CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1959 Sun Schedule <

1959 SESSIONS (7)
July 1, 1959 to July 31, 1959

Studio Session for Mack Self, 1959 / Rita Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1959 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1959 / Arco Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1959 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, 1959 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Billy Emerson, July 1959 / Chess Records
Studio Session for Brad Suggs, July 6, 21, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Thomas Wayne and De-Lons, July 8, 1959 / Fernwood Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube <
   

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1959

Sun recording artist Jimmy Harrell was recalled into the Navy.

Back in Texas, former Sun recording artist Dean Beard continued to record for Slim Willet's labels and for other small labels throughout the 1960s, and remained a popular live act into the 1970s, despite crippling arthritis that he said resulted from an earlier auto accident. His health problems were compounded by high blood pressure and diabates. Sun Records singer Dean Bead died in Coleman, Texas on April 4, 1989. By then, his former band-mates in the Champs, Seals and Croft had become a hugely successful soft rock act on Warner Bross. Records.

SUMMER 1959

One afternoon when there was not much going on, promotion employee Barbara Barnes looked up to see a serious-looking Sam Phillips's lawyer and Memphis attorney, Roy Scott standing in the door. She invited him in, and he sat down and began to explain that Sam Phillips was negotiating with the Philips (with one l) Corporation to sell them the Phillips International segment of the business (On February 1, 1962 opens in the USA and begins discussion with Sam Phillips and the label eventually folded in 1963 after a series of discussions with Philips BV, the Dutch electrical giant from Holland that had bought Mercury Records. They had launched their own imprint in North America in 1962, and saw Phillips International a potential source of confusion). Roy had come to ask Barbara to prepare a presentation brochure for him to take to a meeting with the giant corporation from the Netherlands, which was not only a recording company, but also a manufacturer of electronics equipment. Sam's hope that they'd come to buy his name was coming to pass.

This was a project more easily asked for than delivered. For several good reasons, the Sun archives were very sparse. When Barbara came to Sun, she given a sheet of papers with names and phone numbers of the distributors and some cards with names of disk jockeys and/or radio stations. There was a file cabinet, but there were very few newspaper clippings and only a few artist photos provided by the booking agencies. This was about all Barbara had to work with when she joined the Sun company, and she hadn't accumulated much more by the time Roy Scott asked for the presentation. She had album covers and her newsletters. They had never subscribed to a clipping service, and it had not occurred to me to cut out the ads and little blurbs in the trade papers, though it would have been a good idea. As a promotion person, Barbara probably should have had access to financial information, but she didn't. She had next to nothing, in other words.

One factor contributing to the lack of archival material was Sun's lack of staff and organization. Marion Keisker, when she came with Sam Phillips to help establish the business, not only had her job at Sun, she worked full-time and later part-time at WREC television. Then Sally Wilbourn came, but she was busy with bookkeeping and office management, and then Regina Reese came, but by then Sun was hopping with hits and she was kept busy with the phones, processing orders, and many other tasks. Barbara had been there only a short time and hadn’t had time to accumulate much. When Roy Scott asked for documentation of the company's history, it was a stunning challenge.

The lack of archives was expressive of the unstructured way Sun operated. Though a perfectionist in the aspect of sound recording and scrupulous in some ways, in other matters Sam Phillips wasn't a detail person. Things were always loose at Sun. Everyone else caught that spirit; everything was of the moment or about the future. It took a person like Roy Scott to notice that an important matter, the history of the company, had been overlooked.

Barbara Barnes put together what little she could find for Roy Scott's presentation to Philips of the Netherlands. Nothing came of the meeting that she know of; she did know that Phillips International wasn't bought by Philips. She really regretted that the company and/or Roy never returned the scrapbook she had made, because she had used some photos, clippings, and other materials for which Sun had no copies.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF

SONIC RECORDING STUDIO
1692 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
RITA SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

01 – ''GOIN' BACK TO GEORGIA'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

02 – ''FOUR WALL, TWO WINDOWS'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

03 – ''LONELY ECHOES'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

04 – ''I'VE GOT PENNIES IN MY POCKET'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self – Vocal & Guitar
More Details Unknown

For Biography of Mack Self see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1959

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

"The Shape You Left Me In", was re-recorded by Gene at Hi (without the bluesy vocal opening) and it was later issued on Hi 2039.

