CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1960-1969 Sun Schedule <

1960 SESSIONS (2)
February 1, 1960 to February 28, 1960

Studio Session for Brad Suggs, February 3, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, February 22, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, February 23, 1960 / Judd Records
Studio Session for Barbara Pittman, February 24, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, 1960 (1) / Rita Records
Studio Session for Billy Riley, 1960 (2) / Rita Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 1960

In the issued of Sun-Liners (February 1960), Barbara Barnes announced the latest Johnny Cash single release, ''I Love You Because'' backed with ''Straight As In Love'' (Sun 334). (Both recorded December 13, 1956 at 706 Union Avenue). Recording a tune that had already been a hit for at least three other country stars was ''scraping the bottom of the barrel'' by Sun's usual standards, but the record made it to number 20 on the country charts. They were by this time competing with some strong Columbia releases, ans Sun's days of hit Cash singles were coming to an end.

Also new on the market was the fifth in Sun series of EPs of Johnny Cash music, this was called ''Home Of The Blues'' (Sun SEP 116). Barbara gave a rundown on the cover of all of these as well as the three LPs thus far to hit the market. These ''package goods'' continued to sell well the entire time Barbara was with Sun, even though some of the same songs appeared in more than one album. The other albums had made a great deal of money, so Barbara convinced Sam Phillips that for the fourth one, which chiefly featured songs by Hank Williams, they should go to full color.

FEBRUARY 1960

Like Carl Perkins before him, Carl Mann found it easy to sustain a career on the strength of one major hit. He continued to sell records in respectable quantities through 1960, but by the end of the year it was clear that his career was heading downhill at a steady clip. And, like Carl Perkins, his career problems were compounded by a love affair with the bottle. ''I was going a little too fast there'', is the way Carl characterises it today. ''In fact, it all seems like a dream to me now''.

All I was thinking about was that I loved music, wanted to play music and have a good time. I wasn't worried abut anything else. We thought we were having a good time, but looking back we should have taken care of business a little better and not hit the bottle so much. We'd have been a lot better off we'd done that''.

Surprisingly enough, Carl had no problems getting work in bars and honky tonks despite his tender years. He had a fake ID card, and everyone told him that he looked older than he was. ''I remember one time we were in a bar in Chicago'', he says, ''and I was seventeen Eddie and Robert were five years older but the waitress came and asked them for them ID. Made Eddie mad. He said, Ain't you gonna ask him for his ID, pointing at me. She said, ''No, if he ain't old enough, ain't none of you old enough''.

Nearly everyone needs some kind of crutch to handle the road Johnny Cash developed his well-publicized love call with little palls, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis turned to the bottle, and Carl Mann joined them He reckons he was an alcoholic at seventeen.
When the party started to end, Carl teamed up with Carl Perkins. They played in Las Vegas, Carson City and the usual circuit of bars. Mann played piano behind Perkins and did a few solo numbers. It was a bleak period for both men, unable to find another hit and ill-equipped to do anything else in life. Perkins and Mann wrote a few songs together, and another Carl, Carl Smith, recorded one. Carl Mann recorded one of Perkins songs, ''Look At That Moon'', but, as he says, ''we didn't talk about records all that much. He just couldn't seem to get anything going, and it made him aggravated that nothing would take off. Music had changed.

He tried country, but he was able to keep it going on the strength of ''Blue Suede Shoes'' all those years. He lived and breathed it and kept it going''. Carl Mann didn't have quite that level of commitment to theever-flaky music business.

Sometime around 1963 the partnership between Carl Mann and Carl Perkins broke up. Mann returned to Huntington, Tennessee. He played a little locally, but it was a far cry from the summer of 1959 when the kids had stood and cheered when he played ''Mona Lisa''. Observing that his career was more or less washed up before he was twenty years old, Carl could reject bitterly on the fickleness of public taste.

SPRING 1960

When Scotty Moore started working at Sam Phillips' Recording Service, it had been two years since Sun Records had placed a record in the Top 20 in the pop charts. The two major talents in Sam's stable were Jerry Lee Lewis and a newcomer Charlie Rich, whose song ''Lonely Weekends'' had been a regional hit in 1959. Johnny Cash had moved on to greener pastures; Carl Perkins had dropped out of sight. The reigning Memphis hitmakers were Scotty Moore, with, ''Tragedy'', and Bill Black, with his ''Smokie (Parts 1 & 2)''. Elvis Presley climbed back to the top of the charts in 1960 with ''Stuck On You'' and ''It's Now Or Never'', but neither song was recorded in Memphis.

