CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1959 Sun Schedule <

1959 SESSIONS (6)
June 1, 1959 to June 30, 1959

Studio Session for Billy Riley, June 4, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, June 18, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, June 25, 26, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Sherry Crane, June 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Tommy Blake, 1959 / Recco Records
Studio Session for Narvel Felts, Summer 1959 / Pink Records 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

(Above) Jerry McGill & The Topcoats at the National Guard Armory, Memphis, Tennessee, circa June 1959, where teenagers staged a dance. The event was part of a program by the youngsters to raise funds for their own night club - junior size.

The band shown, Frank Thomas on bass; Ronnie Rich on drums; Jerry McGill vocals. Not shown on photo: Jim King, lead guitar; Bobby Scott on rhythm guitar; and Dwayne Fowler on saxophone.

JUNE 1959

The singles, PI 3542 ''Rebound'' b/w ''Big Man'' by Charlie Rich and PI 3543 ''To Tell The Truth'' b/w ''Silly Blues'' by Bobbie and the Boys issued.

JUNE 1, 1959 MONDAY

While serving the Army in West Germany, Elvis Presley is promoted to specialist fourth class. His new monthly income, $122.30.

The Brown recorded ''The Three Bells'' at the RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

JUNE 2, 1959 TUESDAY

Sun 321, Johnny Cash's ''Katy Too'' b/w ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget''; Sun 322, Billy Riley's ''One More Time'' b/w ''Got The Water Boiling'' and Sun 323, Alton & Jimmy's ''Have Faith In My Love'' b/w No More Cryin' The Blues'' are released.

JUNE 3, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Specialist Elvis Presley begins a week in a military hospital in West Germany with tonsillitis.

Guitarist Cary Park, of Boy Howdy, is born in Stockton, California. The band developes two hits, ''A Cowboy's Born With A Broken Heart'' and ''She'd Give Anything'', before disbanding in 1996.

JUNE 4, 1959 THURSDAY

Guitarist Warner Hodges is born. He joins Jason and The Scorchers, a punkish country band whose speedy version of ''Absolutely Sweet Marie'' is cited among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation's ''Heartaches By The Number''.

MID 1959

Tracy Pendarvis and his band hit the road in support of their first Sun session. They ventured as far as Connecticut but Sam Phillips and his staff failed to call in their favours with Dick Clark and others to get the group a little television exposure. Eventually, the group broke up. ''There's two things will bust up a group. Not making it - and making it. You can't win for losing''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY RILEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY JUNE 4, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT & BILL JUSTIS

''ONE MORE TIME''

This title is a jewel in the crown of Riley's Sun titles - a judgement shared by fans, Sun studio musicians, and the singer, himself. The song's origins are a bit obscure. Its composer / singer was Carolina Slim a.k.a Country Paul a.k.a Edward P Harris. The version that found its way to Riley was recorded in New York either on July 24, 1950 or December is, 1951 (or both). One version appeared on Acorn 319 - a label not at the fingertips of many collectors. The 1951 version was released on King 4532. A side-by-side comparison of the two versions is not available to us. In any case, Riley described the recording as rough and out of meter. A sort of 'John Lee Hooker thing' in Riley s words. How it got to Riley or was transformed into this beautiful piece of decidedly in-meter performance is anybody's guess.

If you want to analyze this record and figure out why it works so well, you'll probably settle on several things: (1) Riley's deliciously soulful vocal, and (2) Martin Willis spectacular horn work. That four-bar intro and the 8-bar sax solo are a ticket of admission to Rock And Roll Heaven. Willis could have left the studio that June, 1959 afternoon assured of his reputation. A half a century later, Willis revealed the source of much of his inspiration.

''I was thinking of Roy Acuff that day I hadn't heard 'Gathering Flowers For The Master's Bouquet' since I was just a little tyke. Suddenly it came to me when I started to play'', recalled Riley.

Actually, the spirit of Acuff was looming large over Union Avenue that afternoon. It's more than Master's Bouquet in Willis's work. Have a listen to Acuff's ''The Precious Jewel'' and you'll hear echoes of ''One More Time''. And why stop there? The Stanley Brothers' ''Rank Stranger'' is also a close relative.

The truth is that Willis's distinctive melodic horn work was inspired by a rich tradition of white country gospel music that suited Riley's soulful bluesy number in a way that Country Paul, Billy Riley or Sam Phillips could never have anticipated. And once it happened, it became another brilliant example of the blending of musical traditions that occurred repeatedly at Sun.

A third key to the success of this recording is the two-note answers the guitar and sax offer to Riley's vocal. "The sky looks so dark" (''dah, dah"). Willis recalls teaching those parallel thirds to guitarist Jimmy Ray 'Luke' Paulman, who was working the session that afternoon. "Luke was real good at picking up those things as quickly as you taught them to him'', Willis recalls. Paulman is an unsung figure in Sun lore and a major player in the history of Arkansas music, performing with singers like Ronnie Hawkins and Conway Twitty And, of course, Billy Riley.

01(1) - "(COME BACK BABY) ONE MORE TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Paul Howard
Publisher: - Jay-Gee Music
Matrix number: - U 360 - Master
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - July 2, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 322-A < mono
(COME BACK BABY) ONE MORE TIME / GOT THE WATER BOILING
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

On this side shows that even the usually frenetic Mr. Riley had a sensitive side. This is a truly soulful reading of another obscure release - Carolina Slim's King record from 1952. Unfortunately, Slim (aka Country Paul, Georgia Pine, Jammin' Jim, Lazy Slim Jim, Edward Harris) died the following year and might never have heard Riley's version. He should have been proud. This side is truly one of Riley's shining moments at Sun Records. The vocal is brilliant and the interplay between sax and guitar raise this arrangement to the realm of inspired.

Billy Riley had first heard "One More Time" on an old blues record: "I listened to that thing and it was real raw", he recalled. "It was like John Lee Hooker, out of meter and everything. It just sounded so good to me I wanted to do it. It happened. Its a great song, man". Quite where or how Riley came to hear "One More Time" is something of a mystery. It was a wholly obscure single by Country Paul (a.k.a. Carolinea Slim and Eddie Harris) issued on King in 1952 and owing, as Riley said, a considerable debt to John Lee Hooker. Riley's performance truly is a masterful. He turns in a plaintive reading of the lyric complemented by responses on both the guitar and sax. The record is capped by a beautiful understated sax solo by Martin Willis. Riley's chameleon-like ability to alter his voice has been evident throughout his career, and has been as much of an impedance as it has been an advantage. "It was the mood of the song", counters Riley. "To me a song like "Red Hot" was screaming but then "One More Time" was a laid back saxophone song. I thought I was a saxophone on it. I don't think I really had control over it. It just happened. That's the only way I could sing "One More Day". I just did it natural. The way the song told me to do it. It goes back to what Sam and Judd both said about me: 'I'm not a voice, I'm a saxophone".

