CONTAINS
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> Back 1957 Sun Schedule <

1957 SESSIONS 9
September 1, 1957 to September 30, 1957

Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, September 5, 10, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, September 6, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Cliff, Barbara & Ed Thomas, September 15, 1957 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

SEPTEMBER 1957

ANNOUNCING A NEW WORLD OF ENTERTAINMENT add reads:

If you're in any way connected with the music business, you're no doubt heard about Sam C. Phillips, perhaps met him. Sam is his own best press agent - personable and friendly. He gets around, makes a good impression, and for years he's been telling the Sun story. Now - someone else is getting a change to tell the story. This account is biased only in that - I like Sam and I believe in Sam, almost as much as Sam believes in Sam.

"Dynamic" is the key word in the 34-year life-to-date of Sam C. Phillips. For Sam, life has been an adventure - market by change, change, change. At times hard, but never boring. Home to Sam was Florence, Alabama, a rather humble but happy household with eight children and "the finest Mother anybody ever had".

Like so many intellectually inclined persons, Sam took an intense interest in religion in his early years. Sam says at one time he wanted to be a minister, but it was one of those heroic young dreams which never was realized. We may surmise, however, that this reflective, genuine spiritual inclination has shaped and still influences the record world's Sam C. Phillips. radio is the route Sam elected to follow after graduating from high school. He was a good radio man - engineer, announcer, production supervisor, what-have-you. He made the leap to recording in 1950 - but that's a story for pages to come.

Sam's appearances is like his manner - informal and relaxed. Office attire means sport shirt, loafers, and loud sox to Sam His blue eyes are humorous and his tongish hair is brown - and all the girls think he's the greatest.

Sam says, "You don't have to figure me out. I'm the simplest man you ever met". And those who meet him casually can do that. He is honest, straightfolward, even-tempered, congenial. However, spend some time with him, and you'll observe that he was a mind that gathers, sorts, and assimilates facts like an IBM machine; a powerful will that pushes right through to its goal looking neither to the left nor to the right; tenacity like a snapping turtle; and a strong, strong self-confident that likes challenge above all things.

And I said - I like Sam Phillips. You probably would, too, for there's a lot there to like.

Federal troops are sent to Little Rock, Arkansas, to escort nine black students to Central High School, enforging integration of the public schools.

SEPTEMBER 1957

Johnny Cash has throat surgery in Memphis, and ceases touring until mid-October.

Jerry Lee Lewis' "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" is in the National Top 10 while holding the number one spot on both the Country and Rhythm and Blues charts.

Sam Phillips launches the Phillips International label, to be run in conjunction with Sun Records. Certainly, Phillips International releases were being recorded in the same tiny magic studio at 706 Union Avenue. And even if some of the artist names were initially unfamiliar, weren't those the same backing musicians playing on Phillips International as on Sun Records. But what about the label itself. Gone were the bright yellow sun rays, not to mention the rooster of 78rpm days. In their place was a subdued blue map of the world (with most of Europe and all of Asia conspicuously missing). Even with these geographic distortions, there were plainly bigger aspirations here. This was an international corporation, or so the label suggested. Actually, the fine print on the bottom of the label restricted its reach to New York, Memphis and Hollywood. Hardly international, but still bigger than just Memphis.

That was the problem. Who needed another record company from New York or California? There were plenty of those large, characterless corporations. We wanted a small, regional label that exuded irreverent energy and marched to its own drummer (preferably J.M. Van Eaton). In essence, we wanted Sun Records! If Phillips International was willing to provide more of those, then fine. We'd make allowances for the tepid looking label. But if this was going to be a way of selling out using a Memphis address, then we wanted no part of Phillips International? And so Sun fans took a wait-and-see attitude in the fall of 1957.

In truth, if there was a corporate philosophy or musical direction in that first batch of five Phillips International releases, it was hard to detect. They were, to put it bluntly, all over the map. Two of them might have fit in with what Sun was releasing in 1957. Two of them were plainly mellow poppish affairs that any true Sun fan would disdain, and one, an instrumental, was hard to figure. Was it big band rockabilly? Needless to say, we now know that the unclassifiable instrumental by Bill Justis was the one to take the nation by storm and provide Phillips International with a massive hit almost as soon as it came into being.

As for whether a particular corporate philosophy ever guided the Phillips International label, its really anybody's guess. On more than one occasion Sam Phillips expressed a concern that disc jockeys and distributors would only give a certain amount of attention to each label. If a package of sic Sun 45s came into a radio station, maybe only three or four of them would get a serious listen before the dee-jay or program-director moved on to the packages from Atlantic, Chess, Liberty and RCA. If two or three of those singles happened to be by Johnny Cash or Jerry Lee Lewis, that made it even harder for a new or second tier Sun artist to get a break or some airplay. By splitting releases between Sun Records and Phillips International, Sam Phillips believed he was giving his artist (not to mention, his copyrights) a better shot at fame and fortune. Whether or not Phillips International was to represent a "softer", more commercial sound (as opposed to the backporch rockabilly increasingly associated with Sun Records) is - with 40 years hindsight - still unclear. Certainly, there was more pop music issued on Phillips International than Sun. But, then, just as you were ready to write off the Phillips International label as an uptown sellout, they would issue something to turn your head around and drag you back into the fold.

SEPTEMBER 1957

Hayden Thompson's "Love My Baby"/"One Broken Heard" in the first batch of releases on the newly-lauched Phillips International disc, the instrumental "Raunchy" by Bill Justis, started to become a major hit. The Sun?Phillips promotional campaign swung Justis, good as "Love My Baby" was.