As head of production, Scotty presided over a state-of-the-art facility that the Memphis Press-Scimitar described as ''plush'' and ''futuristic''. It boasted a sundeck on the roof and an executive bar. Sam moved from his ''no desk'' office on Union Avenue to a penthouse office where he had a jukebox-like stereo hi-fi built into his desk. Seven gold records hung on the wall; none bore Elvis Presley's name. Although Sam didn't come right out and say so, the new studio represented a significant shift in his approach to the music industry. While his efforts previously had been focused on finding new talent for Sun Records, he now was more interested in selling studio time to other labels. Time was a less temperamental commodity in which to deal. As soon as he had the new studio up and running, he turned his attention to opening a studio in downtown Nashville at the Cumberland Lodge Building. It was Scotty's job to oversee production at both facilities.

FEBRUARY 1, 1960 MONDAY

Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran appear at Empire Theater in Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Capitol released Buck Owens' ''Above And Beyond'', and Hank Thompson's ''A Six Pack To Go''.

Loretta Lynn signs her first recording contract with Zero Records. The document requires just three pages.

FEBRUARY 2, 1960 TUESDAY

Cowboy Copas recorded ''Alabam''.

FEBRUARY 3, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Ray Price recorded the Mel Tillis-penned ''One More Time'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BRAD SUGGS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 3, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL

01 – "SAM'S TUNE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 393 - Master
Recorded: - February 3, 1960
Released: - October 13, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3563-B < mono
SAM'S TUNE / MY GYPSY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Brad Suggs just keeps paying homage to his employer and his place of work (''Sam never seemed to mind it'', Suggs recalls). First it was ''706 Union'' (Phillips International 3545). This time out, it's ''Sam's Tune'', dedicated to our esteemed label owner. Although it's a catchy little ditty in a singalong kind of way, this one seems to have no more relevance to its source than ''706 Union'' did. Suggs recalls performing the lyrics with Sonny Haley and Jackie Boy Pennington, although there seems to be a pretty dominant female voice in the mix as well.

Suggs' music continues to surprise us. What can one say about ''My Gypsy'', an utterly strange and lush record? ''I wrote that tune because I love fiddle music. I used to sit and listen to Sonny James play the violin and he used to remind me of a gypsy. That melody stayed in my head for years. I wanted to try to play a fiddle melody on the guitar. That's what this record was about. The musicians we used on there were from the Memphis Symphony. I wish we had been able to record it in Nashville. I think we could have gotten a really great record on it''.

In truth, the final results sound very much like an instrumental backing track that has mysteriously lost its vocal. Certainly, this is not a bad record, and it might even have entered the charts as a left-field item back in 1960. It's just that collectors who've come along for a digital copy of ''Sadie's Back In Town'' are going to have a tough time with this one. According to the session logs, these two titles were recorded in February, 1960. Somebody (probably Suggs, himself) wasn't satisfied and the lads were back in the studio on July 20th re-recording the same tunes.

Curiously, though, it was the earlier versions that were selected for overdubbing (in August) and released in October.

02 – ''MY GYPSY'' - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 392 - Master
Recorded: - February 3, 1960
Released: - October 13, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3563-A < mono
MY GYPSY / SAM'S TUNE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

03 – "CLOUDY"* - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 373 - Master
The basic track was later overdubbed by Charles Underwood
with a chorus and special effects at 639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee.
Recorded: - February 3, 1960
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3554-A < mono
CLOUDY / PARTLY CLOUDY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This is what they mean by "atmospheric music". Brad Suggs third Phillips International single continues the tradition of quirky instrumental outings. Tunes like "Cloudy" were easy to promote and probably got their share of disc jockey attention, but came up short at the cash registers. It was Charles Underwood's idea to overdub the sounds effect on to Suggs' moody guitar work.

04 - "PARTLY CLOUDY" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Brad Suggs-Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 374 - Master
Recorded: - February 3, 1960
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3554-B < mono
PARTLY CLOUDY / CLOUDY
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Some of the Sun gets through on Suggs' solo on this aptly named side. Otherwise, it was the usual crew (including Charlie Rich and Martin Willis" gliding effortlessly through a pleasant but generally undistinguished 12-bar blues whose sole function was apparently to direct attention to the A-side.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs – Guitar
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Saxophone

Memphis Symphony - Strings
Unknown F emale Voices

For Biography of Brad Suggs see: > The Sun Biographies <
Brad Suggs' Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 4, 1960 THURSDAY

Johnny Burnette appears on American Bandstand.

FEBRUARY 5, 1960 FRIDAY

The Biggest Show of Stars for 1960 starts touring with headliners Frankie Avalon, Bobby Rydell and Clyde McPhatter.