01(2) - "(COME BACK BABY) ONE MORE TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Paul Howard
Publisher: - Jay-Gee Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-25 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

The June 4, 1959 session personnel list in the Escott/Hawkins discography does not include a piano player, although one can occasionally be heard here. According to Martin Willis, the most likely candidate is Jimmy Wilson. However, the question remains why the piano wasn't miked - either better than it was or perhaps at all. Right-hand piano work is occasionally audible - sometimes playing triplets, sometimes arpeggios. But the sound appears like an accident, almost as if it had bled through someone else's mike. This is true both on the alternates present here and on Sun 322. Was the piano meant to be part of the session? If it was, Sun certainly knew how to mike pianos better than this, as recordings by Jerry Lee Lewis, Charlie Rich, and other songs on this collection attest. Something seems to have gone wrong here.

Perhaps the most surprising discovery in listening to the three alternate takes, is that none of them includes a bass. The entire session was performed without one, although the Escott/Hawkins discography lists Brad Suggs as the bass player. Suggs confirms that he was not present on the session. Careful listening reveals that Alternate Take 2 is actually the master, minus the bass. The bass is present on Sun 322 was obviously added after the fact, probably by Riley himself

01(3) - "(COME BACK BABY) ONE MORE TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Paul Howard
Publisher: - Jay-Gee Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-26 mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

01(4) - "(COME BACK BABY) ONE MORE TIME" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Paul Howard
Publisher: - Jay-Gee Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-27mono
BILLY RILEY – THE OUTTAKES

02(1) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 361 - Master
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - July 2, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 322-B < mono
GOT THE WATER BOILING / (COME BACK BABY) ONE MORE TIME
Reissued: - 1996 Bear family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Got The Water Boiling" was a cover version of a record by the Regals on Atlantic and features Riley in his Little Richard mode. As was the case with most Riley sessions, the material was not rehearsed prior to entering the studio. Consequently, both "One More Time" and "Got The Water Boiling" were tried a number of different ways during the session.

This was Riley's final Sun single and it is also the first time he appears on a Sun label billed as "Bill". The man was a chameleon in both name and musical style. On this disc, he attacks two pieces of potent (and derivative) rhythm and blues material, one a rocker and one a deep blues. On "Got The Water Boiling", Riley offers his version of a highly obscure Atlantic single by the Regals. The issued version has Riley in his Little Richard incarnation, shouting above Martin Willis' tenor sax. Jimmy Van Eaton's drumming is the highlight here. The man can barely contain his energy.

02(2) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Chatter & Take 1
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-28 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

''GOT THE WATER BOILING''

This song has some pedigree. Don't confuse it with a spontaneous, one take studio knock-off. Billy Riley did not write ''Got The Water Boiling''. That job was done by Tex Cornelius and Diz Russell, members of a vocal group called the Regals. The song was recorded for Atlantic Records in New York on February 14. 1955 and released two months later on Atlantic 1062 - not a highwater mark in the history of doo wop or jump blues.

According to Jay Warner's book, 'American Singing Groups,' when the Regals did the song at New York's Apollo Theater in 1955, the audience included the members of another doo-wop group, the Cadillacs. Their big hit, ''Speedoo'' was recorded and released a few months later and it bears a very strong resemblance to ''Got The Water Boiling''. Chuck Willis's ''Kansas City Woman'' (cut a year later for Atlantic) strongly resembles both of them.

The real question is how the Regals record - the least successful of the three -made its way to Billy Riley. That we may never know. Once Riley decided to record it, he covered more than just the lyrics. Even the 4-bar instrumental work that opens the two records is the same. In fairness, Billy Riley's version is far more driving than the Regals.

Both Riley's Little Richard-cloned vocal and Martin Willis's hopping sax work are more energetic than their counterparts on the Regals effort. But, of course, nobody was copying Little Richard in February, 1955, and King Curtis, Atlantic's sax man who was an undeniable influence on Willis, had not yet begun to honk.

The highpoint of the Regals original is their tight vocal interplay ('zip doobie doobie dop'), especially as backup singers to Diz Russell's lead vocal. There was no way Riley could compete with that.

Here six alt takes here along with four false starts (an additional alternate take, listed in the discography as Alternate Take 7, appears on BCD 15444, Disc 2, Track 18.) These really are alternates. They differ in noticeable ways, like the amount of echo, the raspiness in Riley's voice , vocal/instrumental balance, and the closing voiceovers by Riley. If you're focused on the lyric, you'll also hear small changes such as ''turn you loose" vs. cut you loose''. If you really concentrate on these alternates, you'll probably convince yourself you can hear the moment - either vocally or instrumentally - that doomed each of them to the out-take pile.

Perhaps most interesting in all of this is what we have labeled False Start-3, Billy Riley had a deep feeling for the blues and did his share of listening to and covering records by black artists - more than any other white artist on Sun except Elvis. But the humorous dialog that we hear between Riley and an unidentified woman in the studio seems to cross the line into racial parody. Is this what Riley was about in his spare time? If so, he was far from alone in imitating those "Helloo dere" greetings. This is shtick right out of the Amos And Andy show, which between radio and TV versions was part of American culture from the late 1920s past the time of this recording session and into the 1960s. The voice of George 'Kingfish' Stevens is redolent in Riley's interplay with the studio visitor. In fact, whoever she was, this woman responded to Riley's greeting using the same dialect. The Kingfish was everywhere.

On the other hand, Riley's approach to those closing voiceovers does differ somewhat between takes in how close it comes to racial parody. The version selected for release by Sun is one of the mildest; other takes push the racial dialect quite a bit further.

02(3) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 0:18
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-29 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

02(4) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Chatter & False Start 2 & Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-30 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

02(5) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-31 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

02(6) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 0:21
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Chatter & False Start 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-32 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

02(7) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 1:30
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - False Start 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-33 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

02(8) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Chatter & Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-34 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

02(9) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-35 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

02(10) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 6 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17122-2-36 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE OUTTAKES

02(11) - "GOT THE WATER BOILING" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Bert Russell-Aaron Cornelius
Publisher: - Progressive Music Limited
Matrix number: - None - Take 7 - Not Originally Issued
Riley forgoes the raspy vocal he used on this issued take.
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444 BH-2-18 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

03 - "BETTY AND DUPREE" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - Kassner Association Publishing Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30105-14 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 5 - REBEL ROCKABILLY
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444 BH-2-16 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

04 - "LET'S TALK ABOUT US" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 4, 1959
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30115-B-2 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 8 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15444 BH-2-17 mono
BILLY RILEY - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1960

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Vocal and Guitar Possible Bass Overdub
Roland Janes - Guitar
Jimmy Ray Luke Paulman - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Possible Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Martin Willis - Saxophone

Billy Riley's sound dramatically changed over the course of his Sun career. The first three singles were flashy guitar based rockabilly. The latter three were ersatz gospel, blues and pop influenced sax dominated rock and roll.

Arguably, it is upon his earlier work that his reputation is based and Riley is justifiably proud of it. "We had the only true 1950s sound there ever was", he asserted with a hint of hyperbole.

To Riley's mind, Van Eaton was the key ingredient although he also states that "Sam's equipment had something to do with it. I loved that old Ampex 350 C. When he started changing over and got four tracks, we lost a lot of that".

"Riley was just a damn good rocker", Sam Phillips concludes, "but, man, he was so damn weird in many ways. He interested the hell out of me, but he was not the easiest person to deal with. When he took a drink he'd become almost a different person. He just never achieved his potential in my studio. I'm sorry I didn't do more with him. I was disappointed we never broke him into the big time. His band was just a rockin' mother!".

