CONTAINS
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> Back 1960-1969 Sun Schedule <

1960 SESSIONS (6)
June 1, 1960 to June 30, 1960

Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, Probably June 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Sonny Wilson, Summer 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Lance Roberts, Probably June 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bobbie Jean Barton, June 1, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ernie Barton, Possible June 1, 1960 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jimmy Louis, Summer 1960 / Nita Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1960

With Fernwood Records in dire straits, Scotty Moore would sell his shares, or rather unload them, later in the year, he started looking around for a day job. Sam Phillips told him that in addition to the new studio he was building on Madison Avenue he was buying in 1960 out a studio in Nashville. He needed someone to oversee both studios.

Scotty hadn't had a regular job since his days as a hatter at the dry cleaners, but working for Sam seemed like a good idea. He would no longer be playing for thousands of screaming fans, but he would still be in the music business.

In June 1960 the Sun-Liners, a newsletter put out by Sun Records, announced the title of Johnny Cash's latest album, ''So Doggone Lonesome'', along with a release from newcomer Bobbie Jean titled ''You Burned The Bridges''. Also in the newsletter was an announcement that Scotty Moore had joined the staff of Sam C. Phillips Enterprises as production manager. In that capacity, he would supervise all aspects of studio operations, including sessions, mastering, and new artists acquisition. ''His will be a fulltime job with Sun PI, et al., but he may get together with his old buddies, Elvis Presley and Bill Black, for a gig now and then'', said the newsletter. ''Persons wishing to utilize Sam C. Phillips Recording facilities for recording may reach Scotty in Memphis at Jackson 7-8233''.

Scotty's photograph was prominently displayed in a Memphis Press-Scimitar feature that heralded the official opening on September 17, 1960, of the new studio at 639 Madison Avenue. Sam Phillips told the reporter, Edwin Howard, that he had invested $750,000 in the new facility in an effort to stay competitive. ''Woodshed recordings have had it'', Sam said. ''You've got to have latitude today, all the electronic devices, built-in high and low frequency equalization and attenuation, echoes, and metering on everything''.

The new studio, on a site formerly occupied by a Midas Muffler Shop, had all that and more. Howard asked if there was a possibility Elvis Presley might use the new facilities. ''I don't know'', said Sam Phillips. ''Of course, RCA has its own studio in Nashville, and Elvis has been cutting there. But Ed Hinds of RCA's Nashville office is coming over for our opening. Something might develop even tually. Scotty knew there was fat chance of that; he knew Colonel Parker would never allow Elvis to record again in a studio owned by Sam Phillips.

The year 1960 was a watershed year for Scotty. At age twenty-nine, with a child on the way, he had come to terms with his life. For six years, he had been waiting for the economic situation with Elvis to change. Whenever he thought about it, it gave him a sinking feeling. That's alright, Elvis, he tought, that's alright.

Shortly after he settled into his new routine at the studio, Scotty received a telephone call from someone from the past. Frankie Tucker had seen his photograph in the newspaper. She reminded him of their liaison in West Memphis in 1953. Then she dropped a bombshell: she had had his child six years ago, a little girl she had named Vicki. Would he like to see his daughter?

Vicki recalls her first meeting with her father with that type of fuzzy nostalgia usually reserved for a first Christmas or a first kiss. ''I pretended I was asleep'', she says. ''He was rubbing my back and looking me over. He said (to my mother), 'Oh, she has my nose and she has your smile, your lips''. For years after that initial introduction, Vicki made a mad dash for the television whenever she heard Elvis's name or voice. If it was an old show, she would see her father standing behind Elvis, always to his right; if it was new footage, she would wonder where her father was.

''If it wasn't him, I would be so disappointed'', she says. ''We saw each other only once a year, mostly because Mother's husband was jealous. He wouldn't allow Elvis albums in the house''.

JUNE 1960

Sonico Recordings is opened at 319 7th Avenue North, Nashville by Billy Sherrill, Doug Warren and Bill Cooner.

Jerry Lee Lewis is one of the pallbearers at the funeral of Minnie Bell, the mother of Jimmy Lee Swaggart and Jerry Lee's aunt, in Clayton near Ferriday.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

At the third Madison Avenue session in mid-1960, Jerry Lee Lewis brought new life to yet another folk memory, the tale of the railroad pioneer ''John Henry''. In getting back on the rhythm and blues track, he complemented this with a rousing version of Chuck Willis's ''Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes'', the two being paired for the next single release, Sun 344. This same get-together also witnessed both his first known recording of ''C.C. Rider'', with which Willis had himself scored a hit in 1957, and a frenetic ''What'd I Say. Finally, in a characteristic melding of genres, Jerry Lee refurbished an old western swing favourite, ''When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again'', albeit Elvis Presley had pointed the way on this one with his own uptempo reading of the same song in 1956. (*)

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY JUNE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

1 – ''HANG UP MY ROCK AND ROLL SHOES'' - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Rush Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Chatter - Count-In - Master Take 1
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-29 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-28 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1 – ''HANG UP MY ROCK AND ROLL SHOES'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Rush Music
Matrix number: - U 407 - Master
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - August 1, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 344-B < mono
HANG UP MY ROCK AND ROLL SHOES / JOHN HENRY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

''John Henry'' was the strongest release by Jerry Lee in quite a while. To his credit, the man never failed to surprise. He's turn his hand to a maudlin pop ballad, a vintage hillbilly weeper, or – as he does here – to decidedly bluesy material. ''Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes'' features Jerry's attempt at Chuck Willis's swan song. To add authenticity, Jerry is joined by a honking sax, played either by Ace Cannon or Martin Willis.

But it is the flipside that deservedly caused a stir. ''John Henry'' is what they mean by an artist getting into a groove. Admittedly, this particular groove owed a lot to the fact that Don Hosea was generating a lot of local attention with his own version of ''John Henry'' on Roland Janes's Rita label. The folks at Sun figured they's better get on the bandwagon while the pickings were good, and who batter to call upon than Jerry Lee. The groove Jerry found here owed a lot to Ray Charles, but it was a fine one nonetheless. As Jerry, himself observed mis-session, it was ''too good to stop now!''. In fact, Jerry's music would soon result in his first bona fide hit in years.

It's also clear that Jerry had been doing some hard partying prior to this session, and was singing his heart out during the date. His vocals have rarely sounded more hoarse. There was probably some discussion about whether Jerry's performance was over the line here. Plainly, it was on the cusp, but fortunately, the decision was made to release the track as is. Nearly four decades later, Jerry's vocal state seems to add to the authenticity of the disc.

2(1) – ''JOHN HENRY'' - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Extended Stereo Master
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-30 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-12-29 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

2(2) – ''JOHN HENRY'' - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 406 - Master
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - August 1, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 344-A < mono
JOHN HENRY / HANG UP MY ROCK AND ROLL SHOES
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

John Henry is an African American folk hero and tall tale. He is said to have worked as a "steel-driving man", a man tasked with hammering a steel drill into rock to make holes for explosives to blast the rock in constructing a railroad tunnel. According to legend, John Henry's prowess as a steel-driver was measured in a race against a steam powered hammer, which he won, only to die in victory with his hammer in his hand as his heart gave out from stress. The story of John Henry is told in a classic folk song, which exists in many versions, and has been the subject of numerous stories, plays, books and novels. Various locations, including Big Bend Tunnel in West Virginia, Lewis Tunnel in Virginia, and Coosa Mountain Tunnel in Alabama, have been suggested as the site of the contest.