Pam Gadd is born in Independence, Missouri. A member of The New Coon Creek Girls and Wild Rose, she becomes a background singer for Porter Wagoner and applies support vocals to Terri Clark's hit ''A Little Gasoline''.

FEBRUARY 6, 1960 SATURDAY

George Hamilton IV joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Rhythm and blues singer Jesse Belvin dies in a car crash in Fairhope, Arkansas. A co-writer of The Penguins' hit ''Earth Angel'', he earns a country hit 10 years later as a songwriter after Slim Whitman's cover ''Guess Who''.

Jessie Belvin is killed in an auto accident near Hope, Arkansas. Johnny Preston starts six week tour in Tucson, Arizona. Billy Haley and the Comets appear at the Coliseum in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Sandy Nelson appears on The Dick Clark Show.

Early February Fats Domino is booked around his hometown of New Orleans so he can supervise the building of his new house. Bobby Darin and Connie Francis are chosen the King and Queen of Hearts by the American Heart Association for its annual-fund raising drive.

FEBRUARY 7, 1960 SUNDAY

Country singer Molly Bee guests on CBS-TV's ''The Jack Benny Show''.

FEBRUARY 8, 1960 MONDAY

Congress begins hearings to investigate payola in music and radio. Future Academy of Country awards producer Dick Clark survives the scandal. Rock disc jockey Alan Freed, credited as a co-writer on ''Sincerely'', is destroyed.

Jim Reeves snags a number 1 country single in Billboard magazine with ''He'll Have To Go''.

FEBRUARY 9, 1960 TUESDAY

The Hollywood City Council holds the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Among those honored in its initial installment, Hank Williams, Sonny James, Elvis Presley, Johnny Mercer, Lefty Frizzell, Gene Autry and Jimmy Wakely.

FEBRUARY 10, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Champs perform "To Much Tequila" on ABC-TVs American Bandstand.

Singer/songwriter/musician Lionel Cartwright is born in Gallipolis, Ohio. His relaxed vocal style leads to four Top 10 singles from 1989-1991, the biggest coming with ''Leap Of Faith''.

Jimmie Skinner recorded ''Reasons To Live'' at the King Recording Studio in Cincinnati.

FEBRUARY 11, 1960 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley, serving with the Army in West Germany, receives his stripes as a full sergeant, three weeks after he was officially notified of the promotion.

FEBRUARY 12, 1960 FRIDAY

Chuck Berry headlines the Apollo Theater with Little Anthony and the Imperials, Baby Washington and the Mello-Kings.

FEBRUARY 15, 1960 MONDAY

Paul Anka begins a week long engagement at the New Lotus Club in Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 16, 1960 TUESDAY

Annette appears on American Bandstand to sing "O Dio Mio".

Bass player Doug Phelps is born in Leachville, Arkansas. He becomes a founding member of The Kentucky HeadHunters but leaves in 1992 with his sibling, Ricky Lee, to form Brother Phelps. He rejoins The HeadHunters in 1996.

Johnny cash Recorded ''Smiling Bill McCall'' at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

FEBRUARY 17, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Johnny Cash recorded the George Jones-penned ''Seasons Of My Heart'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Everly Brothers sign a record-setting $1,000,000 contract with Warner Bros., the recording arm of the motion picture company.

The RCA compilation album, ''60 Years Of Music America Loves Best'' goes gold. Among its 30 tracks, primarily culled from pop and classical music, is Eddy Arnold's ''Bouquet Of Roses''.

Elvis Presley earns the first gold album of his career, for ''Elvis'' ( RCA Victor LPM-1382).

FEBRUARY 18, 1960 THURSDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded the pop hit ''When Will I Be Loved'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B. Linda Ronstadt succeeds with the song in country music 15 years later.

FEBRUARY 19, 1960 FRIDAY

Dr. Jive's Rhythm and Blues Revenue opens at the Apollo featuring Johnny Nash, The Flamingos, Tiny Topsy, Nappy Brown, the Hollywood Flames and Barrett Strong.

FEBRUARY 20, 1960 SATURDAY

Bill Haley and His Comets, Frankie Ford, Ray Smith and Johnny Tillotson appear on Saturday evening's Dick Clark Show.

A riot breaks out when teen fans storm the stage during an Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran concert at Caird Hall in Dundee, England.

FEBRUARY 22, 1960 MONDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''Big Iron'', and Stonewall Jackson's double-sided hit, ''Why I'm Walkin'''backed with ''Life Of A Poor Boy''.