Billy Riley stayed on at Sun Records until sometime in 1958 when his growing frustration with Sam Phillips putting all (or most) of his promotional resources behind Jerry Lee Lewis and not Billy Lee got the best of him. Several volatile encounters between Sam and Riley occurred. Riley recalled, ''Sam Phillips and I both had respect for each other, but we didn't get along too well at times. Mostly it was just words, but I did get a little riled one time and tore his studio up a little''. Sam sweet-talked Riley the first time, and the singer returned to Sun. Then it happened again. Things never got back to normal. The short version is that the multi-talented Billy Riley moved on.

 For Biography of Billy Riley see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Riley's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 5, 1959 FRIDAY

Bob Dylan, still known as Bobby Zimmerman, graduates from Hibbing High School in Minnesota. Five years later, he is to recorded ''It Ain't Me, Baby'', destined to become a country hit in the hands of Johnny Cash.

JUNE 6, 1959 SATURDAY

Johnny Horton renews his contract with Columbia Records. The two-year deal offers a royalty rate of 5%.

JUNE 7, 1959 SUNDAY

Johnny Horton performs ''The Battle Of New Orleans'' in New York on CBS-TV's ''The Ed Sullivan Show''.

JUNE 8, 1959 MONDAY

RCA released Eddy Arnold's ''Tennessee Stud''.

Decca released Bill Anderson's ''Ninety-Nine''.

Columbia released Carl Smith's ''Ten Thousand Drums''.

JUNE 9, 1959 TUESDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''Partners'' in the morning at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

JUNE 10, 1959 WEDNESDAY

For almost a year, Sam Phillips and some other manufacturers had been involved in planning a meeting with each other and their record distributors to talk about problems confronting the industry. In June 1958, their first convention was held at the Morrison Hotel in Chicago, and Billboard reported it as a serious meeting with none of the frivolity associated with some conventions. About seventy manufactures and a similar number of distributors attended, meeting in sessions to discuss business matters such as establishing an industry-wide return policy and ways to remain viable in the face of greater competition and changing tastes.

Sam Phillips was serving as vice-president of the organization, which was called ARMADA (American Record Manufacturers and Distributors Association). Sam Phillips and Roy Scott flew back from the ARMADA meeting on Wednesday, June 10, and Roy dropped by the Sun office early in the afternoon, and tell his story to the Sun employees, ''that Sam was what it was all bout. Sam got up and made his speech telling everybody how the independents and distributors had to work together to save the business and keep the majors from taking over like they had before. Sam was like a preacher on the stump. People paid attention all right. They gave him a big hand at the end, but Jerry Wexler from Atlantic was sitting right close to Sam, and he turned around and said to Sam where everybody could hear, ''Talk that trash'', pretty cynical''.

Ewart Abner of Vee-Jay Records had been elected president during the planning session the previous year. Roy said he thought Sam's feelings were hurt a little by not being elected president this year, because he had worked so hard to get folks together. But Sam was pleased that Roy Scott had been appointed legal counsel. Sam Phillips didn't seem let down, instead energized by the meeting when he came bouncing in sometime later. He said the distributors and manufacturers were finally getting the message that if they didn't quit behaving like adversaries they were all going to be gobbled up by the majors. He said there was ''gonna be a lotta shakin' goin' on'' if certain aspects of the manufacturer-distributors relationship weren't improved.

Than Sam Phillips added to the office in general, ''Our distributors love my Barbara Barnes. That's about the first thing any one of them said to me, how great she was''. His face took on a sly look and he continued, ''We haven't been selling any records, but Barbara keeps telling them this release is breaking big, that one's a sure winner''! Then Sam was off on another subject. Sam was given to these outburst of praise, but still it felt good when they pleased him. Later, they didn't hear much about ARMADA again, and time would only tell if this association could stem the tide of takeover of the business, again, by the major labels.

JUNE 11, 1959 THURSDAY

Jimmy C. Newman recorded ''Grin And Bear It'' during the evening at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

JUNE 12, 1959 FRIDAY

After a decade on the Los Angeles airwaves, ''The Spade Cooley Show'' is listed in the KTLA lineup in The Los Angeles Times TV listings for the last time. During part of its run, the show was called ''The Hoffman Hayride''. Its theme song, ''Shame On You''.

JUNE 13, 1959 SATURDAY

Roy Drusky joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

JUNE 14, 1959 SUNDAY

Jazz bass player Marcus Miller is born in Brooklyn, New York. Known for his work with Miles Davis, Grover Washington and Luther Vandross, he plays on Toby Keith's 2009 country hit ''Cryin' For Me (Wayman's Song)''.

JUNE 15, 1959 MONDAY

Hank Snow recorded the hobo tale ''The Last Ride'' during an evening session at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

Don Gibson recorded ''Don't Tell Me Your Troubles'' during a morning session at RCA Studio B in Nashville.

Singer/songwriter/producer Jeff Stevens is born in Charleston, West Virginia. He produces Luke Bryan and authors such hits as Tim McGraw's ''Back When'', George Strait's ''True'' and ''Tracy Byrd's ''Big Love''.

Columbia released Bill Phillips and Mel Tillis ''Sawmill''. It doesn't chart, but Tillis earns a hit with a solo version in 1973.

JUNE 16, 1959 TUESDAY

Buck Owens recorded his first Top 10 hit, ''Under Your Spell Again'' at the Capitol Recording Studio In Hollywood, California.

Rex Allen is a guest on the TV special ''Kodak Presents Disneyland '59'', filmed at the park in Anaheim. It also features Ozzie and Harriet Nelson, Ricky Nelson, Richard Nixon, Walt Disney, Ray Disney, Clint Eastwood and Lawrence Welk, among others.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JUNE 18, 1959
PRODUCER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLIE RICH

01 - "LONELY WEEKENDS" - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 18, 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152 CI-2-11 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

These previously unissued alternate takes are of interest for the obvious differences in vocal and instrumental work. But perhaps more importantly they reveal just how powerful the original recordings were before Charles Underwood carried them to the new studio for the full overdub treatment. Maybe the echoes rim shots helped. Maybe the chorus made this record more commercial. But what is really unforgivable was the cavernous overlay of echo that hid all traces of the taut, wonderful bluesy original.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
More Details Unknown

 For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 19, 1959 FRIDAY

Singer/songwriter Jim Collins is born in Nacogdoches, Texas. He writes Kenny Chesney's ''The Good Stuff'', Jason Aldean's ''Big Green Tracktor'', Chad Brock's ''Yes!'' and Thompson Square's ''Are You Gonna Kiss Me Or Not'', among others.

JUNE 20, 1959 SATURDAY

Shreveport mayor Clyde Fant declares Johnny Horton Day. While performing that night on ''The Louisiana Hayride'', Horton receives a transatlantic phone call from friend and soldier, Elvis Presley.

Guitarist Evelyn Cox is born in Springhill, Louisiana, to Willard Cox. She joins the bluegrass-gospel act The Cox Family, a quartet that makes a major contribution to the multi-platinum soundtrack ''O Brother, Where Art Thou''.