The story of John Henry is traditionally told through two types of songs: ballads, commonly called "The Ballad of John Henry", and work songs known as hammer songs, each with wide-ranging and varying lyrics. Some songs, and some early folk historian research, conflate the songs about John Henry with those of John Hardy, a West Virginian outlaw. Ballads about John Henry's life typically contain four major components: a premonition by John Henry as a child that steel-driving would lead to his death, the lead-up to and the results of the race against the steam hammer, Henry's death and burial, and the reaction of John Henry's wife.

The well-known narrative ballad of "John Henry" is usually sung in at an upbeat tempo. The hammer songs (or work songs) associated with the "John Henry" ballad, however, are not. Sung slowly and deliberately, these songs usually contain the lines "This old hammer killed John Henry / but it won't kill me." Nelson explains that: ...workers managed their labor by setting a "stint'', or pace, for it. Men who violated the stint were shunned... Here was a song that told you what happened to men who worked too fast: they died ugly deaths; their entrails fell on the ground. You sang the song slowly, you worked slowly, you guarded your life, or you died.

There is some controversy among scholars over which came first, the ballad or the hammer songs. Some scholars have suggested that the "John Henry" ballad grew out of the hammer songs, while others believe that the two were always entirely separate. Songs featuring the story of John Henry have been recorded by many blues, folk, and rock musicians of different ethnic backgrounds. Many notable musicians have recorded John Henry ballads, including Bill Monroe, Johnny Cash, Drive-By Truckers, Joe Bonamassa, Furry Lewis, Big Bill Broonzy, Pink Anderson, Fiddlin' John Carson, Uncle Dave Macon, J. E. Mainer, Leon Bibb, Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, Paul Robeson, Pete Seeger, Van Morrison, Bruce Springsteen, Gillian Welch, Cuff the Duke, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Jerry Reed, Jerry Lee Lewis, Merle Travis, Harry Belafonte, Mississippi John Hurt (as "Spike Driver Blues"), Lonnie Donegan, Jack Warshaw, Jason Molina, and Steve Earle.

The story also inspired the Aaron Copland's orchestral composition "John Henry" (1940, revised 1952) and the 2009 chamber music piece Steel Hammer by the composer Julia Wolfe. Henry is the subject of the 1931 Roark Bradford novel John Henry, illustrated by noted woodcut artist J. J. Lankes. The novel was adapted into a stage musical in 1940, starring Paul Robeson in the title role. According to Steven Carl Tracy, Bradford's works were influential in broadly popularizing the John Henry legend beyond railroad and mining communities and outside of African American oral histories. In a 1933 article published in The Journal of Negro Education, Bradford's John Henry was criticized for "making over a folk-hero into a clown''. A 1948 obituary for Bradford described John Henry as "a better piece of native folklore than Paul Bunyan''. Ezra Jack Keats's John Henry: An American Legend, published in 1965, is a notable picture book chronicling the history of John Henry and portraying him as the "personification of the medieval Everyman who struggles against insurmountable odds and wins''.

Colson Whitehead's 2001 novel John Henry Days uses the John Henry myth as story background. Whitehead fictionalized the John Henry Days festival in Talcott, West Virginia and the release of the John Henry postage stamp in 1996. The DC Comics superhero Steel's civilian name, "John Henry Irons," is inspired by John Henry. The Ghost of John Henry appears as a character in Elizabeth Bear's novel "One Eyed Jack''.

03(2) – ''WHAT'D I SAY'' (2) - B.M.I. - 3:22
Composer: - Ray Charles
Publisher: - Unichappel Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-10-A5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS – THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-31 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Jerry recorded this song 3 times (at 2 different studios) within the space of 13 months while at Sun: at one of his final 639 Madison Avenue sessions in January 1960; in June 1960 at Madison Avenue; and at the brand new Phillips studio in Nashville in February 1961. The January 1960 versions (2 takes) weren’t released for many years and indeed appear to have been “lost” until the end of the 1980s when they were issued on Zu-Zazz’s ''Don’t Drop It''! in 1988 and the various artists ''Sun Into The Sixties'' box-set in 1989. Both are perfectly acceptable spontaneous-sounding versions. The June 1960 version was initially released on the 1979 ''Duets'' album LP 1011 as a faked duet with Orion (a.k.a. Elvis sound-a-like Jimmy Ellis). A raucous version with saxophone and raw vocals, it was finally issued undubbed on ''The Sun Years'' box-set in 1983. The 1961 version was released as a tight-sounding single weeks later, reaching number 30 in the United States pop charts and number 10 in the United Kingdom; the backing singers prove that they’re no substitute for Ray Charles’ Raelettes, but nevertheless this was a well-deserved hit, something that very rarely happened in the decade following the 1958 debacle. A ‘live’ favourite for many years (though very rarely performed these days), the song was a natural for the album of (mostly) rock and roll standards recorded in London in January 1973. Released on ''The Session''that year, it is unfortunately overlong and self-indulgent, as several songs at those sessions were.

What'd I Say" (or "What I Say") is a song by American rhythm and blues rhythm and blues musician Ray Charles, released in 1959 as a single divided into two parts. It was improvised one evening late in 1958 when Charles, his orchestra, and backup singers had played their entire set list at a show and still had time left; the response from many audiences was so enthusiastic that Charles announced to his producer that he was going to record it. After his run of rhythm and blues hits, this song finally broke Charles into mainstream pop music and itself sparked a new sub-genre of rhythm and blues titled soul, finally putting together all the elements that Charles had been creating since he recorded "I Got A Woman" in 1954.

The gospel influences combined with the sexual innuendo in the song made it not only widely popular but very controversial to both white and black audiences. It earned Ray Charles his first gold record and has been one of the most influential songs in R&B and rock and roll history. For the rest of his career, Charles closed every concert with the song. It was added to the National Recording Registry in 2002 and ranked at number 10 in Rolling Stone's "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time".

Ray Charles was 27 years old in 1958, with ten years of experience recording primarily rhythm and blues music for Downbeat and Swingtime record labels, in a style similar to that of Nat King Cole and Charles Brown. Charles signed with Atlantic Records in 1954 where producers Ahmet Ertegun and Jerry Wexler encouraged Charles to broaden his repertoire. Wexler would later remember that Atlantic Records' success came not from the artists' experience, but the enthusiasm for the music: "We didn't know shit about making records, but we were having fun". Ertegun and Wexler found that a hands-off approach was the best way of encouraging Charles. Wexler later said, "I realized the best thing I could do with Ray was leave him alone".