SEPTEMBER 3, 1957 TUESDAY

THE SAM C. PHILLIPS INTERNATIONAL LABEL...
The Sam C. Phillips International label is the latest outgrowth of an idea. The idea man was this fellow, Sam, that we've been talking about, and the idea was two-fold:

(1) to develop new talent and (2) to bring universal acceptance to the country and race music which a majority of people either shunned or furtively enjoyed when there was no one around to take note.

When Sun Record Company was organized, it began solely as a colored rhythm and blues operation. This was fine for awhile.

Then, Sam began to be obsessed with the idea, "if I could just find a white man that sings like a Negro". That man finally came along, Elvis Presley. Sun launched him, then sold his contract, and the rest is common knowledge.

Sun has also launched other unknowns with notable success: Carl "Blue Suede Shoes" Perkins; Johnny "I Walk The Line" Cash; and most recently, Jerry Lee "Whole Lotta Shakin'" Lewis.

These kids, and that's the only term for the foursome just mentioned, have been the living realization of the "unknown talent" part of Sam Phillips' dream. Just turn on the radio, check the top 40 tunes, and the answer to the second part of the idea is waiting for you. Rock and roll not only carries no stigma, its the hottest thing out since sliced bread.

Now comes Sam C. Phillips International, a label which will devoted also to the development of new talent. Many of the earlier releases will be rock and roll; future plans call for a wide variety of music, including standard pop and jazz. Four artists are featured initially, and the recordings of each will have an individual "sound", a production element which Sam Phillips personally and constantly looks for, produces, and insists upon in any record. International releases of Phillips International records is the objective of the new P.I. label, not only good from a business standpoint, but also because the Phillips people believe that music is the international language, can make friends, bridge the geographical and cultural barriers, and perhaps promote a bit of international understanding. Who knows? Maybe so!

This whole story, the "why" and "how" that Memphis became the rock and roll capital of the world, is largely Sam's story. To his dynamic personality and intense drive it can be largely attributed. And yet, there are so many people who have played the supportive roll. Brother Jud Phillips, sales and Promotion Director of Sun and Phillips International, a man behind the scenes, but a powerful factor nonetheless. Sally Wilbourn, Girl Friday to Sam. Regina Reese, promotion writer specializing in artist activities. Bill Justis, music director. Jack Clement, Engineer. And many others who have played significant parts in P.I's development.

If you wonder, who is the author of this article, and wherein lies authority to speak, may I say that I am in no way affiliated with Sun or Phillips International. Neither am I a relative. I am friend, critic, observer, and more than anything else, one of the great public to which the record company at 706 Union owes its almost unbelievable success.

Sam Phillips' Phillips International adds below reports:

BUDDY BLAKE

The name of Buddy Blake has appeared on major records labels, although this is his first release for Phillips International.

Both sides of Buddy's current release are ballads - the kind of song that fits Buddy's "tender tenor" voice. The titles are "You Passed Me By" and "Please Convince Me".

Although its been quite awhile since Buddy was a teenager, he has a feel for youthful music and is popular with the younger set. Perhaps he's hep because he has training on the home scene" he's father of two high-school-aged children.

Buddy has had a fascinating and varied career. In addition to many show business stints (including guest appearances on major TV networks), he pitched pro ball with the Detroit Tigers farm system. His home is in Memphis.

Here he is, ladies and gentlement - Buddy Blake.

HAYDEN THOMPSON

Hayden Thompson joins the ranks of young rock and roll recording artists with his Phillips International disc, "Love My Baby" b/w "One Broken Heart".

Hayden is 19 years old and hails from Booneville, Mississippi. Answering random questions, Hayden says concerning his career: "I've had a guitar as long as I can remember... My Mamma and daddy are my biggest boosters.

He says on happiness, "Sure, I'm happy. But I'd be a lot happier if I could sell a million records". On the success of rock and roll he says, "The world was just run down and tired, and rock and roll put it back on its feet".

Billy Riley's band backs up Hayden on the disc, Jerry Lee Lewis' pumping piano is heard on "Love My Baby". "One Broken Heart" is a Hayden Thompson tune. Here is a rock and roll singer whose enthusiasm and easy manner of putting over a song are going to take him far. Meet Hayden Thompson!

BARBARA PITTMAN

Barbara Pittman makes her debut on the Phillips International label with two sides that are different in mood, yet both sure to be popular with the young, record bying public these days.

The first is a ballad, "Two Young Fools In Love" - and Barbara sings it with genuine feeling and tenderness. The flip side really rocks - "I'm Gettin' Better All The Time".

Barbara aspires to follow in the footsteps of another Memphis songstress, Kay Starr. Barbara's voice has been compared to Kay Starr's - husky, emotional, and vibrant.

"Sweet and Sultry" - that's the intriguing Miss Pittman. The nickname "Tiger" fits her perfectly - because of her tawny hair and an easy, catlike way of moving. Listen to her, and see if you don't agree that the future looks definitely bright for this talented 19-year-old.

BILL JUSTIS

"Raunchy" by Bill Justis will be a hit, or all the people at Phillips International will miss a strong bet. This tune is strictly rock and roll, but with a fresh approach by bandleader Justis.

Backing "Raunchy" is "The Midnite Man", with vocal by Roger Fake and The Spinners.

