CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1959 Sun Schedule <

1959 SESSIONS 8
August 1, 1959 to August 31, 1959

Studio Session for Ray Smith, August 1959 / Judd Records
Studio Session for Gene Simmons, Probably (Summer) August 1959 / Hi Records
Studio Session for Johnny Powers, Probably August 12, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, August 15, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Vernon Taylor, August 15, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, August 24, 1959 / Sun Records 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

AUGUST 1959

Bill Fitzgerald was hired by Sam Phillips to be Sun's general manager, a position that had not previously existed. In the September Sun-Liners listed that he was going to be Sam's right-hand man, charged with supervising activities associated with Sun's move to the fine new studios, thereby letting Sam return to cutting records. According to Barbara Barnes, ''I had often talked with Bill at Music Sales, where he was manager of out Memphis distributor, and knew him to be a mild-mannered person who had known and admired Sam a long time''.

As a part owner of Duke Records with a WDIA executive, David James Madis, whose professional experience had acquainted him with black music, he also knew many of Memphis's black artists. Duke was a serious competitor of Sam's for musicians in the days when Sam was cutting masters to sell to other companies, but the label was sold to Peacock Records of Houston sometime before Bill came to Sun.

Barbara said, ''Though Bill knew the world of independent labels from several angles, Sam had not given him much responsibility right away, possibly because things were slow for Sun when he came in. Thus he had the time to sit around and talk with Regina and me every day. We found him sincere, idealistic, and likable, a good church-going family man. He wore a diamond Masonic ring and swept his blond hair in a sort
of swirl over his forehead''.

''Regina and I decided that in many ways he seemed by our standards to be the most normal man we had come across in the Sun environment. He did have one quirk, though. He loved to tear of a little corner of any paper he came across, roll it into a ball, and chew on it. We always knew, ''Bill was here'', when we saw invoices, memos, etc., with a little corner missing.

Barbara continued say, ''He was the one who confided to me one day that in the days before rhythm and blues developed into rock, the term ''rock and roll'' meant sexual relations. I either already knew or had concluded as much, though in my college years as I was listening to pure rhythm and blues, I had taken rock and roll to mean to dance, which in the context of many songs it did. Later it meant just to ''get on with it'' whether that meant traveling or most anything else'', Barbara said.

AUGUST 1, 1959 SATURDAY

Little Jimmy Dickens guests on ABC-TV's ''Jubilee USA''.

AUGUST 3, 1959 MONDAY

Johnny Horton's father, John ''Lolly'' Horton, dies.

AUGUST 4, 1959 TUESDAY

Skeeter Davis joins the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

AUGUST 4, 1959 TUESDAY

Bill Fitzgerald, formerly of Music Sales and Duke Records, is hired as general manager of Sun Records, Phillips International Records, and the publishing companies.

Jerry Lee Lewis performs on Richard Haye's ''Big Beat'' show on TV.

AUGUST 5, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Singer/songwriter Darrell Scott is born in London, Kentucky. Gaining credibility as an alternative-country act, he scores hits by writing Travis Tritt's ''It's A Great Day To Be Alive'', The Dixie Chicks' ''Long Time Gone'' and Sara Evans' ''Born To Fly''.

The movie ''Carnival Rock'' debuts in theaters with appearances by David Houston, James Burton, The Platters and Louisiana Hayride creator Horage Logan.

AUGUST 6, 1959 THURSDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis appears on ''Rate The Record'' TV show.

AUGUST 7 1959 FRIDAY

Michael Peterson is born in Tucson, Arizona. He wins the Male Star of Tomorrow award in the TNN/Music City News awards in 1999, on the heels of a debut album that brings hits with ''Drink, Swear And Lie'' and ''From Here To Enternity''.

Stonewall Jackson recorded ''Life Of A Poor Boy''.

AUGUST 8, 1959 SATURDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis performs on Alan Freed's ''Big Beat Party'' TV show.

AUGUST 9, 1959 SUNDAY

Diane Williams is born on the Hahn Air Force Base in West Germany. She joins the female vocal quartet The Girls Next Door, which lands a Top 10 single, ''Slow Boat To China'', during 1986 for Mary Tyler Moore's MTM Records.

AUGUST 10, 1959 MONDAY

Decca released Ernest Tubb's ''Next Time''.

AUGUST 1-10, 1959

Jerry Lee Lewis plays the Rip Tide Club in Coney Island, New York. Bass player Jay W. Brown is called back on August 9, because Jerry Lee needs a bass player

AUGUST 10, 1959 MONDAY

The Billboard issue reports: "When people think of Sun Records today, they are more likely to think of artists who used to be with the label". At this time, Sun is attempting to rebuild but only Charlie Rich and Carl Mann show any real promise. Pure country recordings on Sun have almost ceased to appear.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

It took a little time for Ray Smith to enter the Judd Records. Charlie Terrell eventually secured his release from his contract with Sun and, according to Terrell: ''There was a song called ''Rockin' Little Angel'' that Judd Phillips heard by a band of four black boys from Mobile, Alabama. They had it on a little disc down there, called ''Rock And Roll Angel''. Jud told me about it and soon after when I was in Mobile I heard it too. So we decided it was right for Ray to record, but my wife, Joanne Terrell, changed the song to ''Rockin' Little Angel''.

The idea was to soften it a little, as we all throught that the harder rock and roll wouldn't last. Jud paid $600 to hire RCA studio B in Nashville and we had Chet Atkins and Grady Martin, Bob Moore, Floyd Cramer, all the top players, and the Jordanaires singing back-up.

''Bill Justis was the engineer – I was the one who loaned him the money to move to Nashville from Memphis. We recorded ''Rockin' Little Angel'' and ''That's All Right'' and after we'd done it Chet Atkins liked the songs so much he called Steve Sholes at RCA head office and they wanted to buy the tapes. Jud wouldn't let them go, though. He had faith in Ray Smith''.

