CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (12)
December 1, 1958 to December 31, 1958

Studio Session for Charlie Rich, December 4, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Rich, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Joe Lewis & Jack Nance, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Warren Smith, Late 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, Probably December 1958/January 1959 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, 1958/1961
Live Performance for Johnny Cash, 1958/1959

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube < 
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 1958

"To Know Him Is To Love Him" by the Teddy Bears (written by Phil Spector and sung by Spector and two schoolmates) is knocked off the top of the charts by the novelty hit, "The Chipmunk Song".

DECEMBER 1, 11958 MONDAY

Review from Billboard magazine says, ''I'll Sail My Ship Alone'' (Sun 312) Lewis' first disk in a spell is set in medium rhythm framework with a boogie woogie piano by Lewis against his good vocal. The flip ''It Hurt Me So'' a slow side for Lewis, with a great heartache type vocal by the cat. Chorus supports the effort. It has a bluesy quality and will Appeal''.

Actress Charlene Tilton is born in San Diego, California. She gains fame for her role as Lucy Ewing on ''Dallas'' and is at her peak in popularity when she meets and marries Johnny Lee. The marriage lasts two years in the early-1980s.

Ricky Nelson is featured on the cover pf Life magazine

Bill Monroe recorded ''Gotta Travel On'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

Maria Elena Holly gives her husband, ''True Love Ways'' songwriter Buddy Holly, a gold watch for an early Christmas present. Barely two months later, the timepiece is found in the rubble of his fatal plane crash.

Decca released The Wilburn Brothers' ''Which One Is To Blame''.

Columbia released Ray Prices ''That's What It's Like To Be Lonesome''.

DECEMBER 2, 1958 TUESDAY

Jimmy Stoneman, bass player for the Stoneman Family, welcomes a daughter, Jeanette Joyce Stoneman.

DECEMBER 3, 1958 WEDNESDAY

December 3, 1958

Miss Barbara Barnes
SUN RECORDS, INC.
706 Union Street
Memphis, Tennessee

Dear Barbara,

Enclose please find copies of the flyer we want to send to our D.J. mailing list. Please approve and return a copy as soon as possible. Vernon was in Richmond, Virginia, yesterday and the D.J.'s there seem quite encouraging. As you know, when a disc jockey believe in a record, you are far better off than when he ''plays'' the record while you're at the station as just a jester to the guest. I think they will continue to lean on the record heavily. And Vernon will be going to Roanoke for ALLEN DISTRIBUTING.

We also intend to hit Baltimore and Philadelphia within the next week too.

We have sent records out to leading TV D. J.'s all across the country plus all the local D.J.'s from Philadelphia to Norfolk. Naturally, there was some dual coverage from people you already services, but I think on some of the really important D.J.'s this will help instead of hinder.

I will call Bill Emerson this week and ask him to help us and I am sure he will and I will appreciate it if you will keep in close contact with me and let me know any areas the record is showing any action. Thank you again for your interest and consideration, I am,

Sincerely,

DON F. OWENS

DFO:c

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY DECEMBER 4, 1958
PRODUCER - BILLJUSTIS AND/OR CHARLIE RICH
RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
 
01 – "STAY"* - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 4, 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-2-21 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962
 
02 - "I'VE LOST MY HEART TO YOU" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Instrumental - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - December 4, 1958
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano
Unknown Group
 
* - Overdubbed with male vocal chorus
 
For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

DECEMBER 4, 1958 THURSDAY

Eddy Arnold recorded ''Chip Off The Old Block'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville.

DECEMBER 7, 1958 SUNDAY

Don Gibson recorded ''Who Cares'' in the morning at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee.

DECEMBER 8, 1958 MONDAY

The Country Music Association hires its first employee, secretary Jo Walker-Meador, in Nashville. She later ascends to executive director, ultimately joining the Country Music Hall of Fame.

DECEMBER 17, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Johnnie and Jack recorded the standard ''Ashes Of Love''.

Carl Belew recorded ''Am I That Easy To Forget''.

DECEMBER 18, 1958 THURSDAY

For his 15th birthday, Keith Richards receives his first guitar. He goes on to play with The Rolling Stones, whose ''Honky Tonk Women'' is judged among country's 500 greatest singles in the Country Music Foundation book ''Heartaches By The Number''.

DECEMBER 21, 1958 SUNDAY

Roy Acuff lands in New York following a two-month USO tour in which he performed for American troops in West Germany, Italy and France.

NBC-TV's ''The Dinah Shore Chevy Show'' welcomes musical guests Burl Ives and John Raitt.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE RICH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
PRODUCER - BILL JUSTIS AND/OR CHARLIE RICH
RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "BLUE SUEDE SHOES" - B.M.I. - 1:02
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm BLP 200-13 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-24 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

02 - "JUICEHEAD BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:05
Composer: - Williams-Daylie
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm BLP 200-12 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-6 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

On at least one occasion, Charlie Rich expressed passing annoyance that anyone would consider releasing unpolished material of his like this. Surely, he mused, anyone could see that this was just a rough late night moment in the studio. And that is precisely why it, along with his hip, irreverent reading of "Blue Suede Shoes" (complete with blown lyric) is a fine, unguarded moment to share with his deepest fans. This title originally appeared on Capitol in 1945, performed by Eddie Vinson with the Cootie Williams band. Rich recalled seeing it performed in a club by a vocalist whose name eluded him nearly twenty years later. What he did remember was seeking out the sheet music so he could learn the piece and make it part of his act, during a period that pre-dated his Sun years.

03(1) - "CHARLIE'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 1:27
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-8-6 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN'
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-12 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

03(2) - "CHARLIE'S BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 1:11
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - with FS - Sort Version - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-8-6 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN'
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-12 mono
LONELY WEEKENDS - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

04 - "I'VE LOST MY HEART TO YOU" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued / Tape Lost
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958

05 - "HOW BLUE CAN YOU BE" - B.M.I. - 1:31
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-23 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

This and "I'm Making Plans" are an essential part. They may not be everybody's favorite selections, but they were an undeniable part of the man who came to work at Sun Records in 1958. Material like this, demoed by Rich during his first year at Sun, was a fundamental part of who he was musically. A gig at the Vapors and the Sharecroppers might contain these songs, back-to-back with Jimmy Reed's "Big Boss Man". That kind of eclecticism or, if you will, musical schizophrenia remained central to Charlie Rich until the end. These demos are arguably among the best but there are at least half a dozen more titles in the same genre that remain unissued.

