rock singer, but his style owed more to tuneful rhythm and blues than rock – some call him the "missing link" between Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley. Ray could (and would) sob on stage to great effect, and his big hits this year were "Cry" and "The Little White Cloud That Cried."

Cinerama presented multi sound track replay to the public for the first time. This stimulated public interest in the possibility of stereo recordings and research was stepped up.

1952

Newspaper clipping, Baton Rouge.

Roundup Boys Give Show In Nashville.

The Louisiana Round-Up Boys, local band composed of teen-agers, visited in Nashville on the Labor Day week end where they entertained at the "Corral", owned by Hank and Audry Williams.

The members of the band and Hannah Faye Harger were the guests of R.L. Langhart. Band members are Red Withers, Buddy Harger, Bucky Wood, Earl LeBlanc and Anthony Whittington. They visited the studios of Station WSM, met the stars of the Grand Ole Opry and were the guests of Lew Childre at the Grand Ole Opry show Saturday night.

1952

Sun Records comes into being in March. Sam Phillips founds Sun Records and declares "If I could find a white man who sings with the Negro feel, I'll make a million dollars".

Bill Haley's Saddlemen become the Comets.

Bob Horn's Bandstand TV program airs from Philadelphia every weekday afternoon.

The Cleveland disc jockey Alan Freed (aka Moondog) organizes the first rock and roll concert, the Moondog Coronation Ball.

Charles Brown's "Hard Times" is the first hit by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller to enter the charts.

Little Richard's first records released.

1952

This year, Scotty Moore, a guitar player from Humbolt, Tennessee had got out of the Army and moved to Memphis. He had contacted Sam Phillips and had been asked to scout around town for musical talent to work with. Whether it was Scotty who approached Doug Poindexter or Sam who put the two together is now unclear, but the result was that Scotty and his friend, bass player Bill Black, joined the Starlite Wranglers. The band worked out a new sound while they played a residency at the Eagle Nest club on Lamar Avenue in Memphis.

Roy Orbison forms the Wink Westerners with high school friends James Morrow, Charles Evans, Billy Pat Ellis in 1952.

Future Sun artist Johnny Carroll's high school band, formed in 1952, was called the Texas Moonlighters because of the many nights he and his friends spent milking cows or bling hay. ''They sounded like Slim Whitman'' he told John Blair. ''But with a little touch of the Clovers''. They performed at talent contests sponsored by the Future Farmers of America organization and on KCLE where the programme directors, Ronnie Hall and Gene Echols, helped them obtain other bookings.

Pianist Roy Hall was on Fortune Records again, working with Skeeter Davis, really Mary Frances Pennick from Corbin, Kentucky, a girl he had known ten years before. Hall told Martin Hawkins, ''I made a record called ''Jealous Love'' with Skeeter that sold about 80,000 copies, which was pretty big record in those days. I had known Skeeter Davis since the age of 14. She was a very fine girl, very religious''. According to Hall, she would join in at social events for which he provided piano and accordion accompaniment. This started around 1945 when she was fourteen, and he was twenty-three. back in Nashville in 1952, Roy Hall set up a late night drinking club on Commerce Street known as the Musician's Hideaway. He continued to work as a session man at Tennessee Records and probably spent much of the next three years running his night club, cursing the day Tennessee Records made Del Wood a piano star than him, and cultivating a drinking habit that really kicked in at this point. In this he was not alone. He developed friendships with a number of Nashville songwriters who also drank hard, men like Jackson Toombs and Vic McAlpin. He started to write songs himself, including ''Cheap Love Affair'', ''Christine'', ''Three Alley Cats'', and ''Santa Claus Is A Texas Cowboy''. He often took inspiration from the players and patrons who frequented the Hideaway. Hall hired a number of passing musicians to play at the Hideaway, and he took pride in later years in having first hired and then fired two of the best, Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley.

1952

By 1952, future Sun artist Curtis Hobock was in Carl Perkins' home town, Bemis, working in lumber, milling, and trucking. Driving a truck one winter he was caught in a snowstorm and was holed up for two weeks in a motel in Chicago. Returning home, he vowed to never drive a truck again as it took too much time away from home and family. He worked for the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) for a short period and then joined Central Woodworks as a millwright, staying with them until his retirement from music in the mid 1960s.

1952

Future Sun recording artist Eddie Bond, started his band The Stompers took place over the ensuing months; well-known members would be Reggie Young, John Hughey, Jimmy Smith and Johnny Fine.