According to Jud's son, also named Jud, ''Chet Atkins called Steve Sholes and said he had a talent in the studio on a rental session that was worth looking at for RCA. Sholes reportedly called my father and offered $10.000 advance to Smith and that RCA would take over the sessions from that point. Apparently my father turned down the offer''.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAY SMITH
FOR JUDD RECORDS 1959

RCA VICTOR STUDIO B
1610 HAWKINS STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
UNKNOWN DATE AUGUST 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – BILL JUSTIS

01 – ''THAT'S ALL RIGHT'' – B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Nelson-Burch
Publisher: - Studio Music – Tunevile Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 6813
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1959
Release: - August 1959
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1016-A mono
THAT'S ALL RIGHT / ROCKIN' LITTLE ANGEL
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-7 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02 – ''ROCKIN' LITTLE ANGEL'' – B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Jimmy Otto Rogers
Publisher: - Starway Music – Singing River Music
Matrix number: - P 6814
Recorded: - Unknown Date August 1959
Release: - August 1959
First appearance: - Judd Records (S) 45rpm Judd 1016-B mono
ROCKIN' LITTLE ANGEL / THAT'S ALL RIGHT
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16936-8 mono
RAY SMITH - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ray Smith – Vocal
Chet Atkins – Guitar
Grady Martin – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Floyd Cramer – Piano

The Jordanaires consisting of
Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews,
Hugh Jarrett, Hoyt Hawkins – Vocal Chorus

Jud Phillips did go for an alternative deal involving Bill Lowery's National Recording Corporation out of Atlanta, Georgia. Jud issued an initial pressing of Judd 1016, ''Rockin' Little Angel'' and ''That's All Right'' at his own expense, and it was reviewed in the trade press in August 1959. When the record started to hit, all subsequent copies bore the legend – ''Subsidiary of National Recording Corp Atlanta''.

Charlie Terrell remembered it this way: ''I instigated the deal where NRC became involved with Judd Records. I knew Bill Lowery pretty good, and told him about Ray Smith's abilities and the great new record he had on Judd. So Bill called Jud and wanted to get involved. Bill Lowery and NRC paid for all Ray''s Judd sessions after the first one, and they were all made at RCA in Nashville.

For Biography of Ray Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

BILL LOWERY - was from Leesburg, Louisiana, born in 1924, and he had lived and worked in radio variously in California, then Shreveport, Hot Springs, Arkansas, Oklahoma City, Wichita Falls, and Elizabethton, Tennessee by the time he was 23 years old. In Elizabethton at WBET he became the youngest radio station manager in the country in 1947. In 1949 he helped set up the programming format of a new station, WQXI in Atlanta, and in 1951 he was on the much bigger Atlanta station, WGST where one of his many roles was as Uncle Ebeneezer Brown, a country character and disc jockey.

While doing this he began developing and booking talent, and from there he got into publishing with his musician partner Dennis 'Boots' Woodall, starting with a gospel song by Joseph Cotton' Carrier. Lowery soon developmed a link with Capitol Records producer Ken Nelson. In 1956, he picket up the publishing on Gene Vincent's ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'', and didn't look back.

In 1957 Lowery started to dabble in recording with the Fox label and the Stars label, recording at WGST. In March 1958, he set up National Recording Corporation, and started issuing discs on the NRC label. Billboard reported: ''A new label N.R.C. (which stands for National Recording Corporation) has been set up in Atlanta, Georgia, by Bill Lowery. Latter is the publisher of such recent hits as ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'', ''First Date, First Kiss'', and ''Young Love''. Lowery has already cut his firms first release with youngster Paul Peek, formerly of Gene Vincent's Blue Caps''. Lowery had a recording studio in Atlanta in a former school building. He soon set up the Scotie and Jax labels, and diversified his operations, setting up a publishing office in Nashville (1958 to 1961), a distribution operation in Birmingham (from April 1959), and a record pressing plant in Atlanta. It was at this time that he started taking on other record labels for pressing and distribution.

On October 1959, Billboard announced: ''The NTC record company here (Atlanta) has just purchased Jud Phillips' Judd label, which currently has a promising single in Ray Smith's ''That's All Right''. Phillips is joining NRC's office here and will work on promotion for both Judd and NRC labels''.

Lowery continued in music publishing, along with studio ownership, and artist management of a list of successful artists. Prior to his death, Lowery Music was sold to Sony/ATV Music Publishing. His work with the Friends of Georgia Music organization assured that Georgia-based artists would be honored in the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. Artists with whom Lowery was connected include (but are not limited to): Joe South, Jerry Reed, Robert Ray Whitley, Ray Stevens, Mac Davis, Tommy Roe, Atlanta Rhythm Section, Dennis Yost, & Classic IV, Backalley Bandits, Bertie Higgens and Billy Joe Royal. Noted session and touring drummer, Michael Huey, began his career with the Lowery Organization as a staff musician.