06 - "I'M MAKING PLANS" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Charlie Rich
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16152-3-33 mono
LONELY WEEKEND - THE SUN YEARS 1958 - 1962

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Rich - Vocal and Piano

For Biography of Charlie Rich see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Rich's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Joe Lewis recorded twice for Sun. There was a demo, ''Life's Too Short To Live'', cut at Sonny Burgess's first session on May 2, 1956, and seven song session here with Jack Nance. According to Nance, the seven songs were to be overdubbed, but never were.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOE LEWIS & JACK NANCE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

Sun detail hounds may care to note that shortly before joining Conway Twitty's band, members of Sonny Burgess band, Joe Lewis and Jack Nance recorded some unreleased songs a cords under the name "Joe and Jack". Producer Jack Clement intended to overdub them for release, but they remained as bed tracks. One title, "My Baby Loves Me", has been included here for a taste.

01 - "MY BABY LOVES ME" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-27 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

02 - "PRETTY BABY"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958

03 - "SO EASY"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958

04 - "LOVE YOU LIKE YOU WANT"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Joe Lewis - Vocal and Guitar
Jack Nance - Vocal and Piano
More details unknown

For Biography of Joe Lewis and Jack Nance see: > The Sun Biographies <
Joe Lewis and Jack Nance's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on >YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JOE LEWIS - Joe E. Lewis was born in the Pennington community near Newport, Arkansas, on January 4, 1937. Pennington doesn't figure on most maps, but it's in the same country, Jackson, as Newport. Lewis’s father and grandfather played at church socials, high school dances and picnics. Aged thirteen, Lewis was in a western band that played Rural Electrical Association concerts in Jackson County. He graduated from Newport High School in 1957.

In Sonny Burgess account, he auditioned at Sun soon after working with Elvis Presley at Newport's Silver Moon club, and was told by Phillips that he needed to upgrade his band. Burgess promptly hired Lewis and Jack Lance from another band. Back then, Burgess band was called the Moonlighters, and at Lois’s suggestion they renamed themselves the Pacers after the Piper Pacer airplane.

Sonny Burgess and the Pacers scored a pretty big non-charting hit on Sun with ''Red Headed Woman''. It would be the biggest record they ever had. The Pacers' recordings make it easy to visualize their bruising act. They formed human pyramids; Lewis, as the tallest and strongest, was on the bottom. They's do the Bug Dance, tossing imaginary bugs on each other before tossing them into the crowd.

On the ferry back to Arkansas after some dates in Mississippi, the Paces met Harold Jenkins who was on the point of reinventing himself as Conway Twitty. When bookings dried up for the Pacers, Lewis and Nance left to join Twitty, whose career appeared to be on the upswing. Right away, they took off for Canada. Joe Lewis stayed with Conway Twitty through his rock and roll years and his rebirth as a country star. He switched from guitar to bass, sang harmony, and did the on-stage patter after Twitty decided that he would remain enigmatically silent. That was until April 15, 1976 when Lewis died in an automobile wreck. According to his girlfriend at the time, Carol Braddom, Lewis had borrowed her red Corvette because she thought he'd be safer in a car than on his motorcycle. Braddom's girlfriend was in the car with him as they drove from Percy Priest Lake to a local store to get some food for a cookout.

Joe Lewis is buried in Newport's Walnut Grove cemetery, quite close to Jack Nance.

JACK NANCE – Richard Jackson Nance born April 22, 1935 in Newport, Arkansas, native. In addition to Conway Twitty, Nance worked with top entertainers including Dionne Warwick, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Monkees, the Moody Blues, the Fifth Dimension, the Rolling Stones, Three Dog Night, the Temptations, Herman's Hermits and others. The "others" included a group of youngsters called the Jackson Five as they rose to prominence. One of them, 12 at the time, went on to become the most famous of pop stars, Michael Jackson.

The name Jack Nance doesn't ring a bell with most folks the way some of Jackson County, Arkansas' more famous musicians do, and that's a shame, because Nance made as many contributions to the world of rock music as anyone who came out of the small town of Newport, and some of the others became famous worldwide, Newport Depot Days festival organizer Henry Boyce said. ''Nance'', Boyce said, ''never got the recognition from the public that he deserves, although he did become well-known among music producers, promoters and other musicians''. Boyce, the district prosecutor, has an extensive knowledge of Jackson County communities' influence on shaping the new kind of music in the early days of rock and roll and makes sure the annual Depot Days reflects that 1950s flavor.

Richard Jackson "Jack" Nance, was Conway Twitty's drummer during Twitty's rock and roll years of 1957 to 1965, died on April 7, 2000. Four years earlier, Nance had started writing a book about his life with author James Schefter, and the quotes from Nance in this article, unless otherwise noted, are from that manuscript, which was never completed due to Shefter's death. The title of the book was to be "It Was Never Make Believe", a play on words of Nance's song, the classic "It's Only Make Believe", which he was writing while on a tour in Canada when Twitty dropped by and helped finish the lyrics. Nance wrote the music and they co-wrote the lyrics.

"Harold Jenkins, later known as Conway Twitty and the Rock House (Rockhousers). That was his group'', Nance said. "Harold had a voice. When he was on, hairs prickled on the back of your neck. He could croon a slow song that would break your heart and he matched Roy Orbison on high notes that sounded like a silver spoon on crystal. Of course, none of us knew much about silver spoons or crystal in those days. What we knew was Dr Pepper, Mason jars and music. What we learned later was that we were midwives at the birth of rock and roll''. Nance went to Arkansas State Teachers College (now the University of Central Arkansas) in Conway in 1953 to study music and engineering, then on to Arkansas Tech University in Russellville. He was 18 when he left for college on a scholarship, and after four years he was back in Newport where the real music was.

