CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1959 Sun Schedule <

1959 SESSIONS (10)
October 1, 1959 to October 31, 1959

Studio Session for Tracy Pendarvis, October 8, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Rayburn Anthony, October 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Rayburn Anthony, Unknown Date(s) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, October 12, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bush, October 12, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bush, Unknown Date(s) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, October 14, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Memphis Bells, October 14, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, October 16, 1959 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1959

The singles, PI 3547 ''The Midnite Whistle'' b/w ''Snow Job'' by Memphis Bells; PI 3448 ''Willie Brown'' b/w ''Mat At You'' by Mack Self; PI 3549 ''I Walk The Line'' b/w ''Oo-Wee'' by Brad Suggs all issued.

Jud Phillips sells the Judd label to NRC owned by Bill Lowery, and they announcement that Jud Phillips would be joining NRC's offices in Atlanta and will work on promotion for both the Judd and NRC labels. This, in fact, never happened. Instead, Jud remained in Florence, where he went back to the used-car business.

OCTOBER 1959

Jackson, Mississippi TV-News.

Barbara Thomas
The Young Lady That Puts The Wheels In "Pro-Motion", At WLBT, Channel 12

When you see your favorite NBC-ABC show advertised locally on TV, rest assured a little blue eyed gal wrote the script that gives you a clear cut word picture of "things to come".

Barbara Thomas, home town lassie, looking like a teen age school girl, but with a college degree to her credit, is the young lady behind all that promotion. For the past two years Barbara has been with the promotion department of WLBT, Channel 3, Jackson. Beginning last month she serves as hostess on "Teen Tempos", Saturday afternoon at 5:00.

Delighted with the part she plays down at WLBT, Barbara says she has to stay on her toes to keep up with both networks. Scads of material coming in daily, Barbara goes over every line in order to give her viewers a concise synopsis in the briefest manner. And right here she adds a plug for the station... "the best shows one could imagine are scheduled for the coming fall and winter months" she says.

A Jackson native and member of a musical family of eight, Miss Thomas is a musician in her own right... singing is her forte. She with her brothers, Ed, Notre Dame graduate and Cliff, Georgia Tech freshman, have been appearing on programs since childhood, as a singing group. More recently they have been on the record making end of the profession... the brothers more extensively than she.

Staying home and not having to go all over the country, working so hard, is much more preferable to Barbara, as she puts it. However in a more serious tone relative to recording, the young lady, after making a record for a Memphis Company, was urged to go all out for a career.

"The idea did not appeal to me at all, as it meant going on my own altogether", Barbara said. Continuing, "You might be able after months and months of hard work to be successful... and again you might not. I love Jackson, my family, home and my work, and I want to stay right here. As for fun... real enjoyment, there is no place better than Jackson with my own folks and friends".

The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Thomas, she is one of six children in the family, all possessing musical talent. The parents are both violinists. Mr. Thomas played with the first Jackson Symphony thirty years ago, under the direction of Roger Phillips. Mrs. Thomas the former Victoria Joseph, is also a talent musician. However the prodigy of the family is three year old Douglas, who handless the drums with the ability of a professional. The little man, according to the family, monopolizes the Hi Fi, has his own idea of good music and refuses to listen to that, he does not like. The younger sisters, Dolores 12 and Loretta 8, both sing. With Ed a pianist composer and arranger of music and Cliff playing the guitar, Barbara says she found herself with a complex... rushed out and bought herself a baritone uke... and our guess is the boys do not overshadow her.

OCTOBER 1, 1959 THURSDAY

Songwriter Wayne Walker and his wife, Elaine, have a daughter, Capri Walker. Elaine is the daughter of Ernest Tubb.

OCTOBER 2, 1959 FRIDAY

The iconic science fiction television series “The Twilight Zone” airs for the first time on the CBS television network. The Twilight Zone was created and hosted by the talented screenwriter Rod Serling. The Twilight Zone still ranks as one of the most unique and best written television shows in TV history. It ran for five seasons until 1964 and had a total of 156 episodes. Of those 156 episodes, 92 were written by Serling himself and many of them contain some of the most memorable television moments. The show consisted of sci-fi and supernatural mysteries in an anthology setting and featured many then unknown actors who would later become famous, like Ron Howard, Dennis Hopper, Robert Redofrd and William Shatner.

OCTOBER 3, 1959 SATURDAY

Review in Cash Box says that ''Teenagers shoul delight-in songster Lewis' rock drive on ''Little Queenie'' (Sun 330), a one-time noise-maker for Chuck Berry. To add to the youngster's interest, the performer pauses twice to make narrative comments. Side follows the recently active Lewis deck, ''Let's Talk About Us''. Lower-lid finds artist in hard-best, country-flavored ballad form''.

OCTOBER 4, 1959 SUNDAY

The western series ''The Rebel'' begins a three-season run on ABC, with Johnny Cash singing the theme song.

OCTOBER 5, 1959 MONDAY

''Splish Splash'' singer Bobby Darin takes a guest role opposite Jackie Cooper on the CBS-TV drama ''Hennesey''.

LATE 1959

Charles Underwood, the composer of ''Ubangi Stomp'' and ''Bonnie B'', replaces Ernie Barton as Artist & Repertoire man at Sun/Phillips International.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sam Phillips and Ernie Barton produced at least two sessions for Tracy Pendarvis at the old studio. ''We'd drive straight up'', recalled Pendarvis, ''maybe write a little along the way, jump out of the station wagon and start recording''. Tracy's first single ''A Thousand Guitars'' used the assertive sonic quality of the old studio to the advantage. The Gene Lowery Singers who were descending like a plague on Sun releases in those days mercifully stayed at home. Instead, Tracy's sparse trio was fattened up with a pianist playing the lower register, imparting an ominous, moody sound to the performance. ''South Bound Line'' was even better with it's hypnotic train rhythm and eerily charged vocal. Tracy had written the song for old flame in Mississippi. ''Things went wrong between us - as they will'', concluded Tracy. ''Marjorie LeBruce where are you tonight''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR TRACY PENDARVIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY OCTOBER 8, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ERNIE BARTON
AND/OR STAN KESLER

1(1) - ''IS IT ME'' - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Buffalo Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BP LP 2078-B-4 mono
TRACY PENDARVIS - A THOUSAND GUITARS

''Is It Me'' has a lot to recommend it. Yes, it's a teen pop outing with more than its share of 6-minor chords, but the record might have been released awash in choral overdubs. To its credit, Sun let things stand and there's nothing here but the simple rolling sound of Pendarvis's band. The title provides a marvellous vocal 'hook', compressed into a single beat at the end of each verse. Very catchy stuff that deserved a serious look in the pop marketplace. When Tracy voice breaks, probably unintentionally, in the first line, the record becomes all the more endearing.