Earlier incarnations of the band had included Ronald Smith, Enlo Hopkins, Curtis Lee Alderson and future Musical Warrior for Charlie Feathers, Jody Chastain.

The rounds of the South and Southwest were made taking in Tucson, Arizona, Birmingham, Alabama and Dexter, Missouri, where Eddie and The Stompers together with Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings and Narvel Felts with Jerry Mercer's Rhythm and Blues Boys played on top of a concession stand at the local drive-in a typical scenario for the period 1954-1956.

Hank Williams is fired from the Grand Ole Opry for drunkenness and persistent no-shows.

JANUARY 1952

Sam Phillips records another Howlin' Wolf session for Chess Records. Rosco Gordon also records further sides for Chess. Master numbers are assigned, but the titles are withheld pending the outcome of the legal action.

Joe and Jules Biharis engage Ike Turner as a talent scout for RPM/Modern Records, and Joe and Jules set out on a field trip through Arkansas and Mississippi, and the Greyhound bus station in Ike Turner's hometown of Clarksdale, which Joe Bihari converted into a serviceable studio to records various blues artists. Among those recorded are Junior Parker, Houston Boines, Boyd Gilmore, Charlie Booker, and Johnny O'Neal, all of whom will later record for Sam Phillips.

JANUARY 1952

Jim Bulleit, owner of the Bullet label in Nashville between 1945 and 1949, returns to Nashville after working as a promoter for KWKH radio, the Louisiana Hayride, and as promoter of a music jamboree in Spruce Pine, North Carolina. Bulleit becomes involved in setting up distribution for Sun Records in the spring of 1952, along with his own Delta and J-B labels.

Sam Phillips' mother Margaret ''Margie'' Lovelace Phillips died in January 1952, and the whole family gathered for the ceremony at the North Wood Methodist Church, Florence, Alabama. Jimmy Connolly, Judge Longshore, and Jud Phillips' father-in-law, Mr. Hensley, were among the pallbearers, and Aunt Emma, almost inconsolable, signed sadly with her favorite nephew.

NBC’s “The Today Show” debuts during January of 1952. Hosted by Dave Garroway, the show featured national and world news, as well as interviews and lighter content in a two-hour live format. The concept of the show was envisioned by Sylvester Weaver Jr. who would later become the president of NBC from 1953 until 1955. Dave Garroway would host the show as the main anchor from its start in 1952 until he left in 1961. “The Today Show” was the very first of its kind and inspired the creation of other similarly modeled programs such as “Good Morning America” and “The Early Show''.

JANUARY 1, 1952 MONDAY

Wesley Rose, future Country Music Hall of Famer, is cut in on the family business, as father Fred Rose gives him part of his share of Acuff-Rose, a publishing company he built with Roy Acuff.

Future singer-songwriter Neil Young arrives in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, with his family, following a six-day trip from Toronto. The family stays for five moths, while young Neil recuperates from a bout with polio.

Booking agent and manager Jim Halsey sets up an agency in Oklahoma City. He plays a major role in the careers of Hank Thompson, Ray Clark and The Oak Ridge Boys, among others.

JANUARY 3, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Audrey Williams, kicks Hank Williams out of the house. She denies accusations that she shot at him, he denies accusations of infidelity. Within days, he is taken to a Montgomery, Alabama, hospital following an overdose of pills.

JANUARY 4, 1952 THURSDAY

Scotty Moore is discharged from the Navy. Two years later, he becomes the first guitar player for Elvis Presley.

JANUARY 5, 1952 FRIDAY

Johnnie and Jack give their last performance on The Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport before returning to Nashville to re-claim a spot on the Grand Ole Opry.

Merle Travis is arrested for drunk and disorderly conduct in Los Angeles.

JANUARY 8, 1952 MONDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Easy On The Eyes'' at the Brown Brothers Studio in Nashville.

Lefty Frizzell recorded ''Don't Stay Away (Till Love Growns Cold)'' at the Jim Beck Studio in Dallas, Texas.

Hank Snow recorded \\Lady's Man'' and ''Married By The Bible, Divorced By The Law'' in the evening at Nashville's Brown Radio Productions.

JANUARY 10, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Studio session with Billy Love at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

Audrey Williams files for divorce from Hank Williams for the second time in four years.