01 - "THE SHAPE YOU LEFT ME IN" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Jimmy Donley
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 10383
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Chess Records (LP) 33rpm Chess PLP 6025-6 mono
JUST GO WILD AND BOPPIN'
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-26 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

02 - "UNKNOWN TITLE"
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Matrix number: - 10384 - Unissued/Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Probably Bobby Stewart - Bass
Carl McVoy - Organ
Ace Cannon - Saxophone
Jerry Satch Arnold – Drums

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR ARCO RECORDS 1959

RECORDING STUDIOS INCORPORATED
2120 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO 16, ILLINOIS
ARCO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Other Carl and Gene Simmons efforts from the era include "Cold Cold Heart" and "Frankie And Johnny" issued as by the Bobby Stewart Combo on Argo 5374. "We all went to Chicago", recalls Carl. "Me and Gene and Bobby Stewart and we picked up a black drummer there". (Session man from Chess Records, Fred Below). In addition to Stewart, Carl, Gene and Below, the trip north also included promer Sun alumnus Smokey Joe Baugh. "I believe Gene set that session up directly with Chess. They knew us well by then and they were happy to get the pickers from Memphis coming up there to record for them. I have to admit, it did sound a lot like the stuff we were doing in Memphis with Bill Black. Bobby was a bass player at Hi - a session guy. Bobby had actually played bass on some of the Bill Black Combo records when Bill wouldn't play for one reason or another. In my opinion, Bobby Stewart was a better musician than Bill. Bill would be in the studio when the songs were cut, but it was Bobby playing on them. We put our record out under Bobby's name because we had a deal with Hi Records at the time. That Bobby Stewart single sold some records, I remember that! Hi wouldn't cut any more on me, especially anything that sounded like the Bill Black Combo. He was the one who was selling the records and they didn't want any bad feelings".

01 - "COLD COLD HEART" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Publishing
Matrix number: - 10374
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Arco Records (S) 45rpm standard single Arco 6374 mono
COLD COLD HEART / FRANKIE AND JOHNNY

02 - "NO LETTER TODAY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Frankie Brown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 10375 - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

03 - "DON'T BE CRUEL" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Otis Blackwell-Elvis Presley
Publisher: - Hill and Range Songs Incorporated
Matrix number: - 10376 - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

04 - "FRANKIE AND JOHNNY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Traditional - Public Domain
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 10377
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Arco Records (S) 45rpm standard single Arco 5374 mono
FRANKIE AND JOHNNY / COLD COLD HEART

05 – "PERDIDO" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Juan Tizol
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 10378 - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bobby Stewart Combo
Bobby Stewart - Bass
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Gene Simmons - Guitar
Smokey Joe Baugh - Piano
Fred Below - Drums

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1959

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

01 - "WORRIED MIND" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jimmie Davis-Ted Daffan
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued/Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Other Details Unknown

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1959

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

Gene Simmons and his brother Carl began to record more and more at Hi Records, much in the way they had at Sun years earlier. You can hear an immense difference in sound and style between the Sun sides cut between 1955-1958 and the Hi material cut just a year or two later. Their earliest work was leased by Hi (whose own release schedule was spotty during the formative years) to there labels. Gene's excellent blues "Going Back To Memphis" appeared on Checker 948 in the first months of 1960.

01 - "BAD BOY WILLIE" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 9942
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 45rpm standard single Checker 948 mono
BAD BOY WILLIE/GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-27 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

"Bad Boy Willie" shows an obvious debt to the Coasters teen bad-boy anthem "Charlie Brown" from February, 1959.

02 - "GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS" - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 9943
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Checker Records (S) 45rpm standard single Checker 948 mono
GOIN' BACK TO MEMPHIS / BAD BOY WILLIE
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-28 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

Lyrically, "Goin' Back To Memphis" was a close relative of Wilbert Harrison's "Kansas City", which was still on the charts when Gene was in the studio. The sound was clearly in the Bill Black Combo mode, although both Jessie Carter (electric bass) and Carl Simmons (guitar) recall playing on the session.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Gene Simmons - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Simmons - Guitar
Jessie Carter - Bass
Ace Cannon - Saxophone
Smokey Joe Baugh or Carl McVoy - piano
Jerry Satch Arnold or Gene Chrisman - Drums

For Biography of Gene Simmons see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jumpin' Gene Simmons passed away on Tuesday, August 28, 2006 in Tupelo, Mississippi, at the age of 69, following a long illness.

Simmons, not to be mistaken for the long-tongued Kiss bassist of the same name, was a rockabilly singer and songwriter best known for the novelty hit "Haunted House" and for co-writing Tim McGraw's first hit song, "Indian Outlaw."