1(2) – ''IS IT ME'' - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 408 - Master
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - August 15, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 345-B < mono
IS IT ME / SOUTH BOUND LINE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

2(1) - ''SOUTH BOUND LINE – 1'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Buffalo Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BP LP 2078-B-2 mono
TRACY PENDARVIS - A THOUSAND GUITARS

2(2) - ''SOUTH BOUND LINE – 2'' - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Buffalo Bop Records (LP) 33rpm BP LP 2078-B-8 mono
TRACY PENDARVIS - A THOUSAND GUITARS

This release by Tracy Pendarvis is about as raw as anything that appeared on the Sun label in 1960. It was a rare when we heard a vocalist accompanied only by bass, drums and guitar, which is what ''South Bound Line'' is all about. It's also about a guy with a mighty shaky sense of time, as Perdarvis extends verses and vocal lines almost arbitrarily. The song is borrowed quite liberally from Jimmie Skinner's ''Doin' My Time'', which Johnny Cash recorded for Sun two years earlier for his first LP. Cash, too, struggled with the song's meter.

2(3) – ''SOUTH BOUND LINE'' - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Tracy Pendarvis
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 409 - Master
Recorded: - October 8, 1959
Released: - August 15, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 345-A < mono
SOUTH BOUND LINE / IS IT ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tracy Pendarvis - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Tracy Pendarvis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Tracy Pendarvis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 9, 1959 FRIDAY

At age 22, Bobby Darin becomes the youngest performer ever to headline the Copa Room at Las Vegas Sands Hotel. The date come six months after he earned a hit with ''Dream Lover'', destined to become a country success for Billy ''Crash'' Craddock.

Rollin Sullivan, of the comedy duo Lonzo and Oscar, loses his wife, Ruth Sullivan, and brother, Phil Sullivan, when another driver drifts into lane on U.S. Highway 30 in Wyoming, and hits their car head-on. Rollin Sullivan, who was sleeping in the backseat, enters Evanson Memorial Hospital with serious injuries.

OCTOBER 12, 1959 MONDAY

Webb Pierce recorded ''Drifting Texas Sand''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAYBURN ANTHONY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE OCTOBER 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY MONDAY OCTOBER 12, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The connection may not have been as obvious in 1960, but this was essentially one more attempt to cash in the success of Carl Mann's unexpected hit record "Mona Lisa". In fact, Mann's record was still on the charts when this release went out to the disc jockey's.

True, Mann's rather thin teenage voice was replaced here by Rayburn Anthony's rich baritone, but other than that, the formula was similar: Take a standard, put it to a gently rocking beat, and then dazzle the audience with a powerful guitar solo. In this case, more than the formula was borrowed. Mann's guitarist, Eddie Bush, came along for the ride. In fact, Anthony got the benefit of Mann's entire rhythm section!

01 - "ALICE BLUE GOWN" - A.S.C.A.P. - 1:56
Composer: - H. Tierney-J. McCarthy
Publisher: - Leo Feist Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 382 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1959
Released: - October 25, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 333-A < mono
ALICE BLUE GOWN / ST. LOUIS BLUES
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

What, you might be wondering, was an Alice Blue Gown? Apparently, light blue had come into vogue after being introduced by Alice Longworth, daughter of ex- president Theodore Roosevelt. An "Alice Blue Gown", therefore, was a light blue gown that Mrs. Longworth might well have worn. Written in 1919 for the musical "Irere", "Alice Blue Gown" became a much-loved waltz in the inter-war years and got another lease on life when "Irene" was adapted for the screen in 1940 with Anna Neagle and Ray Milland.

02 - "ST. LOUIS BLUES" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:15
Composer: - W.C. Handy
Publisher: - Handy Bross. Music
Matrix number: - U 383 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1959
Released: - October 25, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 333-B < mono
ST. LOUIS BLUES / ALICE BLUE GOWN
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

The irony is that the whole approach works better here on "St. Louis Blues" than it ever did on a Carl Mann record. Anthony's painfully restricted baritone is part of the success. His voice has the endearing quality of cracking with every effort to stretch it. The intense, if tuneless vocal, is matched perfectly by the electric bass/hi hat-driven rhythm section. Together they create a surprising amount of tension which is deftly relieved by Bush's maniacal guitar solo, during which all hell breaks loose.

About the only weak link in these proceedings is the poor studio quality of the recording. Sun had just moved into their new digs at 639 Madison Avenue and no one had a clue about harnessing the studio echo. Where was 706 Union when you needed it? In any case, Anthony, and his Jackson, Tennessee connection would be back for two more singles before his gig at Sun was complete.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rayburn Anthony - Vocal and Guitar
Carl Mann - Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
Tony Austin - Drums

For Biography of Rayburn Antony see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rayburn Anthony's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR RAYBURN ANTHONY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1959/1960/1961
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

No Details

01 - ''ALL I DO IS WRONG'' - 1:57
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-14 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-13 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

02 - ''CLIMB THAT MOUNTAIN'' - 1:54
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-12 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-14 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

03 - ''GIRLS LIKE YOU'' - 2:20
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox-109-4/2 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S
Reissued: - 2006 Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-18 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-15 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

04 - ''HAMBONE'' - 2:22
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-4/1 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - THE JACKSON CONNECTION
Reissued: - May 14, 2001 Castle Records (CD) 500/200rpm5016073334428 3-17 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN RECORDS STORY - VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-7 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

05 - ''IF I COULD CLIMB'' - 1:22
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-16 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-16 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

06 - ''JUST FOR YOU'' - 1:36
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-15 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-8 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

07 - ''LOVE OF MY LIFE'' - 2:44
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-11 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-17 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

08 - ''OLD MAN TIME'' - 1:16
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-10 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-19 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

09 - ''THE SAND OF TIME'' - 2:19
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-5 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-20 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

10 - ''SILLY'' - 1:34
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-9 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-21 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

11 - ''SO COLD'' - 1:07
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-8 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-22 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