From 1954 into the 1960s Charles toured for 300 days a year with a seven-piece orchestra. He employed another Atlantic singing trio named The Cookies and renamed them The Raelettes when they backed him up on the road. In 1954 Charles began merging gospel sounds and instruments with lyrics that addressed more secular issues. His first attempt was in the song "I Got A Woman", based either on the melodies of gospel standards "My Jesus Is All the World to Me" or an uptempo "I Got A Savior (Way Across Jordan)". It was the first Ray Charles record that got attention from white audiences, but it made some black audiences uncomfortable with its black gospel derivatives; Charles later stated that the joining of gospel and rhythm and blues was not a conscious decision.

In December 1958, he had a hit on the rhythm and blues charts with "Night Time Is The Right Time", an ode to carnality that was sung between Charles and one of the Raelettes, Margie Hendricks, with whom Charles was having an affair. Since 1956 Charles had also included a Wurlitzer electric piano on tour because he did not trust the tuning and quality of the pianos provided him at every venue. On the occasions he would play it, he was derided by other musicians.

According to Charles' autobiography, "What'd I Say" was accidental when he improvised it to fill time at the end of a concert in December 1958. He asserts that he never tested songs on audiences before recording them, but "What'd I Say" is an exception. Charles himself does not recall where the concert took place, but Mike Evans in Ray Charles: The Birth of Soul places the show in Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Shows were played at "meal dances" which typically ran four hours with a half hour break, and would end around 1 or 2 in the morning. Charles and his orchestra had exhausted their set list after midnight, but had 12 minutes left to fill. He told the Raelettes, "Listen, I'm going to fool around and y'all just follow me".

Starting on the electric piano, Charles played what felt right: a series of riffs, switching then to a regular piano for four choruses backed up by a unique Latin conga tumbao rhythm on drums. The song changed when Charles began singing simple, improvised unconnected verses ("Hey Mama don't you treat me wrong / Come and love your daddy all night long / All right now / Hey hey / All right"). Charles used gospel elements in a twelve-bar blues structure. Some of the first lines ("See the gal with the red dress on / She can do the Birdland all night long") are influenced by a boogie-woogie style that Ahmet Ertegun attributes to Clarence "Pinetop" Smith who used to call out to dancers on the dance floor instructing what to do through his lyrics. In the middle of the song, however, Charles indicated that the Raelettes should repeat what he was doing, and the song transformed into a call and response between Charles, the Raelettes, and the horn section in the orchestra as they called out to each other in ecstatic shouts and moans and blasts from the horns. The audience reacted immediately; Charles could feel the room shaking and bouncing as the crowd was dancing. Many audience members approached Charles at the end of the show to ask where they could purchase the record. Charles and the orchestra performed it again several nights in a row with the same reaction at each show. He called Jerry Wexler to say he had something new to record, later writing, "I don't believe in giving myself advance notices, but I figured this song merited it".

The Atlantic Records studio had just purchased an 8-track recorder, and recording engineer Tom Dowd was familiarizing himself with how it worked. In February 1959 Charles and his orchestra finally recorded "What'd I Say" at Atlantic's small studio. Dowd recalled that it did not seem special at the time of recording. It was second of two songs during the session and Charles, the producers, and the band were more impressed with the first one at the session, "Tell The Truth". "We made it like we made all the others. Ray, the gals, and the band live in the small studio, no overdubs. Three or four takes, and it was done. Next!".

In retrospect, Ahmet Ertegun's brother Nesuhi credits the extraordinary sound of the song to the restricted size of the studio and the technologically advanced recording equipment used; the sound quality is clear enough to hear Charles slapping his leg in time with the song when the music stops during the calls and responses. The song was recorded in only a few takes because Charles and the orchestra had perfected it while touring.

Dowd, however, had two problems during the recording. "What'd I Say" lasted over seven and a half minutes when the normal length of radio-played songs was around two and a half minutes. Furthermore, although the lyrics were not obscene, the sounds Charles and the Raelettes made in their calls and responses during the song worried Dowd and the producers. A previous recording called "Money Honey" by Clyde McPhatter had been banned in Georgia and Ahmet Ertegun and Wexler released McPhatter's song despite the ban, risking arrest. Ray Charles was aware of the controversy in "What'd I Say". "I'm not one to interpret my own songs, but if you can't figure out 'What I Say', then something's wrong. Either that, or you're not accustomed to the sweet sounds of love''.

Dowd solved the recording issues by mixing three versions of the song. Some call-outs of "Shake that thing!" were removed, and the song was split into two three-and-a-half minute sides of a single record, titling the song "What'd I Say Part I" and "What'd I Say Part II". The recorded version divides the parts with a false ending where the orchestra stops and the Raelettes and orchestra members beg Charles to continue, then goes on to a frenzied finale. Dowd later stated after hearing the final recording that not releasing the record was never an option: "we knew it was going to be a hit record, no question''. It was held for the summer and released in June 1959.

Billboard magazine initially gave "What'd I Say" a tepid review: "He shouts out in percussive style ... Side two is the same''. The secretary at Atlantic Records started getting calls from distributors, however. Radio stations refused to play it because it was too sexually charged, but Atlantic refused to take the records back from stores. A slightly sanitized version was released in July 1959 in response to the complaints and the song hit number 82. A week later it was at 43, then 26. In contrast to their earlier review, Billboard several weeks later wrote that the song was "the strongest pop record that the artist has done to date".

Within weeks "What'd I Say" topped out at number one on Billboard's rhythm and blues singles chart, number six on the Billboard Hot 100, and it became Charles' first gold record. It also became Atlantic Records' best-selling song at the time.

"What'd I Say" was banned by many black and white radio stations because of, as one critic noted, "the dialogue between himself and his backing singers that started in church and ended up in the bedroom".

The erotic nature was obvious to listeners, but a deeper aspect of the fusion between black gospel music and rhythm and blues troubled many black audiences. Music, as was much of American society, was also segregated, and some critics complained that gospel was not only being appropriated by secular musicians, but it was being marketed to white listeners. During several concerts in the 1960s, the crowds became so frenetic and the shows so resembled revival meetings while Charles performed "What'd I Say" that the police were called in, when the organizers became worried that riots might break out. The moral controversy surrounding the song has been attributed to its popularity; Charles later acknowledged in an interview that the beat was catchy, but it was the suggestive lyrics that attracted listeners: "See the girl with the diamond ring. She knows how to shake that thing.' It wasn't the diamond ring that got 'em''. "What'd I Say" was Ray Charles' first crossover hit into the growing genre of rock and roll. He seized the opportunity of his immense newfound success and announced to Ertegun and Wexler that he was considering signing with ABCParamount Records (later renamed ABC Records) later in 1959. While he was in negotiations with ABCParamount, Atlantic Records released an album of his hits, titled ''What'd I Say''.