Simmons once worked as an opening act for Elvis Presley, and he eventually signed with Sun Records, although his tenure there was brief and he never found the success of labelmates like Elvis and Johnny Cash. "I looked around and saw my buddies having hits, and I started to think that maybe this was just not meant to be for me'', Simmons once said. "By 1963, I was ready to hang it up."

Instead, he recorded what would become, and remain, the biggest commercial success of his career: 1964s "Haunted House'', a novelty track that rose to number 11 on Billboard's pop chart. His old-time rock and roll offered a stark contrast to the trendier bands of the British Invasion. Simmons would go on to write songs for a number of Nashville contemporaries, but it was a younger rising star, McGraw, who put him back in the spotlight with 1994's "Indian Outlaw" (co-written by Simmons and Tommy Barnes). More recently, Brian Setzer recorded a version of Simmons' "Peroxide Blonde In A Hopped Up Model Ford" for a rockabilly compilation honoring the legacy of Sun Records.

SUMMER 1959

According to Barbara Barnes, ''The main action in the summer of 1959 was the promotion of Sun LPs and EPs on Johnny Cash. In fact, Sam Phillips declared August ''Johnny Cash Month'', and gave his distributors discounts on all the package goods on Cash. Sam had authorized Barbara Barnes to offer distributors 200 free records with each order of 1,000, and the albums were keeping the pressing plants busy. In one day, Barbara sold 40,000 albums, and re-orders kept coming in. They were still getting strong airplay, especially on country stations''.

At Sun, Barbara got used to being berated for late shipments, refusals to take unreasonable return requests, lack of an album on a singer with a hot single, Sam's failure to return a phone call, and any number of other problems. ''This was a part of my learning to stand up for myself, because I knew Sam expected me to, not for me individually but for his company'', Barbara said. ''It was not a skill I had learned before, since southern ladies were supposed to be sweet and compliant, and also I was an only child so I had missed out on fighting with siblings. Our Cash promotion evoked one of those irate calls'', she said.

Milton Sinsheimer, ran the Baltimore firm that distributed both the Sun and Phillips International lines, got on the phone, sputtering and yelling, ''What are you trying to do to me, woman! Taking advantage of this poor colored boy I've got working for me. You've talked him into ordering 2,000 Johnny Cash LPs at one time''. This was the gist of it, with a few curse words thrown in. It was true, Barbara had sold their company 2,000 copies of Sun LP 1245, and they had given him a 400-album bonus. Barbara explained to him that, for a market the size of Baltimore, this wasn't unreasonable. Some distribs would call one day for a couple of thousand and the next day for another thousand. The album was hot! Such a big seller that in September, they extended the promotion. Barbara managed to talk to Milton until he calmed down, and things were OK.

Strange though it may seem, it was more grateful than offended by Milton and some guys like him. His manner meant he took Barbara seriously in her job. She was important enough to be yelled at and negotiated with. She appreciated this aspect of the record business. Chivalry was nice in its place, but what went for respect in other job's she had was actually condescension, as if only a man could talk business.

On one occasion, Barbara had a set-to with her Albany, New York, distributor, Leonard Smith, whom Jud Phillips had described in his notes as ''keen as a pin''. He was an aggressive businessman who, Jud reported, ''can get fabulous results out of a 1.2 market''. On this occasion, he was looking for some free merchandise that Sun had no reason to be giving away, unlike the situation with Cash.

He responded angrily when Barbara didn't agree immediately to his request. He just wouldn't let it go, so finally she said “.d take it up with Sam and he could call her back the next day. At the appointed time, Leonard Smith called again. But this time he was cheerful, even when Barbara gave him Sam's answer, which was less than he had asked for, but something of a compromise.

Not all distributors were difficult, but they were all different. Jack Taylor in Minneapolis was unfailingly pleasant and therefore Barbara's favorite, plus he sold a heck of a lot of records. According to Barbara, ''We always compared notes about the weather, my saying it was always sunshiny in Memphis and his reply being it was freezing in Minneapolis''. Harry Levin in Boston was aloof; the two partners in New York's Alpha distributors believed they should deal with Jud Phillips or Sam only; Leroy Davidson of Kansas City rarely spoke on the phone, leaving the ordering up to others. Barbara came to know the habits of each distributor, how they promoted and sold Sun's records.