Bill Justis is a veteran in the music field, although he's only 30. As music director of Sun Records Co. and Phillips International, Bill can take credit not only for recordings in his name, but for production on other releases.

Although Bill plays rock and roll on his P.I. introductory disc, he also likes to play Dixieland and modern jazz. Bill is the quiet type basically - devoted to his wife and daughter. He says he went to all lengths to avoid a career in music (we don't know why!) - even to getting a B.A degree in English. But here he is, with the newest and most unique record company in the country, Phillips International! Bill's music is sure to please the record lovers of America.

UNKNOWN DATE SEPTEMBER 1957

Billy Riley and The Little Green Men performed at Municipal Airport, Jonesboro, Arkansas, for the Craighead County Fair. The Fair is operated by a board composed of members of the Jonesboro Jaycees and the Craighead County Farm Bureau.

SEPTEMBER 1, 1957 SUNDAY

Chet Atkins becomes the manager of RCA's Nashville operations when Steve Sholes is appointed to run the label's pop division.

Elvis Presley performs at Seattle's Rainier Ballpark. In the audience is future rock guitarist Jimi Hendrix.

SEPTEMBER 2, 1957 MONDAY

Drummer Joe Porcaro has a son, Steve Porcaro, in Hartford, Connecticut. Two years after Dad plays on the Glen Campbell hit ''Southern Nights'' Steve emerges as a member of the rock band Toto.

Decca released Webb Pierce's double-sided hit single ''Holiday For Love'' and ''Don't Do It Darlin'''.

Candence Records released The Everly Brothers' ''Wake Up Little Susie''.

SEPTEMBER 3, 1957 TUESDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''Anna Marie'' during a late-night session at the RCA Studios on McGavock Street in Nashville.

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''The Story Of My Life''.

The Mello-Kings appear on "American Bandstand".

SEPTEMBER 4, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis files for divorce from his second wife, Jane, accusing her of adultery and cursing in public.

The National Guard on the order of Governor Orval Faubus is used to prevent nine African American students from entering Central High School in Little Rock and shortly after Federal troops charge defiant protesters with fixed bayonets to ensure nine African American Students can attend Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas. During September of 1957 nine African-American students enrolled at Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas, a formerly all-white school, in what was one of the most important moments during the early Civil Rights Movement. Known as the “Little Rock Nine,” Carlotta Walls, Elizabeth Eckford, Ernest Green, Gloria Ray, Minnijean Brown, Terrence Roberts, Melba Patillo, Thelma Mothers, and Jefferson Thomas were encouraged by the Arkansas NAACP to be the first determined students to integrate the school. The nine students attempted to enter the school on the first day of classes on September 4, but were blocked by the National Guard as ordered by the Governor, Orval Faubus. Later in the month, the National Guard was removed and the nine students attempted to enter the school again while escorted by police and were successful in entering the building. However, violence broke out within the crowd of protesters upon their entrance and the students were told to leave as the school administrators were worried for their safety. 5. Two days later President Eisenhower ordered federal troops to escort the students and they were able to complete their first full day of school on September 25th. Of the nine, eight students successfully completed their first year of school at the newly desegregated Little Rock Central High School. They faced harassment and attacks throughout the year. Minnijean Brown had been expelled during the year after she had retaliated against an attack by white students. Ernest Green became the first black student to graduate from Little Rock Central High School in May of 1958. After the school year had ended the Governor of Arkansas ordered Little Rock high schools to be closed as the state grappled with the issue of integration. The schools remained closed until August of 1959.

SEPTEMBER 5, 1957 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Blue Christmas'' to begin three days of sessions for his first holiday album. Elvis also cuts ''Treat Me Nice''. The session are held at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

Studio session for Jerry Lee Lewis at Sun Records in Memphis, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SEPTEMBER 5, 10, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

Jerry Lee Lewis virtually lived in the Sun studio during 1957. To our benefit, the tapes appear to have been rolling continuously. Ostensibly, he was working on his forthcoming LP, but the truth is he was a virtual encyclopedia of the kind of music Sam Phillips loved best, and was turning the pages as the tapes rolled.

1 - "WHY SHOULD I CRY OVER YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Zeke Clements
Publisher: - Hill and Range Songs Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-A7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-2 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''Why Should I Cry Over You'' recorded here by Jerry Lee Lewis was written by Zeke Clement and was an American country musician and songwriter often dressed in a Western outfit. He was known as "The Dixie Yodeler."

Clements was born on September 6, 1911 near Empire, Alabama. In 1928, his career began when he joined Otto Gray and his Oklahoma Cowboys touring show and was signed to the National Barn Dance at WLS in Chicago. In 1930, he performed on WSM Grand Ole Opry for the first time. In 1933, he became a member of the Bronco Busters, led by Texas Ruby. Zeke Clements and The Bronco Busters became members of the Opry in the 1930s. In the 1930 and 1940s, Clements appeared as a singing cowboy in several of Charles Starrett's B-Westerns. During this time, he also provided the voice of Bashful, the yodeling dwarf, in Walt Disney's ''Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs'', 1937 film.

Clements formed the Western Swing Gang and returned to the Opry in 1939. His first songwriting success was with the World War II saber-rattling "Smoke On The Water" in 1944. The song was recorded by Red Foley in 1944 and became the number 1 country recording of 1945. Clements also wrote the big Eddy Arnold hits "Why Should I Cry'', "Just a Little Lovin' (Will Go a Long, Long Way)" and "Somebody's Been Beatin' My Time''. Also in 1945, he started Liberty Records in Southern California. It was later renamed Blazon Records. After a short stint on the Louisiana Hayride in the later 1940s, he appeared on several radio stations in the South. In the 1960s, he moved to Florida and joined a Dixieland band as banjo player. Zeke Clements died in Nashville, Tennessee in on June 4, 1994.