12 - THAT'S MY LOVE FOR YOU'' - 1:00
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-3 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-9 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

13 - ''TOLLING BELLS'' - 2:36
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-6 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-10 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

14 - WALK WITH ME'' - 1: 30
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-2 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - OLD MAN TIME
Reissued: - 2018 HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-11 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

15 - MY HEART'S GOING'' - 2:00
Composer: - Rayburn Anthony
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 2018
First appearance: - HMC Records 2018 (CD) 500/200rpm Bootleg-18 mono
RAYBURN ANTHONY - THE SUN SESSIONS 1959-1962

16 - ''PICK ÉM UP, PUT ÉM DOWN''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

17 - ''TAKE ANOTHER LOOK''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rayburn Anthony - Vocal
Unknown Musicians
Unknown Background Vocals

For Biography of Rayburn Antony see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rayburn Anthony's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

This session showed that on a musical level Carl Mann was no flash-in-the-pan. He and Eddie Bush had arrived at an unusual style, and Sam Phillips was on the money as usual when he responded to Bush's guitar. Many talented pickers from B.B. King to Scotty Moore and Carl Perkins had set up their amps in Phillips' studios, and in his way Eddie Bush was the equal of any of them.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 12, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

OVERDUB SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
PRODUCER - CECIL SCAIFE
RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD

01 - "SOME ENCHANTED EVENING" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:04
Composer: - Oscar Hammerstein-Richard Rogers
Publisher: - Williamson Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 365 - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3550-A < mono
SOME ENCHANTED EVENING / I CAN'T FORGET YOU
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This was Carl Mann's second follow-up to "Mona Lisa" and already the formula was wearing thin. This session showed Carl and the boys were still taking previously melodic standards, removing most of their distinctive features, and rocking them up. Its hard to know whether the butchered melodies and stripped down chord changes occurred by design or default. You'd think somebody would know better. in any case, Carl continued his trademark vocal lick here when he sang the line about a "crowded roo - oo - oo-oom". The audience didn't need to be reminded; they remembered all too and they turned out clutching those dollar bills in ever decreasing droves.

02(1) - "I CAN'T FORGET YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Carl Belew-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Four Star
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-28 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

The undubbed version of "I Can't Forget You" suggests that Carl Mann had turned in a pretty decent and tight reading of a sweet country ballad. But then the tapes were taken from their 706 Union Avenue home to their new residence at 639 Madison Avenue where a choral overdub and spacey echo were added. These gratuitous overdubs took the results so far over the top that it is virtually impossible to take them seriously or regard them as a reflection on Carl's artistry.

02(2) - "I CAN'T FORGET YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Carl Belew-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Four Star
Matrix number: - P 366 - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3550-B < mono
I CAN'T FORGET YOU / SOME ENCHANTED EVENING
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

It is a pleasure to listen at long last to Carl Mann's reading of "I Can't Forget You" as it was originally recorded. It has taken thirty years to strip away the numbing effects of the Gene Lowery Chorus and reveal what a splendid performance the original was. Carl Mann confirmed that "I Can't Forget You" was one of his favourite tracks. "I always loved that song but I wasn't happy about the way they put the chorus and everything on there. In those days, we didn't have any say about it, though. After we left, they could add whatever they wanted".

03(1) - "SOUTH OF THE BORDER" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - James Kennedy-Michael Carr
Publisher: - Peter Maurice Music - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-29 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

On "Sound Of The Border" Carl Mann and his band finally found a tune worthy of their treatment. It features simple chord changes and an appropriately Latin theme to go with their patented rhythm. In truth, the version that Carl left in the studio was far better than the gimmicky overdubbed production that finally hit the market in May 1960.

At this point, sales were on such a precipitous decline that they hardly justified all the time and expense spent on all those overdubbing sessions. Could thing have been worse if Carl's performances were released as originally recorded?

03(2) - "SOUTH OF THE BORDER"* - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:30
Composer: - James Kennedy-Michael Carr
Publisher: - Peter Maurice Music - Shapiro Bernstein Music
Matrix number: - P 375 - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3555-A mono
SOUTH OF THE BORDER / I'M COMING HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

In search of the third hit, Carl Mann lit upon "South Of The Border". The song had been written by two Englishmen, James Kennedy and Michael Carr, for Gene Autry on the occasion of his British tour in 1939. It had also been a big hit for Frank Sinatra before Carl Mann turned his hand to it. The basic track was cut at the old studio, shortly before the doors were closed. The song was doctored-up by Charles Underwood in the new studio at Madison Avenue. A chorus, some additional percussion and a flurry of mission bells were added to the original track. It was eventually released in May 1960, sold some 27,000 copies. The above alternate version has a different approach as well as some sparkling guitar from Eddie Bush.

04 - "KANSAS CITY" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Macmelodies
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-30 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

"Kansas City" had been rendered onto a laconic rock classic by Wilbert Harrison in 1959, but it dated back to "K.C. Lovin'", a 1952 recording by Little Willie Littlefield - and one of the first joint efforts from Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. Guitar player Eddie Bush dazzles in his solo space, and his decision to end on a major seventh chord adds a tough of the bizarre.

05 - ""TODAY IS CHRISTMAS" - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Julep Records (S) 45rpm JULEP 1985 mono
TODAY IS CHRISTMAS
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-31 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

06 - "MOUNTAIN DEW" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Belle-Lunsford
Publisher: - Tannen Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-3 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

Overdub Session
The Gene Lowery Singer* chorus and percussion effects.
Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt,
chorus and percussion effects.

The weak link in the chain was bass player Robert Oatsvall whose goofs litter Mann's early recordings. "We'd try to rehearse everything we were going to do", says Carl. "Then we'd get into the studio, do everything we'd rehearsed and Sam would say, 'What else you got?'. Robert was never ready for that". After a year or so, Oatsvall was eased out. He moved to the Dallas area and was replaced by R.W. "T" Willie Stevenson, a bassist from Jackson, Tennessee with jazz leanings who drove a Coca-Cola truck as a day job.

Drummers came and went after Carl and W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland came to a part of the ways. Jimmy M. Van Eaton played with him occasionally, even the formidable Al Jackson, later the linchpin of the Stax house band, was on one session. It was the chemistry between Mann and Bush that made Carl's recordings so memorable and, in their way, original, though. ''I patterned my singing on Eddie's guitar'', says Carl. ''If he did a note different on the guitar, I'd try and follow it with my voice''. It might be closer to the mark, to say that the effectiveness of Carl's records was rooted in the contrast between his straight-as-an-arrow vocals and Bush's eccentric guitar.

