CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1960-1969 Sun Schedule <

1960 SESSIONS (3)
March 1, 1960 to March 31, 1960

Studio Session for Charlie Rich, March 7, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Paul Richy, March 11, 1960 / Sun Records

- The Old Payola Roll Blues -

Studio Session for Carl Mann, March 14, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ray Smith, March 15, 1960 / Judd Records
Studio Session for Jeb Stuart, March 16, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Don Hinton, March 16, 1960 / Sun Records

- Untold Sun Stories - Don Hinton -

Studio Session for Chuck Foster, March 22, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Billy Emerson, March 24, 1960 / Mad Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 1, 1960 TUESDAY

Red Prysock appears at the Surf Club in Baltimore.

MARCH 2, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Jack Scott sings "Burning Bridges" and ''What In the World's Come Over You" on American Bandstand.

Sergeant Elvis Presley leaves West Germany as the end of his Army hitch nears. Life magazine captures Priscilla Beaulieu waving goodbye.

MARCH 3, 1960 THURSDAY

Sergeant Elvis Presley arrives at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey on his return from West Germany. Nancy Sinatra accompanies him, while Tina Louise, the future Ginger Grant on ''Gillugan's Island'' covers the event for the Mutual Broadcast Newwork.

Bill Anderson recorded ''The Tip Of My Finger'', and Duane Eddy winds up a month long term in his hometown of Phoenix, Arizona.

Review from Cash Box says that ''Baby, Baby, Bye Bye'' (Sun 337) by Jerry Lee Lewis, ''The performer has a contagious outing here. The fine Lewis essay is enhanced by a delectable combo-chorus sound. Could be a big one, and ''Old Black Joe'' an even faster, honky-tonkish approach to the old favorite. It's a strong sound, but title may see programming difficulties''.

MARCH 4, 1960 FRIDAY

This was a red letter day in Memphis, because it marked the return from military service of Elvis Presley. Everyone was ecstatic, and there were many fans at the station to welcome him. Seeing him waving from the train where he got off at Buntyn Station in Memphis, immediately one could see that the rough edges of the rebel in the outlandish outfits had been smoothed to a more polished veneer. Here was a wholesome, motherand- country-loving boy even the older generation could adore. Colonel Tom Parker and the William Morris Agency would find him an even more valuable property now than when he had inspired teenagers to riot at his every concert.

Elvis Presley's return inspired Barbara Barnes to query a fan magazine about a ''Back Home in Memphis'' story. TV Radio Mirror accepted the story, and Barbara wrote it under the byline ''Pat Gipson''. She did not want her Sun Records identity to be involved with this piece.

Some of the information for the article Barbara Barnes gleaned from accounts in the Memphis Tress Scimitar, which had always had a strong entertainment section. As she said in her article, ''Graceland, Presley's $100,000 home in Memphis , was thrown open to the press on Elvis' first night home, and the reporters got a chuckle as Mr. Rock and Roll imitated President Eisenhower'' in welcoming the reporters. He stated he had requested to be sent home by ship because of his fear of flying, but ''you know how it is in the army. They tell you to fly, you fly''. Presley demurred when asked to pose with his teddy bear, saying, ''It might look silly for a 25-year-old man home from the service to be playing with dolls''.

Other tidbits were contributed by the various friends of Elvis who dropped into the studio. From another friend, perhaps Elvis's former schoolmate George Klein, Barbara said, ''I learned that, after staying up all night, Elvis awoke on his first day home about noon and asked Alberta Holman, Graceland's cook-made, to cook him up some bacon, black-eyed peas, and hash browns. I can't recall if it was George or someone else who commented on Elvis's diet, saying, ''Elvis likes grease. Every meal, I couldn't eat all that grease''. I left this observation out of my article''.

Sun producer Charles Underwood was still on the scene, and he would drop by with frequent updates as the week of Elvis's homecoming rolled on. Underwood was one of Elvis' good friends and had contributed to his image by designing for him the leather guitar-case cover that fans recognized when he pulled out his acoustic guitar.

''What do all you guys do all night?'' Barbara asked Charles. It was a halfteasing question, but one Charles took seriously. He thus contributed some insider information for Barbara's article. ''Well, at first Elvis wanted to stay at home. So we just hung around Graceland, playing pool and listening records. Elvis likes to show off his karate lessons. One night he wanted to see some movies, so he rented the Memphian for 1:00 a.m. And we saw ''Cash McGall'' and ''Seven Thieves''. He added, ''We might go to the skating rink, he has to rent that out, too''.

MARCH 4, 1960 FRIDAY

Tennessee senator Estes Kefauver honors Elvis Presley's Army service in the Congressional Record saying ''this young American became just another G.I. Joe''.

''Maybellene'' songwriter Chuck Berry is found guilty in St. Louis of violating the Mann Act, for taking an under-age female across the state line with reputedly improper motivation. It is the first of three such cases in which he will be tried over 13 months.

MARCH 5, 1960 SATURDAY

Jackie Wilson headlines a three day Alan Freed production at the State Theater in Hartford, Connecticut.

Elvis Presley is discharged from the Army.

MARCH 1960

Sam Phillips contributed to the complexion of Charlie Rich's music had been to introduce him to the world of commercial rock and roll and country music which set the stage for his moment in the spotlight ten years later. ''At first I didn't dig country'', recalled Rich to Fanfare magazine in 1975. ''As a matter of fact, we put it down because we wanted to be jazz pickers. I had to make a drastic change at Sun Records and I didn't really appreciate country music until I went there. Now I like to mix them up, put some jazz licks in country and some country licks into a heavy driving jazz piece''.

MARCH 7, 1960 MONDAY

The single, Sun 337 ''Old Black Joe'' b/w ''Baby Baby Bye Bye'' by Jerry Lee Lewis issued.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY MARCH 7, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 – ''COME BACK''* - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: None - Master
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - August 23, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1970 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS WITH CHARLIE RICH

02 – ''COME BACK'' - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-27 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''School Days'', tracks like, ''Apple Blossom Time'' and ''Come Back'' were originally issued with Excessive choral overdubs by the Gene Lowery singers. Nearly 40 years later, we can begin to appreciate the performances that Rich left on tape, without all the gratuitous ''sweetening''. The ballads, in particular, reveal a depth that was only hinted at in their original release. Charlie was simply incapable of performing a standard as it was originally composed or best known. On each of these performances, Charlie has digested the original and reinvented it to reflect his indelible streak of blues and jazz sensibility.