2(1) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter, Take 1
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-10-30 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Despite having already recorded what proved to be the master, there may well have been a determination that a better version of the song might be secured using the ''clavi-chord'' sound set up, for inclusion alongside ''Mean Woman Blues'' on the planned EP (''The Great Ball Of Fire'', Sun EP 107). No fewer than ten further stabs at ''I'm Feelin' Sorry'' ensued but, at the last, Sam seems to have decided that the best of the earlier takes had the most worth after all. The results of the ''clavichord'' session reflect an understanding of the song that isn't so apparent in the first installment. Jerry Lee Lewis exhibits many frills in his playing, with more variety in the instrumental breaks and slight changes to the vocal which suggest that he's keen to find some way of distinguishing one take from the next; hesitating here, stretching a vowel there. The solos become steadily more assertive as the session progress. And yet the drumming reflects no great enthusiasm; whoever has the sticks, and it's not thought to be Jimmy Van Eaton, sleepwalks through their work here when compared to the effort made on the earlier recordings of the song. Jerry Lee himself also seems to be frustrated by tunning issues with the piano and eventually his pounding of the keys sounds almost aggressive. Despite there being no discernible use of the guitar on these ''clavichord'' takes of ''I'm Feelin' Sorry'', there is an understanding that Roland Janes was in the studio at the time. This is supported by the fact that the instrument is to be heard on the less than impressive run-through of ''Why Should I Cry Over You'', the only other title that flaunts the ''clavichord'' effect and which, it is reasonable to assume, dates from the same session.(*)

2(2) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2)- B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Chatter, Take 2
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - March 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD Charly 70-7 mono
RARE AND ROCKIN'
Reissued: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(3) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(4) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-A4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-30 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

2(5) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-11-2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(6) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Distorted Take 6
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(7) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Distorted Take 7
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-10 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(8) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 8
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-11 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(9) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 9
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-12 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(10) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 10
Recorded: - September 5, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-4-13 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

he next track "Mean Woman Blues" is a 12-bar blues song written by Claude DeMetrius. It was first recorded by Elvis Presley as part of the soundtrack for his 1957 motion picture, Loving You. Presley also released the song on Side 2 of a four-song EP record. The Elvis Presley version of "Mean Woman Blues" went to number 11 on the rhythm and blues charts.

Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a version of the song on Sun Records which was released on September 1957 as part of an EP, ''The Great Ball Of Fire'' (Sun EPA 107). Lewis also recorded his version of the song on the 1964 live album ''Live At The Star Club, Hamburg'' with The Nashville Teens. The song was also featured as the B-side to the UK release of his hit "Great Balls of Fire" (London 8529). Jerry Lee Lewis' version differed significantly lyrically from the Claude DeMetrius version as recorded by Elvis Presley. Roy Orbison's 1963 recording used the lyrics from the 1957 Jerry Lee Lewis version.

In 1959, Cliff Richard and The Shadows recorded a studio version on their Cliff Sings album. 1950s rockabilly artist Glen Glen from Los Angeles recorded a version of this song for England's Ace label which was released on the album "Everybody's Movin' Again" (Ace CDCH 403) using the same musicians from his 1950s Era records.

In 1963, the song was recorded with "Blue Bayou" as a 45rpm single by Roy Orbison that went to number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 music charts. The Roy Orbison version was based on the 1957 Jerry Lee Lewis recording. The song was recorded by The Spencer Davis Group on their album ''Autumn '66'' with Stevie Winwood on lead vocals. Jay and the Americans released a cover version of the song on their 1969 album, ''Sands of Time''. Although the song was written in the mid-1950s, many similarly titled though different songs with the same theme had emerged decades previously. These include "Jimmie's Mean Mama Blues," a Jimmie Rodgers composition covered also by Bob Wills, Moon Mullican's "Mean Mama Blues," and Ernest Tubb's "Mean Mama Blues''.

3 - "MEAN WOMAN BLUES" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:23
Composer: - Claude DeMetruis
Publisher: - Gladys Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - EP Master
Recorded: - September 10, 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA-107-A1 mono
THE GREAT BALL OF FIRE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-32 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''Mean Woman Blues'' stands apart as a consummate performance, there being no outtakes or enduring evidence of any rehearsals. The other ''thumb tack'' recordings, of ''Why Should I Cry Over You'' and ''I'm Feelin' Sorry'', are looser, and far from perfect; the regrettable lack of any ''tasters'' of Lewis's definitive interpretation of ''Mean Woman Blues'' may well signify that it was recorded on a separate occasion, a few days later, with evidence of any run-throughs perhaps having been dispensed with once the surviving tape had been mastered and copies despatched to the pressing plants. Or maybe Jerry Lee simply cut it in one unsurpassable take. (*)

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Unknown - Guitar
Sidney Manker - Bass
Otis Jett - Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 1957

Hayden Thompson was one of the artists released on the initial pressings of Phillips International but who, unfortunately, never became a household word. The interview Barbara Barnes had with him for the pamphlet she wrote for the label's debut and learned he was from Booneville, Mississippi, just down the road apiece from Barbara's home in Corinth. He said to her that he, like Jerry Lee Lewis, had sold eggs his mother accumulated from raising chickens in order to finance his first trip to Memphis. He found studio sideman work at Sun through playing the clubs with Billy Riley's band. He had high hopes for his first record, but it fizzled. The second time Barbara recall encountering Hayden concerned a moment when he and Jack Clement come close to blows.