For Biography of Carl Mann see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Mann's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

It would be tempting to say that as a singer Eddie Bush was a pretty good guitar player. In truth, he was a credible singer, although his aspirations sometimes outstripped his ability. He was best on mid-tempo material like "Baby, I Don't Care" and "Walkin' And Thinkin'". Both were sabotaged by execrable production at the new studio, and "Baby I Don't Care" later had a chorus added to it. "Walkin' And Thinkin'" suggests that Eddie's vocal style was strongly influenced by Carl Mann's. It is Carl himself, incidentally, who takes the lead vocal on the chorus of "Vanished".

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BUSH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 12, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Eddie Bush also left a fairly large legacy of instrumentals although, interestingly, his best work seems to have been in support of Carl Mann. The tapes include an overlong balled medley and a rambling bluesy improvisation of no great distinction, as well as a version of "Then I Turned And Walked Slowly Away". Bush was far from your average guitarist, and in a very real sense, it was the partnership between Carl's vocal and Eddie's guitar that makes these recordings so listenable. There is an intuitive musically underpinning their best work that helps to transcend an often overworked formula.

01 – "VANISHED"*/## - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 382 - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3558-B < mono
VANISHED / BABY I DON'T CARE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Vanished" is actually a pretty interesting song, although it might have been a touch too unusual for the pop marketplace. Those acoustic guitar major-7ths are powerful, when you can hear them for all the echo, and the wood block percussion adds an atmospheric touch. Interestingly, it is Carl Mann who takes the lead vocal on the chorus of the Flamenco-styled tune. Along with these tracks, Bush left quite a few unissued titles in the Sun vaults. many were instrumentals, which suggested some exciting unknown performances. But the truth is that most of his solo efforts were mediocre at best. The verdict seems to be that Eddie Bush did his finest guitar work in the role of support player behind Carl Mann.

02 - "BABY I DON'T CARE"**/# - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 381 - Master
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - June 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3558-A < mono
BABY I DON'T CARE / VANISHED
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

If Eddie Bush's vocalizing had just a little of the manic energy or character of his guitar playing, this would have been one hell of a record! No such luck. Its not that these vocal performances are bad, its just that they really lack anything distinctive. That's particularly disappointing considering the energy and excitement Bush's guitar work had brought to Carl Mann's records. In truth, Bush was a pretty fair songwriter as some of his contributions to Mann's output attest. "Baby I Don't Care", a tune by Mann as well as Bush (Carl's version appeared on his Phillips International LP), works pretty well when things are kept simple. Unfortunately, Bush was barely out the door when the coral overdubs started. Ne never had a chance.

03 - "WALKIN' AND THINKIN" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-31 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

04 - "NATURALLY'' - 2:34
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-3 mono
EDDIE BUSH - SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN

05 - "THANK YOU AND COME BACK''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959

06 - "HEY, BABY DOLL" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Edward Earl Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush - Vocal and Acoustic Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums
Carl Mann - Vocal*, Acoustic Guitar** and Piano#

Overdubbed Unknown Date
The Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith, Lee Holt.

For Biography of Eddie Bush see: > The Sun Biographies <
Eddie Bush's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BUSH
FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY OCTOBER 12, 1959
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

AND/OR SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – KNOX PHILLIPS

01 - ''EDDIE'S BLUES'' - 3:52
Composer: - Eddie Bush-Carl Mann
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1980
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30186-2-6 mono
TOUGH STUFF - SUN INSTRUMENTAL GOLD
Reissued: - 1989 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-3/6 mono
SUN RECORDS - INTO THE 60S

Eddie Bush (Carl Mann's guitarist) are basically jams which lack focus and were never intended to be released. "Eddie's Blues" with its distorted guitar workout foreshadows a thousand aimless guitar noodles which started to appear from 1966 onwards. Indeed at times it's hard to believe that the recording dates from 1959.

02 – ''(MEDLEY) TENDERLY/ALWAYS/MISTY''
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959

03 – ''BEYOND THE REEF'' - 2:51
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-4 mono
EDDIE BUSH - SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN

04 – ''THEN I TURNED AND WALKED SLOWLY AWAY''
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959

05 – ''SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN'' - 2:14
Composer: - Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 12, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan/Star Club 33-8022-A-6 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - June 25, 2006 Charly Records (MP3) Internet Samples-2 mono
EDDIE BUSH - SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bush – Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Eddie Bush see: > The Sun Biographies <
Eddie Bush's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1959

Carl Mann's follow-up to ''Mona Lisa'' was the big feature of the Phillips International Scandal Sheet in October. The tune was ''Pretend'' and again he gave a rocking beat to the beautiful balled Nat King Cole had popularized. A column saluted Lee Western of KIOA in Des Moines for being one of the first to air the new release. Also mentioned was disk jockey Don Warnock of Kansas City, who had helped break ''Mona Lisa''. Kansas City was a pretty big market that could be influential in getting a record started, but smaller cities in less-populated states like Iowa couldn't do much for national sales. Still, it helped to cultivate jocks in any market, even on 250-watt stations, because they were constantly moving, and often moving up.

The special spotlight column for disk jockeys was occupied by Sam Blessing of KOSI, Denver, who was also trying to get established as a music journalist. According to editor Barbara Barnes, ''As time went on, I kept compiling my disk jockey list from letters they sent me, from the trade publications, and from distributors. In selecting ones to spotlight, I tried to vary regions of the country and to select jocks who were not in the very top tier of their profession. The biggest guys wouldn't care if they were featured, but I got feedback that the plugs really meant something to the jocks I gave some space to. I think our newsletters were unusual in the industry, where promotion pieces were usually generic and focused on one release the manufacturer was trying to promote. Since radio play was the chief means of kids hearing new releases, efforts to court disk jockeys were never wasted''.

Youngsters accounted mainly for Sun's success. In 1956, when Sun was coming into its own, the increasing affluence of the population enabled pre-teens and teens to have more impact on the economy than ever before. Their allowances were larger than in the past, many had part-time jobs, and they liked music as much as their fast food and cars. Above all, they loved to dance. And their numbers were increasing, leaning toward the first wave of baby boomers.