03 – ''SCHOOL DAYS'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:30
Composer: - Cobb-Edwards
Publisher: - Mills Music - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - P 385 - Master
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3560-A < mono
SCHOOL DAYS / GONNA BE WAITIN'
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

''School days'' is another matter. The idea of taking an ancient (we're talking 1907) tune like this and wrapping it in a modern, somewhat jazzy arrangement is novel, to say the least, but the excessive choral overdubs killed whatever promise the idea may have had. The final version seems ill-considered. It's odd to hear Charlie's soulful vocal punctuated by pseudo-hip Frank Sinatra-esque lines (''swingin' bunch of kids'') trying to make its way through gelatinous mounds of choral sweetening. Neither a pretty picture nor Charlie's finest hour at Sun.

04 - ''SCHOOL DAYS'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:31
Composer: - Cobb-Edwards
Publisher: - Mills Music - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - None – Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-7 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

05 - ''I'VE LOST MY HEART TO YOU'' - B.M.I. - 3:10
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-18 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

06 - ''THAT'S HOW MUCH I LOVE YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - August 23, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1970 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS WITH CHARLIE RICH
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-1-24 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

07 – ''UNCHAINED MELODY'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Hy Zaret-Alex North
Publisher: - Frank Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-10 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Unchained Melody'', in all likelihood, this track was little more than a one-take studio warm-up that ended up on tape. Little concentration seems to have gone into the recording, and indeed the whole mid section of the song (''Lonely rivers flow to the sea'') is missing. In addition, Charlie has made an interesting lyric change, altering ''Time goes by so swiftly...''. Even with such a slapdash effort, Charlie's powerful and soulful way with a ballad are obvious. Because of the name value of the title, this track actually appeared – overdubbed with additional instrumentation (including an organ!) - on a budget LP in the 1970s.

08 – ''UNCHAINED MELODY''* - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Hy Zaret-Alex North
Publisher: - Frank Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Gusto Records (LP) 33rpm Gusto GT-103 mono
WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN'GOIN' ON

09 - ''JEANNIE WITH THE LIGHT BROWN HAIR'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Stephen Foster
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 7, 1960
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-23 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

* - Overdubbed in Nashville

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Brad Suggs – Guitar
R.W. ''T-Willie'' Stevenson – Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums

For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 1960

From March through August of 1960, the sessions at the new studio were most about the ones with Charlie Rich, for an eventual album. It seemed to be a very slow process and, except for Charlie come and go a few times, and Barbara Barnes didn't hear much about what they were getting. Finally, in midsummer, Sam Phillips told her that they should get some artwork started for an album cover, and late in July she heard the acetate. Barbara was disappointed both in the sound and the choice of material. To her, the old studio had a more intimate and mellow sound. She liked some cuts, and she was sure in writing the liner notes to praise the diversity of Charlie Rich's stylings, but she just wasn't impressed with all they had put down. However, one point she did emphasize was a belief in Charlie's destiny as a major star, and this was a wholly honest opinion. Barbara also hoped the album would sell, because they didn't have anyone else to pin the hopes on that she knew it.

Charlie Rich was working in Memphis a great deal during that period, and one morning Barbara was surprised to get a phone call asking her to pick him up and bring him to the studio. He gave her an address in East Memphis, and she set out to find the place. When she drove up, she saw Charlie standing at the door with a woman she didn't recognize. They seemed to be having the proverbial ''fond farewell''. Barbara had heard from Bill Justis that Charlie liked to drink and also that women found him irresistible. Bill said they made all the moves and sometimes practically kidnapped Charlie after the gigs.

It was a little strained when he got in the car and neither of they said anything for a while, except Charlie finally said ''thanks''. Barbara told him ''anytime'', but added, ''Charlie, when you make it big, and I am sure you are going to make it big, don't forget Margaret Ann. Your success is going to be her success, too''. His only answer was, ''Hmmmm''.

According to Barbara, ''Charlie Rich, being Bill Justis's protege, wasn't part of the clique of musicians Jack Clement had built up during his Sun says. Instead of hanging out with him, he spent more time with Bill and sometimes Regina Reese than with me. In the early days, this meant lunch or coffee at Mrs. Taylor's. Sometimes it was just Charlie and me, and he also would come talk with me on break when I dropped into the Sharecropper bar. So we became friends, and he introduced me to some of his cronies''.

Charlie Rich's talent was being limited by two factors, seeking to get hits with what was rently commercial, that is, appealing to teens, and restricting his repertoire largely to tunes published in-house, mostly his own. It didn't seem to occur to Charlie or the individuals who had produced him that a new approach might work. Sam Phillips had success with blues, they wondered why he didn't get out some of those old tunes of his black artists and try Charlie on them. He apparently thought that scene was over.

Charlie's friend Bruce Reynolds was disappointed in the new album Phillips International had put out on Charlie, saying the material was weak, especially ''School Days''. Bruce said, ''School Days! Everybody hates school. Who wants to hear about school days''? He had a point. Charlie was too nice and pliable, trying to give Bill Justis and Sam what he thought they wanted, instead of asserting his own talent and what he was good at.

Sun 338 ''The Legend Of The Big Steeple'' b/w ''Broken Hearted Willie'' by Paul Richy issued.

MARCH 7, 1960 MONDAY

Johnny Horton recorded ''Sleepy-Eyed John'' just before midnight at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

MARCH 8, 1960 TUESDAY

Guitarist Jimmy Dormire is born in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He replaces Michael Lamb in Confederate Railroad in 1995, after the band's peak years with ''Trashy Women'', ''Queen Of Memphis'' and ''Daddy Never Was The Cadillac Kind''.

MARCH 9, 1960 WEDNESDAY

The Mystics sing "Hushabye" on American Bandstand.

MARCH 11, 1960 FRIDAY

Jimmy Jones begins a week at the Howard Theater in Washington, D.C. The Flamingos play two days at the Lindenwood Inn in Philadelphia.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Writer and producer Charles Underwood, composer of the superb "Bonnie B", spent a fair bit of time hanging around Sun end of 1959 and early 1960 and was actually entrusted with several productions. Be thankful he never had the producer's chair turned completely over to him. There might have been a lot more Sun records sounding like this. How can one calculate the distance, in miles or years, from "We Wanna Boogie" to "good simple people praying for a sleeple?".

Paul Richy from Arkansas. Moved to Memphis in 1954. Made one record for Sun on March 11, 1960, Sam Phillips met Richy at a disc jockey convention in Nashville and brought him up to the Sun studio.