The final episode of the syndicated TV show ''Frontier Doctor'' airs, with Rex Allen portraying Dr. Bill Baxter.

Red Foley performs ''Chattanoogie Shoe Shine Boy'' on ABC-TV's ''Jubilee USA''.

JUNE 21, 1959 SUNDAY

Kathy Mattea is born in Cross Lanes, West Virginia. Deftly balancing art and commercialism, she nabs a pair of Grammy awards and is twice named the Country Music Association's Female Vocalist of the Year.

Pop vocalist Marcy Levy is born in Detroit, Michigan. A longtime member of Eric Clapton's band, she co-writes ''Lay Down Sally'' and appears as a backing vocalist on Johnny Lee's ''Lookin' For Love''.

JUNE 22, 1959 MONDAY

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''I Ain't Never'', Columbia Records released Hawkshaw Hawkins' ''Soldier's Joy'', and Capitol released Faron Young's ''Country Girl''.

JUNE 23, 1959 TUESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''A Big Hunk O'Love'' backed with ''My Wish Came True'' ( RCA Victor 47-7600).

JUNE 25, 1959 THURSDAY

''Lonely Teardrops'' songwriter Berry Gordy Jr. and Raynoma Mayberry Liles have a son, Kerry Berry, in Detroit.

JUNE 26, 1959 FRIDAY

Ray Charles recorded Hank Snow's ''I'm Movin' On'' at the Atlantic Recording Studios in New York, and gains an rhythm and blues hit.

After two years as a daytime staple, ''The Jimmy Dean Show'' airs for the last time on CBS-TV. The writers included Larry Marks, who writes Dean's 1976 recitation ''I.O.U''.

JUNE 26, 1959 FRIDAY

The St. Lawrence Seaway, a joint United States/Canadian venture, is completed linking the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean. In 1895, the 1st joint US-Canadian Deep Waterways Commission is formed to study the possibility of a seaway. In 1932, the 4th Welland Canal is completed, marking the first step in the process to complete a modern seaway. In 1932, Canada and the United States sign the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Deep Waterway Treaty. In 1949, a 2nd joint US-Canadian Deep Waterways Commission is formed to further study the feasibility of a waterway due to increased public interest. In 1951, the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority Act and the International Rapids Power Development Act let Canadians navigate the Canadian side of the river. In 1951, the United States begins working on the Wiley-Dondero Canal to bypass the International Rapids. In 1954, The US and Canada both pass acts that allow for the development of the St. Lawrence Seaway. In 1954, Canada and the United States reach an agreement on construction plans, Canada pays $336.5 million of the $470.3 million costs. September 1954, construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway officially begins. In 1958, construction deadlines are met with the Iroquois, Snell, and Eisenhower Locks. In 1959, the St. Lawrence Seaway is officially completed and opened on June 26, 1959 and links the Great Lakes to the rest of the world. April 1959, The D'Iberville icebreaker starts the first through-transit of the Seaway.

The building of the Seaway forced many communities to resettle as they were destroyed by flooding during construction. It has also caused serious harm to the ecology of the Great Lakes as non-native animals and plant-life (like Zebra Mussels) have been introduced from foreign ships.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY JUNE 25, & FRIDAY JUNE 26, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ERNIE BARTON & CECIL SCAIFE

During the first half of 1959 Jerry Lee Lewis also recorded such gems as his cover of the Jim Reeves hit ''Home'' which, alongside the aforementioned ''Hillbilly Music'', was destined to find a place on his second long player a couple of years later. He added to stock no fewer than four takes of the pop standard ''My Blue Heaven'', together with a blissful performance of Roy Acuff's 1940 hit, Night Train To Memphis''. Not untypically, Lewis remembers nothing more than a single verse of a song from his childhood but he still makes it sound as if was written especially for him. (*)

Sun's new promotion manager, Cecil Scaife, tried to talk Jerry Lee Lewis into adopting a new image. Scaife's account of the conversation shows how marginally Lewis grasped any concepts other than those he had already developed on his own. "At that time", recalls Scaife, "Jerry had his hair peroxided blond and it was extraordinarily long. That, and his thirteen-year-old bride, was the image that cartoonists caricatured. She would be holding a teddy bear in her hand''.
n Avenue, third floor bar >

''I had a very serious talk with Jerry about his image. We went to the restaurant next door to the studio and sat down in a booth. Jerry had one of his pickers with him. He always had someone with him. You could rarely get him one-on-one. I told him what I thought we should do, in as much detail as I thought he could absorb in one sitting. I wanted to get him out of typical rock and roll regalia. Ivy League was in. I wanted him to get a crew cut. I wanted to hold a press conference where Jerry would announce that he was somewhat remorseful. He would take on an adult image."

"We discussed it for over an hour. Jerry was very polite and listening. He would not every once in a while, but he kept looking at his watch. Finally, he shook it like it wasn't working and he looked at his buddy across the table and said, 'What time is it?'. They guy said, 'Its five before one'. Jerry said, 'Oh! The double feature at the Strant starts in five minutes. It's Return Of The Werewolf and The Bride Of Frankenstein Meets Godzilla. Then he jumped up and left the table. That was the last time we discussed Jerry's image".

1 - "HOME" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Roger Miller
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Master
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1265-A5 mono
JERRY LEE'S GREATEST
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-5-27 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Jerry Lee's cover of the Jim Reeves hit ''Home'' is written by Roger Dean Miller, born on January 2, 1936 in Fort Worth, Texas, was an American singer, songwriter, musician and actor, best known for his honky-tonk-influenced novelty songs. His most recognized tunes included the chart-topping country/pop hits "King Of The Road", "Dang Me" and "England Swings", all from the mid-1960s Nashville sound era.

After growing up in Oklahoma and serving in the United States Army, Miller began his musical career as a songwriter in the late 1950s, penning such hits as "Billy Bayou" and "Home" for Jim Reeves and "Invitation To the Blues" for Ray Price. He later began a recording career and reached the peak of his fame in the mid1960s, continuing to record and tour into the 1990s, charting his final top 20 country hit "Old Friends" with Willie Nelson in 1982. Later in his life, he wrote the music and lyrics for the 1985 Tony-award winning Broadway musical Big River, in which he acted.

Miller died from lung cancer October 25, 1992, and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame three years later. His songs continued to be recorded by younger artists, with covers of "Tall, Tall Trees" by Alan Jackson and "Husbands and Wives" by Brooks & Dunn, each reaching the number one spot on country charts in the 1990s. The Roger Miller Museum in his home town of Erick, Oklahoma, is a tribute to Miller.

2 - "FRIDAY NIGHT" - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 25-26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - July 1975
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm 6467 029-B9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - ROCKIN' AND FREE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-3-29 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

3 - "I'M THE GUILTY ONE" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Aubrey Mayhew-Carl Stuart
Publisher: - Peer Music International
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-9-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-2 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''I'm The Guilty One'' is a neglected classic from an unidentified songwriter (on some releases Aubrey Mayhew and Carl Stuart have the credits). It appears to have been committed to tape almost one year to the day after Jerry Lee was chased out of England and it stood no chance in the pop marketplace of mid-1959. It may even have been ''too country'' for the country market. Jerry Lee's vocal is rich with the intensity of his best Hank Williams interpretations. In fact, there's little distance between this and the country superstardom that lay a few years ahead.