''Newport was 1,000 people, seven nightclubs and when I was growing up it only had two things going, music and booze'', Nance said. ''We were the only wet county in any direction and the booze brought the music''. It also had illegal backroom gambling "sort of tacitly allowed" by authorities, Boyce said he has been told. The gambling, which many of the musicians may not have known about, helped pay the big money the bands got for playing the honkytonks. "You (an entertainer) could get $500 a night at the Silver Moon in Newport, when they might get $50 or $100 in Memphis," Boyce said.

When Nance blew back into Newport from college, he joined five others in a rock and roll band called the Pacers , headed by Sonny Burgess, "playing any club in Arkansas, Mississippi or Tennessee that would let us in the back door'', Nance said.

Nance was assistant band director at Newport High School for one year after returning from college. At that time, the Silver Moon in Newport was the largest club in Arkansas. Elvis Presley's group consisted only of himself, Scotty Moore on guitar and Bill Black on doublebass. Nance, at Elvis' invitation, sat in on drums whenever Elvis played area clubs such as Porky's Rooftop and the Silver Moon. (The original Silver Moon burned down about 1980 and the new Moon, on the recently renamed Rock And Roll Highway 67, is a family friendly center now where no booze is sold.)

"Sam Phillips even gave us (the Pacers) a recording contract with Sun Records, but not much ever came of it'', Nance said. "Still, I was a musician and with any luck, I was on my way. That was how I first performed with Elvis Presley, sat in with Carl Perkins and Buddy Holly, played behind Roy Orbison and met Harold Jenkins''. The two met when Jenkins, who was performing often at Porky's Rooftop near KNBY radio station, visited the Silver Moon just down the street every chance he got, to watch the Pacers perform. The problem with Harold was his choice of songs. He and the Rock House cut a single for Decca Records and it went nowhere. Right after that he called me and asked me to be his drummer, do some arranging, maybe write a little music. He also said he was changing his name. That was nothing unusual, it happened all the time (with performers). 'So, Harry, what's your name gonna be,' I asked. 'Something good?' " 'It better be,' he laughed, 'cause it sure is different. You're now talking to Conway Twitty''', Nance said.

The story of how Twitty selected his new name is legend, while looking at a map, he picked Conway from Conway, Arkansas, and Twitty from Twitty, Texas. At least, that's the most popular story. Twitty and his band were rock and roll artists then.

As a songwriter Nance produced an extensive book of songs. "It's Only Make Believe" earned gold record sales in the United States four separate times, beginning with Twitty's version in 1958. Recordings of his songs hit the charts in Britain, across Europe, in Canada, Africa and Australia and were featured on movie soundtracks and television shows. Glen Campbell's version of "It's Only Make Believe" went to number 1 on three different charts in 1970 and Ronnie McDowell's version later went to number 6. After being diagnosed with cancer just months before his death, Nance created "The Jack Nance Songbook'', which contains sheet music and lyrics of 27 songs he wrote or co-wrote that were recorded, along with introductory comments for each.

"In 1957, I was playing drums for Conway Twitty. We were in a tavern in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada named the Flamingo Lounge. We played there for nine straight weeks... The Flamingo Lounge was being remodeled while we were playing there and, since we didn't use a piano, they had moved theirs upstairs. Being so far away from my home and family, I guess I was a little homesick and would go upstairs during breaks (we would play for 30 minutes and then have a 30-minute break) and monkey around on the piano. On one particular night I started a song, ''It's Only Make Believe'', just as it was time to go back on stage. I told Conway, 'I had a good song started, and that I would like him to hear it. During the next break we went upstairs and I played piano and sang him what I had. Conway picked up, the lyrics, where I had stopped and we finished it. It took a total of seven minutes to write it. Conway didn't want to go as high as I had written it, but I convinced him that it needed to build to a climax. This was the first and most successful song that we wrote together. Conway's musical background was in country and gospel music while mine was in big band and jazz. The combination was good and we wrote some wonderful music together for the next three years'', Nance said.

However, even Twitty and Nance were convinced the best of four songs recorded on May 7, 1958 at Owen Bradley Studio in Nashville was "I'll Try" rather than "It's Only Make Believe'', so "I'll Try" was put on the A-side of the single and "It's Only Make Believe" on the B-side. The single was released during the summer and "I'll Try" went nowhere. "We were really disappointed'', Nance said. "We felt that we had given it our best shot and that if this wouldn't sell, nothing we could write would. We decided to give up the music business, go back home and do something else. "We had been at home about two weeks and I was really feeling down and defeated when Conway called. He was really excited and shouting, 'We've got a hit record''!

"A disc jockey in Columbus, Ohio, named Dr. Bop had flipped the record over and played ''It's Only Make Believe''. The people had liked it and bought it and it had become number 1 in Columbus'. The song was rereleased, so new records had to be pressed and new ads published in trade magazines. The band went to Columbus to perform and do radio interviews to push the record. The people treated us like stars, with thousands of fans flocking to the concerts and mobbing the group's car in the streets'', Nance said. "That was something new and exciting and a feeling I'll never forget. The song slowly worked its way up the charts until on November 24, 1958, "It's Only Make Believe" became the number 1 record in the United States. It went on to become No. 1 in all of the free world countries'.

Nance's widow, Newport native Vicki Lowery Nance, and stepdaughter Melissa, both of Cabot, said recently that as impressive as Nance's achievements in the music world are, they pale in comparison to him as a person. "He never, ever had a bad thing to say about anybody'', Mrs. Nance said. "He was so thoughtful. He always wanted to give people recognition (they deserved). Jack helped so many entertainers. He was so humble. He was so intelligent. He never bragged on himself''. Nance also has a son, Richard Nance, and daughter, Melanie Nance Anderson. His sister, Franchelle Nance Harrell, still lives in Newport.

After Twitty switched to country music in 1965, Nance left the band to spend more time with his family, but after a brief time away from music, was called by Dick Clark for a job in concert tour management and promotion for Dick Clark Productions, followed by similar jobs with Concerts West and Motown Records. "... Jack was smart enough to get into the business end of the music'', Boyce said. For many years, Nance worked with top entertainers including Dionne Warwick, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Monkees, the Moody Blues, the Fifth Dimension, the Rolling Stones, Three Dog Night, the Temptations, Herman's Hermits and others. The "others" included a group of youngsters called the Jackson Five as they rose to prominence. One of them, 12 at the time, went on to become the most famous of pop stars - King of Pop Michael Jackson. Later, the King of Pop called on Nance to be road manager for his 1984 Victory Tour (USA and Canada) and the world tours that followed.