Michael Lydon, another of Charles' biographers, summarized the impact of the song: "'What'd I Say' was a monster with footprints bigger than its numbers. Daringly different, wildly sexy, and fabulously danceable, the record riveted listeners. When 'What'd I Say' came on the radio, some turned it off in disgust, but millions turned the volume up to blasting and sang 'Unnnh, unnnh, oooooh, oooooh' along with Ray and the Raelets. It became the life of a million parties, the spark of as many romances, and a song to date the summer by. The song's impact was not immediately seen in the U.S.; it was particularly popular in Europe. Paul McCartney was immediately struck by the song and knew that when he heard it he wanted to be involved in making music. George Harrison remembered an all-night party he attended in 1959 where the song was played for eight hours non-stop: "It was one of the best records I ever heard''. While The Beatles were developing their sound in Hamburg, they played "What'd I Say" at every show, trying to see how long they could make the song last and using the audience in the call and response, with which they found immense popularity. The opening electric piano in the song was the first John Lennon had ever heard, and he tried to replicate it with his guitar. Lennon later credited Ray Charles' opening of "What'd I Say" to the birth of songs dominated by guitar riffs.

When Mick Jagger sang for the first time with the band that would become The Rolling Stones, he performed a duet of "What'd I Say". Eric Burdon from The Animals, Steve Winwood of The Spencer Davis Group, Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys, and Van Morrison counted the song as a major influence on why they were interested in music and incorporated it into their shows. Music historian Robert Stephens attributes the birth of soul music to "What'd I Say" when gospel and blues were successfully joined; the new genre of music was matured by later musicians such as James Brown and Aretha Franklin. "In an instant, the music called Soul comes into being. Hallelujah!" wrote musician Lenny Kaye in a retrospective of Atlantic Records artists.

In the late 1950s, rock and roll was faltering as its major stars dropped from public view. Elvis Presley was drafted, Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran died in 1959 and 1960 respectively, Chuck Berry was in jail, and Jerry Lee Lewis had been disgraced by press reports that he married his 13-year-old cousin. Music and culture critic Nelson George disagrees with music historians who attest the last two years of the 1950s were barren of talent, pointing to Ray Charles and this song in particular. George writes that the themes in Charles' work were very similar to the young rebels who popularized rock and roll, writing.

By breaking down the division between pulpit and bandstand, recharging blues concerns with transcendental fervor, unashamedly linking the spiritual and the sexual, Charles made pleasure (physical satisfaction) and joy (divine enlightenment) seem the same thing. By doing so he brought the realities of the Saturday-night sinner and Sunday-morning worshipper, so often one and the same, into raucous harmony.

"What'd I Say" has been covered by many artists in many different styles. Elvis Presley used the song in a large dance scene in his 1964 film ''Viva Las Vegas'' and released it as a single with the title song on the B-side. Cliff Richard, Eric Clapton with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers, The Big Three, Eddie Cochran, Bobby Darin, Nancy Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., and Johnny Cash all put their own style on the song. Jerry Lee Lewis found particular success with his rendition in 1961, which peaked at number 30 and spent eight weeks on the charts. Charles noticed, later writing "I saw that many of the stations which had banned the tune started playing it when it was covered by white artists. That seemed strange to me, as though white sex was cleaner than black sex. But once they began playing the white version, they lifted the ban and also played the original''.

Charles later spoofed this double standard on the television comedy show Saturday Night Live in 1977. He hosted an episode and had the original band he toured with in the 1950s to join him. In one skit, he tells a producer that he wants to record the song, but the producer tells him that a white band named the "Young Caucasians", composed of beaming white teenagers, are to record it first, which they do on the show, in a chaste, sanitized, and unexciting performance. When Charles and his band counter with their original version, Garrett Morris tell them, "Sorry. That'll never make it''.

Charles closed every show he played for the rest of his career with the song, later stating, "'What'd I Say' is my last song onstage. When I do 'What'd I Say', you don't have to worry about it, that's the end of me; there ain't no encore, no nothin'. I'm finished!". It was ranked tenth on Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time", with the summary, "Charles' grunt-'n'-groan exchanges with the Raeletts were the closest you could get to the sound of orgasm on Top Forty radio during the Eisenhower era".In 2000, it ranked number 43 on VH1's 100 Greatest Songs in Rock and Roll and number 96 on VH1's 100 Greatest Dance Songs, being the oldest song in the latter ranking. The same year it was chosen by National Public Radio as one of the 100 most influential songs of the 20th century. A central scene in the 2004 biopic Ray features the improvisation of the song performed by Jamie Foxx, who won an Academy Award for his portrayal of Charles. For its historical, artistic, and cultural significance, the Library of Congress added it to the U.S. National Recording Registry in 2002. The Rock And Roll Hall of Fame featured it as one of 500 Songs that Shaped Rock And Roll in 2007.

4(1) – ''C. C. RIDER'' (1) - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Progressive Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Stereo LP Master
Recorded: - Probably June 1960 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - December 1969
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun 107-B3 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS – ROCKIN' RHYTHM AND BLUES
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-32 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

"See See Rider", also known as "C.C. Rider" or "See See Rider Blues" or "Easy Rider" is a popular American 12-bar blues" song. It was first recorded by Gertrude "Ma" Rainey in 1924, and since then has been recorded by many other artists. The song uses mostly traditional blues lyrics to tell the story of an unfaithful lover, commonly called easy riders: "See see rider, see what you have done," making a play on the word see and the sound of easy.

The song is generally regarded as being traditional in origin. Ma Rainey's version became popular during 1925, as "See See Rider Blues''. It became one of the most famous of all blues songs, with well over 100 versions. It was recorded by Big Bill Broonzy, Mississippi John Hurt, Leadbelly, Lightnin' Hopkins, Peggy Lee and many others. Broonzy claimed that "when he was about 9 or 10", that is, around 1908, he had learned to play the blues from an itinerant songster named "See See Rider", "a former slave, who played a one-string fiddle.... one of the first singers of what would later be called the blues...".

In 1943, a version by Wee Bea Booze became a number 1 hit on the Billboard "Harlem Hit Parade'', precursor of the rhythm and blues chart. Some blues critics consider this to be the definitive version of the song. A doo-wop version was recorded by Sonny Til and The Orioles in 1952. Later rocked-up hit versions were recorded by Chuck Willis (as "C.C. Rider'', also a number 1 rhythm and blues hit as well as a number 12 pop hit, in 1957) and LaVern Baker (number 9 rhythm and blues and number 34 pop hit in 1963). Willis' version gave birth to the dance craze "The Stroll''.

Other popular performances were recorded by Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheels (as part of a medley entitled "Jenny Take A Ride!'', number 10 US pop hit in 1965) and The Animals (number 10 US pop hit in 1966).

The Animals' heavy version (featuring Eric Burdon's screaming) also reached number 1 on the Canadian RPM chart, and number 8 in Australia. It was the last single before the group disbanded in September 1966. The arrangement of the song was credited to band member Dave Rowberry.

Other renditions came from Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Ray Charles, Chuck Berry, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, The Who, The Everly Brothers, Charlie Rich, Janis Joplin, The Grateful Dead, Leon Thomas, Snooks Eaglin, John Fahey, Old Crow Medicine Show and many more.