Teresa Brewer recorded ''Gonna Get Along Without You Now''. The song is revised as a country hit a dozen years later by Skeeter Davis.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY LOVE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS PROBABLY 1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: THURSDAY JANUARY 10, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

During the delay before ''Drop Top'' was issued, Billy Love was back in Sam Phillips studio on January 10, 1952 recording two titles, ''There's No Use'' and ''A Dream'', for which Phillips paid Love $61. Another cheque for $50 from Chess was apparently handed over in person on January 23. Phillips assigned two unusual numbers (LS 402/403) to these two titles and on January 7 he noted that he had applied for copyright on ''A Dream''.

It is unclear what this was all about, and certainly there is no trace of the titles having appeared on Chess or any other label. Phillips was having difficulties in his relationship with Chess at the time: he told me, having successes like Howlin' Wolf and Rosco Gordon and these brought in as many problems too. Confusions came in between Leonard Chess and me about what I was supposed to be paid etc ... I grew up on a handshake deal, which guess is not a good thing to rely on in business." Apparently reluctantly, Sam Phillips started to issue discs on his own Sun Records label in March 1952. Possibly he had in mind to use Billy Love's January session on Sun, but his dealings with Chess had not yet fully imploded and in the end Phillips sent Love's songs to Chess, possibly for consideration as alternative B-sides for ''Drop Top''.

01 - ''THERE'S NO USE" – B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - LS 402 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 10, 1952
Released: - Re-Issued of Deleted Track 1977 - November 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30135-14 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS – JUNIOR PARKER & BILLY LOVE
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-5 mono
GEE... I WISH

''There's No Use'' starts as a mid-paced blues about a lost woman before Harvey Simmons breaks out into a wild sax solo supported by trumpet figures and crashing drumbeats. In considerable contrast, ''A Dream'' was a departure from blues and boogie and indicates the range of styles and musical interests Billy Love may have had. It has a Latin beat from piano and drums, reflecting the increased popularity of that style in the early 1950s, and almost classical piano flourishes. Billy employs a strong, serious-sounding vocal about the girl who appears in his dreams but not in his life.

02 – ''A DREAM'' – B.M.I. - 3:23
Composer: - Milton Morse Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - LS 403 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 10, 1952
Released: - November 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30135-16 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS – JUNIOR PARKER & BILLY LOVE
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BFX 17149-6 mono
GEE... I WISH

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Love – Vocal & Piano
Unknown – Guitar, Bass, Drums
Harvey Simmons – Saxophone
Unknown – Trumpet

For Biography of Billy ''Red'' Love see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy ''Red'' Love's Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions o
> YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 12, 1952 SATURDAY

Ricky Van Shelton is born in Grit, Virginia. S smooth and powerful vocalist, Shelton earns a reputation for revitalizing country staples such as ''From A Jack To A King'' and ''Statue Of A Fool'', winning the CMA's Male Vocalist of the Year in 1989.

JANUARY 14, 1952 MONDAY

Hank Williams and Ray Price begin moving into a house at 2718 Wedgewood in Nashville. They share the home for about six months.

JANUARY 15, 1952 TUESDAY

Gene Autry, Pat Buttram and Frankie Marvin all appear in ''The Old West'', a stagecoach drama that debuts in movie theaters.

JANUARY 18, 1952 FRIDAY

Bass player Bob Moore welcomes a son, R. Stevie Moore. Dad goes to play on hundreds of country hits by George Strait, George Jones, Loretta Lynn and Patsy Cline, among others, he played on numerous country and some blues recordings for Elvis Presley.

JANUARY 20, 1952 SUNDAY

Paul Stanley, of Kiss is born in Queens, New York. Noted for its theatrical road shows, the rock band becomes an influence for Garth Brooks' concerts. Brooks goes on to imitate Staley in a performance of ''Hard Luck Woman'' for the Kiss tribute album ''Kiss My Ass''.

JANUARY 21, 1952 MONDAY

Capitol released Hank Thompson's ''The Wild Side Of Life''.

Red Foley recorded ''Milk Bucket Boogie''

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''(When You Feel Like You're In Love) Don't Just Stand There''.

JANUARY 22, 1952 TUESDAY

Alabama bass player Teddy Gentry is born in Fort Payne, Alabama. The band mixes country with southern rock in becoming the hottest country act of the 1980s, eventually entering the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Smokey Mountain Boy Jimmie Riddle has a son, Steve.