According to Barbara, ''Markets were likewise very diverse. Aside from Los Angeles, we could expect few orders from the western states. Atlanta, Charlotte, and Nashville moved records, but at first I couldn't understand why New Orleans wasn't selling. When I asked Sam, he said, ''That's a bastard marked''. It didn't follow trends, possibly because of heaving so much local music''. Sun's New Orleans distributor, Joe Caronna, managed Frankie Ford of ''Sea Cruise'' fame and tended to push Ace Records of Jackson, Mississippi, more than other labels. The other New Orleans artists like Fats Domino and Little Richard were understandably bigger there than the Sun artists, especially those leaning toward country.

The East Coast and Midwest were Sun's bread and butter, so that's where they had the most important contacts and where Jud Phillips and Cecil Scaife visited most often. The Great Lakes region was very populous and prosperous with disk jockeys who loved the introduce new records. It was great not just for selling, but also for breaking, records. Later, the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame was established in Cleveland, partly in tribute to the important role Cleveland played in the 1950s music scene.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY EMERSON
FOR CHESS RECORDS 1959

RECORDING STUDIOS INCORPORATED
2120 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
CHESS SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JULY 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – WILLIE DIXON

01 – ''I'LL GET YOU TOO'' – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Tollie Music
Matrix number: - U 9575
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Chess 1740-A mono
I'LL GET YOU TOO / UM HUM MY BABY
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-30 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''A MIGHTY LOVE'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Tollie Music
Matrix number: - U 9576
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1959
Released: - Chess Unissued/Lost

Nevertheless there was one further Chess session for former Sun artist Billy Emerson in July 1959, resulting in Chess 1740, issued that fall. It coupled ''I'll Get You Too'', a tough bluesy description of how Emerson is going to get anything he puts his mind to, with ''Um Hum My Baby'', on which Billy was augmented by The Dells vocal group. The session featured a band that included Vincent ''Guitar Red'' Duling with whom Emerson had played briefly in the Clarkdale and early Memphis days. The sound was right up to date though and ''Um Hum My Baby'' was aimed firmly at the smoother end of rock and roll with its interactive, catchy vocals and handclaps. Both sides featured excellent sax work and, like many Emerson's discs, this could easily have been the one.

According to Chess master lists, Emerson apparently also recorded ''A Mighty Love'' and ''When It Rains It Pours'' at this session, but tapes have not been found.

03 – ''UM HUM MY BABY*'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Tollie Music
Matrix number: - U 9577
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Chess Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single Chess 1740-B mono
UM HUM MY BABY / I'LL GET YOU TOO
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-31 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04 – ''WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS'' – B.M.I.
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 9578
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1959
Released: - Chess Unissued/Lost

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Robert Emerson – Vocal & Piano
Vincent ''Guitar Red'' Duling – Guitar
Willie Dixon – Bass
Phil Thomas – Drums
Joe Jones – Tenor Saxophone
* - The Dells consisting of
Johnny Carter, Marvin Junior, Mickey McGill,
Verne Allison, Chuck Barksdale – Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Billy Emerson see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 1959

Brad Suggs was a guitarist who was there right at the beginning and right at the end of 706 Union as a recording studio. Suggs had recorded as part of the Slim Rhodes Band back in 1950 and again in 1954-1956. He also undertook session work in 1955-1956 and can be heard on Warren Smith's ''Ubangi Stomp'' among other cuts. His return to session work in 1959 coincided with the departure of Roland Janes. Suggs also saw five singles hit the marked under his own name on Phillips International. In July 1959, just as Sam Phillips planned to close the studio, Suggs came up with his own tribute, the guitar riff that was issued on Phillips International as, simply, ''706 Union''. Like the music of all Sun's session men, Suggs' disc could serve as a metaphor for all that was best about Sun records. Tight, rocking and informal. The sound of surprise.

Jerry Lee Lewis plays in St. Louis, Halls, Tennessee and a few nights in Lake Charles, Louisiana, before taking a week off in Coney Island.

JULY 1, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Johnny Horton recorded ''Johnny Reb'' during the evening at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio on Nashville's Music Row.

JULY 3, 1959 FRIDAY

Patsy Cline recorded ''Life's Railway To Heaven'' at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio. It eventually appears in the 2006 soundtrack to the movie ''The Notorious Bettie Page''.

RCA released The Browns ''The Three Bells''.

JULY 4, 1959 SATURDAY

Bill McCorvey, from Pirates Of The Mississippi, is born in Montgomery, Alabama. He signs lead when the band scores a hit in 1991 with ''Feed Jake''.

