CONTAINS

The Sun Story Volume 1 – Sunrise
The Sun Story Volume 2 – Rockabilly Rhythm

There have been other independent record labels of comparable size which have produced more top-selling blues, country and rock artists, but none have had the cumulative influence upon the music world which Sun's Memphis rockabilly has had, and continues to have. And, of course, only Sam Phillips and Sun Record discovered Elvis Presley and crystallised the elements of the rockabilly sound.

This is a retrospective of the very best of Sun Records and Phillips International, are approaching these sides for the first time then you will understand that these are not museum pieces that belong with 3-D glasses, portable bomb-shelters and the last Studebaker but vibrant and living music made by men who were in touch with hillbilly, blues and gospel, the lifesprings of American music.

The format chosen for the set is basically chronological. We have concentrated on the capturing of raw delta blues talent, on the development of an uptemp country style, and the genesis of southern rock and roll - rockabilly. These were the most vital, the most creative and ultimately the most important parts of the story.

The result is, hopefully, balanced and interesting. We hope it is as fine listening as it is a lasting tribute to Sam Phillips and to all those who made Sun Records shine.

Between 1952 and 1968 there were 226 singles issued on the label along with 71 on the sister label, Phillips International, formed in 1957, and 8 singles on the Flip label, formed as an experiment in 1955. Included in this complication boxes, an 8-page booklet with track information and liner notes by Adam Komorowski.

For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1990 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Instand INS 5039 mono digital
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 1 - SUNRISE

Compact disc. An Charly Record Special Product. White label. Instant logo pressed in black at top of the label. Catalog number right from center. On the back cover Instant logo at right at bottom. Contains original Sun recordings.

Contains
1 - Rocket 88 (Jackie Brenston & The Delta Cats) (1951) 2:46 > Chess 1458-A <
(Jackie Brenston) Arc Music Corporation
Jackie Brenston (vocal), Raymond Hill (tenor saxophone),
Eugene Fox (tenor saxophone), Ike Turner (piano),
Willie Kizart (guitar), Jesse Knight (bass),
Willie Sims (drums)
Recorded March 1951

2 - T-Model Boogie (Rosco Gordon) (1952) 2:25 > Duke 106-A <
(Rosco Gordon) Hi-Lo Music
Rosco Gordon (vocal and piano), Willie Wilkes (saxophone),
Willie Sims (saxophone), John Murry Daley (drums)

3 - Howlin' For My Baby (Howlin' Wolf) (1952) 2:54 > Chess 1497-B <
(Chester Burnett) Arc Music Corp
Chester Burnett (vocal and harmonica), Albert Williams (piano),
Willie Johnson (guitar), Willie Steele (drums)
Recorded December 18, 1951.

4 - Mr. Highway Man (Howlin' Wolf) (1952) 2:24 > Chess 1510-B < 
(Chester Burnett) Arc Music Corporation
Chester Burnett (vocal and harmonica), Albert Williams (piano),
Willie Johnson (guitar), Willie Steele (drums)
Recorded January 23, 1952

5 - Treat Me Mean And Evil (Joe Hill Louis) (1952) 3:43 > Checker 763-B <
(Joe Hill Louis) Hi-Lo Music
Joe Hill Louis (vocal and guitar), Nolen Hall (drums)
Recorded March 31, 1952

6 - Prison Bound Blues (Willie Nix) (1952) 2:40 (Not Originally Issued)
(Willie Nix) Copyright Control
Willie Nix (vocal and drums), Walter Horton (harmonica),
Billy Love (piano), Willie Johnson (guitar)
Recorded October 9, 1952

7 - Tiger Man (Joe Hill Louis) (1952) 2:53 (Not Originally Issued)
(Joe Hill Louis-Sam Burns) Knox Music
Joe Hill Louis (vocal and guitar), Albert Williams (piano),
Willie Nix (drums)
Recorded November 17, 1952