In later years, Elvis Presley regularly opened his performances with the song, such as was captured on his 1970 On Stage album and in his Aloha from Hawaii television special. Elvis's drummer Ronnie Tutt opened Elvis's version with a rolling drum riff followed by the band entering and Elvis's famous brass melody.

Similarly, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band long had "C.C. Rider" as part of their "Detroit Medley" encore romp, which achieved significant visibility on the 1980 No Nukes live album. Film director Martin Scorsese credited the song with stimulating his interest in music. He later said: "One day, around 1958, I remember hearing something that was unlike anything I'd ever heard before... The music was demanding, "Listen to me!"... The song was called "See See Rider'', which I already knew from the Chuck Willis cover version. The name of the singer was Lead Belly... I found an old Folkways record by Lead Belly... And I listened to it obsessively. Lead Belly's music opened something up for me. If I could have played guitar, really played it, I never would have become a filmmaker''.

In 2004, the original Ma Rainey recording received a Grammy Hall of Fame Award. There is a chapter in Richard Brautigan's classic Trout Fishing in America titled "Sea, Sea Rider''.

The term "See See Rider" is usually taken as synonymous with "easy rider." In particular, in blues songs it often refers to a woman who had liberal sexual views, had been married more than once, or was skilled at sex. Although Ma Rainey's version seems on the face of it to refer to "See See Rider" as a man, one theory is that the term refers to a prostitute and in the lyric, "You made me love you, now your man done come'', "your man" refers to the woman's pimp. So, rather than being directed to a male "easy rider," the song is in fact an admonition to a prostitute to give up her evil ways.

5(1) – ''WHEN MY BLUE MOON TURNS TO GOLD AGAIN'' (1) - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Wiley Walker-Gene Sullivan
Publisher: - Peer Music International Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Stereo
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-1 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16-1 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

''When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again'' is a song written by Wiley Walker and Gene Sullivan in 1940. They first recorded it for Columbia Records in 1941 (Columbia 20264). Walker was inspired to write the song while travelling in West Texas with the full moon in his face. As he drove down the highway, daybreak approached. Walker noted the apparent change of colour of the moon from a bluish tint to gold.

Elvis Presley recorded ''When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again' (RCA Victor EPA-992) on September 2, 1956 at Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood, California, with Thorne Nogar and Bones Howe behind the board. Elvis sang "When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again" in his appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show" (January 6, 1957) and on his TV special taping "Elvis", June 27, 1968, at the 6:00pm and 8:00pm shows. It has also been recorded by Zeke Manners (1947), in 1947 by The Singing Lariateers (RCA 20-2130), in 1949 by Tex Ritter (Capitol 1977), and recorded by Cindy Walker, Cliffie Stone, Sammi Smith, the Statler Brothers, Hank Thompson, Emmylou Harris, Eddy Arnold, Jim Reeves, Bill Monroe, Merle Haggard, and of course, Jerry Lee Lewis, among others.

5(2) – ''WHEN MY BLUE MOON TURNS TO GOLD AGAIN'' (1) - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Wiley Walker-Gene Sullivan
Publisher: - Peer Music International Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - 2nd Series Take 1
Recorded: - Probably June 1960
Released: - July 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-A6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS – ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-3 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal & Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Leo Ladner - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums
Martin Willis or John Ace Cannon - Saxophone

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SONNY WILSON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SUMMER 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 – ''THE GREAT PRETENDER'' – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:51
Composer: - Buck Ram
Publisher: - Panther Music
Matrix number: - U 400 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1960
Released: - August 1, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 341-A < mono
THE GREAT PRETENDER / I'M GONNA TAKE A WALK
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-25 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

"The Great Pretender" is a popular song recorded by The Platters, with Tony Williams on lead vocals, and released as a single on November 3, 1955. The words and music were created by Buck Ram, the Platters' manager and producer who was a successful songwriter before moving into producing and management. "The Great Pretender" reached the number one position on both the rhythm and blues and pop charts in 1956. It also reached the UK charts peaking at number 5.

Buck Ram reports that he wrote the song in about 20 minutes in the washroom of the Flamingo Hotel in order to have a song to follow up the success of "Only You (And You Alone)''.

Stan Freberg parodied this version. In 2004, the song was voted 360th greatest song of all time by Rolling Stone magazine.George Harrison led Phil Spector into cutting a simple acoustic version of it in 1970-71 while in the studio jamming on other songs, it was pressed onto acetate but never officially released. There is a 1969 cover version by Gene Pitney; this version is clearly the model that Freddie Mercury used for his much later version, although demos of Mercury's 1987 song sound like the original Platters take. It was covered in 1984 by Dolly Parton, who made it the title song of an album of covers from the 1950s and 1960s ''The Great Pretender''.Other significant recordings by Kathy Young with the Innocents covered the song in 1961 as the B-side to their single, "Baby Oh Baby"; Stan Freberg made a parody version in 1956; Pat Boone covered it on his Moody River album in 1961; Dan McCafferty covered it on Dan McCafferty album in 1975; Gene Summers included it on his 1997 album ''The Ultimate School Of Rock And Roll'' issued on Crystal Clear Sound Records; The Band covered it on ''Moondog Matinee'', an album of covers. Perhaps most radically, it was tackled by Lester Bowie in 1981 and extended to nearly seventeen minutes of improvisation on his album of the same name. It was covered in the UK by Jimmy Parkinson, an Australian vocalist. It entered the Top 20 on 3 March 1956, six months ahead of the Platters' version, Parkinson's hit peaked at number 9 and remained in the Top 20 for 10 weeks.Jackie Riggs, a US doowop singer also covered it in March 1956; George Faith covered the song on his album ''Reggae Got Soul''; The Statler Brothers covered the song on their final live CD. Country singer Roy Clark performed a comedy routine in which he sings the song with comic sound effects, odd guitar strokes and occasional segues into other, different songs. Finally, the song was re-popularized in 1987 by Freddie Mercury, the lead singer of the rock band Queen. Mercury's version reached number four on the UK Singles Chart.

Absolutely nothing is known about Sonny Wilson or the session that produced this surprising rockabilly treatment of the old Platters hit. Perhaps there were death threats from desperate rockabilly collectors, and this recordings was offered up as a sacrifice to keep their loyalty. In any case, there was much to treasure here in the pale Sun summer of 1960.

From the outset, it's hard to know if Wilson is serious about his opening ''Wel..heh..heh..heh..heh..hell'' or whether he's torn a page from Elvis self-parody book.

Regardless, the artist tried his damndest to keep things on track here. There are a couple of timing fluffs, like the extra beat before the second release, but they're deftly wallpapered over.

Somebody takes a fine 16 bar guitar solo, which deserved to be retained despite that one muted clam in the 12th bar. The electric bass work when Wilson sings the release (''Too real is that feeling...'') is quite a delight. All things considered, the Gene Lowery Singers are less annoying here that usual because they're pretty much confined to imitating the Platters.

The bluesy side below, is highly similar to Billy Riley's work on ''One More Time; or, more recently, Tracy Pendarvis's effort on ''Is It Too Late''. There's nothing particularly striking or original here, and about the only insight we get into Wilson's vocal style is that he had obviously done a lot of listening to Conway Twitty.