STUDIO SESSION FOR PAUL RICHY (RICHEY)
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY FRIDAY MARCH 11, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

Despite the presence of Roland Janes, Jimmy Van Eaton, and Charlie Rich, this slice of sentimental dreck was pretty tame, even if it was not out of touch with the pop market in early 1960. These sides were probably among the earliest tracks recorded at 639 Madison Avenue. Its doubtful they could have fit the church bells through the door at 706 Union Avenue.

01 - "THE LEGEND OF THE BIG STEEPLE" - B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Jack Music
Matrix number: - U 394 - Master
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960
Released: - March 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 338-A < mono
THE LEGEND OF THE BIG STEEPLE / BROKEN HEARTED WILLIE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Charles Underwood didn't give up without a fight. The same session that produced these sides also yielded two unreleased titles. One was a tear jerker penned by Underwood called "Flight 303". It (mercifully) never appeared on Sun, but when label alumnus Edwin Bruce visited Nashville for his first RCA session in 1960, he had Underwood's composition in his little hands. It appeared as one side of Bruce's rare first single on RCA. The RCA connection extends deeper, too. Some six or eight weeks before Richy recorded "Big Steeple", Porter Wagoner recorded it for RCA, but it was one of the few Wagoner singles from this era not to chart. Paul Richy, incidentally, is the brother of George Richy, one-time musical director of "Hee-Haw" and sixth husband of Tammy Wynette.

02 - "BROKEN HEARTED WILLIE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Charles Underwood
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 395 - Master
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960
Released: - March 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 338-B < mono
BROKEN HEARTED WILLIE / THE LEGEND OF THE BIG STEEPLE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

On this side, Richy chronicles the trials and tribulations of Willie. Again, this is pretty dire stuff, although Jimmy Van Eaton's surprising kickass drumming shines like a beacon. It turns out that Willie was really a stand-in for Job, and the Lord bails out ole Willie for hanging in with him through all the rotten dates and trials of his teenage years. In its own quiet way, SUN 338 seems to have been a spiritual.

03 - "BROKEN HEARTED WILLIE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960

04 - "FLIGHT 303''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960

05 - "THREE STARS, THREE WISHES''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably March 11, 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Paul Richy - Vocal Roland Janes – Guitar
Brad Suggs – Guitar
Jimmy Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Gene Lowery Singer - Background Vocal

For Biography of Paul Richy see: > The Sun Biographies <
Paul Richy's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

THE OLD PAYOLA ROLL BLUES - Decline that affects Phillips' labels through the early 1960s had even deeper causes than his diminishing interest or the audio characteristics of the new studio. The character of the entire industry was changing. Sun had swept to prominence with some of the most starkly underproduced music ever recorded. ''Blue Suede Shoes'', ''I Walk The Line'', and ''Whole Lotta' Shakin' Gonna On'' featured just three or four instruments and vocalist, but such productions were swiftly going out of vogue. If Phillips had followed his nose back toward rhythm and blues, he would have been well placed to capitalize upon the soul music boom a few years later. Instead, he and his staff followed the trend toward a fuller pop sound. As a result, a Sun record produced in the early 1960s was less likely to be disingguishable from the fifty or one hundred other records released during the same weeks.

Other factors hastened the retrenchment. The wide ranging payola investigations under way in the late 1950s effected subtle but important changes within the industry. Payola (the payment of money or other incentives in exchange for radio play) had started with song pluggers before World War II, and after the war it became a feature of the rhythm and blues business. It was not until the rhythm and blues record labels began to get national exposure, using the same promotional methods they had perfected in leaner times, that the protests started. Phillips was called on to explain his dealing with Dick Clark on the ''Breatless'' promotion, but otherwise emerged unscathed. Parsimony had brought forth its reward. Other companies such as Chess, made detailed disclosures of their payments to disc jockeys. The protracted saga was played out as the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) hearings made their way across the country. Leonard Chess from Chess Records and Jerry Wexler from Atlanta were among those compelled to confess and recant. A few careers were shattered, most notably that of Alan Freed. In the end, payola went underground for a few years, but the more insidious result was that the music business became more conservative.

In the move back to safer ground, the major labels reasserted their power, and there was a general atmosphere of caution. Six of the Top 10 records from June1957 had been on independent labels; by June 1960 just three carried that distinction.

By the early 1960s, Sun was part of the musical establishment. Like the rest of the industry, they were concentrating on good-looking boys with a whitebread sound. What Sam Phillips had been able to do in the mid-1950s, with Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and all the others was carve out a secttor of the market no one had known to exist. The artist that Sun signed during the 1960s were competing in the same sector of the market as the major labels, but without the majors' promotional clout. In the mid-1950s the mayors a were playing catch-up to Phillips; by the early 1960s, he was trying to catch up to them.

MARCH 11, 1960 FRIDAY

Fabian, Jackie Wilson, Freddy Cannon and Santo and Johnny appear on the Dick Clark Show.

MARCH 12, 1960 SATURDAY

Cash Box combines its pop and r & b charts. In an editorial appearing on the front page of that issue, the magazine justifies this decision by noting the similarity between the pop and r & b charts; that is, the r & b listing was at the time almost ninety percent pop in nature. Cash Box evidently had second thoughts about this policy, and reinstated the separate rhythm and blues compilation on December 17, 1960 ("Top 50 in Locations"). Billboard used the same reasoning in deleting its rhythm and blues singles charts between November 23, 1963 and January 30, 1965. On the latter date, Billboard ultimately returned to the two-chart system.

MARCH 13, 1960 SUNDAY

Chuck Berry's trial for the violation of the Mann Act begins. Two weeks later Berry is found guilty and sentenced to five years in prison and fined $5,000. Berry immediately appeals.

MARCH 14, 1960 MONDAY

In England, Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran begin a week at the Empire Theater with British rockers Billy Fury, Georgie Fame and Tony Sheridan. Sam Cooke begins a tour of the Caribbean with a performance at Montego Bay, Jamaica.

Review in Billboard magazine says that ''Baby, Baby, Bye Bye'' (Sun 337), ''Jerry Lee Lewis comes thru with a strong reading of sprightly rocker that has a solid beat and a rhythmic infectiousness. Good wax, and that ''Old Black Joe'', ''wild, stompin' performance of the Stephen Foster tune by Jerry Lee also featuring some solid boogie piano''.

Life magazine runs a photo of Priscilla Beaulieu waving goodbye to Elvis Presley as he ends his stay in Germany. A caption portrays her as the ''girl he left behind''.

Columbia released Johnny Cash's double-sided hit ''Seasons Of My Heart'' backed with ''Smiling Bill McCall'', and Freddie Hart's ''The Key's In The Mailbox''. The song becomes a hit for Tony Booth 12 years later.

