CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1959 Sun Schedule <

1959 SESSIONS 11
November 1, 1959 to November 30, 1959

Studio Session for Ira Jay Lichterman, Late 1959 / Sun Records

- Alan Freed And The Radio Payola Scandal - 

Studio Session for Teddy Redell, Probably November 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Rockin' Stockin', November 17, 1959 / Sun/Mojo Records
Studio Session for Mack Owen, November 20, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jeb Stuart, Probably Late 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Alice Leslie, Late 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Female Singer, 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, Unknown Date(s) 1958 / Sun Records
Studio (Demo) Sessions for Charlie Rich, Unknown Dates / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <
 
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 1959

Memphis was a beautiful old city, giant maples, poplars, oaks, hickory, and other trees turned shades of gold and crimson before dropping their leaves along the broad streets and boulevards of the residential areas. The first frost wouldn't come until October 1959, but after Labor Day the women of Memphis dutifully got out their fall cottons and dark shoes and prepared for a respite from summer's heat.

In the matter of clothes, season meant very to a new artist in the fall. Unlike most of the guys, he patterned himself after the Nashville country singers and wore cowboy-style clothes with glittering sequins, all year long. He was Ray Smith, a singer from the Midwest who had enjoyed some success with stage shows throughout that area.

But to fit the Sun prototype, Ray was given a rock song to record ''Rockin Bandit''. Bill Justis had acquired the tune from a thirteen-year-old boy by the name Ira Jay Lichterman, whose father Bill knew, Mr. Herbert Lichterman, who owned a leather goods factory. When ''Rockin' Bandit'' was set for release in September, he arranged a kickoff dinner at a nice restaurant, the Coach House, to honor Ray and the precocious songwriter. Bill Justis, Regina Reese, and Barbara Barnes showed up, and they talked and had a drink, waiting for our performer to show. Mr. Lichterman had asked to relay a verbal invitation to Sam Phillips and his wife, a courtesy which elicited a snort from Sam, and he didn't show up with either his wife or Sally.

Finally, the host decided they should begin with the first course, and just before the entree was served. Ray finally arrived in his sparkling regalia. Lichterman asked him to sit down and said he would tell the waiter to bring his dinner. Ray said, ''I've done eat'', and kept standing. He hung around for a while as the rest of they enjoyed the excellent meal. Herbert Lichterman tried to appear gracious and, since they been the go-between in conveying the invitations, Barbara mumbled an explanation/apology as best she could. But she could see how deflated the Lichterman's were by Sam's absence and Ray's odd behavior.

This incident pointed up one thing. The Sun phenomenon and the Memphis establishment of genteel dinners, Cotton Carnival balls, or other urban socializing were foreign to each other. Mainstream Memphis never understood Beale Street, Elvis Presley, and all the other blues, hillbilly, and rock musicians. And vice-versa.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sun Records was a magnet for talent. All kinds of talent. In his way, Ira Jay Lichterman was one of the most successful of all Sun graduates. Ira Jay was twelve or thirteen years old when he wrote some songs and sent them to Bill Justis, a family friend. Justis encouraged him, and used one of the songs, "Rockin' Bandit", on a Ray Smith session.

Bill Justis had quit Sun by the time Ira Jay Lichterman cut his only Sun single ''You Don't Love Me''/''More Than Anything'' (Sun 351) at the new Madison Avenue studio in 1960. The contract file indicates that the record was leased from Ira's father, but Ira insists that it was a single done for and at Sun Records.

After it failed to budge, he continued to work for Justis' Tuneville Music and Play Me Records. In 1962, he got his first major break when he and Ed Bruce wrote "Save Your Kisses", which appeared on the flip-side of Tommy Roe's "Sheila". The following year, Bill Justis took Ira Jay Lichterman to New York. He was handling a kid up there.

At the age of eighteen, Lichterman go to work for the Stax label in Memphis, and wrote with Steve Cropper for William Bell, and at the same time he was commuting to Nashville and writing for Bill Justis' Tuneville Music, were he wrote for Charlie Rich, "No Room To Dance". He wrote jingles for a lot of the top stars, like James Brown and Buck Owens. He wrote for National Homes Corporation, and got a Addy Award for a fertilizer ad. That time, Lichterman produced a syndicated radio program, "Football Over Dixie" in the 1960s and 1970s.

Later, Ira Jay Lichterman had his own music publishing company, "Ira & Friends'' and he wrote for a big ad agency in Memphis, "Ward Archer & Associates'', were he finally got out in 1976 and started with his brothers in the shoe business today.

STUDIO SESSION FOR IRA JAY LICHTERMAN II
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

PROBABLY SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

The grandy-named Ira Jay Lichterman II was a jingle writer who supplied the Memphis radio fraternity with station-idents and drive-time commercials. In return for a publishing glad hand, Bill Justis opened the door at Sun and Ira scored overnight when Ray Smith cut his novel "Rockin' Bandit". The track included here amounts to his token artistic moment mainly because composing was his first love. He wrote for the Stax label in later years along with his golfing-partner, Steve Cropper.

01 – ''YOU DON'T LOVE ME ANYMORE'' - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Ira Jay Lichterman-Dover
Publisher: - Tuneville - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 419 - Master
Recorded: - Late 1959
Released: - November 14, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard singles > Sun 351-A < mono
YOU DON'T LOVE ME ANYMORE / MORE THAN ANYTHING
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Both sides of this record are lighthearted teenage fluff - from the material, to the swirling (yet decidedly low budget) string section, to Ira Jay's pubescent voice. Coming hot on the heels of Tony Rossini, Ira Jay's record seems to show that Sun was determined to break into the territory dominated by Chancellor Records and Cameo Records.

02 - "MORE THAN ANYTHING" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Ira Jay Lichterman
Publisher: - Tuneville - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 420 - Master
Recorded: - Late 1959
Released: - November 14, 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard singles > Sun 351-B < mono
MORE THAN ANYTHING / YOU DON'T LOVE ME ANYMORE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ira Jay Lichterman - Vocal
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Ira Jay Lichterman see: > The Sun Biographies <
Ira Jay Lichterman's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 1959

The first sessions are held (October/November) in the new Phillips Recording Studio at 639 Madison Avenue in Memphis.

Payola scandal breaks, with key music figures accused of accepting bribes to play certain records. Alan Freed, at the center of the controversy, is fired from WABC radio and ABC-TV after refusing to sign an affidavit clearing himself of any wrongdoing.