Teens bought virtually all of the single records and the majority of all recordings. In 1958, the seven-inch records that spun at 45 revolutions per minute, called 45s, went for 69 to 99 dollar cents in the record and variety stores in which most were sold. LPs were preferred by adults, and Sam Phillips had some doubts whether Sun LPs would sell. The distributors who had such success with Cash and Perkins singles, however, succeeded in convincing Sam that LPs were essential. Subsequent sales proved them correct. Sun was definitely getting into big business, which is why the majors kept pursuing Sun's artists and Sun kept trying to get their records played.

OCTOBER 1959

In October 1959, just as Sam Phillips was preparing to close the old Union Avenue studio, Charlie Rich went in and recorded a tune he called ''Lonely Weekends''. Phillips gave the tape to Charles Underwood, who took it over to the new studio and overdubbed it for release with a chorus, some echo-laden rim shots, and more echo thrown onto the finished master for good luck. The resulting cut was issued in January 1960. Jimmy Van Eaton's double-timed lick on the bass drum and Rich's assertive Presleysque voice made the record irresistible.

''Lonely Weekends'' became Charlie Rich's first hit, and he was swept out of the clubs and into the promotional whirlwind. ''He could make a front man like me a little nervous'', recalls Cecil Scaife. ''Charlie was a good-looking boy, and on promotional trips people often mistook him for Elvis Presley.

He had that look... but he was so shy. I remember on one trip to New York we were scheduled to be on the Dick Clark show. Charlie was a nervous wreck, perspiring something awful. I said, Charlie, all you gotta do is sit there and lipsync it. The mike's dead'. After he'd sung ''Lonely Weekend'', Dick Clark tried to interview him and Charlie just clammed up. Dick would ask a question and then have to answer it. i thought that would be the end of us on Dick Clark''.

Charlie Rich was an unlike teen idol, his hair streaked with premature gray, his record collection heavy with jazz, his home shared with his wife and three kids. Rich detested the traveling and the one-night stands: ''I was traveling quite a bit with all the pop stars of that time, but that only allowed me to sing ''Lonely Weekend'' brought the first serious strain to his marriage. Margaret Ann left him, and, when she went to find him a few days later, he was holed up in the YMCA, the floor strewn with empty gin bottles. With no money to pay the bill, they sneaked out. The good times were obviously not all they were cracked up to be.

OCTOBER 13, 1959 TUESDAY

Marie Osmond is born in Ogden, Utah. She nets a 1973 country hit with ''Paper Roses'' as a teenager, joins her brother as a host of ABC-s ''Donnie and Marie'' TV show, then makes a mid-1980s comeback as a country singer with ''There's No Stopping Your Heart'' and a Dan Seals duet, ''Meet Me In Montana''.

Webb Pierce recorded the Mel Tillis-penned ''No Love Have I'' at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

OCTOBER 14, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Charlie Rich recorded his first charted record, the pop single ''Lonely Weekends'' (PI 3552) for Sun's sub-label, Phillips International.

Connie Francis recorded the pop hit ''Among My Souvenirs'' at Regent Studio in New York City. Marty Robbins remakes it as a country hit in 1976.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 14, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLIE RICH
RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The basic tracks was later overdubbed by Charles Underwood with a chorus and special effects at 639 Madison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee.

01(1) - "LONELY WEEKENDS"* - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 369 - Master - Overdubbed Chorus
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - January 1, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3552-A <  mono
LONELY WEEKENDS / EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Lonely Weekend" is the record that first put Charlie Rich on the map. Interestingly, it was his third single that hit big time, just as had been the case with Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins. This time they finally got it right. "Lonely Weekend" was just what Sam Phillips had asked for: "Big Man" without religion. The version that hit the market in January 1960 was quite different from the tight, tense, passionate small combo effort that Charlie left the can in June 1959. After the session, Sam assigned the tapes to Charles Underwood, who brought them to the new studio at Madison Avenue, for overdubbing. Underwood added the dreaded Gene Lowery Singers, a ton of echo, and some highly unusual rimshots during Martin Willis' baritone sax break. "I never liked that final version as much as the way we originally cut it", observed guitarist Roland Janes recently. "But then I doubt our original would have sold as well".

01(2) - "LONELY WEEKENDS" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Without Overdubbing Chorus - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - April 1987
First appearance: - Zu Zazz Records (CD) 500/200rpm Zu Zazz 2002 mono
DON'T PUT NO HEADSTONE ON MY GRAVE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-30 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Martin Willis has an interesting take on his role at Sun. ''Sam hated me. Actually, he tolerated me. He didn't want saxes at Sun. Everything was guitars. A solo usually meant a guitar break''. Nevertheless, Willis did some memorable session work, even on a label that built its reputation on guitars (although Jerry Lee might tell you differently). Perhaps Willis's two most memorable solos were both out of the ordinary. The first occurred on Charlie Rich's ''Lonely Weekends''. Willis recalls, ''When Charlie got ready to record ''Lonely Weekends'' he asked for me. We had already worked together in the studio a bit and done some club dates. Charlie told me he wanted something different – he wanted a baritone sax solo, which was very rare, maybe it hadn't even been done on a rock and roll record. He asked if I could get a baritone sax – I didn't own one at the time. I borrowed the instrument and took it into the studio. Everyone gives me credit for the solo but the truth is before I played that solo Charlie sat down with me and hummed what he thought the solo should sound like. So I listened and said 'OK, I got it''. The session was unique for another reason. Willis recounts, ''Sam barely had enough mikes in there as it was. I had to sit next to J.M. Van Eaton's drums. He had a separate mike on his bass drum. When it came time to solo, I had to lean over and play my horn into the bass drum mike. Very few people know that to this day''.

Stalwart session man Van Eaton didn't let anyone down with his driving bass drum work which created such a powerful sound that Sam actually chose to use a separate microphone to make sure that bass drum stayed as hot in the mix as it sounded in the studio. In conversation with Hank Davis, baritone saxman Martin Willis recalled how he had to lean over awkwardly so he could play into ''his'' mike, which was now located at floor level to pick up the bass drum.