MARCH 1960

Charlie Rich did not easily give up the notion of session/producer at Sun. Even as ''Lonely Weekends'' was building momentum, Charlie was in the studio playing piano on songs he had written for other artists. On March 14, 1960, vocalist Carl Mann entered the new studios on Madison Avenue hoping to rekindle the success he had enjoyed barely a year earlier with ''Mona Lisa''. With Charlie at the keyboard, Mann was able to leave his rudimentary piano skills on the shelf and concentrate on singing a new tune Charlie had written for him called ''I'm Coming Home''. The performance ranked among Mann's finest work for sun, and was doubly gratifying for Rich when the song ended up on one of Elvis's LPs within the year. Both Charlie Rich and his wife, Margaret Ann were surprised by that turn of events since they had done nothing to promote the song or persuade Presley to record it. Their subsequent efforts to pitch their song ''Gentle As A Lamb'' to Presley feel on deaf ears, thus reinforcing their belief in the capriciousness of fame and fortune. Things only happen when you least expect them or have given up caring.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

March 1960 found Carl Mann at the new studio to work on his album. Charlie Rich, on the cusp of his first touch of success was sitting in on piano. Another webb Pierce song, ''I'm Walking The Dog'' from 1954 draws the best from everybody, and is recorded on a later session in August.

The sound of Rich on piano is quite apparent here. The fact that Sam Phillips wanted some album tracks drawn from his own publishing companies posed an unusual problem for an artist who had built a career on rocking up ''standards''.

Tunesmith Charlie Rich supplied a novel solution by contribution the standout ''I'm Coming Home''. Rich' songs is based quite closely on the chordal structure of Mann's reading of ''Mona Lisa''. Carl had taken considerable liberties in his adaptation of the Cole hit and Rich seems to have based his song on Car's version, thus circumventing copyright problems.

There is no more impressive track in the Carl Mann Sun legency than ''I'm Coming Home'', a judgement that Carl himself shares.

''I was real happy with the cut we got on that. I was proud to begin with that Charlie Rich had written the song especially for me. Then he played piano on it and we got a beautiful groove (going). Everything just worked perfectly. I was also very flattered when Elvis recorded a version of the song based on our arrangement. He had obviously been listening to our record and that made me feel good'', recalls Carl Mann.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY MARCH 14, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

A Session was paid for on July 15, 1960 for Mann, Rich, Van Eaton, Stevenson and Moore. Some of the titles below derive from that session.

Arguably, the fate of the A-side barely mattered in this case. The joy that awaited anyone brave and smart enouch to flip record over more than compensated for all studio excesses. ''I'm Coming Home'' is quite simply Carl Mann's masterpiece. It is his best recording at Sun and, thus, his best work ever. The reasons are quite straightforward. Charlie Rich has written a wonderful tune based entirely on the melody line used by Carl on ''Mona Lisa''. Since Carl had actually improvised that melody (rather than using the one performed by Nat Cole) there was no fear of plagiarism. Moreover, Carl wisely surrendered the piano stool to Charlie Rich, thus focussing his attention on singing. This also allowed some finely crafted piano stylings to appear on a Carl Mann record – another first. Everything comes to perfection here, right down to the choreographed slow-down ending that makes this tiny little studio combo sound like a well oiled machine.

Eddie Bush again provides a memorable and distinctive guitar solo. W.S. Holland is in peak form here, offering tasty drum rolls to mark the start and finish of most of the 16-bar segments (the song has no ''release'' or chorus). Some of those rolls are preceded by a visit to the crash cymbal. The piece de resistance is the perfectly synchronized final four bars when the band daringly slows down in unison. A moment to cherish, an chored perfectly by Holland.

01 – "I'M COMING HOME" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 376 - Master
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3555-B < mono
I'M COMING HOME / SOUTH OF THE BORDER
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

The result were obviously so compelling that when Elvis Presley heard them he insisted on recording the tune for his ''Something For Everybody'' LP. Along with the ego boost that offered Mr. Mann (not everybody had his records covered by the King), it also provided an unexpected payday for Rich and Sam Phillips, whose publishing company shared the joyride. As a final token of esteem, this track was included on the original LP Sun 1250 titles ''Sun's Million Sellers'', putting it in fast company with selections like ''Blue Suede Shoes'' and ''Great Balls Of Fire''.

''If I Ever Needed You'' was yet another attempt to repackage a ballad from days gone by. The original had been a hit for Eddie Fisher, spending 23 weeks on the charts in 1954. Car's version is nearly as slick as Fisher's original, down to the saccharine chorus.

02 – "IF I EVER NEEDED YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Crane-Jacobs
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-12 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

03 – "ISLAND OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-13 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Another Eddie Bush composition ''Walkin'' And Thinkin'' reveals the kind of dues many Sun artists had to pay for recording at 639 Madison. This fine track would have been a killer if it had been cut at 706 Union Avenue. Instead, its crisp low end, accented by W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland closed hi-hat, has been set awash in a sea of swampy echo.

04 – "WALKIN' AND THINKIN'" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Eddy Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - August 17, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1960 mono
LIKE, MANN
Reissued - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-14 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

05 – "IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER ON" - B.M.I. - 3:06
Composer: - Carl Mann-Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 14, 1960
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-9 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal & Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatswell - Bass
W.S. Holland - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

Sadly, W.S. Holland and Carl Mann came to a parting of the ways sometime in the summer of 1960 following this session at the new Phillips studio on Madison Avenue. Predictably, it was over money. Musicians and groups who make it through the lean years often find unexpected conflict when the money starts rolling in. Until ''Mona Lisa'' starting selling big, Carl and W.S. had made it on a handshake. With revenue from both personal appearances and record sales, the question of exactly what was being split and in what percentage became contentious. At this point, W.S. Holland chose a steady, although unchallenging gig keeping time for Johnny Cash over the ups and downs of working with Carl Mann.

Carl Mann had several 'feel good' moments during his days recording for Sam Phillips' label. Admittedly, his later work for Monument or ABC might have revealed a higher standard of technical perfection, but these early sides by a still very young, optimistic and relatively musician are surely to work for which he will be remembered. There is much to be proud of here.