Congress opens the payola hearings designed to squash rock and roll disc jockeys who receive money from record distributors in exchange for airplay, a common practice in all forms of radio for years. Alan Freed is its main target and becomes its biggest casualty, as he is found guilty and taken off the air as a result.

NOVEMBER 1, 1959 SUNDAY

The day Bill Anderson turns 22, he's disappointed that his girlfriend fails to recognize his red-letter day. As a result, he writes ''Happy Birthday To Me'', a future hit for Hank Locklin. By the end of the day, he receive a surprise party.

NOVEMBER 2, 1959 MONDAY

Billy Walker recorded ''Farewell Party'' in a late-night session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville. The song has to wait another 20 years to become a hit.

NOVEMBER 5, 1959 THURSDAY

Bryan Adams is born in Vancouver, Canada. The pop/rock star takes record producer Robert John ''Mutt'' Lange to Nashville for Fan Fair in 1993, where Lange meets future wife Shania Twain. Adams and Lange also co-write the Lonestar hit ''You Walked In''.

NOVEMBER 6, 1959 FRIDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis in hospital for appendicitis operation.

ALAN FREED AND THE RADIO PAYOLA SCANDAL – Payola became a household word in the 1950s. The decade’s music scene was the convergence of a number of seismic factors, the rise of rock and roll and rhythm and blues (which coincided with the rise of small labels), the introduction of the inexpensive 45rpm single, radio’s shift to Top 40 music (once television took over dramatic programming), post-war prosperity and the emergence of the teenager as an economic force.

Records began to replace live performance as the main way to hear, and sell, music. And labels recognized that popular disc jockeys could influence sales. In 1950, there were approximately 250 disc jockeys in the United States.

By 1957, the number had grown to over 5000. The increase was partially due to the sheer amount of new records being produced, both by major and indie labels. As the name suggests, a disc jockey was responsible for sorting through all these releases (naturally, the sorting was influenced by payola). These on-air personalities had so much clout with younger listeners, Time magazine called them the ''poo-bahs of musical fashion and pillars of U.S. low- and middlebrow culture''.

Aware of their rising status, jocks established flat rate deals with labels and record distributors. A typical deal for a mid-level disc jockey was $50 a week, per record, to ensure a minimum amount of spins. More influential jocks commanded percentages of grosses for local concerts, lavish trips, free records by the boxful (some even opened their own record stores), plus all the time-honored swag. As Cleveland disc jockey Joe Finan later described the decade, ''It was a blur of booze, broads and bribes''.

As payola escalated, Variety and Billboard did lengthy features, calling for reform and government intervention (to its credit, Billboard wrote, ''The cancer of payola cannot be pinned on rock and roll''). ASCAP was also vocal in their opposition to payola, using it as a means to lambaste their competitor BMI. At the time, the larger ASCAP represented the old guard of mostly white composers from the Tin Pan Alley days.

BMI was associated with the young, racially mixed writers of rhythm and blues and rock and roll, as well as indie labels such as Aladdin, King and Chess. By the mid-1950s, BMI single releases outnumbered ASCAP's by almost two to one. The older organization cried foul, accusing BMI of promoting payola.

Fingers pointed and words flew over payola, but it wasn’t until the TV quiz show scandals of 1958 (most famously, the show Twenty One was found to be fixed) that the government got seriously involved. Once the ''Do you now or have you ever …''? questions began, the jig was up.

With the threat of losing their licenses, some radio stations took the precaution of firing disc jockeys who might put them at risk. In November 1959, in closed and open sessions before the U.S. House Oversight Committee, 335 disc jockeys from around the country admitted to having received over $263,000 in ''consulting fees''. That figure was only the tip of the payola iceberg (before the hearings, Phil Lind, a disc jockey at Chicago’s WAIT had confessed that he had once taken $22,000 to play a single record). The trial heated up when the two most influential jocks in the country took the stand.

Alan Freed and Dick Clark both played important parts in the rise of rock and roll (Freed embodied the incendiary spirit of the music more than Clark, refusing to play white cover versions of black songs, such as Pat Boone’s ''Tutti Frutti''). And though they both denied ever accepting payola, it’s almost impossible to imagine two young, popular jocks not succumbing to a little temptation. Guilty or not, it was Freed who ended up taking the fall for DJs everywhere.

Why did the committee single him out? Freed was abrasive. He consorted with black rhythm and blues musicians. He jive talked, smoked constantly and looked like an insomniac. Clark was squeaky clean, Brylcreemed, handsome and polite. At least on the surface.

Once the grilling started, Freed’s friends and allies in broadcasting quickly deserted him. He refused, ''on principle'', to sign an affidavit saying that he’d never accepted payola.

WABC fired him, and he was charged with 26 counts of commercial bribery. Freed escaped with fines and a suspended jail sentence. He died five years later, broke and virtually forgotten.

Previous to the trial, Dick Clark had wisely divested himself of all incriminating connections (he had part ownership in seven indie labels, six publishers, three record distributors and two talent agencies). He got a slap on the wrist by Committee chairman Oren Harris, who called him “a fine young man.” As Clark told Rolling Stone in 1989, the lesson he learned from the payola trial was: ''Protect your ass at all times''. Surprisingly candid words from the eternal teenager.

After Freed went down in 1960, Congress amended the Federal Communications Act to outlaw ''under-the-table payments and require broadcasters to disclose if airplay for a song has been purchased''. Payola became a misdemeanor, with a penalty of up to $10,000 in fines and one year in prison.

The loophole in the legislation was that it didn’t say anything about ''undisclosed payments''. And so payola joined the cockroach and the fart joke on the list of things that, despite changing times, always manage to survive.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Teddy Redell returned to Arkansas and began touring with Tommy Trent in 1956. Arlen Vaden asked Teddy to play backup for a recording session in 1959. When the lead singer came down with laryngitis, Teddy was given the studio time. ''Knocking On The Backside'' and its flipside, ''Before It Began'', was released on Vaden Records under the stage name Teddy Redell. It quickly became a popular selection in the juke boxes of eastern Arkansas.