8 - My Baby Left Me (Raymond Hill) (1952) 2:26 (Not Originally Issued)
(Raymond Hill) Copyright Control
Raymond Hill (vocal and saxophone), Evans Bradhaw (piano),
Willie Kizart (guitar), John E. Nash (bass),
Houston Stokes (drums)
Recorded October 6, 1952

9 - Sweet Home Chicago (David "Honeyboy" Edwards) (1952) 2:58 (Not Originally Issued)
(Honeyboy Edwards) Arc Music Corporations
David Edwards (vocal and guitar), Albert Williams (piano),
Dickle Houston (drums), James Walker (washboard)
Recorded 1952

10 - Easy (Jimmy & Walter) (1953) 2:57 > Sun 180-A < 
(Jimmy DeBerry-Walter Horton) Copyright Control
Jimmy DeBerry (guitar), Walter Horton (harmonica),
Houston Stokes (drums)
Recorded February 25, 1953

11 - Bear Cat (Rufus Thomas) (1953) 2:50 > Sun 181-A <
(Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller) Chappell Morris
Rufus Thomas (vocal), Joe Hill Louis (guitar),
Tuff Green (bass), Houston Stokes (drums)
Recorded March 8, 1953

12 - Just Walking In The Rain (The Prisonaires) (1953) 2:47 > Sun 186-B <
(Riley-Johnny Bragg) Hi-Lo Music
Johnny Bragg (lead tenor), Ed Thurman (tenor),
John Drue (tenor), Marcell Sanders (bass),
William Stewart (baritone and guitar)
Recorded June 1, 1953

13 - Feelin' Good (Little Junior's Blue Flames) (1953) 2:54 > Sun 187-A <
(Herman Parker) Hi-Lo Music
Herman Parker (vocal), Bill Johnson (piano),
Pat Hare (guitar), John Bowers (drums)
Recorded June 18, 1953

14 - Mystery Train (Little Junior Blue Flames) (1953) 2:22 > Sun 192-A <
(Herman Parker-Sam Phillips) Knox Music
Herman Parker (vocal), Raymond Hill (saxophone),
Bill Johnson (piano), Pat Hare (guitar),
John Bowers (drums
Recorded August 5, 1953

15 - Cotton Crop Blues (James Cotton) (1954) 2:58 > Sun 206-A < 
(James Cotton) Knox Music
James Cotton (vocal), Pat Hare (guitar),
Mose Vinson (piano), John Bowers (drums)
Recorded May 14, 1954

16 - The Boogie Disease (Doctor Ross) (1954) 2:31 > Sun 212-A <
(Isiah Ross) Knox Music
Doctor Ross (vocal, guitar and harmonica),
Tom Troy (guitar), Bobby Parker (drums)
Recorded July 1954

17 - When It Rains It Pours (Billy "The Kid" Emerson) (1954) 3:05 > Sun 214-B <
(Billy Emerson) Knox Music
Billy Emerson (vocal and piano), Bernie Moore (tenor saxophone),
Luther Taylor (alto saxophone), Charles Smith (trumpet),
Elven Parr (guitar), Robert Prindell (drums)
Recorded October 27, 1954

18 - So Long Goodbye (Sammy Lewis & Willie Johnson Combo) (1955) 2:07 > Sun 218-B <
(Willie Johnson-Sammy Lewis-Sam Phillips) Knox Music
Willie Johnson (vocal and guitar), Sammy Lewis (harmonica),
Joe Willie Wilkins (guitar), Albert Williams (piano),
Joe Nathan (drums)
Recorded March 28, 1955

19 - Rockin' Chair Daddy (Harmonica Frank) (1954) 3:07 > Sun 205-B < 
(Frank Floyd) Hi-Lo Music
Harmonica Frank (vocal, guitar, and harmonica)
Recorded July 1, 1954

20 - My Kind Of Carryin' On (Doug Poindexter & The Starlight Wranglers) (1954) 1:58 > Sun 202-B <
(Doug Poindexter) Hi-Lo Music
Doug Poindexter (vocal and guitar), Tommy Seals (fiddle),
Millard Yeow (steel guitar), Scotty Moore (guitar),
Clyde Rush (guitar), Bill Black (bass)
Recorded May 25, 1954