Bill Lowery died on Tuesday, June 8, 2004, after a four-month battle with cancer.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR GENE SIMMONS
FOR HI RECORDS 1959

HI STUDIO, OLD ROYAL MOVIE THEATRE,
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HI SESSION: SUMMER PROBABLY AUGUST 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOE CUOGHI

And why, you might ask did it take nearly a year and a half between Gene Simmons' recording the sides of Sun Recordings and Sam's releasing then on Sun? That in itself is a tale whose punchline we may never know for sure. The simple truth is that Gene Simmons and his boys had been in and out of the Sun studio more times than we can count over a three year period of time. They had recorded at least 14 titles that we know of and come away with nothing to show except a few stories to tell. They had finally stopped trying, choosing to invest their energy where the chance of success seemed a little higher. That meant Hi Records, Joe Cuoghi's label across town. Hi was pieced together by former Sun record alumni like Ray Harris, Bill Cantrell, and Quinton Claunch. Hi wasn't sure what it wanted to be )other than lucrative) and was not driven by a singular artistic vision as clear as the one Sam Phillips brought to his company. It also held none of the allure of that little yellow Sun label. No history of discovering, Elvis, Cash, Jerry Lee, Charlie Rich, Carl Perkins, or Howlin' Wolf. Nevertheless, the folks who owned Hi Records were guys with some credentials and some mileage on them. They had a nice little studio containing an Ampex tape recorder. Most importantly, the door was open. Maybe Gene and Carl and Jessie could finally get something going here. You could hardly blamee them after all these years.

And so they started laying down some tracks at Hi, once it became clear that the Sun stuff just wasn't going to go anywhere. If Sam had been serious, he would have put something out long ago, right? Right. In late 1957 Hi had issued their first single by Carl McVoy, and discovered that the cost of pressing a hit single could put them out of business almost as quickly as they had started. They leased their single to Sam Phillips International subsidiary, while the boys at Hi put their heads together to decide what to do next. At some point around March, 1958, Sam finally decided it was time to do something with this kid from Tupelo who had never bugged him for a release. Maybe it was the interest that Hi had begun to express in Gene, although as Gene recalled, Sam Phillips "never had an inkling I'd ever have a hit record". In any case, Sam sat down in his little studio on Union Avenue, probably poured himself a few more drinks, and started playing through all the sessions he had on Gene Simmons and company. That means he heard everything you can hear on Gene's tracks, and a few more alternates to boot.

01 - "YOU LOVE ME TOO" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Quinton Claunch-Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 9531
Recorded: - August 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Hi Records (S) 45rpm standard single Argo 5345 mono
YOU LOVE ME TOO/OUT OF THIS WORLD
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-30 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

The record was released as by The Simmons although Carl recalled that original plans were to call them The Simmons Brothers.

02 - "OUT OF THIS WORLD" - B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Quinton Clauch-Gene Simmons
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - 9532
Recorded: - August 1959
Released: - 1959
First appearance: - Hi Records (S) 45rpm standard single Argo 5345 mono
OUT OF THIS WORLD/YOU LOVE ME TOO
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16758-29 mono
GENE SIMMONS - THE SUN YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Simmons: Gene & Carl Simmons - Vocal and Guitars
Bobby Stewart - Bass
Other Details Unknown

For Biography of Gene & Carl Simmon see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

AUGUST 1959

Jud Phillips was still plugging on with Jerry Lee Lewis. Jud half-believed that Jerry was his own creation, and Jerry concurred, crediting Jud with making him the success he had been. Jerry kept working, despite the meager pay he could now command. Roland Janes was away from the studio often, accompanying Jerry Lee on his live show.

Jud kept trying to figure some angle to bring Jerry back to international prominence. He had gotten two of his hometown friends from the Tri-cities area of Alabama to invest in Jerry's future, and he was having a meeting with them, his brother Tom, and Jerry Lee at a beach house on Mobile Bay. It was late August when Jud called and said that Sam had agreed to send Barbara Barnes to that meeting to represent Sun.

Jud Phillips was still angling for a way to get Jerry some favorable press coverage, so that people could know a more favorable human side of the performer. Privately, Jud worried whether Jerry had the substance to sustain a career. ''Jerry Lee Lewis is the most oversold artist in America'', he said. The problem was partly that he had never had an act to go along with his hit songs, beyond shaking his golden locks and hurling piano benches across the stage. He had proven this during an ill-fated nightclub date in the New York area he had contracted to do upon his return from England. He could announce a song, but that's as far as he could go. Harry Kalcheim had been there and told he was totally dismayed by Jerry's performance.

Jud's brother, Tom, seemed to be looking upon the whole scene with a jaundiced eye. He and Barbara had talked from time to time; he told her during a lull when no one was near that he was a former alcoholic and concerned that both Sam and Jud were headed for the road he had taken. He shook is head, asking Barbara, ''How did you get mixed up in this nest of Phillipses''? His words, with the allusion to snakes or wasp, seemed to carry a warning. When it came time to leave, but there was no Harry Kalcheim, and neither was Jud. Barbara had nothing substantive to report to Sam, and she kept on as before, trying to sell his records with scant success.

AUGUST 1959

Johnny Powers came from points north and apparently made a few trips to Memphis bringing his abundance of Presley-generated style, unbounded enthusiasm, and, on ''With Your Love, With Your Kiss'', a groove that wouldn't quit. Ultimately, it just wasn't quite ''different'' enough and Powers only saw one single released on Sun.

AUGUST 11, 1959 TUESDAY

Sun 325, Vernon Taylor's ''Sweet And Easy'' b/w ''Mystery Train''; Sun 326, Jerry McGill's ''I Wanna Make Sweet Love'' b/w ''Lovestruck; and Sun 328, Sherry Crane's ''Willie Willie'' b/w ''Winnie The Parakeet'' are released.

The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''A Woman's Intuition'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio In Nashville, Tennessee.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY POWERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY AUGUST 12, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS,
AND/OR STAN KESLER

By the time he'd reached his eighteenth birthday, Johnny Powers had already seen two high-octane singles released on local Detroit labels. Both were cut from standard rock and roll cloth but as the ex-john Pavlik hailed from the same northern-most region as rockabilly best-seller Jack Scott, he readily adopted the latter's dusky baritone for his brief moment in the Sun spotlight. Powers would ultimately find his true worth on the shop floor of the music industry, in mastering and distribution.