Teddy Redell also appeared on Hi Records around the time that he auditioned at Sun, but later concentrated on songwriting for Sonny James' companies. Teddy’s second release, ''Corrina Corrina'' / ''Gold Dust'', was recorded at King Studios in Cincinnati, and released on the Vaden label in 1960. His third release, ''I Want To Hold You'' / ''Pipeliner'' soon followed, but it was his fourth release that would become his most famous.

''Judy'' was recorded in 1960 and released as the B side of ''Can’t You See'' on the Vaden and Atco labels. The following year, ''Judy'' was released by Elvis Presley and stayed for several weeks on Billboard’s Hot 100.

STUDIO SESSION FOR TEDDY REDELL
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS PROBABLY 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY NOVEMBER 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "ME AND MY BLUES" - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Teddy Redell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30150-12 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL – TENNESSEE COUNTRY
Reissued: - 1999 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16311-28 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 16

"Me And My Blues" was a polished performance. The song is well-constructed, witty, and rocks along at a jaunty pace.

02 - "STOP" – B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Teddy Redell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-24 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS
Reissued: - 1999 Boot Records (LP) 33rpm Boot 706/2-6 mono
MEMPHIS BOP - VOLUME 2

03 - "TIRED OF LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:27
Composer: - Teddy Redell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-25 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS

04 - "TAKE THE LONG WAY HOME''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

05 - "THAT'S LOVE''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

06 - "LOCK THE DOOR''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

07 - "FOR NOW AND EVER''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

08 - "I DON'T KNOW''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably November 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Teddy Redell - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
J.C. Caughron - Bass
Bobby Crafford - Drums

For Biography of Teddy Redell see: > The Sun Biographies <
Teddy Redell's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 7, 1959 SATURDAY

Smokey Robison marries Claudette Rogers, a fellow member of the The Miracles. They remain husband and wife until 1986. During that time, Robinson writes two songs that become country hits, ''Tracks Of My Tears'' and ''You've Really Got A Hold On Me''.

Patsy Cline sings ''Walkin' After Midnight'' on ABC's ''Jubilee USA''.

NOVEMBER 8, 1959 SUNDAY

Johnny Mathis sings the pop classic ''Misty'' on CBS-TV's ''The Ed Sullivan Show''. The song is destined to become a 1975 country hit for Ray Stevens.

NOVEMBER 9, 1959 MONDAY

Columbia released Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs' ''Crying My Heart Out Over You''.

Faron Young's ''Country Girl'' reaches number 1 on the Billboard country chart.

NOVEMBER 11, 1959 WEDNESDAY

Freddie Hart recorded the Harlan Howard composition ''The Key's In The Mailbox''. The songs emerges as a hit for Tony Booth more than a dozen years later.

NOVEMBER 16, 1959 MONDAY

Marty Robbins' Sometimes-producer Mitch Miller earns a gold album for ''Sing Along With Mitch''. Among the songs featured, Cole Porter's ''Don't Fence Me In'' and Jimmie Davis ''You Are My Sunshine''.

Columbia released Stonewall Jackson's ''Mary Don't You Weep''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE ROCKIN' STOCKIN'
FOR SUN AND MOJO RECORDS 1959

PROBABLY SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY TUESDAY NOVEMBER 17, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY RILEY

Presumably every label, even Sun, is to be forgiven some seasonal music. So here is Sun's foray into the Christmas marketplace, courtesy of Billy Riley, entrepreneur. These sides were produced for Riley's Mojo label, and taken over by Sun on November 17, 1959. That made it too late for Christmas 1959, but Sam Phillips had it out in plenty of time for Christmas 1960.

Billy Riley tear a page from the Bill Black Combo songbook, which was thriving across town at the Hi Studios. Notably, Jimmy Wilson's keyboard work on "Rockin' Old Lang Syne" is a little more skating rink than anything Carl McVoy ever attempted for Bill Black.

01 - "ROCKIN' - LANG - SYNE" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - M 20 - Master - D.J. Copy
Recorded: - Probably November 17, 1959
Released: - November 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 350/1960-B < mono
ROCKIN' - LANG - SYNE / YULEVILLE U.S.A.
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

You wouldn't want a fixed income based on this record's sales in July. In fact, you'd have had a pretty spartan existence based on its sales in December as well.

02 - "YULEVILLE U.S.A." - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - M 21 - Master - D.J. Copy
Recorded: - Probably November 17, 1959
Released: - November 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 350/1960-A < mono
YULEVILLE U.S.A. / ROCKIN' - LANG - SYNE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-2-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Collectors should note that although this record has often appeared in label lists as SUN 350, no copies bearing that number have ever been found. It only appears to have been issued as SUN 1960.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Riley - Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Jimmy Van Eaton - Drums
Martin Willis - Saxophone
Jimmy Wilson - Organ

For Biography of The Rockin' Stockin' see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Rockin' Stokin's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 18, 1959 WEDNESDAY

The iconic religious epic and award-winning film “Ben-Hur” premieres. The film starred legendary actor Charlton Heston and was directed by William Wyler. At the time of its production, the movie had the largest budget of any movie ever made with an estimated $15.9 million spent. It also had some of the largest sets ever created at the time. The film was a remake of a silent film from the 1920s and was also adapted from a novel by Lew Wallace. Ben-Hur was a huge financial and critical success as the film won eleven Academy Awards.

NOVEMBER 19, 1959 THURSDAY

Johnny ash and The Tennessee Two begin their first overseas tour, playing U.S. military bases in West Germany.

NOVEMBER 20, 1959 FRIDAY

WABC radio in New York fires Alan Freed after the disc jockey refused to sign an affidavit saying he never received payola. Thus begins the undoing of a rock and roll legend, credited as a co-writer of the future Forester Sisters hit ''Sincerely''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Mack Owen's only record was a master purchase signed and sealed on November 20, 1959. The music seemed to suggest that Owen needed special material to thrive. To be blunt, uptempo numbers were not his forte. Owen is one of the shadowier figures in Sun history. The little we know is this: he was born in Athens, Alabama on July 27, 1936, and worked in Chicago on Chicago Bandstand.

Someone from Sun Records heard him there, making it almost certain that this was recorded in Chicago. Owen never recorded again, and became a preacher in the early 1960s. He quit the ministry to work for the International Union of Glassworkers, and was living in Indianapolis when he died on October 10, 1991.