21 - Cry! Cry! Cry! (Johnny Cash) (1955) 2:24 > Sun 221-A < 
(Johnny Cash) Hi-Lo Music
Johnny Cash (vocal and guitar), Luther Perkins (guitar),
Marshall Grant (bass)
Recorded May 1955

22 - Let The Jukebox Keep On Playing (Carl Perkins) (1955) 2:52 > Sun 224-A < 
(Carl Perkins) Knox Music
Carl Perkins (vocal and guitar), Bill Cantrell (fiddle),
Stan Kesler (steel guitar), Jay B. Perkins (guitar),
Clayton Perkins (bass), W.S. Holland (drums)
Recorded July 11, 1955

23 - Defrost Your Heart (Charlie Feathers) (1955) 2:30 > Sun 231-A <
Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch) Hi-Lo Music
Charlie Feathers (vocal and guitar), Bill Cantrell (fiddle),
Stan Kesler (steel guitar), Quinton Claunch (guitar),
Bill Black (bass)
Recorded November 1, 1955

24 - Rock "N Roll Ruby (Warren Smith) (1956) 2:50 > Sun 239-A <
(Johnny Cash) Hi-Lo Music
Warren Smith (vocal), Stan Kesler (steel guitar),
Joe Baugh (piano), Buddy Holobaugh (guitar),
Clyde Leoppard (drums)
Recorded February 1956

25 - Slow Down (Jack Earls) (1956) 2:13 > Sun 240-A < 
(Jack Earls) Hi-Lo Music
Jack Earls (vocal and guitar), Luther Perkins (guitar),
Bill Black (bass), Unidentified (drums)
Recorded April 14, 1956
Original Sun Recordings

Original Sun Recordings

 © Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc. 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
 

The year was 1950. Sam Phillips give up his announcing job at radio WREC and started the Memphis Recording Service. His friends thought he was crazy. He had a wife and two young sons to support. So it must have been a hard decision to rent that little studio down on Union Avenue among car lots.

For four years, the backbone of the Memphis Recording Service was the private recordings of weddings, bar mitzvahs and social gatherings. The results were transcribed onto a single-sided album for S9.00. This was not the reason that Phillips had formed the Memphis Recording Service, however, he wanted to cut hot blues
records by the local talent everyone else ignored. He suspected that he was in the right place at the right time, and he was correct.

For Sam the sound was rhythm and blues. It was a style neglected by the major companies but it was the style that Chess and Modern wanted and he intended to pitch his demo's at these companies, one in the north and one on the west coast.

Phillips was always on the look-out for something new. something different and he was by no means lot he to support outside influences. In the main. Though, he did not record jazz or the ''doo-wop'' vocal group sound that dominated the north-east, Memphis and the delta had its own music for him to draw upon. Legendary figures like Sonny Boy Williamson, Robert Lockwood and Arthur Crudup had created, a market for the likes of Phillips own discoveries, Howlin' Wolf. B.B. King and others.

Sam Phillips later success with rockabilly has partially obscured his work with the early 1950s Memphis blues scene but Sam brought his feel for the blues into his work with country and rockabilly artists. "I loved the spontaneity and feeling they brought to their music'', said Sam in a recent interview, "and I knew that if a white guy could get that, not copying mind you. but lust have it. that we would have a market''.

Sun joined the burgeoning number of rhythm and blues and blues record labels in February 1952. It was not the first Indie in Memphis although certainly the majority of the little independents were concentrated on the east or west coasts. Sam Phillips had for some time noted that. "If a black musician wanted to get on record he had to go north or the west coast and there were not many who could afford that. Gradually the word got around Beale Street that there was a studio in town that wouldn't rip you off''. Now he extended that principle to forming his own label.