FEBRUARY 1960

As little shoots of daffodils and crocus were making their first timid forays above the ground in Memphis gardens, the big day came when the Sun staff would move to the new offices. Despite the many problems with a leaking roof, equipment that didn't sound right, and delays in all quarters, the building seemed to be ready in late February 1960 when they were told they could pack up all the stuff and move to 639 Madison Avenue. (The official opening of Sam Phillips' Recording Studio was on September 17, 1960).

This was a much more comfortable space. Sam Phillips had a large, plush office on the third floor with windows overlooking a rooftop patio, a jukebox, and, at last, a big desk of his very own. A wet bar was nearby. Bill Fitzgerald and Sally Wilbourn also had private offices on the third floor. Cecil Scaife and Barbara Barnes found themselves on the second floor side by side in spacious rooms with lovely carpet and all new furnishings.

At first Regina Reese was stationed in the reception area on the first floor, but soon she moved upstairs, relieved by a newly hired lady whose main qualification was that she was of late middle age and thus should not prove a distraction to the young musicians or vice-versa. The new receptionist took a liking to her contemporary, the building construction supervisor, O.T. Being, so far away upstairs they didn't know how that played out. Sam required that Regina and Barbara start alternating Saturday morning on phone duty, an onerous task, since they had the weekends free heretofore. One Saturday morning Sam called and asked, ''Who is this''? When Barbara answered ''Sun Records Company'' in a clipped and frosty voice.

Except for the foyer and a couple of small spaces, the first floor was devoted to the technical space and equipment needed for making records. The two studios and all that went with them were first-class, utterly up to the minute, and designed to Sam's specifications, with the cooperative efforts of designer of Jack Weiner. The interior design reflected Sam's flamboyant taste, with shiny golden chandeliers, a starburst clock, fancy door knobs, and nothing subdued. Denise Howard, who was also the decorator for the Holiday Inn chain, searched out these objects and all the non-technical appointments.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: POSSIBLE MONDAY FEBRUARY 22, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Eddie Bush is also a pretty fair songwriter. His ''I'm Bluer Than Anyone Can Be'' is among the prettiest song on Carl recordings for Sun and for his album. Once again, the decision was that Carl should concentrate on his singing and leave the piano playing in the capable hands of Charlie Rich. Rich's contribution to tracks like this is unmistakable. Purists might also care to note that the obvious splice immediately following the piano solo was made at the time the album was assembled for reasons now lost in the mists of time.

01 - "I'M BLUER THAN ANYONE CAN BE" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-16 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Carl Mann's country soul also came up for air during these session. He cut the Webb Pierce classic ''I Don't Care'' from 1955, and Eddy Arnold's ''Then I Turned And Walked Slowly Away'', which had just been revived by Marty Robbins, Carl and the boys also took a first stab at ''Mountain Dew'', building it around a sustained guitar figure from Eddie Bush. ''I Don't Care'' is something of a wasted opportunity; Bush actually passed up the chance to dazzle us with hot licks around Carl's vocal. There are no mistakes; just a missed opportunity. Oatsvall, as always, seems to be hanging on by his fingernails, just barely handling the rudimentary chord changes.

02 - "BABY I DON'T CARE" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-15 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

03 – "AIN'T YOU GOT NO LOVIN' FOR ME" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Carl Mann-Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-3 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-6 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

04 – "THEN I TURNED AND WALKED SLOWLY AWAY" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Eddy Arnold-Carl Red Fortner
Publisher: - Abbot Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-13 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-7 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

The same group of sessions also included Carl's first stab at ''Serenade Of The Bells'', originally a hit in 1947 and 1948 for Sammy Kaye and Jo Stafford. This early version suggests that Bush, whose idea it was to record it, came equipment with a clear idea of the arrangement in his head, a vision he seems to have neglected to share with his pals. Carl Mann later recorded the song more successfully for Monument.

05 – "SERENADE OF THE BELLS" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Al Goodhart-Kay Twomey-Al Urbano
Publisher: - Melrose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-4 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-8 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

The clutter of tape boxes from the LP sessions yielded some undated bits and pieces by Carl that are gathered together here. ''Sentimental Journey'' was a 1945 hit for Doris Day when she was the girl singer with Les Brown. It had been revived by Conway Twitty at the same session he recorded ''Mona Lisa'', but Carl remembers the instigation to record it came from dee-jay Dewey Phillips. Sam and Dewey were sitting in the control nursing their bottles when Dewey shouted, ''Hey Elvis! I got one for you!''. Then he went out looking for the lyrics while the liquor continued to flow. By the end of the session everyone was drunk. Sam took Carl to his all-girl radio station, WHER, to meet some of the on-air personalities. Later, they cruised around town while Carl passed out. Not your average sentimental journey.