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK OWEN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY NOVEMBER 20, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

On "Walkin' And Talkin'", he Mack Owen seems ill at ease, and even resorts to coarsening his voice for emphasis. Its not a pretty sound. In contrast, everything comes together on "Somebody Just Like You", a tune that seems custom crafted for Owens' quirky vocal style. This is a mighty fine record. It may not have been what Sun fans were seeking in January 1960, but it had everything it needed to dent the charts in a serious way, without embarrassing any of the participants.

The chorus provides smooth and restrained harmony, the brishwork is tasty and minimalist, and the piano supports Owen's vocal admirably. Its anyone's guess why this record didn't garner wider exposure. A hit like this on Sun at the start of the 1960s might have altered Sun's direction considerably.

01 - "WALKIN' AND TALKIN'" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Mack Owen
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 390 - Master
Recorded: - November 20, 1959
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 336-A < mono
WALKIN' AND TALKIN' / SOMEBODY JUST LIKE YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Recorded (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

02 - "SOMEBODY JUST LIKE YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Mack Owen
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 391
Recorded: - November 20, 1959
Released: - January 1960
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 336-B < mono
SOMEBODY JUST LIKE YOU / WALKIN' AND TALKIN'
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Owen - Vocal and Guitar
Scotty Moore - Guitar
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
D.J. Fontana - Drums
Larry Mohoberac - Piano

For Biography of Mack Owen see: > The Sun Biographies <
Mack Owen's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jeb Stuart had a long and fruitful musical career, during which he made several records that should be in every soul fan’s collection. Stuart led an rhythm and blues combo in his hometown of Memphis alongside a teenaged Isaac Hayes. In a highly implausible move, Jones adopted the name of Jeb Stuart (after a General who'd fought in the Civil War) before setting out to find a record deal.

Thanks to a good word from Rufus Thomas, Phillips International unfurled the red carpet in 1960 and this Joe Tex styled stomper very nearly became a national breakout. As Jeb Stuart, he later recorded for Kent, King and San Wayne Records. Jeb Stuart was an single artist and never released an album.
Jeb Stuart >

His early doo wop tracks for Wing Records under his real name Charles Jones sadly isn’t one of them. ''All For Love'' is a doo-wop influenced soul ballad of some merit, but rather spoiled by an intrusive background chorus. ''A Whole Lot Of Tears'', however, is a celebrated deep soul classic with Stuart crying and sobbing his heart out over a solid accompaniment featuring some lovely guitar runs and fills, and withdrawn horns. The Bingo release is another very good one with Stuart double tracking his vocal over a hammered slow 12/8 beat. Three of his four King sides are pretty mediocre to be honest, but ''I Don’t Want To Leave You Darling'' is in a different league. A plodding ballad with a lovely Memphis feel, it features one of Stuart’s very best vocal tracks. Highly recommended.

Stuart's first release after relocating to Florida is another one to search out. ''Dreamer’s Hall Of Fame'' is another class slowie, and Stuart really gives of his best, especially at the final 30 seconds. Electrifying stuff. Even better though is Can’t Count The Days when his hoarse tone really delivers the goods. The melody is better too, as are the background singers who are far less forward in the mix. It’s not surprising that this garnered a release on the larger Kent label. In this company the much sought after Big Score 45rpm suffers rather badly.

His initial 45rpm for his own Great American label continued this fine trend. ''Please Give Me Another Chance'' is one of his greatest records. A completely unrestrained last minute as the song reaches its climax is merely the icing on the cake of a gritty, committed vocal. The slightly uncoordinated backing of rhythm, horns and chorus only add to the disc’s air of improvised agony.

Stuart continued into the 1970s and 1980s on his new Esquire International label, and ''A Long Time Comin Down'' is a very creditable slab of mid paced country soul, with good horn support. ''Somebody’s Gotta Win'' is a worthwhile, melodic ballad as well but in these later days nobody wanted to hear a singer screaming his passion, and Stuart’s vocals are well restrained.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JEB STUART
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

PROBABY SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY LATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Although Jeb Stuart was under contract to Sam Phillips, there is nothing about this record to suggest that it was recorded at either 706 Union or Madison Avenue, or with the usual gang. More likely, Stuart recorded the sides elsewhere, then submitted them to Phillips International. This could, in fact, be the session with Isaac Hayes and the Do-Dads.

01 - "COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Don Covay-Frank Berry
Publisher: - Roosevelt Music
Matrix number: - P 399 - Master - Promotion Copy
Recorded: - Probably Late 1959
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3567-B < mono
COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES / DREAM
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Coming Down With The Blues" is a very effective piece of early 1960s soul music that appears somewhat anomalous in the Phillips International release schedule. The song was written by Don Covay and his partner from the Rainbows, Frank Berry. Covay was the first to record it (as "I'm Coming Down With The Blues") for Big Top Records. Note its somewhat curious structure: three verses, no release. Stuart was really a very good vocalist who would have probably paid dividends if he had been well recorded and promoted. His vocal here could have been the blueprint for an early 1960s Presley record. This title is part of an interesting sub-genre of songs based on the "blues as disease" metaphor. earlier examples include Carl Perkins' "Boppin' The Blues", Huey Smith's "Rockin' Pneumonia And The Boogie Woogie Flu" and, at a stretch, venerable old Dr. Isiah Ross's "Boogie Disease".

02 - "DREAM" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:39
Composer: - Johnny Mercer
Publisher: - Michael H. Goldsen Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 398 - Master
Recorded: - Probably Late 1959
Released: - April 28, 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3567-A < mono
DREAM / COMING DOWN WITH THE BLUES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Dream" is likewise a fine piece of nascent soul, again revealing the commercial held by Stuart. A minor quible: this side would have been a lot more impressive if someone on the date had figured out the correct chords to the song, instead of constructing a new melody to fit the chords they did know. A lot of people from Etta James to Vaughn Monroe, from Dinah Washington to the Four Aces had recorded this Johnny Mercer tune and they all managed to get the chords right. Stuart's recitation is really effective, although somewhat unusual stylistically for the era.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jeb Stuart - Vocal
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Jeb Stewart see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jeb Stewart's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ALICE LESLIE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE LATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR ERNIE BARTON OF CHARLES UNDERWOOD

We were initially unsure whether Alice Leslie, who left several items in the Sun vaults, was the same person who enjoyed a rather colorful performing career, including a 1957 single on the Era label under the name 'Alis Lesley'. Her interview with researcher Will Beard makes it clear that Alice was Alis and her wandering ways did indeed take her through Memphis in 1959.