In 1996, Nance and his wife Vickie were in a K-Mart when she spotted a Conway Twitty tape on a rack. She handed it to him. "I don't think you have this one'', Vickie said. "Want it''? Nance looked at the back of the cassette box, where 10 songs were listed. "You know what''? Nance mused. "I wrote eight of these songs and I played drums on all 10. Yeah, I want it''. That same year, Nance sadly recalled Twitty and his bandmates from those years. "They're all dead now. There were four of us riding the charts to the top. Conway was the name and the voice. I was the drummer. Newport native, Joe Lewis was on guitar. I was 13 and he, Lewis, was 12 when we first played together. He was good. ... Good enough to go for a long ride in the world of rock and roll. Blackie Preston was on bass.... He looked good onstage; he was a showman. They died too young. Blackie drowned in a boating accident. He was maybe 40. Joe died in a car crash at 42. Conway was 57 and had a lot of music left to sing when an aneurysm checked him out in 1993. A lot of others died, too. Elvis is gone. Roy Orbison is gone. You know about Buddy (Holly), the Bopper (J.P. Richardson, known as the Big Bopper), Ritchie Valens (who all died when their airplane crashed in an Iowa cornfield on February 3, 1959)... 'the night the music died.' "But the music didn't die. The rest of us kept it alive'', said Nance. He died April 7, 2000 in Nashville, Texas, as a result of long cancer.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WARREN SMITH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: LATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

01 - "SWEET, SWEET GIRL" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Don Gipson
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Late 1958
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15514-26 mono
WARREN SMITH - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Warren Smith - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown group, possibly included Billy Riley - Guitar

For Biography of Warren Smith see: > The Sun Biographies <
Warren Smith's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

LATE 1958

In late 1958, Slim Willet talked to Joe Johnson at Challenge Records. Johnson was looking for a saxophonist to replace Chuck Rio in the Champs, and the Champs had heard about Jimmy Seals from a local promoter-songwriter, Danny Wolfe. Willet sold Johnson on the idea of hiring Seals together with former Sun artist Dean Beard on piano, and Dash Crofts on drums, but Beard was soon fired and returned to Texas in 1959. The promised salary of $900 a week hadn't materialized, he told Wayne Russell, and he realized that he was in a band on the downslide.

DECEMBER 1958

December rolled around in Memphis, the Salvation Army bell ringers took their places at store entrances, the decorated lamps posts glittered in the early dusk, and it began to get really cold. Regina Reese answered the phone, ''Merry Christmas, Sun Records''.

The grouchy postman brought us cards and gifts from among our many contacts. Regina and Barbara Barnes asked Sally Wilbourn for many to buy a Christmas tree, but she reported that Sam Phillips refused the request, sating they could use the tree from last year that was in the storage room. Digging among the boxes of returns, they retrieved it. The tree had been fresh once, but now it was truly disgusting, brown with needles falling off. But Sam said to use it, so they did. It was about two feet tall, just the size for a table they brought to the front office. For decorations, they used whatever was at hand. Jack Clement and some of the musicians helped Regina and Barbara hang on paper clips, old pink memos, cigarette butts, a broken 45, and any other trash they could find. For the tip-top instead of a star they placed an empty beer can.

The next morning Sally reported that Sam Phillips was very disgusted and angry, demanding in profane language that they get rid of that sick Christmas tree immediately. He wasn't Scrooge entirely, though, because the day before Christmas he came in laden with gifts for everyone.

DECEMBER 22, 1958 MONDAY

Hank Snow recorded ''Chasin' A Rainbow'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

Columbia released Johnny Cash's ''Don't Take Your Guns To Town''.

DECEMBER 23, 1958 TUESDAY

Gram Parson's father, Cecil ''Coon Dog'' Connor, commits suicide with a 38-caliber pistol at his home in Waycross, Georgia.

DECEMBER 25, 1958 THURSDAY

The Everly Brothers begin a 10-day appearance at Manhattan's Loew's Theater in ''Alan Freed's Christmas Rock And Roll Spectacular'', joined on the bill by Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Jackie Wilson.

Elvis Presley, serving with the Army in West Germany, receives an electric guitar from his father for Christmas.

DECEMBER 26, 1958 FRIDAY

Johnny Cash, Tex Ritter and The Sons Of The Pioneers open at the showboat Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada.

DECEMBER 27, 1958 SATURDAY

Ricky and David Nelson share on the cover of TV Guide.

The Rosalind Russell movie ''Auntie Mame'' appears in theaters. A decade after his country hit with ''Dear Oakie'', Doye O'Dell has a bit part in the picture.

DECEMBER 28, 1958 SUNDAY

Joe Diffie is born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Emerging in 1990, he melds traditional country with borderline-novelties to create a string of hits that includes ''Ships That Don't Gome In'', ''Honky Tonk Attitude'' and ''Third Rock From The Sun''.

Mike McGuire, of Shenandoah, is born in Haleyville, Alabama. As the drummer for the group, he contributes to such hits as ''The Church On Cumberland Road'', ''Two Dozen Roses'' and ''I Want To Be Loved Like That''.

Decca released Bill Monroe's ''Gotta Travel On''.

DECEMBER 31, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Buddy Holly anonymously plays drums for country piano player Moon Mullican at a New Year's Eve show on Odessa, Texas.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958/1959

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY DECEMBER 1958/JANUARY 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT
AND/OR BILL JUSTIS

Jimmy M. Van Eaton recalls, ''A lot of stuff, some of which you've probably discovered going through the tapes, was never intended to be released. With Jerry Lee, that was how we did 80%, maybe more of the sessions. You'd just start jamming and Sam has the tape running. That's why with Jerry Lee there were often no arrangements, no beginnings, no endings.

Still trying to bail out Jerry Lee's sagging career, the folks at Sun came up with two solidly crafted contenders for the pop-teen market. There were no concessions to Jerry Lee's country leanings this time. Instead, Sam Phillips went outside his stable of composers and copyrights in search of potent material for his erstwhile moneymaker. The problem is, most top songwriters were reluctant to submit their best work to an artist who was being blacklisted by disc jockey's all over North America.