02 – ''I'M GONNA TAKE A WALK'' – B.M.I. -2:08
Composer: - Dalahite
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 401 - Master
Recorded: Unknown Date Summer 1960
Released: - August 1, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 341-B < mono
I'M GONNA TAKE A WALK / THE GREAT PRETENDER
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-26 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Wilson – Vocal & Guitar

Probably Following Musicians
Billy Robley – Guitar
Doc McQueen – Piano
Glenn Allen - Drums
Bill Black – Bass
Charlie Rich - Piano

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

For Biography of Sonny Wilson see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sonny Wilson's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LANCE ROBERTS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY JUNE 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 – ''THE GOOD GUY ALWAYS WINS'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Bill Husky
Publisher: - Rise Music – Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 413 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably June 1960
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 348-A < mono
THE GOOD GUY ALWAYS WINS / THE TIME IS RIGHT
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Let's start out with a simple point. ''The Time Is Right'' is almost a great song, a perfect example of that gospel-tinged Elvisy ballad that Memphis labels cranked out effortlessly in their heyday. Indeed, Lance Roberts seems to have had a knack for the genre and turns in a hell of a performance.

Moreover, Charlie Rich, although uncredited in the session logs, seems to have a dominant force at this session. Still, something keeps this from being one of Sun's latterday masterpiece. The most obvious problem is the chorus. Not their presence per se, because this arrangement surly needed some vocal support, but rather ''this'' chorus.

It is possible for a vocal group to take itself and its lines too seriously. These folks bring just a bit too much fervor to their reading, and the result is overblown, even comic, which is hardly the effect they were after. Wa ha ha hoo, indeed.

Things don't improve much on the uptempo side. In fact, if you can get through the first four bars of ''The Good Guy Always Wins'' without losing your cookies, you're made of sterner stuff than most Sun fans. Again, blame the chorus who must have thought they were accompanying a Wagnerian opera.

Roberts himself is another of the unknown artists who seemed to populate Sun's 300 series. His contracts were mailed to a town called Norman Park, Georgia on May 12, 1960, but beyond that little is known.

02 – ''THE TIME IS RIGHT'' - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Charlie Feathers-Jerry Huffman
Publisher: - JEG Music Publishers - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 414 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably June 1960
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 348-B < mono
THE TIME IS RIGHT / THE GOOD GUY ALWAYS WINS
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

03 – ''MONEY WON'T BUY LOVE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably June 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Lance Roberts – Vocal
Billy Riley - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
More Details Unknown

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

For Biography of Lance Roberts see: > The Sun Biographies <
Lance Roberts' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1960

In the summer and then early in the fall of 1959, Sam Phillips had hired two people he was hoping would help to invigorate the business. Ernie Barton, a guitar player and singer originally from Florida, and an Elvis friend named Charles Underwood, had come aboard. Ernie was to do Artists and Repertoire and Charles, who also was a songwriter, was to do mastering and some other technical jobs in the new studio as well as A&R.

Ernie Barton was kind of squirrel-faced, a jolly sort who seemed pretty green. He wrote and recorded a few songs on himself, and brought in his fiancee and lawyer Bobbie Jean to cut a single, too. They were not very successful. Charles was large and languorous. The thing that impressed most people about Charles was his wife Bonnie, who was a somewhat tousled look-alike for the French film star Brigitte Bardot. Bonnie always appeared as if someone had awakened her from a deep sleep and she didn't quite know where she was. Her husband had written a song about her, ''Bonnie B'', which Jerry Lee Lewis eventually recorded. Neither of these turned out to be very successful A&R men, and they didn't stay at Sun too long.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

After Bill Justis and Jack Clement were fired by Phillips in 1959, Ernie Barton convinced Sam Phillips that he should take over as in-house producer/arranger. He married a Little Rock lawyer, Bobbie Jean Farrabee, and used his position at Sun to record his wife, who actually was not a bad singer. She had one release on Sun, "You Burned The Bridges" (an answer record to Jack Scott's "Burning Bridges") / "Cheaters Never Win", which came out on Sun 342 in July 1960, credited to Bobbie Jean. Her best recording was probably "I Won't Worry" (another answer song, this time in response to Marty Robbins's "Don't Worry"), which finally saw a release in 2002, on the "Memphis Belles" Bear Family box-set. There are letters from Bobbie Jean Barton in the Sun files demanding that Sam issue an album by Ernie. Obviously, she didn't know that Phillips was uncomfortable with releasing LP records, let alone by someone who never had anything resembling a hit single. Barton and his wife both ran afoul of Sam Phillips at some point in 1961.

STUDIO SESSION FOR BOBBIE JEAN BARTON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JUNE 1, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

01(1) - ''YOU BURNED THE BRIDGES'' - S.E.S.A.C. - 2:06
Composer: - Walter Scott
Publisher: - Sage and Sand
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-6-8 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

01(2) - ''YOU BURNED THE BRIDGES'' - S.E.S.A.C. - 2:08
Composer: - Walter Scott
Publisher: - Sage and Sand
Matrix number: - U 402 - Master
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - July 7, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 342-B < mono
YOU BURNED THE BRIDGES / CHEATERS NEVER WIN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

This side of this commercial venture was an answer record (a practice that has all but died) to Jack Scott's 1960 megahit ''Burning Bridges''. String sections weren't the usual fare at Sun and this production raised a few eyebrows among Sun's distributors and faithful disc jockeys.

It is the next side, ''Cheaters Never Win'', that warrants special attention, though. The song, itself is pretty, if undistinguished, but Vinnie Trauth's string arrangement is another matter. Rather than write a chart around Bobbie Jean's vocal line, this arranger has written a violin fantasy to the song's chord changes. It might as well have been released as a solo recording by strings, so irrelevant is Ms. Barton's smokey vocal. In fact, the violins kick off their own melody before Bobbie Jean has a chance to utter a single word. Taken on its own terms, this side works better that it has right to and serves its own little niche in Sun record history.

This side was written by Sun session guitarist Brad Suggs. ''I originally wrote it for Nat Cole'', Brad Suggs recalls. ''It had a kind of Frank Sinatra-ish feel. The singer got to sing behind the beat and do some fancy phrasing''.

02 - ''CHEATERS NEVER WIN'' - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 403 - Master
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - July 7, 1960
First appearance: Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 342-A < mono
CHEATERS NEVER WIN / YOU BURNED THE BRIDGES
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

A variety of other tunes were recorded by Bobbie Jean, although nothing passed muster and appeared on either Sun or Phillips International. It is clear that Ernie Barton used his position at Sun to record both himself and his wife quite liberally. In addition to her lone single, there are some previously unissued material ''I Just Discovered Boys'' and ''What Are You Gonna Do Now'' are of particular interest. In the latter case, are including an entire segment of a session to provide a glimpse of the songs development, false starts and all. In the case of ''Boys'', you can hear Bobbie Jean's sarcasm as she attempts to vocalize in a whiny pre-teen manner for the commercial market. At one point she makes reference to ''copying all the words down from the record'' while talking to her husband, Ernie. It is not clear which record was the source of this session, although the tape of an old 45 of this song (artist unknown) remains in the Sun archives. In addition, recordings of ''Boys'' and ''Gonna Do Now'' were made in similar arrangements by Charlotte Smith, whose versions also appear in the Memphis Belles collection. Somebody (Ernie Barton?) obviously believed in the potential of this piece of pre-teen pop.