4(1) - "LET'S TALK ABOUT US" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master
Recorded: - June 25-26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - March 1985
First appearance: - Sun International (EP) 45rpm JLL EP 002-B1 mono *
THE FABULOUS JERRY LEE LEWIS - VOLUME TWO
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-23 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

* - Limited edition produced for the International Jerry Lee Lewis Fan Club, not on general sale.

4(1d) - "LET'S TALK ABOUT US"* (2) - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Male Chorus Overdub Unknown Date 1959
by the Gene Lowery Singers
Recorded: - June 25-26, 1959
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-18-13 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Note: Gene Lowery, founder of the Gene Lowery Singers was born as Newton Gresham ''Gene'' Lowery on March 8, 1906 in Clanton, Alabama. Son of a Baptist minister, he was taught strict discipline from the cradle by stern, yet loving parents. Even before he was old enough to go to school he begin singing and ''sitting in'' on singing schools. He was directing congregational singing by the time he was eight years old.

He was educated in a Congregational high school, the Howard College and the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, majoring in music. During summer months, while in school, he led music for evangelists. He became a church music director, a music director for Dempsey W. Hedges' evangelistic party, which toured the South. Upon leaving seminary in 1929, he obtained his first job as radio announcer at Shreveport, Louisiana. Has had programs on thirty-two individual radio stations from coast to coast and held position as music director of some of the large churches of Birmingham, Alabama: Jackson, Mississippi; and Memphis, Tennessee.

In 1938 he organized the Dixie Four Quartet in Jackson, Mississippi, where they had daily broadcast until 1940, when they moved to WMC, Memphis, Tennessee. Gene enlisted in the US Navy in 1942 and served until 1944. Upon his return from service to Memphis , he reorganized the Dixie Four and resumed broadcasting. Had ''Faultless Starch'' broadcast on a network for two years, also a Burial Insurance Company program on local station.

Moved them to Indianapolis, June 25, 1946. Began series of programs for Mutual broadcasting System in 1947. He was also the lead singer for the Dixie Four and they has given 3,000 radio broadcasts and at least that many concerts, to at least one million people. He published several song books which included songs and recitations performed by the Dixie Four. In the late 1940s, while in Indianapolis, Gene organized Lowery Enterprises, which operated a record company with the ''Gospel'' label. In 1950, he formed a new ''Hoosier'' record company.

In the early 1950s Lowery transitioned out of his singing role with the Dixie Four. During this period he organized the Southland Quartet in Olney, Illinois, and managed the Pathfinders. By 1957, he had a group called the Gene Lowery Singers consisting of Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, and Lee Holt, which performed as backup singers at Sun Studios in Memphis for Sun recording artists such as Johnny Cash, Charlie Rich, Carl Perkins, and Jerry Lee Lewis, Barbara Pittman, and many more. In his later years he organized and managed the Gene Lowery Quartet. Gene Lowery died in 1971.

4(1d) - "LET'S TALK ABOUT US"* - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Female Chorus Overdub Unknown Date 1959
by the Gene Lowery Singers
Recorded: - June 25-26, 1959
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-18-14 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

4(1) - "LET'S TALK ABOUT US"* - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - None -Unknown Take
Female Chorus Overdub -Gene Lowery Singers
Recorded: - June 25-26, 1959
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-23 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

4(1d) - "LET'S TALK ABOUT US"* - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - U 364 - Overdubbed Master
Recorded: - June 25-26, 1959
Released: - June 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 324-A < mono
LET'S TALK ABOUT US / BALLAD OF BILLY JOE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Still attempting to revive his career, Jerry Lee Lewis went back to the source of two of his biggest hits: composer Otis Blackwell. Everyone hoped that the magic that had struck on "Great Balls Of Fire" and "Breathless" would again on "Let's Talk About Us". This is a powerful piece of material that went beyond the teen market. Blackwell has created a lot of tension by holding the verses in one chord for 12 bars. Jerry, Roland and Jimmy Van Eaton worked long and hard on the arrangement (numerous outtakes remain in the vaults). Even a discreet female chorus was added to sweeten the arrangement. Neither Jack Clement nor Bill Justis were involved with the overdub session (both had recently been fired by Sam Phillips), and Ernie Barton had persuaded Sam Phillips that he was a producer. Clearly, there was indecision about how or whether to sweeten this pie. Some of the discarded outtakes include a male chorus.

4(2) - "LET'S TALK ABOUT US" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 25-26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-9-A7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-24 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

''Will The Circle Be Unbroken'' is a heartfelt and very respectful version of the well-known religious song. Not released at the time, it was the highlight of the ''Sunday Down South'' album in 1970. The recent re-cut unusually features Jerry playing guitar (which probably explains why it’s in the key of “E”) and is performed with an interesting mid-paced rhythm. Unfortunately the Mavis Staples overdub almost obliterates Jerry’s vocal, and during the last 40 seconds or so he isn’t heard at all while she carries on wailing. Combined with the absence of piano, this almost makes Jerry sound like a guest on a Mavis Staples record rather than the other way round (this would never have happened if Jimmy Rip had produced it, as he always made sure that Jerry was the most prominent vocalist and musician on every song). With a piano overdub and without Ms Staples (and perhaps with a decent ending) this could’ve been a great cut…

5 - "WILL THE CIRCLE BE UNBROKEN" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Ada Ruth Haberson-Charles H. Gabriel,
Publisher: - Peer Music International
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 119-B1 mono
JOHNNY CASH & JERRY LEE LEWIS - SUNDAY DOWN SOUTH
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-5-28 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINTIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

This Christian hymn, written in about 1907 by Ada Ruth Haberson and Charles H. Gabriel, is one of the best known and best loved of all religious anthems. The lyrics aim to provide comfort for people who have recently been bereaved but over the years, singing the song in unison has come to be seen as an anthem appropriate for groups of people standing together in the face of adversity of any kind, announcing their common resolve to overcome their difficulties to the world. Countless concerts by traditional country-oriented musical groups, right up to the present day, feature the song as their finale, with the audience joining in. The quartet was probably able to sing bits of it before they could read and write.

Modern arrangements vary from medium paced and soulful to uptempo and joyous. Most are based on a rearrangement of the song in the thirties by A.P. Carter, of the legendary Carter Family, whose music provided the foundation upon which much of modern folk and country music has been built.

As evidence of its continuing appeal and relevance, the song was used as the title for a famous recording in 1972 by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band which brought together musicians young and old to record traditional old time songs. Bill Monroe was a notable refusenik.

At this point, Sam Phillips was still coming to terms with the "human jukebox" side of Jerry's nature, and simply encouraged him to perform whatever came to his mind in the studio. This title above appeared during a gospel interlude that also featured "When The Saints Go Marching On" and "Old-Time Religion" from February 1957. This ''Will The Circle Be Unbroken'' is by far the best of the three recordings. While it is unlikely anyone knew they were working on a master record, it soon became obvious that the results were very special. The male chorus was rapidly overdubbed and the result are among Jerry Lee's best early work. Although the undubbed master remains available on Bear Family BCD 15420. This is one of the few times that a vocal overdub actually enhanced the original, echoing Jerry Lee's fervour and helping to create a real tent meeting feeling. Roland Janes two bar guitar coda is priceless, although Jerry Lee still gets the last word/note.