01 - "WITH YOUR LOVE, WITH YOUR KISS" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Johnny Pevlik
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 370 - Master
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 327-A < mono
WITH YOUR LOVE, WITH YOUR KISS / BE MINE, ALL MINE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Johnny Pavlik from Detroit City turned in a real two-sided barn burner on his sole Sun single. Powers is a highly energetic vocalist, to say the least. The highlights on the bluesy "With Your Love, With Your Kiss" include the rather unorthodox use of a 3-chord during the verse, and the kick-ass drumming of session stalwart Jimmy M. Van Eaton. Martin Willis, who seemed to be spending more time at 706 Union than at home, reprises his sax solo from "One More Time". It was beautiful the first time, so why not repeat it?.

No one has ever discovered what happened at the end of this recording. The original 45 was released with the final note awkwardly cut off. Subsequent reissues have sounded as if attempts were made to edit the ending to sound intentional, or fade it altogether. At this point, no tape with a clean ending exists.

02 - "BE MINE, ALL MINE" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Johnny Pevlik-Tommy Moers
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated - Asterisk Music
Matrix number: - U 371 - Master
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 327-B < mono
BE MINE, ALL MINE / WITH YOUR LOVE, WITH YOUR KISS
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Powers shifts gears on "Be Mine, All Mine", using a sneering talk/sing approach that just drips with good natured menace. The song rests on a gimmicky yodel during the release, under which Jimmy Van Eaton inserts some fine bass drum work. In fact, it is Van Eaton's assertive accenting on the snare, and lively right foot on the bass drum that propel this record. Powers seems to have borrowed a line of melody from his hero Elvis' "Too Much". Happily, Martin Willis' sax solo sounds like it actually belongs here.

Stuart Colman recalled, ''I was able to grill Johnny Powers about his long and varied career when he headlined a series of shows in the United Kingdom during May 1986. As he explains here, his time at Sun was brought about in a somewhat freewheeling manner by an insidious character named Tommy Moers.

Although his Memphis connection might have been short and sweet, Johnny was nevertheless associated with the company long enough to pervade some of the rockabilly passion that was then becoming tough to track down.

03 - "INTERVIEW JOHNNY POWERS" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-15 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

04 - "ME AND MY RHYTHM GUITAR" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated - Asterisk Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1031-8 mono
COUNTRY ROCK SIDES
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-22 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

05(1) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:29
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1031 mono
COUNTRY ROCK SIDES
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-13 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16

05(2) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:38
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (LP) 33rpm Norton ED 229-1 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR
Reissued - 1992 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm Norton CED 229-15 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

05(3) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm Norton CED 229-16 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR
Reissued: – Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-43 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – LONG BLOND HAIR

05(4) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm Norton CED 229-20 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR
Reissued: – Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-45 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – LONG BLOND HAIR

05(5) - "WAITING FOR YOU" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm Norton CED 229-23 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

06 - ''BUT NOW THAT IT'S OVER'' - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-29 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-30 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

07 - ''DON'T LIE TO ME'' – B.M.I. 2:22
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Norton Records (LP) 33rpm Norton ED 229-19 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-26 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

08 - ''EVERYBODY SAYS I'M A LUCKY GUY'' – B.M.I. - 1:34
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 2007
First appearance: – Roller Coaster (LP) 33rpm 2017-15 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – CAN'T RESIST THAT ROCK AND ROLL
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-34 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

09 - ''I GOT A GIRL WHO KNOWS HOW TO LIVE'' – B.M.I. - 1:22
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 2007
First appearance: – Roller Coaster (LP) 33rpm 2017-14 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – CAN'T RESIST THAT ROCK AND ROLL
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-33 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

10 - ''TROUBLE (I'M EVIL)'' – B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Lindsey Buckingham-Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Kobalt Music Publishing Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1029-15 mono
SHAKE AROUND
Reissued: - 1986 Roller Coaster (LP) 33rpm 2010-9 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - ROCK! ROCK! ROCK!

''Trouble'' issued on LP 1029 and Roller Coaster 2010 as ''I'm Evil''.

11 - ''WON'T YOU PLEASE, PRETTY BABY'' – B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 2007
First appearance: – Roller Coaster (LP) 33rpm 2017-8 mono
JOHNNY POWERS – CAN'T RESIST THAT ROCK AND ROLL
Reissued: - Roller Coaster (CD) 500/200rpm RCCD 3038-28 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

12 - ''DON'T GO AWAY'' – B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Asterisk Music-Jet-Eye Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 12, 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-28 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS

The next four tracks by Johnny Powers probably recorded at Sun Records at unknown dates (1958/1959). More information is needed. Let us know.

13 - ''TREAT ME RIGHT'' – B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958/1959
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BB LP 2001-1 mono
THE BOP THAT NEVER STOPPED VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1992 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm ED 229-B-1 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

14 - ''MEAN MISTREATER'' – B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958/1959
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BB LP 2000-1 mono
THE BOP THAT NEVER STOPPED VOLUME 1
Reissued: - 1992 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm ED 229-A-4 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

15 - ''I'M WALKING'' – B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958/1959
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BB LP 2000-2 mono
THE BOP THAT NEVER STOPPED VOLUME 1
Reissued: - 1992 Norton Records (CD) 500/200rpm ED 229-B-10 mono
JOHNNY POWERS - LONG BLOND HAIR

16 - ''SOMEBODY'S GONNA HURT YOU'' – B.M.I. - 3:26
Composer: - Johnny Powers
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958/1959
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BB LP 2001-2 mono
THE BOP THAT NEVER STOPPED VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 1988 Magnum Force (LP) 33rpm MFLP 056-6 mono
RED HOT ROCKABILLY VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Powers - Vocal and Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Billy Riley - Bass
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Tenor Saxophone

For Biography of Johnny Power see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Powers' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

AUGUST 1959

Sticking true to the formula of rocking up a standard, Mann lighted upon another Nat King Cole hit, ''Pretend'', for a follow-up, but it pegged out halfway up the Hot 100. That should have served notice to Mann and Phillips that the formula had run its course; instead, ''Pretend'' was followed by ''Some Enchanted Evening'', ''South Of The Border'' and ''The Wayward Wind'', each selling progressively fewer copies. Ironically, both Charlie Rich and Eddie Bush were contributing some strong material to Mann's repertoire (including ''I'm Coming Home'', which Elvis Presley later copied note-for-note), but their songs were relegated to B sides and album tracks. The combination of Mann and Bush might have had staying power, but their potential was foiled by Phillips' insistence upon revamping standards.