03(1) - ''I JUST DISCOVERED BOYS'' - B.M.I. - 1:32
Composer: - John Smith-Bonnie Smith
Publisher: - Zest Music Company
Matrix number: - None – Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609 1-17 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

03(2) - ''I JUST DISCOVERED BOYS'' - B.M.I. 
Composer: - John Smith-Bonnie Smith
Publisher: - Zest Music Company
Matrix number: - None – False Start - Chatter, False Start - Chatter - Unknown Take
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960 - Not Originally Issued
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609 2-25/26 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

04 - ''I WON'T WORRY'' - B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609 2-16 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

05 – ''TAKE A TIP'' - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-17 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

06 – ''WHAT ARE YOU GONNA DO NOW'' - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-25 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

07 – ''I'D RATHER HURT'' - B.M.I. - 1:43
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably June 1, 1960
Released: August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-4-26 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bobbie Jean Barton - Vocal
Ernie Barton - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Vinnie Trauth's String Arrangements (Sun 342)
Other Musicians Unknown

For Biography of Bobbie Jean Barton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bobbie Jean Barton's Sun recordings can be heard on her playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ERNIE BARTON
FOR SUN RECORDS 1960

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: POSSIBLE WEDNESDAY JUNE 1, 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

Ernie Barton worked as studio engineer and sometime producer for Sam Phillips. As such, Barton did more recording than his humble talent might have resulted in. He was neither an innovator nor a star at Sun. An album was discussed and two singles were issued under Barton's name on Phillips International.

01 – ''HAVE YOU EVER BEEN LONELY'' - B.M.I. - 1:46
Composer: - Howard E. Johnson-Peter de Rose
Publisher: - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: - January 2018 Crazy Warthog Media (MP3) Internet Sample-18 mono
HEY! GOOD LOOKING

02 – ''HAVE I TOLD YOU LATELY THAT I LOVE YOU'' - B.M.I. - 1:34
Composer: - Scott Weisman
Publisher: - Leeds Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: - January 2018 Crazy Warthog Media (MP3) Internet Sample-20 mono
HEY! GOOD LOOKING

03 – ''HERD OF TURTLES'' - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Louis Mashall Jones
Publisher: - Sony ATV Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-5/8 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S
Reissued: - June 12, 2006 - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: - January 2018 Crazy Warthog Media (MP3) Internet Sample-14 mono
HEY! GOOD LOOKING

04 – ''HEY GOOD LOOKIN''' - B.M.I. - 0:57
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: 2019 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17504-1 mono
SUN SHINES OF HANK WILLIAMS

At least two dozen additional titles were recorded, some from full sessions and some as simple vocal/guitar demos. ''Hey Good Lookin''' was recorded in both formats and never released. The occasional guitar chord fluff and brief running time do nothing to diminish the simple power of this track.

05 – ''I WALK THE LINE'' - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS

06 – ''I WAS BORN FOR YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Ernie Barton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: - January 2018 Crazy Warthog Media (MP3) Internet Sample-17 mono
HEY! GOOD LOOKING

07 – ''NO GOOD WITHOUT YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Ernie Barton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: - January 2018 Crazy Warthog Media (MP3) Internet Sample-15 mono
HEY! GOOD LOOKING

08 – ''NO LETTER TODAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Southern Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1, 1960
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: - January 2018 Crazy Warthog Media (MP3) Internet Sample-13 mono
HEY! GOOD LOOKING

09 – ''ALWAYS ANYTIME, ANYMORE'' - B.M.I. - 1:31
Composer: - Ernie Barton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: - January 2018 Crazy Warthog Media (MP3) Internet Sample-19 mono
HEY! GOOD LOOKING

10 - ''YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE'' - B.M.I. - 1:13
Composer: - John S. Hurt
Publisher: - Sony ATC Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)
Released: - June 12, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ERNIE BARTON - SELECTED HITS
Reissued: - January 2018 Crazy Warthog Media (MP3) Internet Sample-16 mono
HEY! GOOD LOOKIN

11 - ''SHUT YOUR MOUTH''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

12 – ''SOMEDAY''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s)

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ernie Barton - Vocal & Guitar
Scotty Moore - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
D.J. Fontana - Drums
Larry Muhoberac - Piano

For Biography of Ernie Barton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ernie Barton's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1960

The singles, PI 3557 ''Sunny Side Of The Street'' b/w ''Take A Chance'' by Jeb Stuart and PI 3558 ''Baby I Don't Care'' b/w ''Vanished'' by Eddie Bush issued.

JUNE 1, 1960 TUESDAY

Ray Charles headlines the Hitmakers of 1960. Also appearing are the Drifters, Mary Johnson, Ruth Brown, Ray Bryant, Ron Holden, Billy Bland and Preston Epps.

''Brown Eyed Handsome Man'' writer Chuck Berry is found not guilty on two counts of violating the Man Act. It is the second of three trials he undergoes during 1960-61 for allegedly transporting a woman across state lines for sexual reasons.

JUNE 2, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Bobby Darin appears for three weeks at the Copacabana in New York. Chuck Berry is found not guilty for Violation of the Mann Act for the one concerning a female in Topeka, Kansas.

JUNE 4, 1960 SATURDAY

June Carter makes her first appearance on ''The Louisiana Hayride'' in Shreveport, Louisiana, backed by guitarist Jerry Kennedy. She performs ''Big Iron'', ''Gotta Travel On'', Chuck Berry's ''Thirty Days'' and The Carter Family's ''Wildwood Flower''.

Patsy Cline songs ''Lovesick Blues'' during an episode of ABC's ''Country Music Jubilee''. Eddy Arnold and Cowboy Copas also appear.

JUNE 5, 1960 SUNDAY

''The George Gobel Show'' airs on CBS-TV in its final prime-time appearance, concluding a six-year run that began on rival NBC. Gobel began his career as a comedian on WLS Radio's landmark ''National Barn Dance'' program.

Johnny and the Hurricanes begin tour of England.

JUNE 6, 1960 MONDAY

Jimmy Charles arrives in Philadelphia to promote "A Million To One''. Jamie Coe appears on American Bandstand.

Monument Records released Roy Orbison's ''Only The Lonely''.

Ernest Tubb remakes the Connie Francis pop hit ''Everybody's Somebody's Fool'' in an afternoon session at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

Songwriter Harlan Howard arrives in Nashville with wife Jan Howard, after moving from Los Angeles. She becomes a member of the Grand Ole Opry. He writes hits for Buck Owens, The Judds, Reba McEntire and others.

Columbia released Johnny Cash's ''Second Honeymoon''.