02(1) - "EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 370 - Master
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - January 1, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3552-B < mono
EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG / LONELY WEEKENDS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

If ''Lonely Weekends'' hadn't taken off like a rocket, this flipside ''Everything I Do Is Wrong'' might have stood a chance of chart success on shock value alone. Records simply didn't sound like this in January 1960. If you want a one-word description of this record it's ''relentless''. It just keeps coming at you. The song is built around just two chords - which is quite a rarity. Its chorus or release, if that's what it is, involves the same two chords. There's no movement other than the key changes. Just verse after verse after verse separated by key modulations (it starts in G and ends up in A) that are signaled by the wonderful extended single-stroke drum rolls of Jimmy Van Eaton.

The song is based on essentially the same recipe as ''Lonely Weekends'', minus the romantic angle and the commercial overdubs. The anchor is, once again, Jimmy M. Van Eaton working his bass drum front and center in a dum / da dum beat that drives everything the tension intact. Charlie Rich's vocal is as virile and dramatic as it's ever been; his piano is solid; the lyric is clever, even if it's about a loser, and Martin Willis's baritone sax, played directly into the bass drum mike, rivets our attention for the eight bars it's on display. Charlie knew what he wanted and sang the solo to Willis beforehand, and Willis proceeded to bring it to life on his horn. It's the approach Dave Bartholomew often used on Fats Domino records like ''Blue Monday''. Keep the solo simple; keep it melodic. Then give the song back to the singer.

Charlie Rich re-recorded this song in 1965 for his album on Smash. Despite the big production values of a Mercury/Nashville session, the results don't hold a candle to what you have here.

02(2) - "EVERYTHING I DO IS WRONG" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - false Start - Count-In - Alternate Take
Recorded: - October 14, 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-14/15 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willes - Baritone Saxophone

Vocal Overdubs & Handclaps The Gene Lowery* consisting of
A. Davis, B. Gross, D. Horton, P. Jacobs, C. Walker and P. Walker

Although he's suffered ill health in recent years, Cecil Scaife was happy to discuss his role as promotion manager for Sun Records when Stuart Colmann met in Nashville early in 2002. A charismatic individual, Cecil was responsible for birthing Charlie Rich as a hit artist, at a time when new rock and roll stars were becoming distinctly thin on the ground. His was a world that revolved around radio stations and disc jockeys who were willing to apportion airplay - something that Charlie never forgot.

01 - "INTERVIEW CECIL SCAIFE" - B.M.I. - 0:56
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-11 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1959

The unusual thing about the ''Lonely Weekend'' session was that Martin Willis used a baritone sax. Roland Janes recalls, ''Willie usually used an alto or a tenor, but on that record he switched to the baritone. It gave the record a very unusual sound''. Martin Willis recounts the story behind the session. ''When Charlie got ready to record ''Lonely Weekends'' he asked for me. We had already worked together in the studio a bit and done some club dates. Charlie told me he wanted something different - he wanted a baritone sax solo, which was very rare, maybe hadn't even been done on a rock and roll record. He asked if I could get a baritone sax - I didn't even own one at the time. I borrowed the instrument from a friend and took it into the studio. Everyone gives me credit for the solo but the truth is before I played that solo Charlie sat down with me and hummed what he thought the solo should sound like. So, I listened and said ÓK, I got it''.

''Sun wasn't real big about sax solos at that time. Everything was guitars at Sun. A solo usually meant a guitar break. So Sam kind of tolerated me. He barely had enough mikes in there as it was. I had to sit next to Jimmy. Van Eaton's drums. He had a separate mic on his bass drum. When it came time to solo, I had to lean over and play my horn into the bass drum mike. Very few people know that to this day''.

Roland Janes contends that of the literally thousands of sessions he'd played on, the date producing ''Lonely Weekends'' continues to stand out in his mind. Ironically, few listeners in 1960 knew just how powerful the results of that memorable session were. The original tapes were almost immediately overdubbed by Charles Underwood at the newly opened Phillips studio on Madison Avenue. A chorus was added, along with some echo rimshots during Willie's sax break. Finally, the tight intensity of the original 706 Union tapes was utterly destroyed by an overlay of gratuitous echo. The results, released in January 1960, achieved national attention and gave Rich his first taste of fame and fortune. Despite tampering, the record was worthy of its reward. It was surely a good record, although it was just as surely very different from the one Rich, Van Eaton, Janes and Willis left on tape back in October 1959.

With nearly 45 years hindsight, Roland Janes observes, ''I thought both sides of that record were real good. I still think the overdubs had too much echo on them but at the time that was part of the mystique. It probably helped sell them. Personally, I liked the cuts a lot better without those overdubs. Everything was a whole lot clearer''.

In the month after ''Lonely Weekends'' was recorded, Charlie Rich continued to seek a behind-the scenes role in order to make money in the music business.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE MEMPHIS BELLES
(BETTYE HODGES & SHIRLEY SISK)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 14, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The Memphis Bells, cleverly named after the Mississippi paddlewheel boat, sound like an allgirl band, but in fact the group consisting of two organists, Shirley Sisk and her friend Bettye Jean Hodges, backed by the usual suspects. The ever- unreliable log sheets filed with the Union suggest that its Roland Janes, Billy Riley, Brad Suggs, Charlie Rich, J.M. Van Eaton, and Marty Willis. Bettye Jean, though, remembers that Bill Black was present, and as Smokey had yet to break, she might well be right.

Bettye Jean Hodges was one of Shirley's acquaintances from church. They lived close-by each other, and discovered that they both played the organ.

01 - "SNOW JOB" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Bettye Hodges
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - P 362 - Master
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - October 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3547-B < mono
SNOW JOB / THE MIDNITE WHISTLE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

Bettye Jean had written many, many tunes, but the limit of her performing experience was playing in church and at organ recitals downtown during the holidays. She was, she says, pushed into recording by her husband and her mother. "Snow Job" wasn't really my style of music", she says, "but I was trying to go with what was selling. I hate to say it, but I had no perseverance, and that's what it takes". As a result, this is the one and only time that Bettye Jean appeared inside a recording studio.

Shirley remembers that "Snow Job" got played quite often around Memphis, and even remembered hearing is as she was driving to California with her husband, but it wasn't the wintertime smash that it might have been.

"Snow Job" was a shuffle rhythm, and its odd to hear Ms. Sisk play organ glissandi a la Jerry Lee behind Roland's guitar break. Listen to those chords during the last two bars! Where'd that come from?