JANUARY 1952

Studio session with Howlin' Wolf at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee. Probably also an studio session with Johnny Ace.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOWLIN' WOLF
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: WEDNESDAY JANUARY 23, 1952
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN

MOST OF THE REPERTOIRE ON THIS SESSION WAS
DUBBED FROM ACETATE OR DISC SOURCE
MANY OF THE ORIGINAL MASTER TAPES HAVE BEEN LOST

Like all the genuine greats whom Sam Phillips recorded, Howlin' Wolf arrived at 706 Union with a style which he neither cared to alter, not could possibly have improved. He plays and sings with such bite and attack on this track he sounds like he could have saved the South at Gettysburg! Sure, its something of a "Rocket 88" spinoff, but it has an added sparkle and vitality which owes nothing to any other record. Louis Calvin Hubert 's piano is rock solid, whilst Willie Johnson's guitar fairly bristles with energy - and although Wolf pops his "p's" into the mike, that merely adds to the abandon of the recording. The original working title of the song was "Cadillac Daddy", which was arguably stronger.

So Howlin' Wolf played the blues at Chess Records while Chuck Berry played rock and roll, but this rocks harder and with more abandon than just about anything else on Chess.. or Sun, come to that.

01(1) - "MR. HIGHWAY MAN (CADILLAC DADDY)" – B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records 1976 (LP) 33rpm CR 30101-A-1 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 1 - CATALYST
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-12 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

01(2) - "MR. HIGHWAY MAN (CADILLAC DADDY)" – B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - U 7427 Master
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - April 15, 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1510-B < mono
MR. HIGHWAY MAN / GETTIN' OLD GREY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-6 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2

02 - "MY TROUBLES AND ME"* – B.M.I. - 3:15
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Is an evolving version of "Gettin' Old And Grey", originally titled "Old Age Blues",
but cannot properly be termed an alternative take.
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-A-5 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 2 - SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-10 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

On ''My Troubles And Me'', Wolf's own performance is matched - if not overshadowed - by Johnson's guitar work, with its jazzy inclinations and distorted tone. In fact, Johnson is allowed full rein on this one and seems determined to steal the show, bursting forth not only around Wolf's stirring vocal, but under it as well, whilst the mellow tone of Wolf's harp offers a stark contrast, despite being rather overshadowed early on in the proceedings. During the first four bars the guitar and piano seem to be at cross purposes, whilst there is a sax buried way back in the mix somewhere, to little effect.

03 - "GETTIN' OLD GREY"* – B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Burton Limited
Matrix number: - U 7426 Master
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - April 15, 1952
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Chess 1510-A < mono
GETTIN' OLD GREY / MR. HIGHWAY MAN
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15500-7 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 2

Amazingly, ''Getting Old Grey'' consists of just two vocal verses split by one instrumental chorus. Like the previous track, this is very much a vehicle for Willie Johnson's supercharged block chords and fidgeting single string runs. Both verses have Wolf concerded with encroaching old age - after all, he was 41 at the time of this session. When he sang, "I've got to look out for my older days", he had no idea of the international fame that lay in wait for him. Sam Phillips juggles with his microphones during the solo chorus, beginning with Wolf's stereo typical harmonica phrases and then pumping up Willie Johnson's intense lead. Far in the background a pair of tenor saxes riff contentedly. In his final verse, Wolf reckons "I've got to find me a place to stay". That place would be Chicago.

Johnny Temple's ''Getting Old Blues'' doesn't fret like this, and neither does any other blues song that comes to mind. Just as Sleepy John Estes extolled the virtues of the burial policy, Wolf almost seems intent on selling you a retirement account. Nevertheless, this track becomes a timing nightmare pretty quickly and despite Wolf's distinctive and spectacular voice, it could have used another couple of takes.

04 - "MY BABY WALKED OFF" – B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Chester Burnett
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: -1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30102-A-1 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK – VOLUME 2 – SAM'S BLUES
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-8 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

Wolf's vocal performance on this number is damn near faultless, containing all that feral energy and menace which he regularly generated at his very best. However, the pianist seems to have real problems keeping up during the first chorus, before settling in unobtrusively. Wolf contributes some genuinely bizarre lines: "You know she's just my colour/she's just my kind/ I'm crazy 'bout the woman/she just walked off and died". His vocal inflection on the repetition of "colour" is simply magical.

05 - "CHOCOLATE DROP" – B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Joe Hill Louis
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30134-5 mono
HOWLIN" WOLF - THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15460-11 mono
MEMPHIS DAYS - THE DEFINITIVE EDITION - VOLUME 1

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Howlin' Wolf - Vocal and Harmonica
Willie Johnson - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
Willie Steele - Drums
Albert Williams or Louis Calvin Hubert - Piano
Unknown – Saxes*

For Biography of Howlin' Wolf see: > The Sun Biographies <
Howlin' Wolf's Chess recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions o
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 1952

Eddie Hill leaves Memphis to work for WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee.