1(1) - ''LOVIN' UP A STORM" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Allyson R. Khent-Luther Dixon
Publisher: - Figure Music
Matrix number: - None - Chatter - Take 1
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rom BCD 15420-5-13 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-12 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

On this session, Jerry Lee Lewis turned his attention to ''Lovin' Up A Storm'' which, despite the continuing fulmination against his marital status, achieved a reasonable measure of eminence, briefly making the top ten in the UK. The hitherto unreleased first take of the song might just have served the purpose quite well had Jerry Lee not persisted in having another five attempts; everyone involved has got into a feisty groove for this classic rocker right from the off.(*)

1(2) - LOVIN' UP A STORM" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Allyson R. Khent-Luther Dixon
Publisher: - Figure Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 2
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-13 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(3) - LOVIN' UP A STORM" (1) - B.M.I. - 0:27
Composer: - Allyson R. Khent-Luther Dixon
Publisher: - Figure Music
Matrix number: - None - 4 False Starts - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-14 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(4) - LOVIN' UP A STORM" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:42
Composer: - Allyson R. Khent-Luther Dixon
Publisher: - Figure Music
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-15 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(5) - LOVIN' UP A STORM" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Allyson R. Khent-Luther Dixon
Publisher: - Figure Music
Matrix number: - None -False Start - Take 4
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-8-A6 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-16 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(6) - LOVIN' UP A STORM" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Allyson R. Khent-Luther Dixon
Publisher: - Figure Music
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Take 5
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD Charly 70-21 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - RARE AND ROCKIN'
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-17 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(7) - LOVIN' UP A STORM" - B.M.I. - 1:59
Composer: - Allyson R. Khent-Luther Dixon
Publisher: - Figure Music
Matrix number: - U 346 - Master
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 317-A < mono
LOVIN' UP A STRORM / BIG BLON' BABY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

On "Lovin' Up A Storm", the writers have taken meteorological rock to its pinnacle and Jerry's vocal and piano are duly frenzied. The rhythmic hook gives the song some powerful appeal, but the result are a bit too studied to be among Jerry's best work. Even so, the record deserved more of a response than it got.The powerful stop-rhythm drum intro snd those two-bar single-stroke rolls into the chorus mark this record as special.

2 - "FRANKIE AND JOHNNY" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:30
Composer: - Traditional (Alex Gottlieb-Fred Karger-Ben Weisman)
Publisher: - Williamson Music
Matrix number: - None - LP Master
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1265-A4 mono
JERRY LEE'S GREATEST
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-4-2 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

Although all versions of this song maintain a similar story line, it seems that each recording is noticably different in both lyrics and arrangement. Both the Johnny Sea and Johnny Cash releases were titled "Frankie's Man Johnny".

"Frankie and Johnny" (sometimes spelled "Frankie and Johnnie", also known as "Frankie and Albert" or just "Frankie") is a traditional American popular song. It tells the story of a woman, Frankie, who finds that her man Johnny was making love to another woman and shoots him dead. Frankie is then arrested; in some versions of the song she is also executed. The song was inspired by one or more actual murders. One of these took place in an apartment building located at 212 Targee Street in St. Louis, Missouri, at 2:00 on the morning of October 15, 1899. Frankie Baker (1876-1952), a 22-year-old woman, shot her 17-year-old lover Allen (also known as "Albert") Britt in the abdomen. Britt had just returned from a cakewalk at a local dance hall, where he and another woman, Nelly Bly (also known as "Alice Pryor" and no relation to the pioneering reporter who adopted the pseudonym Nellie Bly), had won a prize in a slow-dancing contest. Britt died of his wounds four days later at the City Hospital. On trial, Baker claimed that Britt had attacked her with a knife and that she acted in selfdefense; she was acquitted and died in a Portland, Oregon mental institution in 1952.

In 1899, popular St Louis balladeer Bill Dooley composed "Frankie Killed Allen" shortly after the Baker murder case. The first published version of the music to "Frankie and Johnny" appeared in 1904, credited to and copyrighted by Hughie Cannon, the composer of "Won't You Come Home Bill Bailey", the piece, a variant version of whose melody is sung today, was titled "He Done Me Wrong" and subtitled "Death of Bill Bailey''.

The song has also been linked to Frances "Frankie" Stewart Silver, convicted in 1832 of murdering her husband Charles Silver in Burke County, North Carolina. Unlike Frankie Baker, Silver was executed. Another variant of the melody, with words and music credited to Frank and Bert Leighton, appeared in 1908 under the title "Bill You Done Me Wrong;" this song was republished in 1912 as "Frankie and Johnny," this time with the words that appear in modern folk variations: ''Frankie and Johnny were sweethearts. They had a quarrel one day, Johnny he vowed that he would leave her. Said he was going away, He's never coming home'' also ''Frankie took aim with her forty-four, three times with a rooty-toot-toot''.

The 1912 "Frankie and Johnny" by the Leighton Brothers and Ren Shields also identifies "Nellie Bly" as the new girl to whom Johnny has given his heart. What has come to be the traditional version of the melody was also published in 1912, as the verse to the song "You're My Baby," with music is attributed to Nat. D. Ayer.

Several students of folk music have asserted that the song long predates the earliest published versions; according to Leonard Feather in his Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz it was sung at the Siege of Vicksburg (1863) during the American Civil War and Sandburg said it was widespread before 1888, while John Jacob Niles reported that it emerged before 1830. The fact, however, that the familiar version does not appear in print before 1925 is "strange indeed for such an allegedly old and well-known song," according to music historian James J. Fuld, who suggests that it "is not so ancient as some of the folk-song writers would have one believe''.

At least 256 different recordings of "Frankie and Johnny" have been made since the early 20th century, singers include Leadbelly, Mississippi John Hurt, Jimmie Rodgers, Les Paul and Mary Ford, Roscoe Holcomb, Big Bill Broonzy, Bob Dylan, Frank Crumit, Johnny Cash, Doc Watson, Pete Seeger, Mississippi Joe Callicott, Charlie Patton, Taj Mahal, Charlie Poole, Sam Cooke, Lena Horne, Lonnie Donegan, Jerry Lee Lewis, Gene Vincent, Fats Waller, Van Morrison, Michael Bloomfield, Brook Benton, Lindsay Lohan, Chris Smither, Jack Johnson, Burl Ives, Sammy Davis, Jr., Anika Noni Rose, and Stevie Wonder. A 1966 recording by Elvis Presley became a gold record as the title song of a Presley movie.