JULY 5, 1959 SUNDAY

Singer/songwriter Marc Cohn is born in Cleveland, Ohio. He gains a pop hit in 1991, with "Walking in Memphis", and was remade by Cher for her twenty-second studio album ''It's A Man's World'' from which it was released as the lead single in Europe and the United Kingdom on 16 October 1995, and ''Walking In Memphis'' also successfully remade by Lonestar as a country hit in 2003.

JULY 6, 1969 MONDAY

Columbia released Johnny Cash's double-sided hit, ''I Got Stripes'' backed with ''Five Feet High And Rising''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BRAD SUGGS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JULY 6, 21, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

01 - ''POLLY-TICKING'' - 2:12
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 6, 1959
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample-2 mono
BRAD SUGGS - I WALK THE LINE

Brad Suggs you say. First there were those three country ballads issued with the Slim Rhodes band back in 1955. Then between 1959 and 1961 Suggs had five singles issued on Phillips International. Virtually all of them were instrumentals with some novelty aspect to them. This two sides, issued in September 1959, were his first shot at the marketplace.

Suggs tribute to "706 Union" was not lost on The Fireballs who later requisitioned the melody for a chart single entitled "Vaquero".

02(1) - "706 UNION" - B.M.I. - 2:47
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 21, 1959
Released: - November 1986
First appearace: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-12-19 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - RAUNCHY
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-8-32 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

02(2) - "706 UNION" - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 355 - Master
Recorded: - July 21, 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International 45rpm standard single > PI 3545-A < mono
706 UNION / LOW OUTSIDE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"706 Union" raises an interesting question. If you were asked to compose a brief instrumental to commemorate the birthplace of Sun Records, would this be it? Consider everything that had happened at 706 prior to this date: Elvis Presley, Howlin' Wolf, Johnny Cash, B.B. King, Carl Perkins, The Ripley Cotton Choppers. Would your music be in a minor key? Of the approximately 200 singles issued on Sun/Phillips International and Flip prior to this date.

Not to mention those sides issued on Chess, RPM, and other labels to which Sam Phillips licensed his recordings, no more than a handful of them were performed in a minor key. So why choose one for the tribute? Compounding the problem, Martin Willis' sax break sounds like it was lifted from a rock bar mitzvah, and Charlie Rich's piano solo sounds like something drifting out of a lounge in Havana in the early 1950s. Only Van Eaton's echoey drumming sounds remotely Sun-like. All this might have been a lot more acceptable if it weren't titled "706 Union".

03 - "LOW OUTSIDE" - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Edwin Bruce-Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 356 - Master
Recorded: - July 21, 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3545-B < mono
LOW OUTSIDE / 706 UNION
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

According to Brad Suggs, "Low Outside" was a phrase borrowed from baseball ("the pitch was low and outside"). He recalls that the idea for the title came directly from Sam Phillips, a man rarely associated with baseball. Perhaps, unknown to historians, Sam Phillips spent some August nights at the ballpark when the Memphis Chicks were playing in town.

Although the record label credits the song to Suggs and Bruse (presumably Edwin, who was still making records at Sun as late as summer, 1959), Suggs recalls no involvement by anyone else in the composition. "The song was 100% mine", he maintains. The 1-6-minor-4-5 progression is certainly familiar enough, and Willis' sax solo is deftly borrowed from the Del Vikings' "Whispering Bells". There are three key modulations here, suggesting that these pickers knew their chops, especially Suggs on guitar. The fade on a sustained high note is a subtle reminder of the final bars of "Raunchy".

04 - KING OF FOOLS''
Composer: - Brad Suggs
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 21, 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Alt Saxophone
R.W. Stevenson or Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

 For Biography of Brad Suggs see: > The Sun Biographies <
Brad Suggs' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 7, 1959 TUESDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded ''(Till) I Kissed You'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Janis Joplin enrolls at Port Arthur Business College to develop clerical skills. She lasts just one month. Her version of ''Me And Bobby McGee'' ranks among country's 500 greatest singles in a book published by the Country Music Foundation, ''Heartaches By The Number''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THOMAS WAYNE AND DE-LONS
FOR FERNWOOD RECORDS 1959

PROBABLY SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JULY 8, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SCOTTY MOORE

Definitely a Sun Records connection with the Fernwood label. Musician and songwriter and producer Jack Clement was an original founder of Fernwood. Jack took Billy Lee Riley's first recording, "Trouble Bound" (cut at WMPS Radio and originally slated to be Fernwood's first release) to Sun for mastering. Sun's Sam Phillips liked it so much he put Riley's record out on his own label (Sun 245, one of the very few Sun records that wasn't cut at Sun) and hired Jack as producer and engineer for Sun, where he stayed until 1959.