The legal wranglings over Howlin' Wolf and Rosco Gordon is finally settled, the Biharis getting Rosco plus four Unissued masters, whilst Chess keep Wolf. Meanwhile, "Booted" is still available on two labels, and the Chess version finally enters the Rhythm and Blues charts.

Chess Records release their second Wolf single "Howlin' Wolf Boogie" (Chess 1497).

Sam Phillips records Arkansas disc jockey Walter Bradford, and pairs jug band veteran Jack Kelly up with Walter Horton, and pitches the dubs to Chess Records. Following their rejection by Chess, Phillips schedules both to be among the first batch of releases on his forthcoming SUN label, although neither make the final ship-out.

In the meantime another Sun label, operating out of Albuquerque, New Mexico, starts up with a disc by Don Paull. Another Sun label, owned by Abe Lyman and based on 161st Street in New York, was launched in 1946 and issuing Jewish and Yiddish Folk music but had probably ceased business by 1952.

Modern Records issues a final Joe Hill Louis single "Chocolate Blonde"/"Peace Of Mind" (Modern 868) an old masters supplied by Sam Phillips.

EARLY 1952

By early 1952, several of Sam Phillips' recording artists were caught up in commercial and legal arguments between the companies who took recordings from him - principally Chess in Chicago and Modern/RPM in Hollywood. Companies not unreasonably wanted exclusivity on the bestselling singers. One of these was Rosco Gordon who had registered hits with RPM but who would also appear shortly on Chess and then, for good measure, on the Duke label.

JANUARY 23, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Rosco Gordon made a session for Chess at Phillips' studio that included an engaging bar room song called ''Decorate The Counter''. However, by February 15 wrangling between the various companies had seen Gordon's contract signed over to Modern/RPM Records and two days later most of the recordings from the January session were passed to Modern. ''Decorate The Counter''was not one of them because Chess had expressed an interest in the song. Sam Phillips apparently held it back as the prototype for someone else to record. That someone was Rufus Thomas, and so we had tuded an extended version of the earliest of Rosco's versions of the song.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR CHESS RECORDS 1952

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: WEDNESDAY JANUARY 23, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Rosco Gordon made a session for Chess Records at Phillips' studio that included an engaging bar room song called "Decorate The Counter". However, by February 15, wrangling between the various companies had seen Gordon's contract signed over to Modern/RPM Records and two days later most of the recordings from the January session were passed to Modern. "Decorate" was not one of them because Chess had expressed an interest in the song. Sam Phillips apparently held it back as the prototype for someone else to record. That someone was Rufus Thomas, and so we have included an extended version of the earliest of Rosco's version of the song (03).

01(1) - "DECORATE THE COUNTER" – B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Robert Henry-Courtney Harris
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30133-A-8 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-2-5 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

01(2) - "DECORATE THE COUNTER'' - 1 – B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Robert Henry-Courtney Harris
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30133-B-1 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16695-11 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Its hard to be critical of a record like this, which is infectious good-time music, pure and simple. This is the second, looser take with the band getting bawdy in the background, and is a vast improvement on Take 1 (which was released on CR 30133). This version was actually mastered for release on Chess as the follow-up to "Booted", however, legal warn glings between Chess and RPM/Modern over Rosco's contract led to it being withheld. Since Leonard Chess had felt so strongly about the song he requested another version with the same sound and feel: Phillips immediately reassembled the same studio band and brought in another artist - who, like Rosco, had a good-time, good-humoured vocal style. Enter Rufus Thomas: Phillips rushed the resulting acetate to Chess Records in April 1952, and the disc was in the stores within weeks.

02 - "I WADE THROUGH MUDDY WATER (DREAM ON BABY)" - B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm 30133-14 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-2-6 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

John Murry Daley's drums beat like a sepulchral metronome throughout this dirge-like song, the designated B-side of "Decorate The Counter". Sam Phillips recut "Decorate" with Rufus Thomas, but this track - retitled - had to wait 25 years to be released. Its original title comes from the second verse, when Rosco describes what he's prepared to do for the woman who's deserted him. Richard Sanders' baritone sax solo is perfectly recorded, catching the full eruptive depth of those bass notes. His wheedling tone sounds like Lewis Carroll's Walrus coaxing virgin oysters from their shells.