The band wasn't there, it was just Hayden alone at the microphone going through some tunes, trying with Jack Clement to work up something for his session. The guys said that Jack sometimes liked to goad musicians to make them do their best, and don't know if that was his strategy that day or what. Anyhow, he must have said something Hayden took exception to, because what heard coming out of the mike was Hayden shouting, ''Ain't no son of a bitch in short pants gonna talk to me that way''.

Hayden was referring to Jack Clement's Bermuda shorts, a rare costume for men in the mid-South in those days, and certainly not one you'd see in a place of business. Jack was in what they called his ''Dr. Livingston'' period, with a safari helmet to match the pants. According to Barbara, ''I rushed out of my office and through the studio partly out of curiosity and partly in hopes my sudden appearance would forestall physical blows. Hayden quieted down, and soon they were working on songs again''.

The only other time Barbara Barnes heard of Jack's almost getting into an altercation with a musician concerned Billy Riley. It had to do with one of Jack's efforts to attract the opposite sex. Jack had been married and divorced (a pretty lady named Doris was his ex) in June 1957, and he was thinking a lot about girls. Sam Phillips had driven up one day with a head of wavy bright blond hair, a striking change from his normal brown color. So Jack decided to go blond, too. His transformation was actually more effective, as the bleach job was more subtle. He was also considering growing his hair long. ''Chicks dig long moss'', he told, though, as time went on, he didn't let his hair grow nearly as long as Sam did his.

On the other hand, when he decided his nose wasn't his most attractive feature, he did something about it. Elvis had a nose job and had paid for his friend, the sleek and voluble George Klein, to have an elegant new nose, too. They thought Jack's nose was fine, a good Gallic nose as befit his ancestry. But he went in for plastic surgery, and when Regina Reese and Barbara Barnes visited Jack in the hospital, they found him swathed in bandages over much of his face. When they came off, he looked fine, but couldn't tell much difference.

It was the nose job that was the focus of the narrowly averted fight with Billy Riley. The pugnacious Riley took offense at something Jack said during a session and charged into the control room for a fight. Jack backed off. ''No, man. My nose, watch my nose''. It had barely had time to heal, and Jack was terrified that the surgical efforts would be destroyed.

Besides being the day-to-day musical contact that the Sun musicians looked to, some of them depended on Jack for their nighttime entertainment. Jack had an apartment not far from the studios where he welcomed the musicians to ''orgies'' which when heard them described seemed to be more like frat parties. The girls weren't privy to many details, but the events seemed to involve some drinking and adolescent pranks, such as jumping into the pool from the roof. Jack Clement and various others in the Sun crowd had motorcycles, and they have heard that the guys, even Elvis in time past, sometimes went for nude bike rides. Nudity seemed to be a big thing. Roy Scott, dignified lawyer though he was, attended one of the parties and reported seeing Jerry Lee Lewis sitting atop a refrigerator in the altogether.

An accumulation of annoyances and complaints from other tenants moved the landlord to decide he no longer required Jack as a tenant. Far from being nonplussed, Jack Clement considered being evicted some kind of accomplishment and proudly showed a copy of his eviction letter. Then he got a house far from Union Avenue and asked Barbara to help him shop for furniture, which she enjoyed doing. At that point, Jack's role as party host toned down considerably.

On many Sunday nights, he still joined up with George Klein and other friends but to go to East Trigg baptist Church, which reserved an area in the back of the church for young whites who came regularly to drink in the sounds of the church's spirited gospel singers and musicians. The Reverent Herbert Brewster, who sang, wrote songs that had been million-sellers, and preached the gospel, presided over a black congregation that indeed could make a joyful noise.

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On the strength of his Phillips International record, Hayden Thompson went into the Sun studio again in the fall of 1957. He was armed with two good songs and a lot of hope. Roland Janes led a slightly different version of the Riley band on this September session which produced passable versions of "Don't You Worry" and "Congratulations To You, Joe", although neither was quite a finished master.

Not only was this career best recording passed over, it escaped its rightful heritage due to the master tape being misfiled. Rather that the artist taking on what would have been an unlikely pseudonym, the tape box apparently referred to a Sid Watson, who had no involvement in the session.

Beyond Sun, Hayden made his way to Chicago where he cut a custom 45 for the dimestore BEAT label, whilst further sides appeared on Profile and Arlen.

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: POSSIBLY FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 6, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

Thompson himself confirmed it, as indeed does aural evident. Thompson believes that "Don't You Worry" and one other title were recorded at Hi circa 1959, although the recording has the signature Sun sound and J.M. Van Eaton and Roland Janes don't remember cutting with Hayden Thompson at Hi Records. Its hard to account for the song presence in a box marked "Sid Watson" the likeliest explanation is that the recording or copies or edits were done at Sun Records and that safeties were stored in a tape box previously used for Sid Watson, who might even have been one of Sam Phillips' commercial accounts.

01 - "DON'T YOU WORRY" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 6, 1957
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm 270131-2-4 mono
LOVE MY BABY
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-8 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

"Don't You Worry" is a considerable rocker with electric bass this time by Stan Kesler and piano by Jimmy Wilson. Hayden's vocal is as sharp and upfront as anything he had recorded to date, and this song could have been a real candidate for release given another take or two and maybe one more verse.