Carl Mann was only seventeen when his career began its downward slide, but that was hardly the worst of his problems: unable to handle the rigors of heavy touring, he had become an alcoholic. After his band broke up, Mann toured been with Carl Perkins, neither able to find that elusive second hit. Finally Mann returned whence he came, to Huntington; he kept his hand in, playing a few night spots, but they were a far cry from the venues he had worked during the summer of 1959 when the kids had stood and cheered for another encore of ''Mona Lisa''. His last Phillips International single, shipped in June 1962, coupled the strangely appropriate ode to illicit liquor ''Mountain Dew'' with yet another oldie, ''When I Grow Too Old To Dream''. It sold a shade over one thousand copies.

Mann was drafted in 1964 and sent to Germany for his tour of duty. After his return he tried to pick up the pieces of his recording career, and cut some sides for Monument Records; but by that point his alcoholism had rendered him unable to promote his career. He married in 1968 and started the painful process of weaning himself off the bottle. A liaison with ABCDot in 1970 produced five singles in the contemporary country mold, none of which was that second mayor hit.

''There's hardly a week goes by that I don't wish at some point that I'd stayed with it'', said Mann in 1987. ''I'd probably have done been gone though. I needed to change the way I was going with the booze, but it's hard to get off it when you're on the road''. A more recent conversion to Christianity has further removed Mann from the desire to perform.

If Mann ever needed to reject upon the value of home and security, the example of Eddie Bush, who continued to drink and drift, certainly offered food for thought. Bush was last seen in the early 1980s in the record store that Shelby Singleton (owner of the Sun catalog since 1969) operated in Nashville. Fortified by the bottle, Bush announced to the patrons that he was the greatest guitarist who had ever come to Nashville. Those who took any notice probably thought that they were listening to a drunk living out a delusion. Don Powell, manning the store that day for Singleton, knew better; he had toured once with Mann and Bush, and knew that Bush really was one of the best. Powell's attempts at conversation about the old days faltered, as Bush tried to bum some cash.

AUGUST 1959

Surprisingly, it was Harold Jenkins' sometime band-mate in the Arkansas Wood Choppers, Mack Self, who eventually saw one release on Sun and another on Phillips International. Self's wonderfully archaic ''Easy To Love'' is on the country box-set, and should be the cornerstone of any 1950s country collection. Trying his hand at rockabilly, Self had mixed results. His version of ''Goin' Crazy'' is markedly different from the hillbilly version on the country box-set. If ''Mad Of You'' was rockabilly caught out of time when it was released in October 1959, that's hardly surprising. It was recorded two years earlier, and was resurrected as the B-side of a Tom Dooley-soundlike, ''Willie Brown''. Collectors figured that it was Charlie Feathers singing the bluesgrass-style harmony on ''Mad At You'', a belief that Feathers fostered, but it was actually Jimmy Evans.

AUGUST 13, 1959 THURSDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hit ''Sweet Nothin's'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville. Charlie McCoy observes the session, the first one the future Hall of fame member ever attends.

Singer/songwriter Bobby Darin signs a million-dollar contract with Paramount Pictures. ''Dream Lover'', a song he wrote, will eventually become a country hit for Billy ''Crash'' Craddock.

AUGUST 14, 1959 FRIDAY

Johnny Cash recorded ''The Rebel - Johnny Yuma'' in Nashville at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

Decca released The Wilburn Brothers'''A Woman's Intuition''.

AUGUST 15, 1959 SATURDAY

Captain Paul Beaulieu arrives in West Germany with his family, including 14-year-old daughter Priscilla, destined to meet and years later, marry Elvis Presley.

Former country hitmaker and current orchestra leader Lawrence Welk graces the cover of TV Guide.

The Browns perform ''The Three Bells'' on ABC's telecast of ''The Dick Clarlk Saturday Night Beechnut Show''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY AUGUST 15, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ERNIE BARTON

This version of "Lovin' Memories" contains far more echo and a slightly different mix. It's a safe bet the track results from an entirely different session. This early take of ''Lovin' Memories'' (a song erroneously released in the past as ''Love Love Memories'') retains a strong country feel despite the presence of Jimmy Van Eaton on drums and Martin Willis on saxophone. It has the same genuine rockabilly feel as some of the Warren Smith items such as ''Hank Snow Medley'' and ''Dear John'', literally a hillbilly song with a rocking beat.

01 - "LOVIN' MEMORIES'' - 2 - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Mac Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-9-8 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-5-26 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Motivated initially by Sam Phillips and later by Jack Clement, Mack Self set out prove he could forge the kind of material that would eventually slot into the Sun mandate. His full-bodied "Mad At You" was first tried out at 706 Union in 1956, then a master was cut a year later, although there was no release as such until October 1959. The sweet-spot harmony comes courtesy of Fender bass player, Jimmy Evans, who was on loan from the Harold Jenkins band at the time.

"Willie Brown" this song is the outlier in Mack's recordings for Sun. Certainly it is the least country of all his compositions and owes a clear debt to the folk boom in popular music at the time.