6 - "NIGHT TRAIN TO MEMPHIS" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Beasley Smith-Marvin Hughes-Owen Bradley
Publisher: - Roy Acuff Music
Matrix number: - None - Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 114-8-B3 mono
A TASTE OF COUNTRY
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-6-1 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

''Night Train To Memphis'' is a 1946 American action film directed by Lesley Selander and written by Dorrell McGowan and Stuart E. McGowan. The film stars Roy Acuff, Allan Lane, Adele Mara, Irving Bacon, Joseph Crehan and Emma Dunn. The film was released on July 12, 1946, by Republic Pictures. The song was a major hit for Roy Acuff in 1942 and led to his appearance in a 1944 movie bearing the song's title. Jerry Lee Lewis' version, it shares with this track an almost eerie understated passion. Jerry's vocal is disarmingly laid back, yet the music just seethes with tension.

7 - "BALLAD OF BILLY JOE" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 365 - Master - Charlie Rich on piano
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959
Released: - June 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 324-B < mono
BALLAD OF BILLY JOE / LET'S TALK ABOUT US
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Charlie Rich took control of this side as both pianist and composer. Jerry's reading is fine, but Rich has contributed a very strange piece of material, attempting to 'Cash in' on the success of "Don't Take Your Guns To Town". Johnny Cash's gunfighter ballad had a poignant, almost mythical quality: a wannabe tough kid rides off into town, takes on some anonymous cowpoke and, it turns out, fools with the wrong guy.

He is pointlessly gunned down in an event that never should have happened. It would have made a fine, almost metaphysical western. Charlie Rich, speaking through Jerry Lee, says, "No, wait. It wasn't like that. It turns out that the young cowpoke really 'knew' the cowboy who shot him.

It was all over a girl named Mary Ann. It wasn't a senseless shootout in a tavern. It was pre meditated murder; or at least would have been if the young cowboy had been a faster draw". So Cash's fine piece of existential mythology is turned into a third rate crime of passion. It isn't Jerry Lee's fault that this doesn't work. He's given some pretty stilted dialogue to read, including one memorable howler of a line. After reviewing all the wrong this cowpoke has done him, Jerry concludes he had "to kill that little rat". It may rhyme with "Get away with that", but the line is better suited to James Cagney in a 1930s gangster movie, not a ballad of the old west.

Billboard gave SUN 324 a "pick Hit" but Jerry Lee's name was still poison in the marketplace. It would be a while before he enjoyed his next hit record.

8(1) - "SAIL AWAY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Duet Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich on Piano
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 1974
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300002-A7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AND HIS PUMPING PIANO
Reissued: - 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-5-30 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

8(2) - "SAIL AWAY" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None -Take 2
Duet Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich on Piano
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - May 1975
First appearance: - Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 864-B2 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - KINGS OF COUNTRY VOLUME 2
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-29 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

It is hard to know what anyone was thinking when Jerry Lee and Charlie entered the studio and recorded two different unissued duets on Charlie Rich's session on May 26, 1959, or is it this June 26 session. It is clear that Ray Smith's version of this Charlie Rich tune (featuring a vocal duet with guitarist Stanley Walker) had been recorded and released months earlier, which further beggs the question of why Rich and Lewis would have bothered bringing their distinctive vocal styles to this material. In fact, considering their pronounced stylistic differences, it is remarkable that Rich and Lewis produced such a cohesive effort.

9(1) - "AM I TO BE THE ONE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:42
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-R. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Duet Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich on Piano
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-30 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

9(2) - "AM I TO BE THE ONE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-R. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 2
Duet Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich on Piano
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-4-9-23 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-31 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

9(3) - "AM I TO BE THE ONE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:13
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-R. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - 3 False Starts - Take 3
Duet Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich on Piano
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-9-A9 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEAR
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-32 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

9(4) - "AM I TO BE THE ONE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-R. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Duet Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich on Piano
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1989
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-5-31 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Reissued: -- October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-33 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

9(5) - "AM I TO BE THE ONE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-R. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Duet Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich on Piano
Recorded: - June 25, 26, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun 114-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - A TASTE OF COUNTRY
Reissued: - Oc tober 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-10-34 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Charlie Rich - Possible Piano on some tracks and
Duet Vocal on ''Sail Away'' and ''Am I To Be The One''
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Guitar
Leo Ladner - Bass
Russel Smith - Drums
* Gene Lowery Singer Overdubbed

Tape box information seems to indicate that this session was held on June 25, 26 and not May 25, 26 as had been previously indicated. Chatter also refers to "Russell" possibly indicating that Russ Smith was the drummer and not J.M. Van Eaton as logged. (See also Charlie Rich session May 25, 26, 1959).

This period witnessed a further collaboration with Charlie Rich, nothing of which saw the light of day until the 1970s. The most polished variant of ''Am I To Be The One'', when first issued on the Sun International LP ''A taste Of Country'', was attributed to Jerry Lee alone, causing no end of speculation about the identity of the other party heard singing. Just four years later, when anything with Rich's name on would be guaranteed to sell, the recordings of ''Sail Away'' were issued under the guise of both artists; and by no means unreasonably, given that to all intents and purposes this was the work of Rich with Lewis simply contributing a secondary vocal. (*)

Had fate dictated otherwise, and Charlie's breakthrough in 1973 hit ''Behind Closed Doors'' been recorded and released prior to Lewis's own re-emergence in the country market in 1968, it's entirely possible that these duets would have been tagged by Shelby Singleton as products of a Charlie Rich session and not even associated directly with Lewis. The fact that Singleton saw fit to place one of them on a Lewis LP in 1970 has led to them being used subsequently as filler on any number of complications and explains their inclusion here; this despite the thought that Jerry Lee's own input is rather less interesting than what he bestowed upon a dozen or more recordings dating from his brief spell as a session musician in late 1956 and early 1957 which, for reasons stated in the introduction. (*)

The reality is that ''Sail Away'' was cut as nothing more than a demo to enable Rich to pitch the song to Ray Smith who, recorded it on February 21, 1959, and saw it released as a single (Sun 319) on March 23, 1959; for Jerry Lee to be involved in something so mundane was surely symbolic of his fall from grace. And thus came to an end both the 1950s and his tenure at the studio on Union Avenue; not with a bang but a whimper. The scene of his greatest recording triumphs was about to pass into history as Sun Records entered the new decade with seemingly little idea of how to rehabilitate its fallen angel. For now, at least, paradise was far from being regained. (*)

 For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 27, 1959 SATURDAY

Lorrie Morgan is born, a day before father George Morgan's 35th birthday, in Nashville. She follows her father into the Grand Ole Opry in 1984, preceding a run of 1990s hits, including ''Something In Red'', ''Five Minutes'' and ''What Part Of No''.

Bob Wills and Cecil Brower team up for a fiddle breakdown on the weekly ABC-TV series ''Jubilee USA''.