Sam' realised that he could always rely on the Memphis and delta market, using local blues musicians With a solid base of followers but always keeping an eye open for the record that would break nationally. With the help of one of his early partners. Jim Bullet, he gradually built up a coast-to-coast distribution network. (Bullet had travelled the same road a few years previously when setting up his Bullet label in Nashville, one
of the first Indies in the southern states). Sam tried to capitalisc on local and national trends: virtually all the popular styles were covered In the first 25 Sun releases. He tried gospel which was a big seller for Savoy (who boasted the only million selling gospel single by James Cleveland) and Chess and he tried a few of the vocal group styles that were so popular in the north and west. He tried country blues, and a lot of it because there was a bigger market in the south. as well as slick nite-club acts and a driving instrumental in the mould of Savoy's small group rhythm and blues/jazz acts. Nothing clicked nationally until he settled upon sharp urban lump blues as sung by Rufus Thomas and Little Junior Parker.

Virtually all the rhythm and blues indies from the 1940s and 1950s have either gone out of business or been swallowed up in huge corporations.

Sun remained In business longer than most. Sam Phillips was one of the first to realise that the key to prosperity was to tap the huge white market and he set out work his way into it. His first step was to record the white equivalent of his bluesmen Memphis' country artists.

The hillbilly style was one which was foremost In Memphis when Sam Phillips turned to recording white singers, hillbilly, western swing, country boogie, country-pop and bluegrass were all assuming varying degrees of importance in the country music scene as Phillips began recording country music in earnest round 1954. In fact. he had made a false start earlier (in 1951) when he had recorded Bob Price and Frank Floyd for Chess.

Track information and liner notes by Adam Komorowski.
Continued on Volume 2

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© 1990 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Instant INS 5040 mono digital
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 2 - ROCKABILLY RHYTHM

Compact disc. An Charly Record Special Product. White label. Instant logo pressed in black at top of the label. Catalog number right from center. On the back cover Instant logo at right at bottom. Contains original Sun recordings.

Continued from Volume 1

Sun was fortunate to have a number of young artists who could jerk a tear and cut a rug and they soon established Johnny Cash as the major country pop artist of the 1950s. He was briefly joined at the top by Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis who, depending on his mood, will tell you that he's always been country or always been a rocker.

The new music was definitely the death-knell for the old time hillbilly music. The older performers who couldn't. or wouldn't. adapt their styles soon found themselves short of bookings and their careers went onto a back burner,

Nashville coped very well with rock and roll. developing the country-pop Nashville Sound. The word "hillbilly" disappeared. It had come to mean sequined suits, cowboy hats, basic country instrumentation and jokes about laxatives and outhouses between songs. Sun's country artists, including Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins. were closer to the old traditions than Sonny James, Marty Robbins and the other new country politan stars. As late as-1957 Sun still issued delightfully anachronistic country by the likes of Ernie Chaffin, One Wheeler and Mack Self in a partial throwback to the vintage hillbilly style. Eventually, though Sun's country productions by Jack Clement and Bill Justis moved toward the slick formula developed in Nashville by Decca's Owen Bradley, RCAs Chet Atkins (who took over from Presley's mentor Steve Sholes in 1957) and Columbia's expatriate Englishman Don Law.

In 1956. Sam Phillips was in the vanguard of the short lived rockabilly craze. "Everyone knew that I was a little cat down here trying new artists - people that weren't being tapped by the establishment. I just wanted total abandon. I didn't care what kind of music it was''.

Rockabilly is uptempo hillbilly music with a strengthened rhythm that is partially derived from rhythm and blues, jumping guitar solos that owed a lot to rhythm and blues and the country-boogiemen. and a lot of slap-back echo on hot-potato-in-the-mouth vocals.