02 - "THE MIDNITE WHISTLE" - B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Bettye Hodges
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 361 - Master
Recorded: - October 14, 1959
Released: - October 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3547-A < mono
THE MIDNITE WHISTLE / SNOW JOB
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

The ladies actually offer a touch of blues to go with the skating rink feel. Both melodies were by Bettye Jean, although its Shirley playing the organ on "Snow Job" and Bettye Jean on "Midnite Whistle" (a tune that Bettye Jean says was meant to be called "The Midnight Whistler). "Midnite Whistle" features a very catchy melody. This track truly could have been a left field hit back in 1959. There's a fine piano break by Charlie Rich, and Roland Janes uses his vibrato bar to good effect.

Shirley Sisk grew up in Memphis as Ernestine Brooks. Shirley Ruth Sisk was at Sun Records before, during and after Elvis Presley. The reason is simple. Sam Phillips liked her. Born in Memphis in 1926, she started playing guitar she had picked up on a dump, and, lacking the 60 cents for strings, strung it up with clothes wire. She switched to piano and organ and begin writing songs. She was met Dewey Phillips around 1950 and worked with Sam Phillips doing some records for home folks.

In 1952 Shirley with her sister-in-law, Judy Dismukes to cut on February 8, 1952 at the Memphis Recording Service "Let Me Count The Curls" with ''Mean Old Memphis'' on the b-side as an private record. Sam Phillips successfully pitched "Let Me Count The Curls" to music publisher Acuff-Rose, and later pitched Shirley's version to Chess Records, but Chess was the last place on earth it belonged.

Shirley had married a man named Shirley Sisk, and then Shirley and Shirley had a daughter named... Shirley. Anyone asking for Shirley was likely to get three faces at the door. Shirley (the husband) didn't like Shirley (the wife) hanging out with all those degenerate musicians, but Shirley (the husband) was a truck driver so he wasn't always around. When he wasn't, Shirley would head down to Sun. "I'd go there on the sly", she says. "I used to go in day after day, but Sam wouldn't come in 'til late. He'd sleep all day. I was waiting there with Elvis Presley one time. He was waiting on Sam to pick up some money to go buy a car. There was a black woman up from New Orleans too and Stan Kesler, and we went into the studio and had a jam session 'till Sam arrived. My husband held me back. He was afraid I was gonna get independent, I guess. One time I played at the Municipal Auditorium when he was out of town, and went over so well they invited me back and announced it on the radio. My husband heard about it on the radio and came home and said, 'You'll never believe it, there's another Shirley Sisk in Memphis'".

Shirley Sisk was still hanging out at Sun in the 1960s, playing organ on sessions, including some Jerry Lee Lewis singles. "I had to join the Union for that", she says. "Sam told me, 'I can find better organists than you any day of the week, but they haven't got what you've got'. Then we cut the Memphis Belles singles for Phillips and the single that came out on Sun".

Shirley Sisk eventually divorced Shirley, but never picked up her recording career. As far as she can remember, she never cut another record, and she joined her family's longstanding involvement with the United Methodist Church in Memphis.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bettye Jean Hodges - Organ on "Midnite Whistle"
Shirley Ruth Sisk* - Organ on "Snow Job"
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley or Bill Black - Bass
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Charlie Rich - Piano
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

For Biography of The Memphis Belles see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Memphis Belles' Sun/PI recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 15, 1959 THURSDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''He'll Have To Go'' during an a.m. session at RCA Studio B in Nashville, then recorded ''Snow Flake'' during the afternoon.

Kenny Rogers and his first wife, Janice, separate, a year after the birth of their daughter, Carole Rogers.

Mark Dinning recorded the tragic pop song ''Teen Angel'' in an afternoon session at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio. Producing is Jim Vienneau, destined to oversee country hits for Hank Williams Jr., Mel Tillis and Sheb Wool.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY OCTOBER 16, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWNM
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

OVERDUBBED SESSION: SUNDAY OCTOBER 2, 1960
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CHARLES UNDERWOOD OR
SCOTTY MOORE AND/OR ERNIE BARTON

A session was paid for on February 22, 1960 for Mann, Bush, Oatsvall and Holland. The Gene Lowery choral overdubs for PLP 60 were also paid for on that day.

01 - "CRAZY FOOL" - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Carl Mann-Eddie Bush
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Sun Spotlight (LP) 33rpm SPO 131 mono
CARL MANN - THE SUN STORY VOLUME 6
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-2 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

02(1) - "THE WAYWARD WIND" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Herb Newman-Stan Lebowsky
Publisher: - Warman Music
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-1 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

02(2) - THE WAYWARD WIND"* - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Herb Newman-Stan Lebowsky
Publisher: - Warman Music
Matrix number: - P 394 - Master
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - October 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3564-B < mono
THE WAYWARD WIND / BORN TO BE BAD
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

You simply need to listen to these two sides of "The Wayward Wind", as they were originally recorded. There is no way to estimate the damage done here in the name of "sweetening". We may not quite be working in the range of mainting a mustache on the "Mona Lisa", but there is no doubt that a lot has been lost here with the addition of strings, voices and echo. The overwrought productions that hit the marketplace are not a true measure of Mann's ability.

More to the point, somebody named Charles Underwood, Scotty Moore, or Ernie Barton has a lot to answer for, even if they were only following orders or following trends. It seems the effects were actually more devastating to "Wayward Wind", Gogi Grant's pop hit from 1956.

Carl's group was well rehearsed and tightly recorded here on 706 Union. You'll to take that on faith since there is hardly a shred of evidence of these virtues on the issued single. Although sales barely justified the experiment, it was encouraging that Mann was allowed to record original material of this calibre along with his rock-up the oldies formula.

02(3) - "THE WAYWARD WIND"** - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Herb Newman-Stan Lebowsky
Publisher: - Warman Music - Hillard & Bamboo
Matrix number: - PH 154 - Master - LP Version
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm LP 1960-2 mono
LIKE MANN!

Robert Oatsvall lack of expertise bobbed here up again when the band tackled Gogi Grant's 1956 smash "Wayward Wind". The early takes disintegrate because Oatsvall is so off-target.