The Kinston Trio's "Tom Doley", another hand down song, had charted less than a year before Mack took "Willie Brown" before the microphone. Another contribution to Mack's unconscious was probably Johnny Cash's "Don't Take Your Guns To Town", another tale of a decent young lad who ends up badly after some violence in a saloon. At a strictly musical smash hit from the era.

Like "Willie Brown", the Browns' record also alternates between unaccompanied and accompanied vocal sections. On "The Three Bells", the return to the full band in rhythm is announced by a four note vocal hook ("Bum bum bum bum"). Self's record also uses a four note lead-in, only it's played on the guitar by Roland Janes.

02(1) - "WILLIE BROWN" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 360 - Master
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - October 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3548-A < mono
WILLIE BROWN / MAD AT YOU
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This was somebody's idea of a commercial record in 1959. It might have been subtitled "Tom Dooley Meets The Battle Of New Orleans". Ironically, this is the least interesting record Mack Self left in the Sun vaults, an ersatz folk concoction full of dramatic drum rolls and a wholly out-of-place sax. At least it gave them an excuse to resurrect and release "Mad At You" (1957), for which we should be deeply beholden to the hung down "Mr. Brown".

02(2) - "WILLIE BROWN" - B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-18 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The song seems to be written from the point of view of the dead man. It's not immediately clear who's saying "Hang down, Willie Brown, hang down and die" until you consider the next few words: "My loved ones, they cry". That pretty much identities the murdered man as the speaker. In any case, "Willie Brown" was worked up over at least two different sessions and underwent some personnel changes in the process. Both Ace Cannon and Martin Willis took a hand at the sax part and both W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland and J.M. Van Eaton played drums. One of those stalwart session drummers (we're not sure which) had a little bit of trouble mastering the military drum roll that appears prominently in "Willie Brown". This becomes painfully clear on a number of takes that had to be aborted when the drummer goofed his attempt at the drum roll. Some alternate takes feature a heavier backbeat than the version issued in October, 1959. The major difference on the alternate take here can be heard in the sax work behind Self's vocal; it seems more adventurous on this unissued take.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley or Jimmy Evans - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Martin Willis or Ace Cannon - Tenor Saxophone
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

03 - "INTERVIEW MACK SELF" - B.M.I. - 4:55
Recorded: - 2007
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-31 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

A fragment of an impromptu performance recorded during a recent (2007) telephone conversation by Hank Davis. Consider it a teaser for the full band version that's included on Mack's self-produced CD recorded recently in Memphis. Despite the primitive sound quality of this snipped, many of you will appreciate the honesty and directness of Mack's solo acoustic guitar performance. It's the next best thing to camping out on Mack's front porch and listening to him sing for friends and family.

04 - "MIDNIGHT MUSIC IN MEMPHIS" - B.M.I. - 1:17
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - 2007
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-31 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Also known as "When Darkness Falls In Memphis", this is Mack's tribute song to his days at Sun Records. In addition to two of his own titles ("Easy To Love" and "Mad At You"), the song also pays its respects to Elvis, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison.

For Biography of Mack Self see: > The Sun Biographies <
Mack Self's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR VERNON TAYLOR
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY AUGUST 15, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

One of Sam Phillips favorite copyrights was trotted out yet again on Vernon Taylor's second Sun release. One more time, Taylor shows off a fine voice, ideally suited to the kind of rockabilly Sun is famous for. One can only wish he had been in town during the golden era. Unfortunately, Taylor also reveals that his sense of timing was a tad less than stellar. He tacitly recognized as much by given up the music business after this single.

01) - "MYSTERY TRAIN" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Sam Phillips-Herman Parker
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 367 - Master
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - July 16, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 325-B < mono
MYSTERY TRAIN / SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 157803-4-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Although there is nothing technically wrong with his playing, Martin Willis' saxophone was becoming in 1959 what the Gene Lowery Singers had been two years earlier. Ironically, we had temporarily dispensed with annoying choral overdubs only to find ourselves surrounded by omnipresent sax licks. At its best, as on "One More Time", Willis' playing made some restrained and meaningful contributions. But too often, the obligatory appearance of Willi's madly hopping sax suggests that whoever was twiddling the knobs at Sun had listened to too many Coasters' records. They assumed that King Curtis spelled a one way ticket to sales. They were wrong. If you can listen through all the manic sax intrusions, the instrumental bed track to "Mystery Train" is damn fine.

02 - "SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Roy Orbison
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 366 - Master
Recorded: - August 15, 1959
Released: - July 16, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 325-A < mono
SWEET AND EASY TO LOVE / MYSTERY TRAIN
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

The world is still awaiting a definitive version of "Sweet And Easy To Love". Gone is the obnoxious barbershop-quartet that marred Orbison's original version (one almost hears a distant "do de wada wada wah" during Taylor's version). Also, the chord structure has been changed here, providing some pleasant 6- minor/2- minor chords in place of Orbison's original conception. But once again, the sax riffing all but sinks this outing. The attempted guitar-sax harmony during the solo is particularly dire. Even the redoubtable Charlie Rich seems curiously lost.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Vernon Taylor - Vocal and Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Martin Willis - Sax
Charlie Rich - Piano
Jimmy Van Eaton - Drums

For Biography of Vernon Taylor see: > The Sun Biographies <
Vernon Taylor's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

AUGUST 21, 1959 FRIDAY

Hawaii becomes the 50th state added to the United State. The Aloha State provides a home for Randy Travis, Kris Kristofferson and Dolly Parton, and a wedding site for Travis, Janis Gill and The Dixie Chick's Martie Maguire.

Hawaii is the only U.S. state located in Oceania and the only one composed entirely of islands. It is the northernmost island group in Polynesia, occupying most of an archipelago in the central Pacific Ocean. Hawaii is the only U.S. state not located in the Americas. The state does not observe daylight saving time.