"Congratulations To You, Joe" is a rockaballad of equal promise, probably inspired by Presley's movie ballads but not performed as any kind of vocal imitation. Again, another take or two and a proper solo toward the end and this could have seen a release. For some reason, the tape was filed away under the name of Sid Watson and only surfaced when drummer Jimmy Van Eaton told researchers years later that he recognised it as a Hayden Thompson session.

02 - "CONGRATULATIONS TO YOU, JOE" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 6, 1957
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm 270131-2-33 mono
LOVE MY BABY
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-9 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Note: These two songs were originally issued in the 1980s under the name Sid Watson.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Stan Kesler - Bass

For Biography of Hayden Thompson see: > The Sun Biographies <
Hayden Thompson's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 1957
THE FRONT ROW
__________________________

Does Elvis Have A Nom de Disc?
By Edwin Howard
Press-Scimitar Amusement Editor

THERE'S A RUMOR going around Europe that Hayden Thompson, who had a couple of sides out under Memphis' Sun label a few years ago, was really Elvis Presley, under what you might call a nom de disc.

I got the rumor from "Elvis News", a monthly newspaper mimeographed in Flemish, French and English by Hubert Vindevogel in Antwerp, Belgium. Hubert is pretty incensed over the report that "I Love My Baby" by Hayden Thompson was really an old Presley master which Sun's Sam Phillips allegedly held back when he sold his discovery's contract and masters to RCA. "To think" Hubert seethed, "that there are people who believe it, that RCA and, before everything, Elvis and the Colonel, as well as Sam Phillips himself, would have agreed to such a trick".

I didn't for a minute believe it myself. After all, if it had really been Elvis on that record, wouldn't all his fans have recognized his voice and bought a million copies? Still, we newspapermen have to run these vicious rumors down, so I called Stan Kesler, who runs Phillips' Memphis studio now. Stan got a good laugh out of it. He remembered playing on a couple of Hayden Thompson's sessions, though he doesn't think Sun ever released more than one record. "He was a tall, black-headed boy from Mississippi as I remember", Stan said, adding that he was not Elvis Presley.

SEPTEMBER 7, 1957 SATURDAY

Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps appear on the "Big D Jamboree" in Dallas, Texas.

SEPTEMBER 6, 1957 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Don't'' at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

Joe Smith is born in Portland, Maine. He becomes the drummer for Sawyer Brown, behind the kit for such hits as ''Thank God For You'', ''The Race Is On'', ''Six Days On The Road'' and ''Step That Step''.

The Everly Brothers begin a major concert tour with Chuck Berry, Buddy Knox, The Drifters, Paul Anka, Fats Domino and Buddy Holly, among others.

Faron and Hilda Young gave a son, Robin Young.

Songwriter Liz Rose is born in Irving, Texas. She co-writes such Taylor Swift hits as ''You Belong With Me'', ''White Horse'' and ''Teardrops On My Guitar'', plus The Eli Young Band's ''Crazy Girl''\ and Little Big Town's ''Girl Crush''.

SEPTEMBER 7, 1957 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley receives letters of resignation from guitar player Scotty Moore and bass player Bill Black.

Margot Chapman, of The Starland Vocal Band, is born in Honolulu, Hawaii. The group has a 1976 hit on the John Denver-owned Windsong label with ''Afternoon Delight'', which is covered as a country hit by Johnny Carver.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1957 SUNDAY

Jimmie Rogers sings ''Honeycomb'' on ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Others who appeared on the some, live from New York, include Paul Anka, Della Reese and The Chordettes.

SEPTEMBER 9, 1957 MONDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis takes ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On'' to the top of the Billboard country and rhythm and blues singles charts to number 1, falling just short in the pop field, where in one of the great miscarriages of musical justice it was eclipsed by Canadian teenager Paul Anka's saccharine ''Diana'' and film actress Debbie Reynolds' even more saccharine ''Tammy''.

SEPTEMBER 13, 1957 FRIDAY

The Everly Brothers sing "Wake Up Little Susie" on "American Bandstand and "Wake Up Little Susie" is banned from the airwaves in Boston for lyrical content.

Mercury/Starday records sign song writer J.P. "Jape'' Richardson, a disk jockey at KTRM, Beaumont, Texas.

The Nelsons are in litigation with Verve Records over Rickey's recording contract. Verve who had issued his first two releases sues for breech of contract when Ricky signs with Imperial Records.

The Nelsons countersue asking for $42,000 in unpaid royalties. Then Verve countersues for one million dollars in damages.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1957 SATURDAY

The singles Sun 277, Billy Riley ''Red Hot'' b/w ''Pearly Lee''; Sun 278, Tommy Blake ''Lordy Hoody'' b/w ''Flat Foot Sam'' released.

"Home Of The Blues" b/w ''Give Me Love To Rose'' (Sun 279) by Johnny Cash released which reaches numbers 5 on the country charts in September.

''The Jimmy Dean Show'' airs on CBS-TV, ending a two-month run in prime time as it reverts back to a daily program.

The western ''Have Gun, Will Travel'' airs for the first time on CBS-TV. Johnny Western performs the theme song, ''The Ballad Of Paladin''.

SEPTEMBER 15, 1957 SUNDAY

Sun 270, Jimmy Williams' ''Please Don't Cry Over Me'' b/w ''That Depends On You'' released.