Rockabilly had a much stronger rhythm than most country music and the heavy off-beat was usually emphasised by the drums. Afro-American music had used the drums since slavery and they became an integral part of early jazz and blues. By early 1950s drums were very important part of urban blues, driving the small lump band. and a clattering drummer became part of the Chicago blues scene. Rockabilly borrowed this feature of black music because drums were virtually unknown in country music and were actually prohibited on the stage of the Grand Ol' Opry. The first thing Elvis did when he and Scotty and Bill started earning a little money was to recruit a drummer. He knew the importance of the big beat and he knew that little bombshells helped him time his bumps and grinds. The message was not lost on Roy Orbison, a struggling hillbilly singer in Wink, Texas. After seeing Elvis perform he quickly got himself a drummer and even characterised rockabilly as fast county music with drums.

Finally, we come to the vocals. All of the rockabilly singers on this album owe a first or second hand debt to the black blues shouters. The declamatory style, heavy on melodramatic effects and out-and-out yelling, was virtually-unknown in country music but was an integral part of rhythm and blues. Some rockabilly singers took to it naturally, for example Elvis Presley, Ray Harris and Carl Perkins but others such as Roy Orbison never quite came out screaming the blues.

Despite its pioneering work in recording rockabilly Sun and its new subsidiary, Phillips International, never capitalized fully on their initial success. In the period 1956-1960 Sun saw considerable chart action.

Even back in 1956 Sun's performers were just a little too raunchy to capture the hearts and minds of the little girls who wanted nothing more than to be Elvis' teddy bear. Carl Perkins did not look in the least cuddly and his cameos of poor Southern life such as "Dixie Fried" which sound so good today did not belong on the same portable record player as "A Rose And A Baby Ruth", It was commercial hara-kiri. Jerry Lee Lewis also had his stab at stardom but he was unable to live down the image of the Louisiana wild man and the fiasco in England effectively ended his career as a rock star. In the man's own words. "From $10.000 a night to $250 a night is a hell of a disappointment. All for the love of a girl... ha ha... Then she left me. Caught me cheatin'. "Johnny Cash gave Sun the nearest thing to sustained success with a string of hits from 1956 which lasted long after he left the label for Columbia In 1958. Otherwise. Sun's really big successes were largely one-hit deals; such as Bill Justis and Carl Mann.

The newer Memphis labels. first Hi and then Stax/VoIt seemed much better equipped to handle the changing times. Sun enjoyed their last real national hit with Jerry Lee's revival of ''What's I Say'' in 1961. From that point they declined in importance until they ended much as they had begun: a small local label servicing a local market. Sun and Phillips International could not or would not capitalise on the base built up by Presley, Perkins, Cash and Lewis. Some of the newer Sun artists such as Dickey Lee, Edwin Bruce and Rayburn Anthony went on to carve solid careers for themselves in country music but they lacked the magnetism. of the original Sun artists.

Sun was in the right place at the right time but real success came with twenty years' hindsight when Charlie Feathers, Warren Smith, and Billy Riley were seen as some of the true-giants of 1950's music and big sellers such as Hugo Winterhalter are now names in an out-of-date record catalogue.

Contains
1 - Folsom Prison Blues (Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two) (1955) 2:47 > Sun 232-B <
(Johnny Cash) Hi-Lo Music
Johnny Cash (vocal and guitar), Luther Perkins (guitar),
Marshall Grant (bass)
Recorded July 29, 1955

2 - It's Me Baby (Malcolm Yelvington) (1956) 2:23 > Sun 246-B < 
(Reece Fleming Knox Music
Malcolm Yelvington (vocal and guitar, Miles Winn (steel guitar),
Frank Tolley (piano), Gordon Mashburn (guitar),
Billy Weir (drums)
Recorded February 2, 1956

3 - Feelin' Low (Ernie Chaffin) (1956) 2:34 > Sun 262-A < 
(Pee Wee Maddux) Knox Music
Ernie Chaffin (vocal and guitar), Murphy ''Pee Wee'' Maddux (steel guitar),
Ernie Harvey (guitar), Leo Lodner (bass)
Recorded December 12, 1956

4 - I Walk The Line (Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two) (1956) 2:41 > Sun 241-B <
(Johnny Cash) Hi-Lo Music
Johnny Cash (vocal and guitar), Luther Perkins (guitar),
Marshall Grant (bass)
Recorded March 30, 1956