The state encompasses nearly the entire volcanic Hawaiian archipelago, which comprises hundreds of islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight main islands are—in order from northwest to southeast: Nijhay, Kauai, Oahu, Molokaj, Kahoolawe, Maui and the Island of Hawaiii. The last is the largest island in the group; it is often called the "Big Island" or "Hawaiʻi Island" to avoid confusion with the state or archipelago. The archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania.

Hawaii's diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists. Because of its central location in the Pacific and 19th-century labor migration, Hawaii's culture is strongly influenced by North American and Asian cultures, in addition to its indigenous Hawaiian culture. Hawaii has over a million permanent residents, along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. Its capital is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu.

Hawaii is the 8th-smallest and the 11th-least populous, but the 13th-most densely populated of the fifty U.S. states. It is the only state with an Asian plurality. The state's coastline is about 750 miles (1,210 km) long, the fourth longest in the U.S. after the coastlines of Alaska, Florida and California. The United States President Eisenhower signs the Hawaii Admission Act into law and than Hawaii becomes the 50th state in the United States of America. William F. Quinn is elected as the state's first governor.

AUGUST 23, 1959 SUNDAY

Jimmy Dean appears on the NBC series ''The Dinah Shore Chevy Show''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY AUGUST 24, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) - "ROCKIN' LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-10-12 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - WILLING AND READY
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-25 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

01(2) - "ROCKIN' LOVE" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:50
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - False Start - Alternate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
''Rockin' Love'' with False Start released on BCD 17313 by mistake
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - May 29, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-7-15/16 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

This alternate version contained mistakes of near mythic proportions by bassist Robert Oatsvall which prompted some to wonder if Oatsvall was playing a fretless electric bass which might help explain his miscues. Carl Mann, though, recalled that the reasons for Oatsvall's hit-or-miss approach to his instrument was, as he says, "just lack of practice. Robert had a day job whereas Eddie and I had nothing in our lives but music. We were playing all the time". Oatsvall's lack of expertise bobbed up again when the boys tackled Gogi Grant's 1956 smash ''Wayward Wind''. The early takes disintegrate because Oatsvall is so off-taget.

01(3) - "ROCKIN' LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 357 - Master
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3546-A < mono
ROCKIN' LOVE / PRETEND
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Rockin' Love", which accompanied "Pretend" on the follow-up to "Mona Lisa", had already been recorded by Carl Mann for the Jazon label. The Sun out-takes reveal that the first segment of the song was originally taken at a brisker tempo. A sample of that early approach has been here.

"Rockin' Love", was a remake of the lone Carl Mann single on Jaxon Records, recorded prior to his pilgrimage to Memphis. The first half is a tight, tough little record that builds quite a bit of tension.

And then it happens: the band speeds up and just when things should soar into the stratosphere, the sheer incompetence of one band member threatens to destroy the whole gig. Bass player Robert Oatsvall simply goes to piece.

He can barely keep up with the changes awn manages to hit a few clams of near mythic proportion. In truth, it is a wonder that this take was released. Sam Phillips has often told of releasing records with technical imperfections because the feeling was right. "Down The Line" by Jerry Lee Lewis was one such case (listen to the guitar go out of tune).

Here is another. Oatsvall sounds like he studied bass at the Luther Perkins school of fretboard mastery. These aren't exactly complex chord changes but Oatsvall manages to turn finding the 1-chord (the tonic, the key in which the song is being performed) into an adventure as Carl sings the little phrase. Oatsvall stuck around for a few more sessions but by 1960 he had been given his walking papers.

02(1) – "PRETEND" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:36
Composer: - Douglas-Parman-LaVere
Publisher: - Brandon Music
Matrix number: - P 358 - Master
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - September 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3546-B < mono
PRETEND / ROCKIN' LOVE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Pretend" was cut on the afternoon of Carl Mann's seventeenth birthday.

Nothing in Carl Mann's life had prepared him for what was happening. He spent his seventeenth birthday on the road. For a while, it looked as though his career would hold up. His version of "Mona Lisa" eclipsed Conway Twitty's version, and when he went back into the Sun studio he thought he had stumbled upon a formula that could be applied indefinitely, but "Pretend" pegged out a number 57 on the Billboard Hot 100.

"The biggest problem I had after "Mona Lisa" was getting back into the studio", says Carl. "I offered to go back but Sam kept holding us off".

03 – "TOO YOUNG" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:05
Composer: - Sylvia Dee-Sid Lippman
Publisher: - EMI Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
''Too Young'' False Start released on BCD 17313 by mistake.
Released: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-7-17/18 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

Sam Phillips reservations may have had more to do with what happening to his little empire. He held out great hopes for his new studio, build on Madison Avenue, a few blocks from the old studio. In the meantime, he had dismissed his resident producer, Jack Clement, and his musical arranger Bill Justis, and his regular session crew were following new directions. As is the case with most Sun artists, Carl Mann's recording history is a little difficult to piece together.

Tape boxes from the old studio in particular yield few secrets and sessions filed with the Musicians Union were usually a book-keeping exercise. It seems, though, that Carl and his group went back to the old studio in August 1959 just before it closed. "Pretend" and Carl's own "Rockin' Love" were cut then.

"We worked with Sam on "Pretend", remembered Carl Mann. "He was great to work with. He was always wanting to come up with something unique. He wanted us to do "Bali-Hi" or songs from "South Pacific".

Charles Underwood took over at the new studio, but the studio on Madison just didn't have anywhere near as good a sound. It might have been a fuller sound, but it just didn't have the magic that the old studio had. The old studio had the greatest sound I'd ever heard. A lot of body. When I heard "Mona Lisa" coming back over the monitors I said, 'That ain't me. I ain't that good'. The sound on Madison was too hollow, too distorted".