Patsy Cline marries Charlie Dick at her mothers home in Winchester, Virginia.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The Thomas family were frequent visitors to the Sun studio between 1957 and 1959. Their efforts resulted in two singles issued under the trio's name, one single under brother Cliff's name, and one single featuring sister Barbara. The Thomas siblings were masters (and a mistress) of white pop music, often with more bite than usual, owing to brother Ed's bluesy piano stylings.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CLIFF, ED & BARBARA THOMAS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 15, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Avoiding the temptation to exploit their family jewels, Sam Phillips label-copied the three Thomas siblings in several permutations, sometimes as Cliff Thomas, Ed and Barbara, then on other occasions as plain and simple, Cliff Thomas. The threesome hailed from Jackson, Mississippi and arrived on Sun's doorstep in the summer of 1957. Four quality singles emerged on the company's Phillips International subsidiary, although the smart-licked "Jumpin' Jack" wasn't one of them.

01 - "JUMPIN' JACK" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Cliff Thomas
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1957
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Sun England (CD) 500/200rpm CD 33-24 mono
THOSE ROCKIN' GALS
Reissued: - 2002 Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-5-7 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

02 - ''DANCE LITTLE GIRL'' - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: Cliff Thomas
Publisher: -Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - September 15, 1957
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-21 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS

03 - ''TREAT ME RIGHT'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Ed Thomas Jr.
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - September 15, 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Cliff Thomas - Vocal and Guitar
Ed Thomas - Vocal - piano
Barbara Thomas - Vocal
Stan Kesler - Bass
Sid Manker - Guitar
Nat Tassinario – Drums

For Biography of The Thomas Family see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Thomas Family's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER 16, 1957 MONDAY

Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps and the Diamonds appear on ABC-TV.

Imperial released Ricky Nelson's ''Be-Bop baby''.

SEPTEMBER 17, 1957 TUESDAY

Wanda Jackson recorded the pop hit ''Fujiyama Mama'' at the Capitol studios in Hollywood during an evening session.

SEPTEMBER 18, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley's father, Vernon, sends a letter to guitar player Scotty Moore and bass player Bill Black, accepting their resignation.

The CNS-TV series ''The Big Record'' debuts, with host Patti Page.

''Wagon Train'' make his debut , is an American Western series that ran on NBC 1957–62 and then on AMC 1962–65, although the network also aired daytime repeats, as ''Major Adams'', ''Trailmaster'' and ''Trailmaster'' (post-1961 episodes without original series lead Ward Bond), from January 1963 to September 1965. The show debuted at number 15 in the Nielsen rating, rose to number 2 in the next three seasons, and peaked at number 1 in the 1961–62 television season. After moving to ABC in the autumn of 1962, the ratings began to decline, and''Wagon Train'' did not again make the Top 20 listing.

The series initially starred veteran movie supporting actor Ward Bond as the wagon master, later replaced upon his death by John McIntire, and Robert Horton as the scout, subsequently replaced by Scott Miller and Robert Fuller.

The series was inspired by the 1950 film ''Wagon Master'' directed by John Ford and starring Ben Johnson, Harry Carey Jr. and Ward Bond, and harkens back to the early widescreenwagon train epic ''The Big Trail'' (1930) starring John Wayne and featuring Bond in his first major screen appearance playing a supporting role. Horton's buckskin outfitt as the scout in the first season of thetelevision series resembles Wayne's, who also played the wagon train's scout in the earlier film.

SEPTEMBER 19, 1957 THURSDAY

Carl Smith marries Goldie Hill.

SEPTEMBER 19, 1958

On this day start The Mid-South Fair is a fair that was held for many years held in Memphis, Tennessee, every year in late September and early October. It is now held in neighboring northwest Mississippi. It hosts many shows and attractions, as well as different types of rides and concession stands. Not only is it popular in the Memphis area, but also in the adjacent states of Mississippi and Arkansas, and even nearby Missouri. The fair's official website states, "As a non-profit organization, our mission is not to make money. Rather, the Fair exists to create a cultural and entertainment experience that exposes the people in our community to items and events they might not otherwise encounter. In addition, we serve as a focal point for all sorts of organizations and communities."

The event was last held in Memphis from September 19–28, 2008, in its 152nd year. The fair has been held at the Lander's Center in Southhaven, Mississippi since September 2009 and will remain there until at least 2019.

The Shelby County Agricultural Society agreed to host the second fair in the fall of 1856. During World War I, the military used the Mid South Fair to find recruits. In 1908, the name was changed to the Tri-State Fair to encourage more people in areas around Memphis to attend the fair. In 1911, African American Memphians founded the Negro Tri State Fair, which was discontinued in 1959.

In 2008, the city of Memphis announced that it would not renew the fair's lease on the grounds, which is owned by the city. The fair then announced that it would move to the casino resort area in Tunica County, at a new site along U.S. Highway 61. The project was cancelled in 2009 due to poor economic conditions. The fair planned to temporarily use the Lander's Center in Southaven as a temporary host; however, due to the cancellation of the Tunica project, this location has been secured until at least 2019. The fair lasts two weeks and begins the last weekend in September each year.