The earliest country recording of a Frankie song is Ernest Thompson's 1924 Columbia recording of "Frankie Baker", which is listed in Tony Russell's "Country Music Records A Discography, 1921-1942", Oxford University Press. 2004. Thompson was a blind street singer from Winston-Salem, Noth Carolina. As a jazz standard it has also been recorded by numerous bands and instrumentalists including Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, Bunny Berigan, Dave Brubeck, Duke Ellington, and Benny Goodman. Champion Jack Dupree set his version in New Orleans, retitling it "Rampart and Dumaine''.

The story of Frankie and Johnny has been the inspiration for several films, including ''Her Man'' (1930, starring Helen Twelvetrees), ''Frankie And Johnnie'' (1936, starring Helen Morgan), and ''Frankie And Johnny'' (1966, starring Elvis Presley). Terrence McNally's 1987 play, ''Frankie And Johnny'' in the Clair de Lune, was adapted for a 1991 film titled ''Frankie aAd Johnny'' starring Al Pacino and Michelle Pfeiffer. In 1930 director and actor John Huston wrote and produced a puppet play titled ''Frankie And Johnnie'' based on the Frankie Baker case. One of Huston's main sources was his interview with Baker and Britt’s neighbor Richard Clay.

Comedian Harry Langdon performed the song in his 1930 short "The Fighting Parson'', in a variant on his vaudeville routine originally performed in blackface. Mae West inserted her ballad in her successful Broadway play Diamond Lil. West sang the ballad again in her 1933 Paramount film ''She Done Him Wrong'', which takes its title from the refrain, substituting genders. She also sang it many years later (1978) on the CBS television special ''Back Lot U.S.A''. The song was used in the 1932 film ''Red-Headed Woman'', in a scene where actress Jean Harlow's character is drinking and lamenting having been jilted by her married lover. It is also sung by a river boat crew in ''Bed Of Roses'', a film released the following year. Yvonne De Carlo sings the song while masquerading as an opera singer in the 1949 film ''The Gal Who Took The West''. Moira Kelly sings it in the 1996 film ''Entertaining Angels: The Dorothy Day Story''.

A dazzling musical number from the 1956 MGM film ''Meet Me In Las Vegas'' featured Cyd Charisse and dancer John Brascia acting out the roles of Frankie and Johnny while Sammy Davis, Jr. sang the song. Mia Farrow, in the role of Jacqueline De Bellefort, sang/hummed a drunken rendition of the song in the 1978 version of ''Agatha Christie's Death On The Nile'', just before she attempts to shoot her former lover, Simon Doyle, played by Simon MacCorkindale. The climax of Robert Altman's 2006 film ''A Prairie Home Companion'' is Lindsay Lohan's rendition of the song with quasi-improvisatory lyrics by Garrison Keillor. The tune is often used for comic effect in animated cartoon shorts, such as the 1932 Disney cartoon ''The Klondike Kid'' (starring Mickey Mouse) and various ones produced by Warner Bros. or MGM in the 1940s and 1950s, as a theme or leitmotif for a meretricious woman. The song was the basis of a 1951 UPA cartoon ''Rooty Toot Toot'', directed by John Hubley. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Short Subject.

3(1) - "BIG BLON' BABY" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:39
Composer:- Rhoda Roberts-Kenny Jacobson
Publisher: - Alamo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 347 - Master
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - February 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 317-B < mono
BIG BLON' BABY / LOVIN' UP A STORM
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Big Blon' Baby" had been recorded previously by Ronnie Self, whose version stiffed as badly as Jerry Lee's. The exclamation "Jumpin' Jehosaphat, Big blon' baby!" was obviously intended to rekindle memories of "Goodness gracious, great balls of fire". It didn't. Musically, the record has its pros and cons. Roland (if indeed its him) takes one of his least memorable recorded solos, although Jimmy Van Eaton's final single stoke drum roll is a moment to be reckoned with. In 1979 Jerry Lee Lewis re-cut (the only real rocker on (the ''Would You Take Another Chance On Me'' album) is hotter, faster and wilder, but also somehow lacks the charm of the earlier cut.

3(2) - "BIG BLON' BABY" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:22
Composer:- Rhoda Roberts-Kenny Jacobson
Publisher: - Alamo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Unknown Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-21 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

Judging from some exchanges between Sam Phillips and Jerry Lee Lewis following the recording of ''Big Blon' Baby'', the song chosen to partner ''Lovin' Up A Storm'' as the flip of Sun 317, the prevailing mood in the studio was quite light-hearted. Sam asks that Jerry Lee should ''wail from the heart'' when setting himself to deal with the next matter on the agenda; the response doesn't lend itself to being reproduced in pint. Notwithstanding the flippancy, Jerry Lee set about his interpretation of the Hank Williams classic, ''I Could Never Be Ashamed Of You'' with all due reverence. A strange twist in the vocal, introducing the contortion ''pray-haps'' in place of ''perhaps'', occurs both in the first take and in the third, which proved to be the master. Despite that slip, the latter recording, which features an especially accomplished solo, was chosen for the country radio stations to spin as an alternative to Jerry Lee's sublime cover of Chuck Berry's ''Little Queenie'' when the two were paired on Sun 330.(*)

It would seem, however, that there may have been some concerns over the similarity of the first few bars of this version of the song with the introduction to the issued cut of ''Fools Like Me'', sufficient to encourage another attempt in pursuit of a more innovative opening. But the several subsequent efforts reflect the perils of over-ambition; too much swing, too much embellishment with the right hand and too little sincerity. They're something of a hotchpotch and the number of alse starts should have made it obvious to all involved that they were over-egging the pudding; nothing matched the quality of the earlier work on the song.(*)

4 - STUDIO CHATTER - 0:29
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-22 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(1) - "I COULD NEVER BE ASHAMED OF YOU" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-23 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(2) - "I COULD NEVER BE ASHAMED OF YOU" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-9-20 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-9-24 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

5(3) - "I COULD NEVER BE ASHAMED OF YOU" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:23
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - Acuff Rose Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 377 - Master
Recorded: - December 1958/January 1959
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 330-B < mono
I COULD NEVER BE ASHAMED OF YOU / LITTLE QUEENIE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Jerry Lee Lewis dips into the Hank Williams songbook for a powerful reading of the country classic. All things considered, this is a pretty stripped down version, with Jerry's piano handling all the solo chores and Roland Janes' guitar buried deep in the mix. Ironically, Jerry has taken such liberties with the lyrics that he's managed to soften, if not alter the impact of Williams' original intent. There's a hell of a different between singing "Makes no difference what you used to do" and "Makes no difference what they say or do". Given the well-known litany of sexual accusations Jerry put childbride Myra through, its not surprising his version of the lyric seems a lot more forgiving of his buddies than his girlfriend.