For Biography of Carl Mann see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Mann's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 15, 1960 TUESDAY

NBC's ''Ford Startime'' celebrates Oscar-winning songs, with Tex Ritter singing ''High Noon'' and a current nominee, ''The Hanging Tree''. Nat King Cole is also hand to deliver ''Mona Lisa''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The LP collected most of Ray's singles alongside some unissued songs. Overall, it reveals a man working within the parameters of rock and roll and the softening sounds of 1960 popular music, but who was nevertheless capable of a wide range of good music. Rockers like ''That's All Right'', and Charlie Rich's ''Rebound'' sit well alongside catchy and classy soft rockers and Dean Martin-inspired ballads that included ''You Don't Want Me'', ''You Make Me Feel Good'' and ''I'll Be Coming Home''. Smith benefited at this time from the contacts Bill Justis and Bill Lowery had with a number of good young songwriters, including Marijohn Wilkin and Ray Stevens.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
FOR JUDD RECORDS 1959

RCA STUDIO B.
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
JUDD SESSION: TUESDAY MARCH 15, 1960
SESSION HOURS: 20:00-23:00 & 23:00-02:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – JUD PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

In October 1960 came Ray's fourth and final single, Judd 1021, ''Blonde Hair, Blue Eyes'' and ''You Don't Trust Me'', and an LP called ''Travelin' With Ray'', Judd LP 701. This single and some of the album tracks were made on Tuesday March 15, 1960 in two sessions at RCA, one at 8:00pm and another night session at 11:00pm. Once again, these sessions were produced by Bill Justis.

There were to be no more Ray Smith discs on Judd, however. Despite Smith's hits and two successful discs by Tommy Roe in 1960, including the big hit ''Sheila'' (spelled ''Shiela'' on the record label), Bill Lowery's NRC operation went bankrupt. It was caught in the well-known trap of being unable to collect funds from distributors fast enough to keep up with the outgoings. Lowery ran other small labels later, and guitarist Stanley Walker recorded a single on the Lowery Records label, but in the main Bill Lowery decided to focus on publishing as his main business, Jud Phillips decided to stick to artist promotion and other activities outside music, and Charlie Terrell was left looking for another deal for Ray Smith.

01 – ''BLONDE HAIR, BLUE EYES'' – B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Martin-Blake
Publisher: - Cedarwood Music
Matrix number: - 5-1023
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1021-A mono
BLONDE HAIR, BLUE EYES / YOU DON'T WANT ME
First appearance: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-13 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''YOU DON'T WANT ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Marijohn Wilkin-Stanley Walker
Publisher: - Cedarwood Music
Matrix number: - 5-1024
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1021-B mono
YOU DON'T WANT ME / BLONDE HAIR, BLUE EYES
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-14 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 – ''REBOUNT'' – B.M.I. - 1:42
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 729
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-30 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04 – ''BABY JUST BECAUSE'' – B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Lazenby-Lazenby
Publisher: - Tuneville Music
Matrix number: - S 729
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-31 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

05 – ''LITTLE MISS BLUE'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Ron Isle-Jimmy Isle
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 730
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-32 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

06 – ''SPEAK LOW'' – B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Weill-Nash
Publisher: - Chappell Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 729
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-33 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

07 – ''I'LL BE COMING HOME'' – B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Ray Stevens
Publisher: - Chappell Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 730
Recorded: - March 15, 1960
Release: - October 1960
First appearance: - Judd Records (LP) 33rpm Judd LP 701 mono
RAY SMITH – TRAVELIN' WITH RAY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-34 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Chet Atkins – Guitar
Grady Martin – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Floyd Cramer – Piano

The Jordanaires consisting of
Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews,
Hugh Jarrett, Hoyt Hawkins – Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Ray Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JEB STUART
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY MARCH 16, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

Jeb Stuart is what they used to call a stylist. An entertainer. If you're looking for a straight reading, you won't get it from ''Mr. Emotions', as he billed himself. On ''Sunny Side Of The Street'', Stuart brings his frenetic energy to the lyrics. Like fellow stylist Billy Stewart (no relation), Jeb repeats words two or three times. He seems overcome by his own excitement; he just can't bear any pauses in his delivery. Empty space is wasted space. The effect is strange to say the least. How does one classify such an agitated style?

01 – "SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 1:53
Composer: - McHugh-Fields
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein
Matrix number: - P-379 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3557-A < mono
SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET / TAKE A CHANCE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Is it rhythm and blues? Blues? Pop? Jazz? We can pretty much rule out country or gospel, but then what? The situation isn't helped by the new studio at 639 Madison, whose spacey echo only confuses matters more. When you've finished adding overdubs by the Gene Lowery Singers, the effects are beyond recognition. Things become a lot clearer on ''Take A Chance'', which is far more conventional urban rhythm and blues, circa 1960. Once again, though, Stuart is sabotaged by the out-of-control sonics of the new studio.

From the beginning of his career, Stuart seems to have oriented himself toward the white audience. It surely couldn't have been coincidence that a black Memphian named Charles Jones took the name of a Confederate cavalry general. Jones/Stuart claims to have been born on June 2, 1945, although one suspects that there's a birth certificate somewhere that tells a different story. He grew up idolising Billy Eckstine, Nat King Cole, Elvis, Fats Domino, and Little Richard, and left Memphis to study at the Chicago Conservatory of Music under Frank Lavere, one of the writers of Cole's hit ''Pretend''.

Back in Memphis, Stuart landed a gig at the Southern Club, and hired Isaac Hayes as his piano player. They were eventually displaced by Sam the Sham, but moved on to several other local venues. Hayes, incidentally, claims to have played piano and arranged one of Stuart's Phillips singles (although the Union logs tell a different story, as they often do).It was Rufus Thomas who suggested that Stuart contact Sam Phillips. Stuart was auditioned by Charles Underwood, who was sufficiently impressed to call Phillips down from the executive suite.

Phillips liked what he heard. Stuart and Underwood co-wrote ''Take A Chance'', and, given the choice of signing with Phillips International or Sun, Stuart opted for Phillips because of its uptown image.

02 – "TAKE A CHANCE'' - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Charles Underwood-Jeb Stuart
Publisher: - Up Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 380 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3557-B < mono
TAKE A CHANCE / SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stuart - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
More Details Unknown

Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Jeb Stuart see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jeb Stuart's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

An ardent Elvis Presley devotee, Donald L. Hinton grew up in Carruthersville, Missouri wearing cool clothes, driving a slick car and singing the kind of rock and roll songs that he hoped the King would approve of. A taste of the real thing came when he opened for Carl Perkins, a move that gave him the concocted with Narvel Felts. His moment at the label came and went in a heartbeat but the peppy ''Honey Bee'' is a deserving lagacy.