The song below was written in the minor key style of "Fever", which spent much of late 1958 on the pop charts. Leslie left six takes of "Handsome Man" in the vaults.

01 - ''HANDSOME MAN" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer:- Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8182 mono
HILLBILLY FILLIES & ROCKIN' CHICKS
Reissued: - August 2002 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-4-14 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

"Handsome Man" is a sound that got full expression in the clubs but went missing in action when composer Rich worked by day to provide material for other Sun artists like Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis or, later on, himself. Rich did not succeed in pitching this song (or Alice Leslie) to Sun management. Ironically, it was a last minute search for material at Barbara Pittman's "Eleventh Commandment" session that led to Charlie's success. Fortunately for Rich, Barbara's expertise at learning songs on the spot (a requirement for most demo singers) led to a better than credible recording of "Handsome Man", which actually made the Memphis charts for several weeks in 1960.

Alice Leslie was left to watch the song she had originally demoed climb the local charts in the hands of another singer. In any case, she did her watching from Arizona, where she returned to care for her ailing mother. After the death of her mother, Alice attended Arizona State University and received a degree in education, which she put to good use in subsequent years working with Native American children in the Southwest, both as an educator and a missionary.

According to Alice Leslie, "I was born in Chicago on April 20, 1938. My father was born in Liverpool, England. They came over to the States and we moved to Phoenix, Arizona in 1948 and attended the Phoenix Junior College. I had my own band called the Arizona Stringdusters. We used to perform on KTVN, Channel 3 in Phoenix and local night clubs. I was discovered by Buddy Morrow, who led a big band. He had me come up on stage I sang "Blue Suede Shoes", "My Blue Heaven", "Hound Dog" and "See You Later Alligator".

''It was during "Blue Suede Shoes" that I kicked my shoes off into the audience and they all loved it. I performed at the Silver Slipper in Las Vegas in 1956. Elvis flew out there to see me. We never performed together but we were friends. In 1956 I recorded "He Will Come Back To Me" for Era Records. I also cut a song I wrote called "Why Do I Feel This Way" (This side remained unreleased).

''In January 1957 I flew into Hollywood from Vegas and cut one more side called "Heartbreak Harry". The record (Era 1034) came out in April 1957. While I was in Las Vegas, I was seen by Lee Gordon, an Australian promoter, who signed me for a tour in 1958. I flew over with Eddie Cochran, who was also on the bill. Little Richard and Gene Vincent were on the show as well. This was the same show where Little Richard renounced rock and roll and threw his ring into the ocean''.

''When I got back from Australian, I did a lot of shows in the Dakotas, as well as New Jersey and New York City. I appeared with Bobby Darin in Alabama, and also toured in Quebec, Canada in late 1958 and 1959". '' At this point, Alice Leslie and Sun Records crossed paths. "I was thinking of going with Sun Records, and did some recordings for Sam Phillips in Memphis, but the deal did not go through". "I retired in 1980 and have spent a lot of time traveling around the world, studying history and genealogy. I'm very interested in my British roots I was stricken with cancer in 1995 and I'm a cancer survivor. I'm still fighting to live. I continue to sing and do a lot of charity work. I perform mostly country and western and gospel music and work as a vocal coach to teach stage presence to young singers".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Alice Leslie - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Alice Leslie see: > The Sun Biographies <
Alice Leslie's Sun recording can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN FEMALE SINGER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS & OTHERS

This enthusiastic but amateurish demo makes it clear that not all the Elvis wannabees in the world were guys.

01 - "WEAR MY RING AROUND YOUR NECK" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Bert Carroll-Russell Moody
Publisher: - Wexford Music Incorporated. - Elvis Presley Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably Unknown Date 1959
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-1-24 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

"Wear My Ring Around Your Neck" is a song written by Bert Carroll and Russell Moody, performed by Elvis Presley, which was released in 1958. It was particularly notable for breaking a string of ten consecutive number 1 hits for Presley achieved in just two years. It was Presley's 19th number-one hit in the American Rhythm & Blues Charts, and peaked at number 2 on the American Pop Charts.

American country music singer Ricky Van Shelton covered the song for the soundtrack of the 1992 movie ''Honeymoon'' in Vegas. Shelton's version, also included on his album ''Greatest Hits Plus'', peaked at number 26 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart .

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Unknown Female Singer and Musicians

Sun recording can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NOVEMBER 21, 1959 SATURDAY
 
Rock and roll disc jockey Alan Freed refuses to say he has not received cash or gifts for playing records on the airwaves in New York. Listed as a co-writer of The Forester Sisters hit ''Sincerely'', he is permanently tarnished by the payola scandal.
 
NOVEMBER 22, 1959 SUNDAY
 
Broadway lyricist Sam Lewis dies in New York. The author of ''Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody'' and ''Five Foot Two, Eyes Of Blue (Has Anybody Seen My Girl)'', he also wrote Jimmie Rogers country hit ''In The Hills Of Tennessee''.
 
NOVEMBER 23, 1959 MONDAY
 
An RCA spokesman denies rumors that Elvis Presley will change his style after his discharge from the Army.
 
NOVEMBER 27, 1959 FRIDAY
 
A doctor from Johannesburg, South Africa, begins a one-month series of treatments to reduce pores and acne scars on Elvis Presley. Presley is thrilled with the results, though those around him see no change.
 
NOVEMBER 29, 1959 SUNDAY
 
''The Battle Of New Orleans'' wins Song of the Year for composer Jimmy Driftwood and Best Country and Western Performance for Johnny Horton during the second annual Grammy Awards.
 
NOVEMBER 30, 1959 MONDAY
 
Decca released Webb Pierce's ''No Love Have I''.
 
LATE 1959
 
W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland quit the line-up of the band of Carl Perkins. He tried managing Carl   Mann for a while and then opted for the security of playing drums behind Johnny Cash,   where he remains. He was replaced by Tony Moore. Jay Perkins had been replaced in the   band of Perkins by Eddie Starr as Perkins tried to keep a regular band together.
 
The last two really big hits on the Sun label were Carl Mann's ''Mona Lisa'' and Charlie Rich's   ''Lonely Weekends''. Both were recorded at the old studio, although ''Lonely Weekends'' was   doctored-up at the new studio. Then, as Carl and Charlie Rich proved unable to replicate   their success, Sam gradually lost interest. He diversified his interests, and the studio that   had once been his home day and night no longer seemed to excite him. The torch passed to  newer and hungrier labels.
 