03 - "BLUEBERRY HILL" - A.S.C.A.P. - 1:39
Composer: - Al Lewis-Larry Stock-Vincent Rose
Publisher: - Victoria Music Publishing Company Limited
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-4 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

"Blueberry Hill" may be a standard but its hard to believe that any other performer could have found in it the excuse for sly lasciviousness that Fats Domino did. And its surely true that nobody else could have made that sly lasciviousness seem so harmless as this jainty Creole pianist, who owned an accent so thick that Mick Jagger once said he perceived it as a cow to be misunderstood. Don't discount the band, either; the very sonority of Dave Bartholomew's arrangements let fats get over on Top 40 radio with sexually subversive whose appeal hasn't yet been topped. Carl Mann's version is quite a surprise and in its own way quite a standout track. For one thing, it may be the only known post-Fats version that wasn't influenced by him. Rather, this reading has a distinctively loose and jazzy feel to it, reminding us once again just how good a guitarist Eddie Bush was.

The irresistibly playful "Ain't Got No Home" was an imaginative choice for inclusion on Carl Mann's debut album. The song had been a major rhythm and blues success and crossover hit for its writer, Clarence Henry, early in 1957 and had garnered strong audience reaction when Carl performed it on stage. Although the "frogman" and "baby girl" gimmicks were retained, he traded the hard eights feel of the original for a buoyant swing at what became his final visit to the original Sun studio.

04 - "AIN'T GOT NO HOME" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Clarence "Frogman" Henry
Publisher: - Francis Day & Hunter Limited
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (LP) 33rpm SLP 1960-7 mono
LIKE MANN!
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-11 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

When "Ain't Got No Home" first appeared on Carl Mann's Phillips International album it was mistitled as "I Ain't Got No Home" and credited to Woody Guthrie rather than Clarence "Frogman" Henry. The song had been part of Carl's routine since his earliest days. Beyond its gimmick value, it proves just how tight and full of energy Carl's band was.

05 - "I'LL ALWAYS LOVE YOU DARLING" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - H. Medress-P. Margo-M. Margo
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 16, 1959
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-7 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 - Bear family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2-6 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland - Drums

Overdubbed Session* October 2, 1960
Scotty Moore - Leader
Joan Gilbert - Violin
Noel Gilbert - Violin
Nino Ravarino - Violin

Overdubbed Session** Unknown Date, Memphis, Tennessee
Gene Lowery - Leader and Vocal
A. Davis - Vocal
B. Gross- Vocal
D. Horton - Vocal
P. Jacobs - Vocal
C. Walker - Vocal
P. Walker - Vocal

Carl Mann was a victim of these changing times at Sun Records. He had the talent and potential to survive in the world of early 1960s pop, a world characterised by Jerry Lee Lewis as one dominated by the Bobbys. Carl problem, though, was that he stuck with the same formula for too long. He should have stopped goosing up standards after "Pretend" pegged out half way up the Hot 100. Instead, no-one had the courage to strike out in a new direction. His third and fourth singles sold respectably well, around 25,000 were accounted for on royalty statements, but by the end of 1960 the formula was wearing thin and no-one was listening.

Currently, Carl Mann is without a recording contract. He recorded a couple of sessions for Rockhouse Records in Holland in 1976 and 1980, and toured Europe again in 1984 without recording. Periodically, Carl gives though to re-entering the business, but it now seems to be a remote prospect. Unaccountably, his early music had not enjoyed the same measure of exhaustive reissuing that has come to many of his confreres at Sun Records. This major retropective goes a long way towards redressing that lack.

For Biography of Carl Mann see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Mann's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 24, 1959 SATURDAY

For the second time in the year, Elvis Presley is hospitalized in a German military hospital with tonsillitis.

OCTOBER 25, 1959 SUNDAY

Sun 333 ''Alice Blue Gown'' b/w ''St. Louis Blues'' by Ray B. Anthony issued.

OCTOBER 26, 1959 MONDAY

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''El Paso''.

Reno and Smiley recorded ''Don't Let Your Sweet Love Die'' in Cincinnati, Ohio.

OCTOBER 27, 1959 TUESDAY

Brenda Lee makes her ''American Bandstand'' debut performing ''Sweet Nothin's''.

OCTOBER 29, 1959 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley is released from a military hospital in Germany, where he's been treated for the previous five days for tonsillitis.

OCTOBER 30, 1959 FRIDAY

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club opens in London, England. The owner, a jazz saxophone player, goes on to write Bonnie Tyler's ''It's A Heartache'' and Shelly West's ''Flight 309 To Tennessee''.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 1959

Memphis was a beautiful old city, giant maples, poplars, oaks, hickory, and other trees turned shades of gold and crimson before dropping their leaves along the broad streets and boulevards of the residential areas. The first frost wouldn't come until October 1959, but after Labor Day the women of Memphis dutifully got out their fall cottons and dark shoes and prepared for a respite from summer's heat.

In the matter of clothes, season meant very to a new artist in the fall. Unlike most of the guys, he patterned himself after the Nashville country singers and wore cowboy-style clothes with glittering sequins, all year long. He was Ray Smith, a singer from the Midwest who had enjoyed some success with stage shows throughout that area.

But to fit the Sun prototype, Ray was given a rock song to record ''Rockin Bandit''. Bill Justis had acquired the tune from a thirteen-year-old boy by the name Ira Jay Lichterman, whose father Bill knew, Mr. Herbert Lichterman, who owned a leather goods factory. When ''Rockin' Bandit'' was set for release in September, he arranged a kickoff dinner at a nice restaurant, the Coach House, to honor Ray and the precocious songwriter. Bill Justis, Regina Reese, and Barbara Barnes showed up, and they talked and had a drink, waiting for our performer to show. Mr. Lichterman had asked to relay a verbal invitation to Sam Phillips and his wife, a courtesy which elicited a snort from Sam, and he didn't show up with either his wife or Sally.

Finally, the host decided they should begin with the first course, and just before the entree was served. Ray finally arrived in his sparkling regalia. Lichterman asked him to sit down and said he would tell the waiter to bring his dinner. Ray said, ''I've done eat'', and kept standing. He hung around for a while as the rest of they enjoyed the excellent meal. Herbert Lichterman tried to appear gracious and, since they been the go-between in conveying the invitations, Barbara mumbled an explanation/apology as best she could. But she could see how deflated the Lichterman's were by Sam's absence and Ray's odd behavior.

This incident pointed up one thing. The Sun phenomenon and the Memphis establishment of genteel dinners, Cotton Carnival balls, or other urban socializing were foreign to each other. Mainstream Memphis never understood Beale Street, Elvis Presley, and all the other blues, hillbilly, and rock musicians. And vice-versa.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©