06 – "SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Bud Green-Les Brown-Ben Homer
Publisher: - Morley Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 22, 1960
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-8 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-10 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann – Vocal & Piano
Eddie Bush – Guitar
Robert Oatswell – Bass
W.S. Holland – Drums

For Biography of Carl Mann see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Mann's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jud Phillips did go for an alternative deal involving Bill Lowery's National Recording Corporation out of Atlanta, Georgia. Jud issued an initial pressing of Judd 1016, ''Rockin' Little Angel'' and ''That's All Right'' at his own expense, and it was reviewed in the trade press in August 1959. When the record started to hit, all subsequent copies bore the legend – ''Subsidiary of National Recording Corp Atlanta''. Charlie Terrell remembered it this way: ''I instigated the deal where NRC became involved with Judd Records. I knew Bill Lowery pretty good, and told him about Ray Smith's abilities and the great new record he had on Judd. So Bill called Jud and wanted to get involved. Lowery and NRC paid for all Ray''s Judd sessions after the first one, and they were all made at RCA in Nashville.

After leaving Sun Records, Bill Justis formed the Play-Me label in Memphis and he worked for Jud Phillips. According to Bill Justis, ''When Jud left, he ran his own Judd label based in Florence and Memphis and operated from a mobile home type bus. I produced Ray Smith for Judd in Nashville. That was really the start of my move into the Nashville music scene''. In Nashville, Justis worked with Bill Beasley for Hit Records, a company producing soundalike versions of hit songs, while working on independent productions for other labels, soon joining Monument and Mercury as an arranger.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
FOR JUDD RECORDS 1959

RCA STUDIO B.
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
JUDD SESSION: TUESDAY FEBRUARY 23, 1960
SESSION HOURS: 19:00-23:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – JUD PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

Bill Lowery had just started in the record business having emerged from the radio and publishing business and he was on his way to building a real music empire in Atlanta. By 1970, the Lowery group of music publishing companies was the second largest measured in Billboard's chart hits. Lowery's catalog included ''Young Love'', ''Games People Play'', ''Dizzy'', ''Walk On By'', and many others by his stable of artists and writers including Joe South, Tommy Roe, Jerry Reed, Ray Stevens, The Tams, Ric Cartey, Kenny Hayes, Billy Joe Royal, and a host of others. Even Lowery's vice president was named Mary Tallent in 1970, Billboard reported: ''The Bill Lowery complex is about as complex as a complex can be'', and described Lowery as ''the unquestioned head of commercial music in Atlanta... and a man who simply doesn't know how to slow down''.

01 – ''PUT YOUR ARMS AROUND ME HONEY'' – B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - von Tilzer-McCree
Publisher: - Broadway Music Corporation
Matrix number: - NRJ 1070
Recorded: - February 23, 1960
Release: - April 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1017-A mono
PUT YOUR ARMS AROUND ME HONEY / MARIA ELENA
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-9 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

How appropriate, then that the next release on Judd Records was Ray Smith's version of ''Put Your Arms Around Me Honey'', Judd 1017, issued in the spring of 1960 and reviewed in Billboard that April. It was recorded on February 23, 1960 at the first of three sessions funded by NRC for Judd. Charlie Terrell remembered them well: ''I attended all Ray's recording sessions in those early years. Never missed a one. I was a bit older than Ray, but we were very friendly from the start and I treated him like he was my son. Our families were real close, and for years, everything he did, I was there. They called us the Missouri Mafia''.

''Put Your Arms Around Me Honey'' was backed by a ballad, ''Maria Elena'' and it made its way slowly to just number 71 on the popular charts by May 1960. According to the recording logs of bass player Bob Moore, demo sessions had been held on February 1, for three hours, for which Moore was paid $30, and on February 9 for one hour. The master sessions were on Tuesday February 23 at 7:00pm followed by another at 11:30, both of which ran over the allotted three hour timeslots.

02 – ''MARIA ELENA'' – B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Lorence Barcelata-S.K. Russell
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - NRJ 1069
Recorded: - February 23, 1960
Release: - April 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1017-B mono
MARIA ELENA / PUT YOUR ARMS AROUND ME HEY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-10 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 – ''ONE WONDERFUL LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Adams Cage-Everette-Murphy-Shelton-Yaney
Publisher: - Tuneville Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - NRJ 1073-A
Recorded: - February 23, 1960
Release: - July 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1019-A mono
ONE WONDERFUL LOVE / IT MAKES ME FEEL GOOD
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-11 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The session included a number of other songs including the ones chosen for Ray Smith's third Judd single, Judd 1019 issued in June 1960, which coupled ''One Wonderful Love'' with ''It Makes Me Feel Good''. This one was a good pop-rock record but it failed to make the charts at all.