5 - Boppin' The Blues (Carl Perkins) (1956) > Sun 243-A <
(Carl Perkins) Hi-Lo Music
Carl Perkins (vocal and guitar), Jay B. Perkins (guitar),
Clayton Perkins (bass), W.S. Holland (drums)
Recorded January 20, 1956

6 - Dixie Fried (Carl Perkins) (1956) 2:24 > Sun 249-B < 
(Carl Perkins-Curley Griffin) Hi-Lo Music
Carl Perkins (vocal and guitar), Jay B. Perkins (guitar),
Clayton Perkins (bass), W.S. Holland (drums)
Recorded March 22, 1956

7 - There You Go (Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two) (1956) 2;16 > Sun 258-B <
(Johnny Cash) Hi-Lo Music
Johnny Cash (vocal and guitar), Luther Perkins (guitar),
Marshall Grant (bass)
Recorded July 29, 1955

8 - Home Of The Blues (Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two) (1957) 2:38 > Sun 279-A <
(Johnny Cash-Glenn Douglass-Lily McAlpin) Hi-Lo Music
Johnny Cash (vocal and guitar), Luther Perkins (guitar),
Marshall Grant (bass), Jimmy Wilson (piano)
Recorded July 1, 1957

9 - Ballad Of A Teenage Queen (Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two) (1957) 2:10 > Sun 283-A < 
(Jack Clement) Knox Music
Johnny Cash (vocal and guitar), Luther Perkins (guitar),
Marshall Grant (bass, Jack Clement (guitar)
Recorded October 11, 1957

10 - Breathless (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1958) 2:42 > Sun 288-A < 
(Otis Blackwell) Hi-Lo Music
Jerry Lee Lewis (vocal and piano), Roland Janes (guitar),
Billy Riley (bass), Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded January 21, 1958

11 - The Way Of A Woman In Love (Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two) (1958) 2:15 > Sun 302-A <
(Charlie Rich-Bill Justis) Knox Music
Johnny Cash (vocal and guitar), Luther Perkins (guitar),
Marshall Grant (bass), Jimmy Wilson (piano),
Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded July 10, 1958

12 - Come On Little Mama (Ray Harris) (1956) 2:14 > Sun 254-B <
(Ray Harris-Wayne Cogswell) Knox Music
Ray Harris (vocal), Wayne Cogswell (guitar),
Joey Reisnbery (drums)
Recorded June 20, 1956

13 - Flyin' Saucers Rock And Roll (Billy Riley & His Little Green Men) (1957) 2:02 > Sun 260-A < 
(Ray Scott) Hi-Lo Music
Billy Riley (vocal and guitar), Jerry Lee Lewis (piano),
Roland Janes (guitar), Marvin Pepper (bass),
Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded December 11, 1956

14 - Ain't Got A Thing (Sonny Burgess) (1957) 2:03 > Sun 263-A < 
(Jack Clement-Albert Burgess) Hi-Lo Music
Sonny Burgess (vocal and guitar) Ray Kern Kennedy (piano),
Joe Lewis (guitar), Johnny Ray Hubbard (bass),
Russell Smith (drums)
Recorded Unknown Date 1956/1957

15 - Put Your Cat Clothes On (Carl Perkins) (1957) 2:50 (Not Originally Issued)
(Carl Perkins) Hi-Lo Music
Carl Perkins (vocal and guitar), Jay B. Perkins (guitar),
Clayton Perkins (bass), W.S. Holland (drums)
Recorded January 1957

16 - Red Hot (Billy Riley & His Little Green Men) (1957) > Sun 277-A <
(Billy Emerson) Knox Music
Billy Riley (vocal and guitar), Jerry Lee Lewis (piano),
Roland Janes (guitar), Marvin Pepper (bass),
Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded January 30, 1957