03 - "I LOVE YOU BETTER THAN I LOVE MYSELF" – B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records Internet iTunes MP3-4 mono
ROSCO GORDON - SELECTED HITS

04 - "TELL ME PRETTY BABY"
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - Sun Unissued

This session was recorded for Chess Records, but the masters were not dispatched pending the outcome of the legal dispute. ''I Wade Through Muddy Water'' was issued as ''Dream On Baby'' on CR 30133.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Saxophone
John Murry Daley – Drums

For Biography of Rosco Gordon see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rosco Gordon's recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions o
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR HOUSTON BOINES, BOYD GILMOORE,
BROTHER BELL (JOHNNY O'NEAL), CHARLIE BOOKER
FOR MODERN, BLUES & RHYTHM RECORDS

CLUB CASABLANCA, 1102 NELSON STREET, GREENVILLE, MISSISSIPPI
STUDIO SESSION: THURSDAY JANUARY 23, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR JOE BIHARI

In January 1952, Joe Bihari and Ike Turner turned up at the Club Casablanca located on Nelson Street in Greenville to record the local talent which produced three solid countrified, cotton patch singles including harmonica blower Houston Boines (spelt Baines on the Modern subsidiary Blues & Rhythm label and Boyd Gilmore on his cut of Robert Johnson's ''Ramblin' On my Mind'' both trying to capture some of the magic of Elmore James' ''Dust My Broom'' lick. The fourth single by Brother Bell sounded much more like Ike's King's Of Rhythm with Raymond Hill's tenor saxophone prominent on both sides. Brother Bell was vocalist Johnny O'Neal who would record again with Ike Turner at Sun Records in 1953

01 – ''GOING HOME''* – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Houston Boines-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1790
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Blues & Rhythm Records (S) 78rpm B&R 7001 mono
GOING HOME / RELATION BLUES
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-14 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

02 – ''RELATION BLUES''* – B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Jules Taub-Houston Boines
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1791
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Blues & Rhythm Records (S) 78rpm B&R 7001 mono
RELATION BLUES / GOING HOME
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-15 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

03 – ''RAMBLIN' ON MY MIND''** – B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Boyd Gilmore
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1780 - Take 3
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm Modern 860 mono
RAMBLIN' ON MY MIND / JUST AN ARMY BOY
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-13 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

04 – ''IF YOU FEEL FROGGISH''*** – B.M.I.
Composer: - Jules Taub-Brother Bell
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1792
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Blues & Rhythm Records (S) 78rpm R&B 7002 mono
IF YOU FEEL FROGGISH / WHOLE HEAP OF MAMA
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-17 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

05 – ''WHOLE HEAP OF MAMA''*** – 1 - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Jules Taub-Brother Bell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - MM 1793
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Blues & Rhythm Records (S) 78rpm R&B 7002 mono
WHOLE HEAP OF MAMA / IF YOU FEEL FROGGISH
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-16 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

06 – ''RABBIT BLUES''**** – B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Jules Taub-Charlie Booker
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1794
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Blues & Rhythm Records (S) 78rpm B&R 7001 mono
RABBIT BLUES / NO RIDIN' BLUES
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-18 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

07 – ''NO RIDIN' BLUES''**** – B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Jules Taub-Charlie Booker
Publisher: - Modern Music Publishing
Matrix number: - MM 1796
Recorded: - January 23, 1952
Released: - 1952
First appearance: - Blues & Rhythm Records (S) 78rpm B&R 7001 mono
NO RIDIN' BLUES / RABBIT BLUES
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-1-19 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
* - Houston Boines - Vocal, Harmonica
** - Boyd Gilmore - Vocal, Guitar
*** - Johnny O'Neal - Vocal
**** - Charlie Booker - Vocal, Guitar
Ike Turner - Piano
Jesse ''Cleanhead'' Love - Drums
Raymond Hill - Tenor saxophone
Willie Kizart - Guitar
Edwin Nash - Bass
Willie Sims - Drums

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NELSON STREET, GREENVILLE, MISSISSIPPI - Nelson Street was once the epicenter of African American business and entertainment in the Delta. Nightclubs, cafes, churches, groceries, fish markets, barbershops, laundries, record shops, and other enterprises did a bustling trade. Famous blues clubs on the street included the Casablanca, the Flowing Fountain, and the Playboy Club. Willie Love saluted the street in his 1951 recording "Nelson Street Blues''.