By that time, Carl Mann had some serious problems of his own.
 
LATE 1959
 
Although Charlie Rich continued to record fine music at Sun, he seemed to have expended   his commercial potential on ''Lonely Weekends''. On several occasions during his career, Rich   has shot himself in the foot by choosing weak follow-ups; ''Gonna Be Waitin''', which followed   ''Lonely Weekends'', was unexceptional. The music that Rich made for Phillips was as   multifaceted as his diverse musical tastes. But the teenagers who had responded to the   echoes of Elvis in ''Lonely Weekends'' were unlikely to respond to the profoundly adult   sentiments of a record like ''Sittin' And Thinkin''', which opened with the announcement, ''I   got loaded last night on a bottle of gin...''.
 
Sam Phillips signed Charlie Rich to one of his standard three-year contracts after the success   of ''Lonely Weekends''. Rich acquired a new manager, Seymour Rosenberg, a Memphis   attorney who also played a little jazz trumpet under the name of Sy Rose. Rosenberg was   anxious to place Rich with a company that paid higher royalties and had a stronger   commitment to the record business than Sun. When his contract came up for renewal in   March 1963, Rosenberg signed Rich to the reactivated Groove division of RCA. Phillips filed a   suit against Rich, claiming that the singer had verbally agreed to re-sign with Sun or give   Phillips the chance to match any other offer he might sure. After a month of bickering,  Phillips finally reconciled himself to the inevitable and let Rich depart.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT OR BILL JUSTIS

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL OR SCOTTY MOORE

Below an another wasted opportunity. For all his genius, Sam Phillips was none too good at following up hit records. ''Gonna Be Waitin''' is basically an inferior clone of ''Lonely Weekend''. Marty Willis baritone solo has been replaced by a guitar break, but otherwise it's business as usual with little of the original passion or tension.

01 - ''GONNA BE WAITIN*''' - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 387 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - May 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3560-A < mono
GONNA BE WAITIN' / SCHOOL DAYS
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-2-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

The side below is something of a mystery. If the logs can be believed, Charlie cut ''Gentle As A Lamb'' at the same session as ''There's Another Place''. If ever a track deserved release for the pop/teen market, it was ''Gentle As a Lamb'', complete with strings and voices. Instead, that title languished in the vaults for nearly ten years before appearing during the first wave of Sun archaeology in the 1970s. Instead,, ''I Need Your Love'', a rather lackluster Rich composition and performance that had ''demo'' written all over it, appeared on the B-side. Admittedly, it focused all the action on ''Place'', but why not go with the far stronger original ''Gentle As A Lamb''? Perhaps ''Lamb'' was a viewed as too strong a contender, worth its own A-side. Maybe it was scheduled to be Rich's next single. But before that could happen, Charlie Rich had left the fold for the greener pastures at RCA, and the Phillips International label had ceased to exist.

02 - ''I NEED YOUR LOVE'' - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 434 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - April 1963
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3584-B < mono
I NEED YOUR LOVE / THERE'S ANOTHER PLACE I CAN'T GO
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-4-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Stay" was a beautiful country ballad, amazingly undoctored by the post production crew. The restraint that must have underlies this release truly ranks as one of Sun's finest hours. ("Oh, Sam, just let me put some strings and voices on there. I know I can sweeten this thing up like a dream. We'll really cross over with Charlie this time. You're gonna need strings on there to sell it. Its too bare this way"). But cooler heads prevailed. At least they kept the strings and voices away. What they didn't control was the echo. Its hard to know exactly what went wrong here, but this has got to be the most variable echo on any Sun release. Parts of Rich's performance (like the opening lines) are so swamped with echo that they are all but unintelligible. On the other hand, the release ("Many mistakes...") are virtually dry, revealing how truly wonderful this side might have been.

03 – "STAY" - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 391 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - September 7, 1960
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3562-B < mono
STAY / ON MY KNEES
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

04 – "REBOUND" (1) - B.M.I. - 0:45
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - 4x False Starts - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-1 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

05 – "REBOUND" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-2 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

06 – "REBOUND" (2) - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Charlie Rich-Bill Justis
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-17 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

07 – "STOP THIEF**" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-4 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Stop Thief'', again, an overlooked gem in Charlie's recorded work for Sun. This is a clever arrangement of a musically complex song that had all kinds of pop potential. A surprisingly effective overdubbed version of this song was issued on Power-Pak LP 245, featuring additional percussion and some masterful guitar work by Jimmy Dempsey. Here the songs issued as originally recorded. A lot went into this production which makes the original decision to consign it to the vault all the more curious.

08 – "STOP THIEF**" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Power Pak (LP) 33rpm 245 mono
CHARLIE RICH - ARKANSAS TRAVELER

09 – "WHAT'S MY NAME" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-19 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

10 – "WHAT'S MY NAME**" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Power Pak (LP) 33rpm 245 mono
CHARLIE RICH - ARKANSAS TRAVELER

11 – "EVERYDAY" – B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-24 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Everybody'', Charlie Rich recorded two tunes by this title while at Sun. The track on CD-2 is a full production featuring Latin percussion. Although the songs has elements of overproduction (similar to ''Lonely Hurt Within''), the vocal also has a decidedly bluesy construction. The same title demo on CD-3 is an entirely different matter. This was plainly written during Rich's attempt to 'Cash-in' during Johnny's final months at Sun when he refused to record any of his own material. Its sentiments are pretty grim: do I forgive you for the adultery you committed? It was a long way from ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen''.

12 – "THE WEDDING'S OVER'' – B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-28 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

13 – "THERE WON'T BE ANYMORE'' – B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-11 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''There Won't Be Anymore'', Charlie recorded this tune for RCA during his generally unproductive year with them in Nashville. Ten years after it was recorded, that version was a number 1 country hit. Shelby Singleton combed his song file, realized he had an earlier demo version of the title, and dubbed it for release to cash in on its current popularity. The irony of course is that this rough demo eclipses the smooth RCA version in every conceivable way except for musicianship. Charlie's performance here is chilling, with emotion building to a fever pitch at the start of the last verse. Enjoy the original undubbed show.