Fernwood's earliest releases (101, 103 and 104 at least) all have their A and B sides published by Sun's two in-house publishing companies (Hi-Lo Music and Knox Music). Makes no wonder whether the records themselves were cut at Sun.

"Tragedy" has a Sun, Elvis Presley, and Johnny Cash connection. Thomas Wayne was actually Thomas Wayne Perkins, brother of Johnny Cash's guitarist Luther Perkins. The record was produced by Scotty Moore, who was doing free-lance work because his employer, Elvis Presley, was currently in Germany with the US Army and out of circulation.

Both brothers were destined to die young. Thomas Wayne Perkins died in a car wreck and Luther Perkins died in a house fire in 1968. Tragedy indeed...

Source: Recordholic and Jay Halsey

1 - "GONNA BE WAITIN''' - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - F 189 Master
Recorded: - July 8, 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Fernwood Records (S) 45rpm standard single Fernwood 113 mono
GONNA BE WAITIN / JUST BEYOND
Reissued: Stomper Time (CD) 500/200rpm STCD 33 mono
HOT ROCKIN' MUSIC FROM MEMPHIS - VOLUME 2

2 - "NO LOVE HAVE I"
Composer: - Mel Tillis
Publisher: Decca Music
Matrix number: - None Tape Lost
Recorded: July 8, 1059

3 - "MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: None Tape Lost
Recorded: - July 8, 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Thomas Wayne - Vocal
Scotty Moore - Guitar
Reggie Young - Guitar
Joseph ''Joe'' Thomas Lee - Saxophone
Charlie Rich - Piano
Bill Black - Bass
D.J. Fontana - Drums

De-Lons consisting of
Nancy Reed - Vocal Harmony
Sandra Brown - Vocal Harmony
Carol Moss - Vocal Harmony

 For Biography of Thomas Wayne see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 11, 1959 SATURDAY

Rock guitarist Richie Sambora is born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. He gains prominence as a member pf Bon Jovi, a band that earns a country hit in 2006 by teaming up with Jennifer Nettles on ''Who Says You Can't Go Home''.

''Slippin' And Slidin''' songwriter Little Richard shows up six hours late for his wedding to Ernestine Campbell.

Minnie Pearl and Lew Childre guest on ABC-TV's ''Jubilee U.S.A.''.

JULY 12, 1959 SUNDAY

Earl Scruggs performs at the first Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island using Hylo Brown and The Timberliners as his backing group.

JULY 13, 1959 MONDAY

Guitarist Brent mason is born in Vanwert, Ohio. his credits include Alan Jackson's ''Chattahoochee'', plus recordings by Brooks and Dunn, Shania Twain and George Strait, leading him to win the Country Music Association's Musician of the Year twice.

Capitol released Buck Owens' first hit single, ''Under Your Spell Again''.

JULY 20, 1959 MONDAY

Singer/songwriter Radney Foster is born in Del Rio, Texas. He joins Bill Lloyd in the 1980s duo Foster and Lloyd, develops a solo career and authors such hits as Sara Evans' ''A Real Fine Place To Start'' and Keith Urban's ''I'm In''.

Columbia released Johnny Horton's ''Johnny Rep''.

JULY 21, 1959 TUESDAY

Stonewall Jackson recorded ''Mary Don't You Weep''.

JULY 24, 1959 FRIDAY

Richard Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev argue about advantages of communism and capitalism in a Kitchen known as the ( Kitchen Debate ).

JULY 31, 1959 FRIDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''Amigo's Guitar''.

Jazz guitarist Stanley Jordan is born in Chicago, Illinois. He provides a rippling solo at the close of Kenny Rogers' 1995 country hit ''Morning Desire''.

JULY 1959

PI 3544 ''Flea Circus'' b/w ''Cloud Nine'' by Bill Justis and His Orchestra is issued.

END JULY 1959

After the Summer Dance Party Festival ended, Carl Mann signed with the Jim Denny Artist Bureau in Nashville. He fronted his own band, but Denny's experience was in booking country lounges and Mann's act was more pop-oriented. "I felt more comfortable with my own band behind me, though", says Carl. "I was able to duplicate the sound we got on records. I was scared to death on that first tour, especially when they pulled me off to do the Dick Clark Show in New York. It was all so new to me. I'd never even flown anywhere before".

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