Ray Smith was still in demand for live performances though, based on his own talent and the promotional work of Jud Phillips. Charlie Terrell confirmed: ''In the days when he was with Jud and Sun, Ray was on some rock and roll package shows, but he was a showman in his own right. He could carry a show himself. He was playing some very big and very night clubs, and we took him out to Vegas. He played the Golden Nugget and so on''.

04 – ''IT MAKES ME FEEL GOOD'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Wilkin-Walker
Publisher: - Cedarwood Music
Matrix number: - NRJ 1074-B
Recorded: - February 23, 1960
Release: - July 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1019-B mono
IT MAKES ME FEEL GOOD / ONE WONDERFUL LOVE
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-12 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Chet Atkins – Guitar
Grady Martin – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Floyd Cramer – Piano

The Jordanaires consisting of
Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews,
Hugh Jarrett, Hoyt Hawkins – Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Ray Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In the months after ''Lonely weekends'' was recorded, Charlie Rich continued to seek a behind the scenes role in order to make money in the music business. Barbara Pittman, whose first sides appeared on Sun in 1956, recalls how Charlie wrote and produced one side of her latest single, released immediately after ''Lonely Weekends''.

''Charlie always told me he thought I could sing jazz. That meant a lot to me because I was just a kid back then. He had heard my sing Peggy Lee's ''Fever'' at the Cotton Club. That's why he wrote ''Handsome Man'' for me. The night we recorded it the session went on quite late. At one point we missed Charlie's voice and piano. He had been singing with the vocal group and we missed his ''oooh-ah's''. We looked and there he was, under the piano. We woke him up and went on with the session. That was my last session for Sun Records and I remember the date quite well - February 3, 1960 (??). That was the night my sister murdered her husband. J.M. Van Eaton was driving me home - it was about 3:00 in the morning - and we heard it on the radio. She and her husband had taken me to the studio. It happened about 30 minutes after they left me off''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR BARBARA PITTMAN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 24, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLIE RICH
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

A marathon session to cut "Handsome Man". Things went well and Barbara's precocious smoky voice is showcased by Charlie Rich's minor key composition. Its a long way from this track to "I Need A Man" (SUN 253) and the Janis Martin bag into which some journalists have tried to force Barbara Pittman.

A different Charlie was in charge here, as Mr. Underwood force-fed his contorted ballad to Barbara, and spent too much of Sam's saving in the process. The results were hardly worth it. There is some irony to "The Eleventh Commandment". Call it a credibility issue, as producer/composer Charles Underwood, who was later arrested for shoplifting drugs, takes it upon himself to pass editorial comment on the Ten Commandment. Sam Phillips nearly choked when he saw the bill for this epic session.

Needless to say, record sales never came close to offsetting session costs. Nearly 40 years later, Barbara Pittman still winces when she remembers trying to sing the erratic line lengths and basically tuneless opus.

01 - "HANDSOME MAN" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master
Recorded: - February 24, 1960 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-8 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

"Handsome Man" was Barbara's final release, gets a split vote. The uptempo side was written and produced by Charlie Rich, for whom Barbara has enormous respect. ''Charlie was the best thing that ever came out of Sun, period. I've been a big fan of Charlie's since I first met him when I was about 13 years old. He was always a good friend and I've always been crazy about him. His singing, his playing, his looks. He was a very handsome guy, very shy, very unassuming. Charlie was also a great writer and a fantastic pianist. Charlie and I used to play clubs together. We even did some TV work together", recalled Barbara.

02 - "HANDSOME MAN" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 372 - Master
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3553-B < mono
HANDSOME MAN / THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Handsome Man" is strong material. Unfortunately, "The Eleventh Commandment", is another story. Virtually no one, including Barbara herself, has a kind word to say about this track. No amount of remixing or de-chorusing can resurrect this recording. In its favor, this abominable production has generated some amusing anecdotes. Guitarist Brad Suggs, who played on the date, still shakes his head in disbelief when remembering the song. "It was a mess, man. Just all out of a meter. Impossible to play on". Barbara recalls, "Charles Underwood came by my house one day at two in the afternoon and said 'Barbara, we've got a session tonight'. I went down and learned to the song and recorded it the same night. I had a reputation then for being able to learn stuff real fast so I could do demos, but I wasn't ready for this. That enormous session! Charlie did the whole thing behind Sam's back. Charlie was the engineer and Sam was sick so he figured he could get away with it. You know, that was the most expensive session they had ever done. You wouldn't believe the session. All the strings, everybody there at one time. No overdubbing. Sam Phillips was in bed with pneumonia. He got out of bed to witness it. The head of the musicians union was also there. It was just incredible. I think Sam went into shock. I know I was scared to death just looking around me in the studio. The song itself was awful. I hated it. It was the worst thing I ever recorded. Its all out of meter. Billy Riley really got me through the session. Him and J.M. Van Eaton, the drummer. Jimmy kept saying to Underwood, 'She's right. The song is out of meter'. And Underwood would say back. 'No. It's fine. She just has to dip here a bit and dip there..."