STUDIO SESSION FOR DON HINTON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY MARCH 16, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

01 - "HONEY BEE''* – B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Don Hinton-Narvel Felts
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P-378 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3556-A < mono
HONEY BEE / JO ANN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Records like ''Honey Bee'' were not that hard to find in the 1960 pop marketplace. They came complete with quasi-Latin rhythms and Elvisy vocals, like Donnie Brooks' popular ''Mission Bell''. Hinton arrived at 639 Madison in March, 1960 and recorded four titles, two of which were released on May 10th. Not bad – a two-month delay for a kid obsessed with Sun Records. The record sold poorly, though, and Hinton's Sun career was over almost as quickly as it started.

The flipside, ''Jo Ann'', is pretty straightforward teen fare circa March 1960, that does little to bring out the best in Hinton's vocal chops.

02 - "JO ANN'' - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Don Hinton-Wolf
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 377 - Master
Recorded: - March 16, 1960
Released: - May 10, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3556-B < mono
JO ANN / HONEY BEE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

03 - "DREAM GIRL''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 16, 1960

04 - "HEART OF GOLD''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 16, 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Don Hinton - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Sid Manker - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich – Piano

*- Gene Lowery Singers consisted of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Don Hinton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Don Hinton's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

UNTOLD SUN STORIES – DON HINTON - Born in Caruthersville, Missouri, some 90 miles north of Memphis, in 1942, Don Hinton not only grew up in the immediate post-Elvis generation but in awe of what was happening in Memphis. To him and his buddies, Memphis was the epicenter of the musical universe. His first gigs were with Junior Upchurch and the Rockers. They reckoned themselves to be the number 2 local band, second only to Narvel Felts. There was a jukebox supplier in Caruthersville named Bo Young (rumors of Bo's contacts with local organized crime seemed to be borne out when he was later murdered).

Young knew Sam Phillips, and took Don to Memphis. ''Bo liked our songs'', said Don. ''He financed the session, and Sam was there. Sam liked it well enough to want to release it on Sun. All the Sun guys were there: Roland Janes, Billy Riley, Charlie Rich... and so on.

Roland liked what we'd done and wanted to issue it on his label, Rita Records. Hi Records was interested, and so was Fernwood. I remember going to Fernwood and Bill Black's bass was there with the white trim. Fernwood wanted the record too, but everyone wanted to be on Sun, and when Sam says he wanted to release it, we jumped. They pushed ''Jo Ann'' but ''Honey Bee'' was the side that fit the era much better. Sam told me I should move to Memphis, stay at the YMCA, and hang out at Sun. I didn't do it, and I've regretted it all these years''.

Hinton says that ''Jo Ann''/''Honey Bee'' was released on the same day as Carl Mann's ''South Of The Border''. ''They sold 20,000 ''South Of The Border'' on the first day'', he told Dave Booth, ''and all the Phillips International power was behind Carl Mann. Mind You, if I was Phillips I would have done the same thing''.

Before and after his Phillips single, Don opened a few shows for Jerry Lee Lewis, Charlie Rich, Carl Perkins, and others. It was, he says, a joyful period. Then he went to Chicago. ''I went for a two-week stand in June 1961, and I left in 1972'', he says. He met his wife, Sabina, in Chicago and when they left it was to take his Elvis show on the road. He modeled himself after Elvis' Vegas period. Sabina made the sequined jumpsuits. Together, they toured the United States and Canada. They did this until 1985 or 1986. ''I'd be on the road five or six months at a stretch'', he says. He'd hang a sign outside the lounges he played, ''If you like Elvis, you'll love Don Hinton''. Playing places that Elvis didn't play made Don a lot of money, but much of it went on life sweeteners. He had no home, just a recreational vehicle.

Don came close to Elvis just once. Elvis's girlfriend, Linda Thompson caught his act and invited him to join a party of Elvis's friends at the Memphian Theater. They watched a bad war movie, and Don asked Linda if Elvis was in a mood to meet anyone. She went to ask and never came back. Don was on a trek across Canada when he heard that Elvis had died.

Don eventually settled in Mobile, Alabama. ''I loved the mystique of the town'', he says. ''Down here on the Gulf, it's a very unique area. We liked anything unique... and I'm not going to elaborate on that. I flew down one January and bought a house''. There wasn't much recording after Sun. ''I recorded in Chicago for a little offbeat label. Then I did an LP in 1985 for Mister Music Records in Nashville. It sounds cheesy, and I guess it was. We had two singles off that record''.

For the greater part of his musical career, Don inhabited the twilight world of bars and lounges. Tours could be extended indefinitely. If he went over well in one market, his booker would call ahead to other markets and line up more shows. He had no hits, but he didn't really need them as long as Elvis was in the charts. Still, it was a punishingly hard life, and Don now seems more less relieved to be putting on his sequined jumpsuit only for the occasional charity with his son, Bo, on drums, his son-in-law on organ, and his daughter Jessica, singing backup, but for the moment (1998) he's in Mobile running a dry cleaning business.

MID MARCH 1960

As a result of the payola investigations, Washington calls on record companies to stop sending free promotional records to radio stations.

MARCH 17, 1960 THURSDAY

The Platters open for a week at the Olympia in Paris.

Jeanne Black recorded ''He'll Have To Stay'', intended as a response to Jim Reeves' ''He'll Have To Go''.

Janis Joplin is suspended at high school in Port Arthur, Texas. She eventually gets her degree, and delivers a recording of ''Me And Bobby McGee'', regarded among country's 500 greatest singles in a Country Music Foundation publication, ''Heartaches By The Number''.

MARCH 18, 1960 FRIDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded the pop hit ''Cathy's Clown'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Carl Smith recorded ''Cut Across Shorty''. A Nat Stuckey version of the song becomes a country hit nine years later.

MARCH 18, 1960 FRIDAY

New York deejay Doug "Jocko" Henderson produces the Rocket Ship Reeve featuring the Coasters, Dave "Baby" Cortez, the Isley Brothers and Luther Bond at the Apollo. Wilbert Harrison is booked for three days at the Lindenwold Inn in Philadelphia.

MARCH 19, 1960 SATURDAY

Bobby Darin, Freddy Cannon, Dorsey Burnette and the Contours appear on the Dick Clark Show. Brook Benton and the Coasters break the house record during their week at the Howard Theater in Washington, D.C.

The Browns perform ''The Old Lamplighter'' on ABC's ''The Dick Clark Show'', also featuring Johnny Cash, Bobby Darin, and The Coasters.

MARCH 21, 1960 MONDAY

Waylon Jennings' third child, Buddy, is born.