14 – "THERE WON'T BE ANYMORE**'' – B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Power Pak (LP) 33rpm 241 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THERE WON'T BE ANY MORE

15 – "GOODBYE MARY ANN (3)'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1970
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun 123-B-1 mono
CHARLIE RICH – A TIME FOR TEARS

''Goodbye Mary Ann', again, one of Charlie's catchier tunes never saw release during his days with Sun. A version of this song first appeared on Charlie's second Sun LP issued by Shelby Singleton shortly after taking over the Sun label. A second version (recorded in 1962) appeared nearly twenty years later on a ZuZazz LP (Z 2002) of Rich rarities. The arrangement here, arguably the best of the three, has never before been issued and appears in an effective stereo mix, thus suggesting this version dates from sometimes after 1960. The dialogue between Sam Phillips and Charlie Rich that precedes the track is quite interesting. Plainly, Phillips is trying to produce Charly, encouraging him to give the song more of an Elvis feel. And just as plainly, Rich is resisting him. Listen closely: Early on, Rich breaks the tension by singing the opening lines to ''Whirlwind''. There is some strained laughter but Phillips keeps pushing him. And then Rich finally tells him ''Don't put me down like that or I can't hit it at all. Then there won't be any record''.

16 – "LONG LONG WAY FROM TENNESSEE'' – B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - December 1974
First appearance: - Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 856-B-3 mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - KINGS OF COUNTRY – VOLUME 1

''Cloud Nine'', the known version of this lovely Charlie Rich tune first appeared on Bill Justis's LP (and as a flipside to his single ''Flea Circus''). Rich played piano on that date, but apparently left a solo version of the tune at Sun. Roland Janes believes that this track began life as a simple demo and was later overdubbed of the new studio into the form we hear here. Perhaps it was just an early exercise in overdubbing at the new studio. In any case, the track was not originally issued and has never appeared before.

17 – "CLOUD NINE'' – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-26 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

18 – "MY BABY DONE LEFT ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-13 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''I Need Your Love'', a shorter version of this title appeared as the flip-side of Charlie Rich's last single. Here managed to uncover a previously unissued version of ''I Need Your Love'' that features an extended guitar solo.

19 – "I NEED YOUR LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 3:11
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None – Alternate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-29 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

** - Overdubbed in Nashville, 1974

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal & Piano
Unknown Musicians

* - Gene Lowery Singers consisting of
Edwin Bruce, Sara Bruce, Nita Smith,
Lee Holt, Vocal Harmony

For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun/PI recording can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

On balance, Rich's single release for the Phillips International label maintained a very high standard. It is worth remembering that for every tittle by Charlie Rich that was ever released by Sam Phillips, there are at least four others that sat behind in the vaults. Some of these were rough demos and never candidates for the marketplace. But many others weren't. They were finished masters into which a lot of thought and work were invested. Titles like ''Gentle As A Lamb'', ''Lonely Hurt Within'', ''Stop Thief'', ''What's My Name'', ''Every Day'', and ''Goodbye Mary Ann', to name but a few, could well have appeared above Charlie's name on a Phillips International label. Some of these efforts represented extentions of Rich's existing style. But others, like ''Lonely Hurt Within'', would have been a radical departure in directions that might have played havoc with his subsequent development.

Where did these titles come from? Roland Janes recalls, ''Charlie always recorded what he wanted to when he wanted to. It wasn't a real big expensive thing like it is today. Charlie was always experimenting. He and Justis would try stuff all the time. Especially when we got to the new studio, even though it didn't sound as good initially, it opened up a lot of possibilities that hadn't been there at 706 Union. Charlie also did a lot of stuff with Scotty Moore. I think I remember ''Every Day'' and ''Lonely Hurt Within''. Those were probably things that Scotty Moore did with him at the new studio. I remember hearing some of that and thinking. That doesn't sound like Charlie. Charlie would listen to what was being played and try to write one of his own. There was a lot of searching for a direction with Charlie. The problem was he was so adaptable, so good at some things''.

Drummer Jimmy M. Van Eaton recalls, ''Charlie was very much an even keel type of guy in the studio. A pleasure to work with, Kind of the opposite of Jerry Lee, where it could get out of hand. We never struggled to get the session done and we always seemed to be happy with what we put down. There was never any finger pointing or problems like that. With Jerry it could get wild. If you didn't get it in three takes, forget it. You just moved on''.

Van Eaton also has a slightly more cynical view of the creative process surrounding Charlie and at Sun in general. ''During the latter part of Charlie's stay at Sun there really wasn't anybody around. The creative people had left. Sam wasn't coming down anymore. Jack Clement had left, Justis was gone. When they lost these guys, they lost the heart of the label. When they brought in the Ernie Bartons and Charles Underwood – it made a real difference. Something big was lost. These new guys, they just weren't bringing anything to the table. It got to where we were just doing a job when we went in there.

Van Eaton's views of the creative downturn at Sun is shared by others. However, the question is whether an artist like Charlie – whose creative energies were overflowing – was as affected by the lack of external ideas as some of his less talented label mates.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
FOR SUN RECORDS UNKNOWN DATES

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT OR BILL JUSTIS OR ERNIE BARTON

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR CHARLES UNDERWOOD OR SCOTTY MOORE

AND/OR
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL OR SCOTTY MOORE

''ALL DEMO TAPES''

Contains Charlie's demos. Some have been issued before, although many exist only on rare or out-of-print LPs. Others appear here for the first time. These demos are undoubtedly that least polished recordings but, in many ways, his most rewarding. None of them was ever intended for release. This is a very special glimpse into the development of Charlie's music. Some of it would probably have embarrassed him. During his earliest period Charlie was almost always searching musically. He was taking chances, playing in styles that were alien to him. Some of these experiments were surprisingly successful. Others were expendable failures. Some were abandoned, nearly on the spot. Others gave rise to patterns, songs, even instrumental riffs that would surface later in his career.

01 - ''AIN'T IT A SHAME'' - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-3 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Baby I Need You'', this is one of the simplest and most enjoyable of Rich's early attempts at rock and roll. He plainly was a man at odds with a genre here, essentially clueless and struggling to work even the squirrels in the park into his teen love song. You can decide for yourself whether this brief demo works better with Charlie's piano or Jack Clement's acoustic guitar in support. Incredibly, Shelby Singleton included the piano version of this tune on his second Sun International Rich LP.