Williams cut ''I Could Never Be Ashamed Of You'' at his last recording session in Nashville at Castle Studio in the Tulane Hotel, with Fred Rose did the producing. By this point, the singer had been fired from the Grand Ole Opry for drunkenness and had returned to Shreveport to play the Louisiana Hayride. Although he was in terminal decline, the quality of the songs Williams recorded at his final session was astonishing, "I Could Never Be Ashamed of You'', "Take These Chains From My Heart'', "Kaw-Liga'', and "Your Cheatin' Heart''. As biographer Colin Escott marvels, "Most singers hope to hang their careers on one or two classics; Hank cut four classics between 1:30 and 3:40 on the afternoon of September 23, 1952...". Williams was backed by Tommy Jackson (fiddle), Don Helms (steel guitar), Chet Atkins (lead guitar), Jack Shook (rhythm guitar), and Floyd "Lightnin'" Chance (bass). A demo version of Williams singing this song with just his guitar, likely recorded in 1951, is also available.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON

HALL RECORDING STUDIO
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
STUDIO SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958-1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – UNKNOWN

Here nine rock and roll recordings from the Hall studio, made between 1958 and 1961, none of which were issued on records at the time. They all feature Hayden on guitar or piano with Travis Westmoreland and Bob Miller for support, although probably a fourth person plays guitar or piano, depending which Hayden is playing.

For this eight Chicago recordings described here and included, there are at least as many again that Hayden recorded in his Tally Ho years; none were released at that time, but some appeared on LP and CD in the 1980s and 1990s. Others may have been planned for release by Eli Toscano, who told Billboard in December 1958 that he had signed Hayden to his Cobra label.

''Goin' Steady'' is performed as an effective country rocker about a girl qho's about to be taken off the market. Country singer Faron Young has the writer's credit for this song but contemporary documentation seems to show clearly that Hank Williams wrote the song and sold it to Young. The vocal style is all Hayden, and his piano playing cab be heard on this track.

01 – ''GOIN' STEADY'' – B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Faron Young
Publisher: - Campbell-Connelly Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-6 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-12 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

''Call Me Shorty'', was one of many late 1950s songs that played on the ''big cigar and Cadillac car'' theme, celebrating the Presley-esque success that could be achieved, aspired to, or manipulated. Think of ''All American Boy'' and the like, ''Shorty'' was first released on Dot Records in February 1958 by Mickey Gilley, future country star and the cousin to Jerry Lee Lewis, but at the time just one of a growing band of singers helping to crystallise and recycle what was becoming the generic sound of Presley-inspired rock and roll.

Paradoxically, now many miles and several years removed from Presley's direct influence, Hayden Thompson joined a throng of other singers in starting to sound more like a conscious Elvis imitator than he ever had at Sun.

''Call Me Shorty'' starts with an attacking bass-led rhythm and hot guitar licks and boasts a considerable sound for just three musicians.

If talks about the singer being ''some kins of a king'' and Hayden throws in a Presley-style mumbled ''uh huh'' at the end to emphasise the link

02 – ''CALL ME SHORTY'' – B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Charles Matthews
Publisher: - Fellows Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-2 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-10 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

''I'll Hold You In My Heart'' is an impressively sung version of the big Eddy Arnold country hit of the 1940s. This is the one song where Hayden is singing very much in the Presley mould, but if Hayden's dates on his demo recording are correct, his version came some ten years before Presley recorded the song in 1969.

03 – ''I'LL HOLD YOU IN MY HEART'' – B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Tony Dilbeck-Hal Horten-Eddy Arnold
Publisher: - Adams Vee & Abbot Inc.
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-8 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-11 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

04 – ''FRANKIE AND JOHNNY'' – B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-7 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-14 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Hayden Thompson remembered, ''These were all songs we were doing regularly at the Tally Ho Club. I was there for four years or so and Hank Ballard had come out with ''The Twist'', so I worked up a version of Chuck Berry's ''Brown Eyed Handsome Man'' and added a twist theme to it. We recorded it that way. Similar thing with, ''Frankie And Johnnie'', it was a traditional song that we fooled around with and made a cha cha theme to it. That would have been around 1959 or 1960''.

05 – ''BROWN EYED HANDSOME MAN'' – B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Chuck Berry
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-1 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-15 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Hayden may also be playing piano on a rocking version of ''Kansas City Blues'', the Leiber and Stoller song associated with blues singer Little Willie Littlefield. This recording takes a hurried pace, led by guitar and piano, and features a fine exploratory solo by Travis Westmoreland and some improvised words by Hayden. Although taken from a scratched acetate, it is a favourite of Hayden's, partly because he once sent the acetate to a record company only to find it years later in the hands of a record collector who asked him to sign it. Hayden had to pay to buy it back.

06 – ''KANSAS CITY (BLUES)'' – B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Jerry Leiber-Mike Stoller
Publisher: - Jerry Leiber Music – Mike Stoller Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1959
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-5 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-15 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

07 – ''PRETENDING'' – B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1960
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-10 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: - 1997 Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm CD 270131-2-16 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – LOVE MY BABY

08 – ''IT WON'T BE LONG UNTIL THE SUMMER'' – B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-3 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: - 1997 Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm CD 270131-2-13 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – LOVE MY BABY

09 – ''OLD KRIS KRINGLE'' – B.M.I. - 1:29
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Ridgetop Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1961
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sunjay Records Sweden (LP) 33rpm SJLP 569-21 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – EARLY DAYS
Reissued: - 1997 Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm CD 270131-2-19 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON – LOVE MY BABY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson – Vocal & Piano, Acoustic Guitar
Travis Westmoreland – Guitar
Bob Miller – Drums
Unknown – Piano

For Biography of Hayden Thompson see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1958-1959

The studio was busy most of the time in 1958-1959, not just with the big names, but with an assortment of aspiring musicians who remained in obscurity. For every artist who made it big, Sun had dozens who dreamed of, but never realized, stardom. Some sang country, some rock and roll, some novelty, most all of them a mixture of different types of music.