JUNE 1959

"Ballad Of Billy Jo" b/w Let's Talk About Us'' (Sun 324) by Jerry Lee Lewis is released. Review in Billboard magazine says: ''Lewis can return to the charts with either of his dates here. ''Let's Talk About Us'' (Sun 324) is the upbeat stand and Lewis sells the ditty with pro drive. Combo-chorus backdrop plays an infectious game. Also of sound note is ''The Ballad Of Billy Joe'', a middlebeat, honky-tonk dramatic about a man who will hang for the shooting of a man who took his gal away. It can score, too''.

SUMMER 1959

By the summer of 1959, big-time agent, Harry Kalcheim came to town. The usually blasé Sally and Sam Phillips himself were very impressed and excited, that's what was new. Harry Kalcheim was one of the William Morris talent agency's most distinguished members, he had been involved with Elvis since the buyout of Elvis' Sun contract, and now he was coming to Memphis to audition Sun's up-and-comers, possibly in hopes of finding the next Elvis.

Sam were hoping he'd find someone, too, because the sales were off, as they were in the whole industry. Singles nationwide had declined in sales over a third during late 1958 and early 1959. Some people said that with the new Top 40 programming and transistor radios, teenagers no longer needed their own disks, they could hear all the new music on the radio at any time. Also, LPs were making strong inroads, and it seemed musical tastes were about to change again. Jazz, Broadway musical scores, classic pop, and classic albums were all selling in large numbers.

Back in the Sun studio, Sam Phillips was assembling a group of youngsters for Kalcheim to hear. Pre-teen Sherry Crane, the Cliff Thomas Trio, and several other acts were paraded out. The famous agent was courteous and warm to all of them, and to all the Sun people, but none of the talent seemed promising to him. Later one of the photographs taken that evening found its way into a story in the Saturday Evening Post, written by Ren Grevatt and a Post editor, Merrill Pollack (''It All Started With Elvis'', Saturday Evening Post, September 26, 1959). Ren Grevatt knew the rock and roll world quite well, being a Billboard writer on the rhythm and blues beat, but Pollack probably didn't. Most was surprised and annoyed that the article's tone was clearly condescending toward 1950s music and independent record labels. Perhaps slanted toward the Post's older readership, it reflected the continued mystification and hostility of the older generation when confronted with rock and roll. The article spoke of rock singers as ''musical primitives'', with ''raucous, untutored voices'', production techniques as ''technical crudities'', and instrumentalists as having ''only a passing acquaintance with sound musicianship''. Elvis's style was described as ''savage'', and the rock beat as ''monotonous''.

Most couldn't understand Ren Grevatt's role as the co-writer, because he was continually reviewing rock in enthusiastic terms in his Billboard section. Most telling of all, the information was not up to date. He surely would know that the rising star were far tamer than the pioneers such as Elvis Presley. The charts were now featuring those Philadelphia pretty boys, Fabian and Frankie Avalon, along with Bobby Darin and Paul Anka, who were very smooth and as musically ''sound'' as the pop stars of earlier years. The instrumentation of the records was changing, too, sparse and raucous guitars giving way to strings, choruses, and lush arrangements.

In 1959, when this piece appeared, the first wave of rock and roll was about over. By leasing masters from independent producers, and luring artists from small labels to theirs, the majors were regaining their dominance. Independents like Sun were really hurting. Some of the greatest stars of early rock and roll were out of the scene. Buddy Holly was dead, Elvis was in the Army, Chuck Berry was in jail, and Jerry Lee Lewis was banned from radio. In essence, rock was going pop, and the top records were coming out of the East Coast, Hollywood, and Nashville.

At that moment, no doubt Colonel Tom Parker was thinking of how he would present Elvis when he came home from the Army next year. We would then see Elvis transformed for his movie career into a smooth, wholesome, middle-class young man that even the older generation could adore.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The moment we've all been dreading. Let's try to stay calm. Nobody quite knows why this happened, but we've got to deal with it. Up until now, the youngest woman to record for Sun was 13 year old Maggie Sue Wimberly. But Maggie Sue sang some pretty credible country music that didn't upset anybody's ideas about Memphis music or Sun Records. This time, we've added an eleven year old vocalist to the Sun rooster: the aptly named Sherry Crane singing about "Winnie The Parakeet". Most Sun fans are very upset about this.

Mercifully, this is Sun's only entry into 'cagin' music. Despite all the bird content, Charlie Feathers was now where around when we needed him most. Veteran Nashville country and gospel singer Wally Fowler was working out of Birmingham, Alabama in 1957 when he started promoting a nine year old singer named Sherry Crane who saw two children songs issued as Sun 328 in the summer of 1959. Both sides of Sherry's Sun single as well as ''I've Just Discovered Boys'' were produced and published by Fowler.

When Fowler, along with associate E.O. Batson, publisher of Gospel Singing World magazine, decided to record Sherry Crane he asked the brother and sister gospelwriting team, John and Bonnie Smith, to provide some suitable material for the young singer. The Smiths came up with the two songs that appeared on Sun 328 and also ''I've Just Discovered Boys''. ''I remember going over to their house to learn the songs'', Sherry told Hank Davis who found and interviewed her some 54 years later. Sherry remembered that the songs were recorded in Nashville's RCA Studio. After returning home with four masters, Wally Fowler pitched the session to Sam Phillips who took a flyer and issued Sherry's Nashville recordings of ''Willie Willie'' and ''Winnie The Parakeet'' on Sun. Apparently, Sam or Ernie Barton decided to keep back ''I've Just Discovered Boys'' for someone else to record and there exists a tape of Bobbie Jean Barton learning the song with guitar accompaniment. We don't know how or why Charlotte Smith also recorded the two songs.

STUDIO SESSION FOR SHERRY CRANE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JUNE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCERS AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS,
JACK CLEMENT AND/OR STAN KESLER

01 - "WINNIE THE PARAKEET" - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - John Smith-Bonnie Smith
Publisher: - Zest Music Company
Matrix number: - U 373 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date June 1959
Released: - August 11, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 328-B < mono
WINNIE THE PARAKEET / WILLIE WILLIE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-23 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Trivia freaks may care to know that this was recorded in stereo. Sun was no more capable of recording in stereo in mid-1959 than in 48-track digital, so its possible the recording was made elsewhere. There is, however a photo of Sam and Sherry appearing to be mid-session at 706 Union.

02 - "WILLIE WILLIE" - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - John Smith-Bonnie Smith
Publisher: - Zest Music Company
Matrix number: - U 372 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date June 1959
Released: - August 11, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 328-A < mono
WILLIE WILLIE / WINNIE THE PARAKEET
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rom BCD 15803-4-24 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sherry Crane - Vocal
More Details Unknown

Footnote: Wally Fowler released Sherry Crane's two unissued tapes from 1959, ''I've Just Discovered Boys'' and ''Santa Bring Me A Puppy Dog'', on Trumpet Records of Birmingham through the NRC label and distribution network based in Atlanta. We don't know when he issued it but, bizarrely, it was reviewed in Billboard in July 1964 as the earliest Christmas disc ever.