02 - ''BABY I NEED YOU'' - B.M.I. - 1:40
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-8 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

03 - ''BALLAD OF BILLY JOE'' (1) - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 839 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THE GREATEST

04 - ''BALLAD OF BILLY JOE'' (2) - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date – Overdubbed in the 1970s
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 134 mono
CHARLIE RICH – GOLDEN TREASURES
2009 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SNAJ 744 CD-3/26 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THE COMPLETE SUN MASTERS

05 - ''CLOSED FOR REPAIR'' - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30101-B-7 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 1 - CATALYST
2009 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SNAJ 744 CD-3/17 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THE COMPLETE SUN MASTERS

06 - ''EVERY DAY'' - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-13 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

07 - ''GRAVEYARDVILLE'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date - Instrumental
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-18 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

08 - ''GRAVEYARDVILLE'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Alternate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date - Instrumental
Released: 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 132 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THE EARLY YEARS

''How Blue Can You Be'', this and ''I'm Making Plans'' are an essential part of this demos. They may not be everybody's favorite selections, but they were an undeniable part of the man who came to work at Sun Records in 1958. Material like this, demoed by Rich during his first year at Sun, was a fundamental part of who he was musically. A gig at the Vapors and the Sharecropper might contain these songs, back-to-back with Jimmy Reed's ''Big Boss Man''. That kind of electicism or, if you will, musical schizophrenia remained central to Charlie Rich until the end. These demos are arguably among the best but there are at least half a dozen more titles in the same genre that remain unissued.

09 - ''HOW BLUE CAN YOU BE'' - B.M.I. - 1:33
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-23 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

10 - ''IF YOU KNEW'' - B.M.I. - 3:31
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 2009
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SNAJ 744 CD-3/13 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THE COMPLETE SUN MASTERS

11 - ''I JUST THOUGHT YOU'D LIKE TO KNOW''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

12 - ''I'M MAKING PLANS'' - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-33 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''I Said Baby'', this previously unknown title emerged from its unknown untitled status during the most recent search of the Sun vaults. There is a strong bluesy edge to its otherwise country style, and a surprising melodic tension. The song plainly needed some reworking ( and a better demo) but since we are not likely to see either in this lifetime, here is the only glimpse of the song Charlie left us, possibly from as early as 1958.

13 - ''I SAID BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-9 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

14 - ''JUST A LITTLE BIT SWEET''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

''Life Is A Flower'', this tune was known to Sun discographers only as a Ray Smith recording. It is now apparent, from this rough demo, that Charlie Rich had some role in its development, possibly even wrote it. If he did, he certainly does a laughably poor job of singing his own lyrics. He gets ''Life is a flower/Love is the honey'' correct the first time through, but from there it is all downhill. And every one of those little stumbles seems to have disruptive effects on his piano playing as well as vocal phrasing. The tune is rather Presleyish and surprisingly catchy, even if it is far from regular Charlie Rich fare.

15 - ''LIFE IS A FLOWER'' - B.M.I. - 1:22
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-31 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

16 - ''LITTLE BY LITTLE'' - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm LP 134 mono
CHARLIE RICH – GOLDEN TREASURES
Reissued: - April 1989 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 109-6/1 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - KEEPERS OF THE FLAME

17 – ''CHATTER/LITTLE WOMAN FRIEND OF MINE'' – B.M.I. - 0:32
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-1 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Little Woman Friend Of Mine'', unlike many Rich compositions, this title never progressed beyond the demo stage. That is somewhat surprising considering some of the material that was given the full treatment. This tune is vintage Rich. A bluesy underpinning, a passing nod to Presleyana, some fine boogie piano, and interesting chord changes despite the simplicity of the material, And, like Charlie's best songs, this is no simple piece of fluff. There is a real story here. One gets the feeling with a little effort this lyric could have been fleshed out into a steamy piece of southern fiction. Considering how Charlie was shuttling in those tears between Arkansas town with three digit populations and downtown Memphis, the lyric might have held some meaning for him.

18 – ''LITTLE WOMAN FRIEND OF MINE'' – B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-2 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

19 - ''NEVER MIND, LITTLE GIRL''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

20 - ''DON'T PUT NO HEADSTONE ON MY GRAVE''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 2009
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm SNAJ 744 CD-2/30 mono
CHARLIE RICH - THE COMPLETE SUN MASTERS

21 - ''ROCK AND ROLL PART'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1975
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300 004 mono
CHARLIE RICH – LONELY WEEKENDS

22 - ''SITTIN' AND THINKIN''' – B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-25 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

23 - ''SOMEHOW WE'LL FIND A WAY''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

24 - ''SO YOUNG''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

25 - ''STOP FAKIN'YOUR LOVE''' - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-4 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

26 - ''TIME'S A-WASTING''' - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-19 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

27 - ''TOO MANY YEARS''' - B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-16 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

28 - ''UNSUSPECTING ME''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

29 - ''WE WERE MADE FOR EACH OTHER''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued

30 - ''WHEN'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1975
First appearance: Hallmark Records (LP) 33rpm SHM 861 mono
CHARLIE RICH – THOSE MIDNIGHT BLUES

31 - ''WHY, WHY, WHY''
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - Sun Unissued - Tape Lost

32 - ''YES MA'AM'' - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-14 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

33 - ''YOU MADE A HIT'' - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-20 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''You Made A Hit'', this tune was written by Walter P. Maynard, Jr. who owned Walmay Music, a local publishing/recording company that featured Charlie Feathers among its artists. This song, later recorded on Sun by Ray Smith, was demoed by Charlie Rich although he had no formal interest in the song. It is interesting to compare the feel of Rich's demo with Smith's issued version. Smith's enthusiastic rockabilly mannerisms are replaced here by the almost jazzy feel of Rich's version. The uncredited drummer provides some surprisingly nice accenting to this minimalist recording.

34 - ''UNTITLED INSTRUMENTAL'' - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: Unknown Date
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-26 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

''Untitled Instrumental'', this oddity is included (despite the gadawful drumming that goes with it) because it holds a window on Rich's musical development. In crude form, this was simply an instrumental idea with no lyrics to adorn it. By the time Rich appeared at RCA several years later, this very riff became the background for his effective reading of ''Old Man River'', which appeared on his first LP. Like most great musicians, Charlie Rich rarely squendered a good idea.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich – Vocal & Piano
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun/PI recording can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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