JUNE 7, 1960 TUESDAY

Bobby Darin appears on George Burns' NBC-TV show.

JUNE 8, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Gene Vincent and Freddy Cannon for a week at the Empire Theater in Glasgow, Scotland.

JUNE 9, 1960 THURSDAY

Broadway composer Cole Porter, co-writer of the 1945 country hit ''Don't Fence Me In'', receives an honorary doctorate from his alma mater, Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut.

JUNE 10, 1960 FRIDAY

Songwriter Wynn Varble is born in Atlanta. Among his credits are Brad Paisley's ''Waitin' On A Woman'', Easton Corbin's ''A Little Country Than That'' and Darryl Worley's ''Have You Forgotten?''.

Dion and the Belmonts appear for two nights at the Safari Club in Long Island, New York.

JUNE 11, 1960 SATURDAY

The Dick Clark show broadcasts from Pittsburgh rather than its home base Philadelphia.

JUNE 12, 1960 SUNDAY

Gene Vincent cancels a tour of Great Britain, saying he's received a telegram that his 18-month-old daughter has died from pneumonia. His story is fabricated.

Record producer Eli Oberstein dies in Westport, Connecticut. Among his credits are pioneering records by Ernest Tubb, The Delmore Brothers, The Blue Sky Boys and The Monroe Brothers.

JUNE 13, 1960 MONDAY

Decca Records released Roy Drusky's single, ''Anymore''.

Steel guitarist Jerry Byrd suffers three fractured ribs and a broken knee cap in an car accident, forcing him to spend more than a week in the hospital. Byrd's work includes recordings by Hank Williams, Eddy Arnold and Marty Robbins.

Capitol released Hank Thompson's ''She's Just Whole Lot Like You''.

Clyde McPhatter leaves the Drifters and Atlantic Records to go solo with Mercury Records.

JUNE 14, 1960 TUESDAY

Dante and the Evergreens sing their version of "Alley Oop" on American Bandstand.

JUNE 16, 1960 THURSDAY

The Platters with Tony William's replacement Sonny Turner begin a week at the Lotus Club in Philadelphia.

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs appear on the CBS-TV special ''Folk Sound U.S.A.''. Hosted by Cisco Houston, the one-hour program also features Joan Baez, John Lee Hooker and Peter, Paul and Mary''.

JUNE 18, 1960 SATURDAY

Pop singer Jude Cole is born in Carbon Cliff, Illinois. Best known for the 1990 hit ''Baby, It's Tonight'', he appears in country music as a co-producer on Clay Davidson''s 2000 debut, ''Unconditional''.

ABC-TV's The Dick Clark Show broadcasts from Hollywood. Guests are Jimmie Rodgers, the Hollywood Argyles and the Safaris.

JUNE 20, 1960 MONDAY

Mandolin player Pam Perry is born in Bowling Green, Ohio. She joins the all-female ensemble Wild Rose, which scores a minor hit in 1989 with ''Breaking New Ground''.

Probably studio session with Big Lucky Carter at Sun Records, Memphis, Tennessee.

At this point, the studio at 706 Union Avenue in Memphis was closed and recordings for Sun and Phillips International continued in a new studio at 639 Madison Avenue. Some blues, soul and gospel sessions were held. These include the rhythm and blues session by Frank Frost in April 1962, for Phillips International album, the Frank Frost blues sessions of April for the Phillips International album and single, the rhythm and blues/soul recordings by the Climates in 1967, and Brother James Anderson's gospel session of May 1962 finally released on Sun in 1967.

JUNE 21, 1960 TUESDAY

Louis Jordan opens a five day stay at the Ember's Club in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

JUNE 23, 1960 THURSDAY

Paul Anka becomes the youngest performer to ever play the Copacabana.

JUNE 24, 1960 FRIDAY

Brenda Lee and the Casuals appear at Springlake Park in Oklahoma City. Jackie Wilson begins a week at the Regal Theater in Chicago along with Elmore James, the Vibrations and Dion and the Belmonts. Tommy "Dr. Jive" Smalls produces a revue at the Apollo that features Mary Johnson, the Flamingos, Sonny Boy Williamson and the Five Satins.

JUNE 25, 1960 SATURDAY

The Dick Clark Show is broadcasted from Treasure Island Naval Base near San Francisco. Guests are the Olympics singing "Big Boy Pete'', Jan and Dean performing "Baby Talk" and Dorsey Burnette performing "Hey Little One''.

JUNE 27, 1960 MONDAY

ABC-TV $400,000 Coke Time special features Paul Anka, Frankie Avalon, Edd Brynes and Anita Bryant. Cozy Cole starts a week at the Chateau Lounge in Pittsburgh.

Capitol released Wanda Jackson's pop hit ''Let's Have A Party''.

JUNE 28, 1960 TUESDAY

Sam Phillips buys Sonico Recording Studio and plans to remodel the studio.

Scotty Moore is hired as Production Manager of Sam C. Phillips Recording Service, overseeing the Memphis and Nashville studios.

JUNE 29, 1960 WEDNESDAY

Wanda Jackson starts an East Coast tour.

Elvis Presley completes his work on the movie, ''G.I. Blues''.

JUNE 30, 1960 THURSDAY

Dion and the Belmonts are at the Regal in Chicago. Jimmie Rogers is at the Riverside Hotel and Casino in Reno, Nevada.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The information surrounding these sides is a tad sketchy although it is clear they were probably not recorded at Sun. The most likely scenario is that Louis initially leased them to Billy Riley's Rita Records, where assigned a release number as Nita 128. How, why, or when they were transferred to Phillips International remains unclear. Jimmy Louis was a disc jockey and a performer on live radio show.

He, Ray Arlington, and Lewis Smith (the composer of Jerry Lee's "Baby, Baby Bye Bye") had a live music show on KWEM, West Memphis, Arkansas, and recorded around Memphis between 1957 and 1960. "We took these songs to a guy who had a studio", is all that Smith remembers. Beyond that, information is scant.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JIMMY LOUIS
FOR RITA RECORDS 1960

PROBABLY SONIC RECORDING STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SUMMER 1960
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY RILEY

01 - "GONE AND LEFT ME BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Ray Scott
Publisher: - No Jo Publisher Corporation
Matrix number: - E 101 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1960
Released: - November 11, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3565-A < mono
GONE AND LEFT ME BLUES / YOUR FOOL
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

''Gone And Left Me Blues'' is a fairly pedestrian country tune that was unlikely to garner much attention from record company owners or buyers. ''Your Fool'' is another matter. It's a highly contagious gospelstyled tune with traces of both the white and black churches.

02 - "YOUR FOOL" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Ray Arlington-Lewis Smith
Publisher: - Jack Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - E 100 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1960
Released: - November 11, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3565-B < mono
YOUR FOOL / GONE AND LEFT ME BLUES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Louis - Vocal
Possible Roland Janes – Guitar
Billy Riley Bass
Stan Kesler - Steel Guitar
Jimmy M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Jimmy Louis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jimmy Louis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©