Elvis Presley recorded "Stuck On You" backed with ''Fame And Fortune'' is Elvis Presley's first hit single since he was discharged from the Army. He recorded the song during March 1960 session at the Nashville's RCA Studio B in his first stereo session, and the single was released within weeks and went to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in late-April 1960, becoming his first number-one single of the 1960s and thirteenth overall. "Stuck On You" peaked at number six on the rhythm and blues chart. The song knocked Percy Faith's "Theme From A Summer Place'' from the top spot, ending its nine-week run at number one on the chart. The record reached number three in the United Kingdom. The song was written by Aaron Schroeder and J. Leslie McFarland and published by Gladys Music, Elvis Presley's publishing company.

In New Zealand (and perhaps other countries), the single had a special paper sleeve with the usual RCA logo top left and 45 R.P.M. bottom left and included, in large letters, "ELVIS" top right and bottom left: "Elvis' 1st new recording for his 50,000,000 fans all over the world''.

Decca released Kitty Wells' ''Left To Right''.

MARCH 21, 1960 MONDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis starts tour of Hawaii and Australia with Tommy Sands as headliner.

Afrikaner police open fire with sub machine guns on demonstrators in the black township of Sharpeville, South African.

MARCH 22, 1960 TUESDAY

The Playmates appear on American Bandstand and sing "Beep Beep''.

MARCH 1960

Another attempt to break into a different type of music with an LP was cut in the Skyway of the Peabody Hotel in downtown Memphis, where Sam Phillips had once engineered big-bands broadcasts. Chuck Foster was popular with Memphians during his two engagements each year at the Peabody, and he had national standing, having played the Academy Awards Ball and other big events. In March, the band cut a bunch of sides live during one of their shows. That LP, designated PLP 1965, was intended not only for national distribution but to be sold to guests at the hotel. This music was pretty formulaic and was exactly of the type Sam Phillips had grown to detest when he worked there. Tunes of the vintage of ''Oh, You Beautiful Doll'' marked the LP as music of decades past.

This time they returned to the old standby artist, Andy Anderson, and he executed a blue cover with pictures of people dancing in the Skyway and a bellman leading the famous Peabody ducks through the lobby for their daily bath. This wasn't a great-selling album either.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHUCK FOSTER
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY MARCH 22, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

The muddy Mississippi winds its way to the gulf, lazily flowing by Memphis, where towering bluffs look down. Year in and year out the bluffs see the barges carry away the cotton that provides the wherewithal for the good life that the Southern agriculturist enjoys. Just outside Memphis is the sprawling Delta country of Mississippi and Arkansas, presided over by affluent planters who like to come up to Memphis for their holidays. The often repeated phrase attributed to William Faulkner - "The Delta begins in the lobby of Hotel Peabody" - is no exaggeration.

The Peabody is something of an institution about these parts, and along with the Peabody one thinks of Chuck Foster. Playing his usual month's engagement around the Christmas and New Year's holidays, Chuck provides musical background for the gaiety that goes along with the festive season, which is also a time of celebrations honoring Delta debutantes. When June brings balmy days, when the cotton is planted and he Southern gentleman wants to relax and drink his bourbon and branch water, again he treks to Memphis and Hotel Peabody, and under the stars he dances to the music of Chuck Foster at the Skyway.

Chuck Foster, also, is an institution. Since 1943, he has played two lengthy engagements per year in Memphis. A veteran showman who got his start on the West Coast prior to World War II, Chuck plays smooth arrangements that are danceable and listenable. From the first strains of the theme, 'Oh You Beautiful Doll', through the end of the set, there's not a loser in this album. Chuck has played at distinguished clubs throughout the country and Music in the Foster Fashion' has provided the background for such glittering events as the Academy Awards Ball. Now you can make a ballroom of your own living room or patio, and join the fun-loving people throughout the country who name Chuck Foster as their favorite bandleader.

Liner notes by Barbara Barnes

01 – ''OH YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:20
Composer: - Brown
Publisher: - Ayer Remick Music
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-1 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

02 – ''WOODCHOPPERS BALL'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:35
Composer: - Herman
Publisher: - Bishop Leeds Music
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-2 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

03 – ''CIMARRON ROLL ON'' – B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Bond
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-3 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER
Reissued: - 2012 Sun Records X5 Group Internet iTunes MPS-9 mono
SUN RECORDS - JUMP BLUES

04 – ''LA DORRACHITA'' - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Esperon
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-4 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

05 – ''SLOW POKE MEDLEY'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:17
Composer: - Gay Johnson-Leo Feist
''Slow Poke'' (King-Price) Ridgeway Music
''Just One More Chance'' (Johnson-Sam Coslow) Famous Music
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 156
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-A-5 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

06 – ''PATRICIA'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:32
Composer: - Davis-Bradman-Vocco-Conn
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-1 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

07 – ''SOUTH'' – B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Motor-Charles-Hates
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-2 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

08 – ''CORN BALL MEDLEY'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 3:00
Composer: - Brooks-Leo Feist-Robinson-Davis-Conrad-Irvin Berlin
Publisher: - Irvin Berlin Music
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-3 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

09 – ''BEGIN THE BEGUINE'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 3:21
Composer: - Cole Porter
Publisher: - Harms Incorporated
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-4 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

10 – ''JOSEPHINE'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:16
Composer: - Kahn-Bivins
Publisher: - Leo Feist Incorporated
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-5 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER
Reissued: - 2012 Sun Records X5 Group Internet iTunes MPS-3 mono
SUN RECORDS - JUMP BLUES

11 – ''MORITAT'' - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:00
Composer: - Brecht-Weill
Publisher: - Harms Incorporated
Matrix number: - PH 157
Recorded: - March 22, 1960
Released: - August 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm PLP 1965-B-5 stereo
AT HOTEL PEABODY OVERLOOKING OLD MAN RIVER

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Chuck Foster Orchestra consisting of
Lester Sexton, Woodward Sanders,
Dennis Sourwine, William Howard,
James Maag, Charles Finkiziner,
James Putnam, Eugene Schuette,
Thomas Gran, Walter Major
Unknown Instruments

For Biography of Chuck Foster Orchestra see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Into 1960, former Sun artist Billy Emerson continued to play some of the beat club spots in Chicago and to have his songs published. One was ''Do Me So Good'', recorded on Chess by Little Miss Cornshucks and later picked up by the dancing, singing, movie body Ann-Margret. The Cornshucks disc was backed by another Emerson song, ''No Teasing Around'', and Chess continued to use Emerson as a writer and as a session pianist or organist during the 1960s. He appears on recordings by Larry Williams, Willie Mabon, Sonny Boy Williamson and a number of others.