Whereas many Delta towns once "rolled up the sidewalks" in time for curfews, Greenville nurtured a flourishing nightlife, especially during the 1940s and 1950s. Blues artists and audiences from throughout the area gravitated to the cafes, pool halls, and nightclubs of Nelson Street. The music ranged from raw Delta blues to big band jump blues and jazz. Years before he became America’s top black recording artist, Louis Jordan joined local bandleader and music educator Winchester Davis for some performances here in 1928.

When down-home southern blues was at its commercial peak in the American rhythm and blues industry in the early 1950s, record companies headed for Nelson Street in search of talent. Leading lights on the local scene included Willie Love and Sonny Boy Williamson II, both of whom recorded for the Jackson-based Trumpet label. In 1952 Charlie Booker and others recorded for the rival Modem Records at the Casablanca, an upscale restaurant and lounge at 1102 Nelson, which advertised its services "For Colored Only''. In the midst of one session, the local sheriff ordered the recording stopped when artists contracted to Trumpet attempted to record for Modem. The resulting lawsuit made headlines in the national trade papers.

One of the Casablanca recordings, Charlie Booker’s "No Ridin' Blues'', joined Willie Love’s "Nelson Street Blues" as a local anthem when Booker sang, "Greenville's smokin’, Leland's burnin' down''. Booker, Love, and Little Milton Campbell were among the blues artists who had their own radio shows on WGVM or WJPR. Disc jockey rocking Eddie Williams later had a record store on Nelson Street. Blues venues of the 1950s included Henry T's Pool Room, the Silver Dollar Cafe and the Blue Note.

Nelson Street alumni include Oliver Sain, Eddie Shaw, J.W. "Big Moose" Walker, Burgess Gardner, Lil' Bill Wallace, Roosevelt "Booba" Barnes, Willie Foster, T-Model Ford, John Horton, and Lil’ Dave Thompson, as well as Greenville’s first black policeman, guitarist Willie "Burl" Carson. The most successful of them all, Little Milton, paid tribute to the Flowing Fountain, a Nelson Street show club, in his 1987 Malaco Records hit "Annie Mae's Cafe''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BOBBY BLUE BLAND
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE 1952 FOR MODERN RECORDS

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: THURSDAY JANUARY 24, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 – ''LOVE ME BABY'' – B.M.I. - 3:00
Composer: - Jules Taub-Robert Bland
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 24, 1952
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Ace Records (LP) 33rpm Ace 216-5 mono
THE FIFIES - JUKE JOINT BLUES
Reissued: - 2011 Jamine Records (CD) 500/200rpm JASCD 564-4 mono
BOBBY BLAND - IT'S MY LIFE, BABY

Name (Or. No Of Instruments)
Bobby Bland - Vocal
Junior Parker – Vocal & Harmonica
Johnny Ace - Piano
Matt Murphy - Guitar
Earl Forest - Drums

For Biographies of Bobby Bland see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bobby Bland's recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

Flair Records was an American record label owned by the Bihari Brothers, launched in the early 1950s. It was a subsidiary of Modern Records. Its most famous artist was Elmore James, who released ten singles with this label.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ELMORE JAMES
FOR FLAIR RECORDS 1952

CLUB DESIRE
SOUTH UNION STREET, CANTON, MISSISSIPPI
STUDIO SESSION: FRIDAY JANUARY 25, 1952
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - IKE TURNER
AND/OR JOE BIHARI

The main purpose of Ike Turner's trip was to record Elmore James whose ''Dust My Broom'' was big at the time and who, although under contract to Trumpet Records, seemed willing to record elsewhere. The dynamic duo found their man in Canton and duly recorded him at the Club Desire. Over two days ten songs were cut which produced sides for four singles singles. On the three tracks included here are some of Elmore's most impassioned and intense vocals ever recorded. ''Hand In Hand'' burst from the speakers as though the beginning of the recording has been sliced off while on ''Please Find My Baby'', Ike and Elmore seem to battle for prominence over Elmore's famous riff - Elmore wins. ''Rock My Baby Right'' is more measured with the guitar turned down a notch and Ike's boogie piano up front and central.