03 - THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 371 - Master
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - April 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3553-A < mono
THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT / HANDSOME MAN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

There were originally three takes of "The Titles Will Tell" appears to be gone forever. The second, probably the better of the remaining versions, is missing the start. The third (included here) is complete. It is a powerful piece of material, sung to bluesy perfection.

04 - "THE TITLES WILL TELL" - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-3 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Perhaps the most interesting part of the Barbara Pittman story concerns the recent discovery of "The Titles Will Tell", a song previously thought lost. Barbara recalls: "I thought that was gone forever. I haven't heard it since the day we recorded it over 40 years ago. That was a Charles Underwood song. He wrote it for Elvis and I cut the demo for him. The session turned out just great, in fact Charlie thought we could have put the record out as a single. Dewey Phillips fell in love with it, too. He used to listen to it every time he came by the studio. Dewey took the song to Elvis and he loved it, but his management said they couldn't do anything with it unless they had the publishing. Unfortunately, Charlie had already published the song with Sam. Neither side would budge and so noting happened. I'll always remember that Elvis actually said to Dewey, 'Why don't you put the record out by Barbara. She sings it better than I could'". Barbara recalls: "The start of the second tape of "The Titles Will Tell" was erased by Sam Phillips and Dewey Phillips. They hit the record button by mistake when they were playing it over and over. Before anybody could stop them, the first 20 seconds were gone. Just enough to ruin it. Sam and Dewey used to get together in the studio and get stone drunk night after night. They had their buddies Jack Daniels and Haig & Haig with them. The five of them in the studio every night. They used to drive Jack Clement crazy. He would have to go in and re-do sessions".

05 - "JUST ONE DAY" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Bill Cantrell
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 24, 1960
Released: - 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15359-9 mono
I NEED A MAN
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-23 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Although Barbara recorded at Sun for a relatively long period of time, but she never had a hit record: "Sam wouldn't push my records even if they started to sell. "Handsome Man" received a bullet in Billboard. "Two Young Fools In Love" was the number 1 record in Memphis for around three months. The flipside had started to sell in Chicago. Sam's brother Jud told me how frustrated he was as well. He said that Sam had told him not to push it. "Raunchy" (by Bill Justis) came out on Phillips International at the same time as "Two Young Fools" and that just buried it. Sam wouldn't do anything to help. Its always bothered me. After more than 30 years, I got on the phone with Sam one night and we talked for over three hours. I finally got him to tell me why he wouldn't promote my stuff. Finally he told me. He was uncomfortable with female artists. He lacked confidence in them, especially somebody like me. I had a low, bluesy, husky voice and his favorite female artist was Doris Day. He told me this! Its the truth. So I said 'Well, Sam, why didn't you tell me this 30 years ago so I could have gone on with my life? Why did you keep me hanging on for four years" It makes me wonder what might have been if he had just been behind me".

Certainly, it is not true that Sam Phillips had no regard for female vocalists. For example, on a number of occasions, he has rhapsodized about the Miller Sisters, whose sweet country harmonies he personally recorded for over three years. Barbara Pittman concedes this point. "He loved them. They had high, sweet, girlish voices. I had a low, growling and husky voice. I was a blues singer. This petite little teenager singing like Koko Taylor. And he just didn't like that. Sam has always been a macho man. The lady has got to be very feminine. Like I said, his favorite artist was Doris Day. That should tell you something".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Barbara Pittman - Vocal
Billy Riley - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jilly Wilson - Piano

The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

For Biography of Barbara Pittman see: > The Sun Biographies <
Barbara Pittman's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on her playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

FEBRUARY 24, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Carl Dobkins currently serving six month hitch with the Ohio National Guard performs live from Fort Dixon on NBC-TVs The Perry Como Show. Ray Peterson begins a five week booking at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Songwriter Don Sampson is born at Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington, D.C. He authors Brad Paisley's ''Waitin' On A Woman'', Alan Jackson's ''Midnight In Montgomery'' and Gary Allan's ''Tough Little Boys''.

FEBRUARY 26, 1960 FRIDAY

Ernie Ashworth recorded ''Each Moment (Spent With You)'' and ''You Can't Pick A Rose In December''.