Emerson's days as a featured singer at Chess were over, though, and he opened the 1960s on the MAD label. This was launched in 1957 on East 53rd Street by Tommy ''Madman'' Jones, who had spent thirty years blowing honking tenor sax solos for Chicago nightclub audiences. By the time he recorded Emerson in March 1960. MAD was part of the Apex Producing Corporation of Chicago that was run by Bill Sheppard and Norman Dempsey.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY EMERSON
FOR MAD RECORDS 1960

UNIVERSAL RECORDING CORPORATION
111 EAST ONTARIO STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
MAD SESSION: THURSDAY MARCH 24, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – RILEY HAMPTON

01 – ''IT DO ME SO GOOD'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Riverline Music
Matrix number: - 60-1840
Recorded: - March 24, 1960
Released: - Mad Unissued/Lost

02 – ''IT TOOK IT SO HARD'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Riverline Music
Matrix number: - 215 / 217
Recorded: - March 24, 1960
Released: - U.S.A. Records (S) 45rpm standard single U.S.A. 777 mono
IT TOOK IT SO HARD / WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS

The MAD single below, came from this session, included two other songs, unissued until later. It has been suggested that the original master numbers and the studio group led by Riley Hampton indicate that the session was done for Vee-Jay and later unloaded by that label, but Emerson denies this, saying ''I did that for Dempsey Nelson who had the MAD label''. Either way, it seems that Bill acquired the tapes later and leased some of them to the USA label, on which he appeared in 1961

03 – ''WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS'' – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - S 827
Recorded: - March 24, 1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Mad Records (S) 45rpm standard single MAD 1301-A mono
WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS / I NEVER GET ENOUGH
Reissued: 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-32 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The MAD session produced one single, the rocking ''I Never Get Enough'', backed by a new version of ''When It Rains It Pours''. Emerson expands on the lyric a little but his vocal delivery and the arrangement of ''When It Rain It Pours'' is familiar from the Sun version. This is a worthy remake though, with a tight band and a solid overall sound. Emerson remembered: ''I Never Get Enough'' was a Howlin' Wolf type song. That's the only blues been recorded in three quarters time. A guy bet me I couldn't do it. Never bet me!''. Certainly the disc moves along at a storming pace, opening with rabble-rousing guitar figures by a musician Emerson recalled as ''Chico''. The band featured John and Bobby Neely on saxes along with McKinley Easton, and other musicians with whom Emerson was used to working in the studio. It was produced by Riley Hampton. This is a formidable record whether you favour blues, rhythm and blues or rock and roll.

04 – ''I NEVER GET ENOUGH'' – B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Josette Publishers
Matrix number: - S 826
Recorded: - March 24, 1960
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Mad Records (S) 45rpm standard single MAD 1301-B mono
I NEVER GET ENOUGH / WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS
Reissued: 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-33 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

All four of the songs had new vocals added in the mid-1960s, and were issued on the Tarpon and Chirrup labels.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Robert Emerson – Vocal & Piano
Chico – Guitar
Wilburn Green – Bass
Jimmy Cottrell – Drums
Riley Hampton – Alto Saxophone
Bobby Neely – Tenor Saxophone
John Neely – Tenor Saxophone
McKinley Easton – Baritone Saxophone

For Biography of Billy Emerson see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 23, 1960 WEDNESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's first single after his military service, ''Stuck On You'' backed with ''Fame And Fortune'' (RCA Victor 47-7740).

''Time Don't Run Out On Me'' songwriter Carole King and Gerry Goffin welcome a daughter, Louise Goffin.

MARCH 24, 1960 THURSDAY

Jimmie Rodgers appears an ABC-TV's The Pat Boone Show.

MARCH 25, 1960 FRIDAY

The Temptations sing "Barbara" on American Bandstand. Ray Charles headlines at the Opera House in Chicago, Illinois. Jerry Butler, the Spaniels, Big Maybelle, Etta James appear at Chicago's Regal Theater.

Ray Charles recorded Hoagy Carmichael's ''George On My Mind'' at the Capitol Studios in New York. The song later becomes a country hit for Willie Nelson.

Roy Orbison recorded ''Only The Lonely'' in Nashville's RCA Studio B.

MARCH 26, 1960 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley gets $125,000 for a six-minute appearance in the taping of ''The Frank Sinatra Timex Special'' at Miami's Fontainbleau Hotel, performing ''Fame And Fortune'' and ''Stuck On You''. He harmonizes with Frank Sinatra ''Love Me Tender/Witchcraft''.

''Wild River'' debuts in movie theaters, with Montgomery Clift in the starring role. Tootsie's Orchid Lounge co-owner Big Jeff Bess makes an appearance in the picture.

Frankie Avalon headlines the Dick Clark show.

MARCH 27, 1960 SUNDAY

Brenda Lee recorded ''I Want To Be Wanted'' and the Jerry Reed-penned pop hit ''That's All You Gotta Do'' at the Bradley Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

MARCH 28, 1960 MONDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hit ''I'm Sorry'' at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Cut Across Shorty''. The song becomes a hit nine years later for Nat Stuckey, and Columbia also released Charlie Walker's ''Who Will Buy The Wine''.

The Drifters begin a Southern tour.

MARCH 29, 1960 TUESDAY

Tootsie's Orchid Lounge opens on lower Broadway in Nashville, just around the corner from the Grand Ole Opry. The small, lavender bar becomes a hangout for the likes of Willie Nelson, Harlan Howard, Hank Cochran and Mel Tillis.

A Los Angeles judge approves Nat ''King'' Cole's adoption of a 13-month-old boy, Nat Kelly Cole. The senior Cole appeared on an early version of the Billboard country chart in 1944 with ''Straighten Up And Fly Right''.

MARCH 30, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Sun 339 ''Whose Gonna Shoe Your Pretty Little Feet'' b/w ''There's No Tomorrow'' by Rayburn Anthony are issued.

Sun 340 ''Bobaloo'' b/w ''Bad Times Ahead'' by Bill Johnson is released. It is the first on the label by a black artist for a year and a half.

The Olympics sing "Big Boy Pete" and "Baby, Hully Gully" on American Bandstand.

MARCH 31, 1960 THURSDAY

Paul Anka headlines the Chase in St. Louis, Missouri.

Jim Reeves recorded ''I'm Gettin' Better'' in an evening session at RCA Studio B in Nashville. He also recorded ''Oh, How I Miss You Tonight'', which becomes a duet with Deborah Allen nearly 20 years later.

Little Jimmy Dickens recorded ''We Could'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville. Charley Pride turns the song into a hit 14 years later.

LATE MARCH

Little Richard's former back-up band The Upsetters are on the road with Little Willie John.

Lloyd Price is at Pep's Lounge in Philadelphia.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
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