03 - "TAKE THESE CHAINS FROM MY HEART" - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Hy Heath-Fred Rose
Publisher: - ATV Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally issued
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-1 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-27 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Among the tunes Carl Mann tried his hand at in search of another hit was the Hank Williams composition ''Take These Chains From My Heart''. The track was never selected for release, either as a single or as LP fare. In retrospect it is easy to see why: it almost a perfect clone of both sides of ''Mona Lisa'' (the flipside was called ''Foolish One''). Within the first 16 bars of ''Chains'' you hear everything that made the earlier hit special, without bringing anything new to the table. It would have been commercial suicide to release it: it was simply too close to the original sources. For our purposes, it's a great reminder of what made Carl Mann a successful artist in 1959/1960, and it offers another dimension to how Sun artists brought their own stylistic stamp to the songs of Hand Williams. Guitarist Eddie Bush shines on "Take These Chains From My Heart", but the overall results prove that not every standard can be forced into the "Mona Lisa" mould. Carl Mann in particular sounds awkwardly selfconscious.

"Too Young" appears in the safety masters coupled with "Rockin' Love", suggesting that it was originally scheduled as the follow-up to "Mona Lisa".

04 - "TOO YOUNG" - B.M.I. - 1:53
Composer: - Sylvia Dee-Sid Lippman
Publisher: - EMI Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - August 24, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm JAN 33-8022 mono
14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-26 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

After the success of "Mona Lisa", Carl Mann and Eddie Bush inevitable dipped again into the Nat King Cole songbook on this early Sun session. "Too Young" was a major hit for Cole in 1951, and "Pretend" sold two million copies for Cole and Ralph Marterie in 1952. Notes in the out-take boxes suggest that "Too Young" had originally been slated as the follow-up single, but was bounced at some point in favour of "Pretend".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

''Some Enchanted Evening'' was apparently cut at Sam Phillips' insistence. It was first recorded as an aria by Ezio Pinza in ''South Pacific'', but on an enchanted evening ten years later Carl Mann and his band settled down to give it treatment that would have Ezio shudder. It was tried here on this session, but only a fragment of the session remains, and it was re-attempted two months later in October 12, 1959.

For Biography of Carl Mann see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Mann's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

END AUGUST 1959

Carl Mann was booked to play the White City Amusement Park in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. In a matter of weeks he had gone from playing little 250-watt local radio stations where the signal carried to the station's parking lot on a clear night to playing holiday resorts for the well heeled youth of the north-east.

Everyone wanted to strike while the iron was hot. Right after the Shrewsbury gig ended he had to drive half-way across the country to a date that Jim Denny had arranged in Kennett, Missouri. The failure to place Carl Mann with a New York management team probably hurt his career as much as the insistence upon revamping oldies long after the formula had gone stale.

After arranging the audition, W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland had signed Mann to a management contract, and he played with him on the road. He cut himself in for fifty percent of all personal appearance fees, but Carl Mann didn't baulk until Holland demanded fifty per cent of recording royalties too. On the first statement for the six months ending June 30, 1959 Sam Phillips accounted for 72,000 copies of Carl Mann's "Mona Lisa". Carl was owed $1900, but Sam Phillips had already fronted Carl $800 for band uniforms and other out-of-pocket expenses. This still left $1100 - big money and the promise of much more to follow.

"W.S. and I had a split over royalties", confirmed Carl. "We had an agreement - no contract. He'd take care of road management and I'd give him fifty percent of road money after expenses, but he wanted half of everything including the record royalties". Holland quit Mann's team around July 1960 (there was a lump sum payment to him from Mann's royalty account that month suggesting a split). He then opted for the security of playing with Johnny Cash.

Some artists adapted well to life on the road, but Carl wasn't one of them. ''The worst part was not getting enough rest'', he says. ''We travelled in the car all the time. I remember this agent booked us into towns five or seven hundred miles apart. We only had time to travel, set up and play. Any sleep we got was in the car. You'd be half-asleep and you'd take something to keep awake and that would to something else. You'd end up with all kinds of problems''.

AUGUST 25, 1959 TUESDAY

Songwriter Tim Menzies is born in Mechanicsville, Virginia. Known under a recording deal as Tim Mensy, he writes Doug Stone's ''I Thought It Was You'', Mark Chesnutt's ''I Just Wanted You To Know'' and Shenandoahs ''Mama Knows''.

AUGUST 27, 1959 THURSDAY

Chuck Berry, the author of future hits for Emmylou Harris, George Jones and Buck Owens, is arrested in Meridian, Mississippi, when a white girl at a fraternity dance kisses him. The African-American rocker is jailed overnight and fined $700.

''Put It Off Until Tomorrow'' singer Bill Phillips and his wife Nita, have a son, William George Phillips, in Waynesville, North Carolina.

AUGUST 28, 1959 FRIDAY

Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper recorded ''There's A Big Wheel''.

AUGUST 29, 1959 SATURDAY

Future Academy of Country Music awards producer Dick Clark appears on the cover of TV Guide.

AUGUST 30, 1959 SUNDAY

A Salute to Dick Clark yields a sold-out show at the historic Hollywood Bowl with guests Jerry Wallace, Duane Eddy, Skip and Flip (Skip Battin and Gary Paxton), Rusty York, Jan and Dean, Anita Bryant and Ernie Freeman, who performs ''Raunchy''.

AUGUST 31, 1959 MONDAY

Ray Price recorded ''The Same Old Me'' and ''Under Your Spell Again'' in an evening session at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Riverside Rancho, formerly a live stomping ground for western swing's Spade Cooley, is deliberately burned to the ground, a training opportunity for Los Angeles firefighters.

The Browns claim a number 1 country single in Billboard magazine with ''The Three Bells''.

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