FEBRUARY 26, 1960 FRIDAY

Lenny Welch performs "You Don't Know Me" on American Bandstand.

FEBRUARY 29, 1960 MONDAY

Bobby Darin and Connie Francis appear on The Ed Sullivan Show.

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''Is It Wrong (For Loving You)'', Columbia released Ray Price's ''One More Time''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
FOR RITA RECORDS 1960

PEPPER RECORDING STUDIO
2076 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION : UNKNOWN DATE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES & BILLY RILEY

It is probably closer to the mark to say that Billy Riley's records for Sun and Rita were just a little too raw for prime time, although a little of the dumb luck that often separates a hit from a flop could have changed the picture considerably. The reputation of Riley's records as seminal rockabilly is now beyond dispute, although it is worth noting that Riley never considered himself a rockabilly singer. "What we did was rock and roll", asserted Riley to Bill Miller. "There was no hillbilly in it at all. To me, Elvis doing "Blue Moon Of Kentucky" was rockabilly but after Bernero came in he stopped cutting rockabilly, he became a rock and roll singer. I was a rock and roll singer!".

01 - "MY BABY'S GOT LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Harold Dorman
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) BFX 15272 mono
BILLY RILEY & THE LITTLE GREEN MEN
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-2-27 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Guitar
Wylie Gann - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Tommy Bennett - Piano

Those close to Riley thought that stardom was assured. "I really thought Riley was going to be a big star", asserted James M. Van Eaton. "That was one of the best bands I've ever played with. There were some musicians in that band as good as anyone in the country at that time. I think what it boiled down to was that they (Sun Records) didn't want us to have a hit record because they would lose the staff band".

After starting and folding two more labels in Memphis, Billy Riley eventually left for the West Coast. He slept on Charles Underwood's floor. He played guitar on a few sessions, including Herb Alpert's "Lonely Bull" session, which Underwood engineered, and he recorded for a plethora of labels.

Through the 1960s and 1970s, Billy Riley persevered in the music business. He recorded under his own name and a host of pseudonyms including the Megatrons, the Rockin' Stockings and Sandy and The Sandstones. The list of labels for whom he recorded is even longer. Riley even achieved a small breakthrough on the Entrance label in 1972 with the Chips Moman produced "I Got A Thing About You Baby" (later recorded by Elvis Presley). Immediately preceding his deal with Entrance, Riley had returned to the re-born Sun label in 1969, launching it in fine style with "Kay". Both "Kay" and "Red Hot" were - in their way - definitive performances but the gulf between them highlighted Riley's real problem: he lacked an identifiable style. With all the talent in the world, Riley would not stick in one groove long enough to reap the rewards. His versatility was his greatest asset and his greatest drawback.

He also worked for Sam Phillips' son Knox, recording a rockabilly session for Knox's Southern Rooster label. After feeling once again that his hour had finally come when Robert Gordon and the rockabilly revivalists started doing good business with what was essentially his music, Riley saw his star eclipsed for the last time and retired from the music business to work in construction.

Since 1983 Billy Riley has refused to gig, recorded little and released nothing. If the right offer under the right conditions came along he would probably give it one last -go-round. In the meantime, he supports himself as a contractor, rarely dwelling upon his impressive - if less than successful - past.

"Looking back", recalled Sam Phillips, "all in all I could have had a darn good country and rock and roll label, I really feel that. I think that I stayed in country music alone, and dedicated myself to that, then I had the nucleus of several fine artists who would have made it - Doug Poindexter, earl Peterson, Red Hadley, Malcolm Yelvington, the Miller Sisters, Maggie Sue Wimberly and, in particular, Ernie Chaffin, Charlie Feathers and Warren Smith.

See, my whole thing was, I just loved stylists. People you knew the minute you heard them on record. People like Carl and Johnny and Jerry Lee. That's what its all about, man. Then, once you get that feel and rapport with an artist and a style you can do just whatever you wanted to do, within reason, and still sell records.

But I know that if I had persisted in pure country music, I would have had difficulty in orienting the taste of people and getting the radio play I would needed to succeed. Because it was a different sound in country and rock and roll".

For Biography of Billy Riley see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
FOR RITA RECORDS 1960

SONIC RECORDING STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION : UNKNOWN DATE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES & BILLY RILEY

01 - ''MUD ISLAND'' – B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: Roland Janes-Billy Riley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date 1959/1960
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) BFX 15272 mono
BILLY RILEY & THE LITTLE GREEN MEN
Reissued: 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444-1-26 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Harmonica
Roland Janes – Guitar
Tommy Bennett - Piano
James M. Van Eaton – Drums
Martin Willis – Tenor Saxophone

For Biography of Billy Riley see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©