For Biography of Sherry Crane see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sherry Crane's Sun recordings can be heard on her playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR TOMMY BLAKE
FOR RECCO RECORDS 1959

DEE MARAIS STUDIO AND BAYOU RECORD SHOP
408 EAST 70TH STREET, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
RECCO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – HARDIN GUION DES ''DEE'' MARAIS

On November 1959, Tommy Blake issued a single on Maires' Recco Records, ''The Hanging Judge''/''$F-Olding Money $''. The guitarist was stellar, so Blake was still attracting the best even if he wasn't keeping them. ''Hanging Judge'' was in the style of Johnny Cash's western ballad, and the superlative ''$F-Olding Money $'' was clearly influenced by Eddie Cochran's ''Summertime Blues''. Shane Hughes claims to know the true authors of ''$F-Olding Money $'', and says that Blake acquired the song deviously, but, as with so much to do with Tommy Blake, we'll truly never know.

Several more recording contracts followed (Aetna, Chancellor, Bragg, Musicor, and lastly Paula) but nothing came of any of them. Blake had the 4-Star, who was a magnet for down-on-their-luck hillbillies. He'd feed them small advances in the hope that they'd come up with a song he could use, and then he'd cut himself in or buy the song outright, as he did on ''Release Me'' and hundreds of others. McCall can usually be spotted under the name of W.S. (for William Shakespeare) Stevenson.

Blake wrote for 4-Star Music, and some of the Stevenson credits among Patsy Cline's recordings could very well be Blake's songs (Blake certainly hinted that they were). In 1961, Blake also recorded for 4-Star Records as Van Givens, but soon discovered that the only winner in the Bill McCall deal was Bill McCall.

01 – ''THE HANGING JUDGE'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Carl Adams
Publisher: - Kemo Music - La Dee Music
Matrix number: - 9593
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - November 1959
First appearance: - Recco Records (S) 45rpm standard single Recco 1006-A mono
THE HANGING JUDGE / $F-OLDING MONEY $
Reissued: 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-29 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''$F-OLDING MONEY $'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Tommy Blake-Carl Belew-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - 4-Star Sales Music
Matrix number: - 9594
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - November 1959
First appearance: - Recco Records (S) 45rpm standard single Recco 1006-B mono
$F-OLDING MONEY $ / THE HANGING JUDGE
Reissued: 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16797-15 mono
TOMMY BLAKE - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tommy Blake – Vocal & Guitar
Unidentified – Guitar, Bass, Drums

For Biography of Tommy Blake see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SUMMER 1959

The newly formed Bill Black Combo evolved from the Hi Records session band that Bill had organized with Reggie Young. An executive from London Records, which had the distribution rights for Hi Records, was in the studio one day and heard them playing. He suggested they form a band. They didn't need much encouragement. ''We were quual owners of the group'', says Reggie.''We tried to figure who to name it after. It was either Bill or me. I had been working at the Louisiana Hayride with Johnny Horton, so I had some name recognition. But Bill had been with Elvis and knew more disc jockeys than I did''. Thus the Bill Black Combo was born.

With Bill Black on bass, Reggie Young on guitar, Carl McVoy on piano, Jerry Arnold on drums, and Martin Willia on saxophone, the Bill Black Combo popularized a whole new genre of groove-based instrumentals. ''I tuned my guitar down a couple of steps, where it was real low, and I played rhythm with a pencil as a pick, that's how that shuffle kind of came about'', says Reggie.

Bill Black was becoming the most famous bass player in America. A headline in the Memphis Press-Scimitar proclaimed, ''Bill Black Getting The Top Breaks''. The story, written by Robert Johnson to announce an upcoming appearance of the combo on the Ed Sullivan Show, said: ''Things are breaking wide open for Bill Black, the Memphis musician who started out with Elvis, went with him all the way to the big time, then got lost for a time in the backwash''.

As ''Smokie (Parts 1 & 2)'' peaked on the charts, Reggie received his draft notice. He left the group for two years, but when he returned he picked up where he had left off. Scotty Moore and Bill remained friends, and helped each other on projects whenever they could, but Scotty had his own thing going and never considered becoming a member of Bill's group. In his heart, Scotty still felt everything would work out with Elvis. He believed in Elvis, perhaps even more than Elvis believed in himself.

SUMMER 1959

Former Sun recording star, Mickey Gilley made a rocker, ''Drive In Move'', for Khoury's that stood a chance but didn't get the right promotion. Gilley was playing bars and clubs across Texas and by the mid-1960s had perfected the Jerry Lee Lewis style completely and was making good records that lacked just the key ingredient, originality.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

After it was obvious there was some success with ''Three Thousand Miles'', playing very well in Canada and making the national pop-charts in the United States. Walt Maynard, who was running Pink Records, wanted us to come back to Memphis and record again. So between dates in Canada we went to Memphis to the royal Studio with Jack Clement engineering, with Jimmy M. Van Eaton on the drums and the rest of us.

''Honey Love'' was one of the songs we did. I had always loved that song by the Drifters, so just from memory we took a few takes on it that day and then Walt decided that should be the one for the next record'', recalled Narvel Felts. ''It was also one that made the pop-charts in the United States and played very well in Canada in early 1960, it was released in late 1959'', said Narvel Felts.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR NARVEL FELTS
FOR PINK RECORDS 1959

ROYAL RECORDING STUDIO
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE STREET, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
PINK SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SUMMER 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – JACK CLEMENT & WALT MAYNARD

01 - ''HONEY LOVE*'' - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Jerry Wexler-Clyde McPatter
Publisher: - Progressive Music
Matrix number: - S-411
Recorded: Unknown Date Summer 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Pink Records (S) 45rpm standard single Pink 702 mono
HONEY LOVE / GENAVEE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-27 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

02 - ''GENAVEE*'' - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Narvel Felts-Walt Maynard
Publisher: - Walmy Publishers
Matrix number: - S-412
Recorded: Unknown Date Summer 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Pink Records (S) 45rpm standard single Pink 702 mono
GENAVEE / HONEY LOVE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-28 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

03 - ''TONY**'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Narvel Felts-Walt Maynard
Publisher: - Walmy Publishers
Matrix number: - S-591
Recorded: Unknown Date Summer 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Pink Records (S) 45rpm standard single Pink 706 mono
TONY / DARLING SUE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-29 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

04 – ''DARLING SUE**'' - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Narvel Felts-Jerry Tuttle-Barnes
Publisher: - Walmy Publishers
Matrix number: - S-592
Recorded: Unknown Date Summer 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Pink Records (S) 45rpm standard single Pink 706 mono
DARLING SUE / TONY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-30 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

05 – ''CINDY LOU**'' - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Narvel Felts
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date Summer 1959
Released: -
First appearance: - Belgian White Label Records (S) 45rpm standard single WL 20152 706 mono
CINDY LOU (NARVEL FELTS) / I LOVE MY BABY (THE PHAETONS)
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16220-31 mono
NARVEL FELTS - DID YOU TELL ME

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Narvel Felts - Vocal & Guitar
Leon Barnett - Guitar
J.W. Grubbs - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Unidentified - Piano

Overdubbed Later Date
*- The Anita Kerr Singers consisting of
Anita Kerr, Dottie Dillard,
Gil Wright, Louis Nunley - Vocal Chorus

**- The Jordanaires consisting of
Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews,
Hoyt Hawkins, Raymond Walker - Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Nervel Felts see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube <
 

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