Events and attractions at the Mid-South Fair include a carnival midway and rides, concerts (Ronnie Milsap and The Sugarhill Gang were featured in 2007), a home-made ice cream contest, a horticulture contest, the Extreme Canines Stunt Dog Show, agricultural exhibits, a pig race, and the world's largest youth talent contest. Previous entrants in the talent contest (first held in 1953) include Mississippi natives Elvis Presley and Lance Bass and Tennessee native Justin Timberlake.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1957 FRIDAY

Sixteen days after Jerry Lee Lewis filed for divorce, his second wife, Jane, also files, accusing him of cruel and inhuman treatment. Among her accusations, that he once left her to fend herself and their child on 82 cents and six cans of milk.

SEPTEMBER 21, 1957 SATURDAY

Scotty Moore, electric guitar, and Bill Black, bass who have been with Elvis Presley through his entire career, quit over a dispute over wages.

Songwriter/producer Mark Wright is born in Fayetteville, Arkansas. He writes ''Today My World Slipped Away'' and ''Take A Little Trip'', while producing hits for Lee Ann Womack, Gary Allan, Mark Chesnutt, Brooks and Dunn and Gretchen Wilson.

Screenwriter/director/producer Ethan Coen is born in Minneapolis. With brother Joel Coen, he creates ''O Brother, Where Art Thou?'', which leads to a multi-platinum soundtrack of American roots music, including bluegrass and gospel.

''Perry Mason'' starts and is an American legal drama series originally broadcast on CBS television from September 21, 1957, to May 22, 1966. The title character, portrayed by Raymond Burr, is a fictional Los Angeles criminal defense lawyer who originally appeared in detective fiction by Erle Stanley Gardner. Many episodes are based on stories written by Gardner.

Hollywood's first weekly one-hour series filmed for television, Perry Mason is one of TV's longest-running and most successful legal series. During its first season, it received a Primetime Emmy Award nomination as Best Dramatic Series, and it became one of the five most popular shows on television. Raymond Burr received two Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actor, and Barbara Hale received anEmmy Award for her portrayal of Mason's secretary Della Street. ''Perry Mason'' and Burr were honored as Favorite Series and Favorite Male Performer in the first two TV Guide Award readers polls. In 1960, the series received the first Silver Gavel Award presented for television drama by the American Bar Association.

''Perry Mason'' has aired in syndication in the United States and internationally ever since its cancellation, and the complete series has been released on Region 1 DVD. A 2014 study found that Netflix users rate Raymond Burr as their favorite actor, with Barbara Hale number seven on the list.

A 1973 revival of the series with a different cast was poorly received. In 1985 the first in a successful series of 30 Perry Mason television films aired on NBC, with Burr reprising the role of Mason in 26 of them prior to his death in 1993.

SEPTEMBER 22, 1957 SUNDAY

Bobby Helms performs ''My Special Angel'' in New York on CBS's ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. Elsewhere on the telecast, pop singer Jo Stafford covers Hank Williams' ''Jambalaya (On The Bayou)''.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1957 MONDAY

After Sam Phillips to launch his Phillips International label, according to Johnny Carroll, who recounted the story, Sam had heard that the Dutch Philips company of Eindhoven were planning to move into the American market. He therefore decided to launch his record label, and get right behind whichever of the five releases showed signs of taking, with a view to having a national hit with Bill Justis' "Raunchy". Then when Phillips moved in, they would be forced to pay compensation to Sam for him to remove the name. Johnny was offered the chance of having a release on Sun, or take a one in five chance of having a national hit. Of course he opted for Phillips International, little realizing the significance that having a record out on the yellow label would assume in future years. From all this, you can gather that it was Justis whom Sam boosted into the charts, and indeed it made number 3 in November 1957.

The first five PI releases come on September 23: PI 3516 by Buddy Blake (''You Pass Me By'' b/w ''Please Convince Me''), PI 3517 by Hayden Thompson (''Love My Baby'' b/w ''One Broken Heart''), PI 3518 by Barbara Pittman (''Two Young Fools In Love'' b/w ''I'm Getting Better At The Time''), PI 3519 by Bill Justis and His Orchestra (''Raunchy'' b/w ''Midnight Man''), and PI 3520 by Johnny Carroll (''That's The Way I Love'' b/w ''I'll Wait'').

SEPTEMBER 24, 1957 TUESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's two-sided hit, ''Jailhouse Rock'' and ''Treat Me Nice'' ( RCA Victor 47-7035).

The Alan Freed biopic ''Mister Rock And Roll'' premieres at the Paramount Theater in New York City. Listed as a co-writer of the future Forester Sisters ''Sincerely'', Freed appears on-screen, as do Little Richard, Clyde McPhatter and Frankie Lymon.

''Polka Time'' ends a 14-month prime-time run on ABC-TV. The show's regulars include bass player Jack Taylor and banjo player Chick Hurt, former members of The Prairie Ramblers who now perform in Stan Wolowic's Polka Chips.

SEPTEMBER 25, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Hank Thompson recorded ''How Do You Hold a Memory'' during the evening at Hollywood's Capitol Tower in Los Angeles.

SEPTEMBER 27, 1957 FRIDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis headlines the Apollo Theater in Harlem, New York City for nine days. During his nine minutes on stage he played four songs.

SEPTEMBER 28, 1957 SATURDAY

Buddy Holly recorded the pop hit ''Maybe Baby'' at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City. In 1978, the song is refashioned as a country single by Susie Allanson.

Comedian and future country singer George Burns shares the cover of TV Guide magazine with Gracie Allen.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1957 SUNDAY

''Those Whiting Girls'', featuring pop-and-country singer Margaret Whiting, ends its second session as a summer replacement series on CBS-TV.

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For Biographies of Artists see > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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