17 - Rock Baby Rock It (Johnny Carroll) (1957) 2:20 (Not Originally Issued)
(Johnny Carroll) Hi-Lo Music
Johnny Carroll (vocal and guitar), Bill Bustin (piano),
George Jones (guitar), Jay Salam (bass),
Bill Hennen (drums)
Recorded at Cliff Herring's Studio, Fort Worth, Texas

18 - Love My Baby (Hayden Thompson) (1957) 2:09 > PI 3517-A <
(Herman Parker) Hi-Lo Music
Hayden Thompson (vocal and guitar), Roland Janes )guitar),
Marvin Pepper (bass), Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded September 6, 1957

19 - Milkshake Mademoiselle (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1957) 2:10 (Not Originally Issued)
(Hammer) Northern Songs
Jerry Lee Lewis (vocal and piano), Roland Janes (guitar),
Billy Riley (bass), Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded 1957

20 - Red Cadillac & A Black Mustache (Warren Smith) (1957) 2:38 (Not Originally Issued)
(Hayden Thompson) United Artists
Warren Smith (vocal and guitar), Al Hopson )guitar),
Sid Manker (guitar), Jimmy Lott (drums)
Recorded June 1957

21 - Blue Suede Shoes (Carl Perkins) (1956) 2:14 > Sun 234-A <
(Carl Perkins) Hi-Lo Music
Carl Perkins (vocal and guitar), Jay B. Perkins (guitar),
Clayton Perkins (bass), W.S. Holland (drums)
Recorded December 19, 1955

22 - Ooby Dooby (Roy Orbison & The Teen Kings) (1956) 2:10 > Sun 242-A <
(Wade Moore-Dick Penner) Southern Music
Roy Orbison (vocal and guitar), James Morrow (piano),
Johnny Wilson (guitar), Jack Kennelly (bass),
Billy Ellis (drums)
Recorded March/April 1956

23 - Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1957) 2:50 > Sun 267-B < 
(Dave Williams-Sonny David) Robert Mellin Music
Jerry Lee Lewis (vocal and piano), Roland Janes (guitar),
Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded March/April 1957

24 - So Long I'm Gone (Warren Smith) (1957) 2:10 > Sun 268-A < 
(Roy Orbison) Hi-Lo Music
Warren Smith (vocal and guitar), Jerry Lee Lewis (piano),
Marcus Van Story (bass), Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded January/February 1957

25 - Raunchy (Bill Justis & His Orchestra) (1957) 2:20 > PI 3519-A <  
(Bill Justis-Sid Manker) Hi-Lo Music
Bill Justis (saxophone), Jimmy Wilson (piano),
Sidney Manker (guitar), Billy Riley (bass),
Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded June 5, 1957

26 - Great Balls Of Fire (Jerry Lee Lewis) (1957) 1:50 > Sun 281-A <
(Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell) Hi-Lo Music
Jerry Lee Lewis (vocal and piano), Roland Janes (guitar),
Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded probably February 5, 1957

27 - Guess Things Happen That Way (Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two) (1958) 1:48 > Sun 295-A <
(Jack Clement) Knox Music
Johnny Cash (vocal and guitar) Jimmy Wilson (piano),
Luther Perkins (guitar), Marshall Grant (bass),
Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums),
The Gene Lowery Singers
Recorded April 8, 1958

28 - Mona Lisa (Carl Mann) (1959) 2:27 > PI 3539-A <
(Livingston-Evans) Famous Chappell
Carl Mann (vocal and piano), Eddie Bush (guitar),
Robert Oatswell (bass), W.S. Holland (drums)
Recorded March 15, 1959

28 - Lonely Weekend (Charlie Rich) (1959) 2:08 > PI 3552-A <
(Charlie Rich) Knox Music
Charlie Rich (vocal and piano), Martin Willis (tenor saxophone),
Roland Janes (guitar), Billy Riley (bass),
Jimmy M. Van Eaton (drums)
Recorded October 14, 1959

Original Sun Recordings

Track information and liner notes by Adam Komorowski.

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 
 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©