01 - ''PLEASE FIND MY BABY'' - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Jules Taub-Elmore James
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number - PL 147
Recorded: - January 25, 26, 1952
Released: - 1953
First appearance: - Flair Records (S) 78rpm Flair 1022 mono
PLEASE FIND MY BABY / STRANGE KINDA' FEELING
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-2-15 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

02 - ''HAND IN HAND'' - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Jules Taub-Elmore James-Sam Ling
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - FL 161
Recorded: - January 25, 26, 1952
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Flair Records (S) 78rpm Flair 1031 mono
HAND IN HAND / MAKE MY DREAMS COME TRUE
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-2-28 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

03 - ''ROCK MY BABY RIGHT'' - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Joe Josea-Elmore James
Publisher: - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - FL 201 - Take 2
Recorded: - January 25, 26, 1952
Released: - 1954
First appearance: Flair Records (S) 78rpm Flair 1048 mono
ROCK MY BABY RIGHT / DARK AND DREARY
Reissued: - 2010 Secret Records (CD) 500/200rpm SECBX025-3-27 mono
THAT KAT SURE COULD PLAY! - THE SINGLES 1951 - 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elmore James - Vocal & Guitar
Ike Turner - Piano
Unknown - Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

CLUB DESIRE, CANTON, MISSISSIPPI - The Club Desire, which stood across the street from this site, was one of Mississippi's premier blues and rhythm and blues nightclubs from the late 1940s through the early 1960s. Owner Clarence Chinn presented the top national acts, including B. B. King, Bobby Blue Bland, Little Junior Parker, James Brown, Ivory Joe Hunter, Big Joe Turner, Hank Ballard & the Midnighters, and the Platters. In the 1960s the club also served as an important meeting place for civil rights workers. Club Desire – or New Club Desire, as it was actually named for most its tenure – was a Canton landmark for several decades, renowned for providing the African American community with first-class entertainment in a celebratory but elegant atmosphere, with strict codes enforced for dress and behavior. Its shows drew patrons from Memphis and New Orleans, and former Cantonites from Chicago and points beyond often attended family reunions and gala holiday events here. Founded by Clarence Chinn (1906-1995) in the 1940s as the Blue Garden, the club was rebuilt after a fire and renamed New Club Desire in the early 1950s. The name Club Desire was first used by a popular nightspot on Desire Street in New Orleans.

The club also earned a place in blues recording history in January 1952 when Modern Records of California rented it to set up a portable tape machine to record several songs by legendary Canton singer-guitarist Elmore James (1918-1963). Modern’s talent scout, Ike Turner from Clarksdale, played piano on the session. Two local members of James’s band, Ernest “Frock” Odell and Precious “Little Hat” Whitehead, were probably also on the recordings. Most published accounts of this session have erroneously cited the name as the Club Bizarre.

Ironically, despite James’s posthumous fame among blues fans, he and other local down-home bluesmen rarely played at New Club Desire, although they did perform for Clarence Chinn’s brother C.O. (1919-1999) at his café on Franklin Street, as well as for Frank Williams at a big dance hall in the Sawmill Quarters. New Club Desire favored touring blues and soul bands with horn sections and professional talent revues. B.B. King, Bobby Bland, and Hank Ballard & the Midnighters were recalled as particular favorites, and the talent roster also featured Little Milton, Albert King, Ted Taylor, Memphis Slim, Joe Simon, and many more. Clarence Chinn sometimes coordinated bookings with Tom Wince, who owned the Blue Room, a prominent Vicksburg venue, so that acts could play in both towns while on tour.

After Chinn decided to focus his energy on real estate and housing, New Club Desire was operated by Leonard Garrett, George Raymond, and Eddie Newton. Raymond and C.O. Chinn were Canton’s leading civil rights activists in the 1960s. At various times New Club Desire was used for private parties and meetings of civic, social, and civil rights organizations. The club closed in the 1970s.

Content © Mississippi Blues Commission

JANUARY 29, 1952 TUESDAY

Hank Williams plays his first concert since a December back operation in Richmond, Virginia. At the hotel, he drinks a mixture of tomato juice and rubbing alcohol, then gives a poor, abbreviated show. Ray Price fills in with a 40-minute set.

The Maddox Brothers & Rose hold their first recording session for Columbia Records after a split with the Four Star label.

JANUARY 30, 1952 WEDNESDAY

Addressing a female reporter who gave the prior night's show a bad review, Hank Williams dedicates a song to a ''gracious lady writer'' on stage in Richmond, then plays ''Mind Your Own Business''.

''The Las Vegas'' opens in theaters with leading roles for Jane Russell and Victor mature. The motion picture also has a secondary part for ''Georgia On My Mind'' songwriter Hoagy Carmichael.

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Chess/Modern/Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©