Two of them were Edwin Bruce and Dickey Lee. Although they were different in their singing and songwriting, and they didn't work together, they were college boys from Memphis State. Dickey Lee even called his band ''The Collegiates''. Sun had releases on both of them in 1958, but they sold poorly. Edwin, who had signed with Sun he was a senior in high school, was the younger and had the more mellow voice. Both had their share of fame later in the music business as singers and songwriters.

Barbara Pittman was one of several women vocalists who recorded for Sun and Phillips International but whose records never caught on. A friend of Elvis's from way back, she was the only one of sun's few women performers who was decidedly rockabilly. Some of the less charitable musicians complained she couldn't sing, but she was managing to squeak out a living in the music business with club dates.

Young Sherry Crane's ''Willie Willie'' and releases by Maggie Sue Wimberly as well as the Miller Sisters were never good sellers. Rockabilly did have a few women successes on other labels, but Sun were never able to launch one. The public preferred the sweet singers like Patti Page or the country ladies like Patsy Cline.

There were far more men than women who never made it. One is by the name of Rudi Richardson. The Aside was a great tune, ''Fools Hall Of Fame''. Rudy was a very smooth black rhythm and blues singer, who had also recorded for other labels, sometimes as Rudy Richardson. It was a surprise to read of his death in 1958 in the Memphis paper, which said he had worked as a female impersonator in Chicago and had died in a Memphis hotel from alcoholism and an overdose of drugs.

A few of Sun's artist who never got a hit on Sun later did so on other labels. For example, Harold Dorman went with Billy Riley on a label he had formed called Rita Records and got a hit on ''Mountain Of Love''. Johnny Rivers, one of many artists who either couldn't get an audition with Sun or who were turned down, also covered the song.

The ''New Sounds'' column of the September 1959 Sun-Liners echoed once again the idea of the next Elvis. Smooth-talking George Klein, his manager, was touting the Elvis soundalike Jerry McGill, who was strictly a good-looker. The record ''Lovestruck'' went nowhere, and Jerry, like his record, just faded out of the Sun scene.

The other release being spotlighted in that issue was a redo of the Elvis debut hit, Mystery Train''. Everybody thought maybe Vernon Taylor's cover might make it, because this was a good arrangement and Taylor had an appealing voice. He had some regional success with his first release, thanks partly to the energetic promotion of his manager, Don Owens, a disk jockey with WARL in Arlington, Virginia, the jocks to give it some spins, but this was the summer of Paul Anka. At Sun they often identified with these youngsters who came in with such high hopes and felt sad for them when so often they were disappointed. It was a great feeling to let newcomers know their records were selling and if they found eventually success.

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Live Recordings Published for Historical Reasons

LIVE PERFORMANCE FOR JOHNNY CASH 1958/1959
SESSION HOURS - UNKNOWN

Compilation of two radio Programmes Country Style U.S.A. episode 18 and Country Music Time episode 141.

The first show was recorded at Owen Bradley's Quonset Hut, 804 16th Avenue South in Nashville, Tennessee, for the TV show ''Country Style USA'' hosted by Charlie Applewhite, previously a regular singer on the Milton Berle TV Show who recorded for Decca. While in the US Army from 1956 to 1958, Charlie hosted numerous shows for the US Army Recruiting Service, ''Go Go Army And grow''! These recording were broadcast by more than 1875 radio stations in the USA but also as far as Puerto Rico, Hawaii and Guam.

Johnny Cash sings the warm up song ''Stay All Night, Stay A Little Longer'' with Marshall Grant and Luther Perkins. Next are ''There You Go'' and ''Give My Love To Rose'' before Carolee Cooper goes on ''White Silver Sands'' backed by a steel guitar player and the Tennessee Two. Carolee, daughter of Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper are sixteen in March 1958.

''Home Of The Blues'' is the last song before closing time with Johnny Cash, Charlie Applewhite and Carolee going on ''Stay All Night, Stay A Little Longer''. This 13 minutes long show was included in the DVD ''Country Style USA – Season 2'' issued by Bear Family BCD 17308 in 2007.

01 – ''INTRO - STAY ALL NIGHT, STAY A LITTLE LONGER'' – B.M.I. - (0:53)
Composer: - Bob Wills-Tommy Duncan
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-1 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

02 - ''THERE YOU GO'' – B.M.I. (1:37)
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-2 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

03 – ''GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE'' – B.M.I. - (3:01)
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-3 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

04 – ''WHITE SILVER SANDS''*– B.M.I. - (3:12)
Composer: - Charles ''Red'' Matthews-Gladys Reinhardt
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-4 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

05 – ''HOME OF THE BLUES'' – B.M.I. - (2:40)
Composer: - Johnny Cash-Glenn Douglas-Lily McAlpin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-5 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

06 – ''OUTRO - STAY ALL NIGHT, STAY A LITTLE LONER''* – B.M.I. - (1:24)
Composer: - Bob Wills-Tommy Duncan
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-6 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

Name (Or. No. of Instruments)
Johnny Cash – Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins – Guitar
Marshall Grant – Upright Bass
Carolee Cooper – Vocals*
Charlie Applewhite – Guitar and Vocals*
Unknown – Steel Guitar

The second show, running for 10 minutes, is a ''Country Music Time'' performance recorded in Hollywood probably late 1959. Another recording made to promote the US Army and in that special case the US Air Force. Hosted by Sergeant Tom Daniels, attached to the US Armed Force Network (AFN) that broadcast as far as Europe and Pacific, Johnny Cash delivers ''I Got Stripes'' and ''Pickin’ Time'', two songs cut for Columbia. Next to guest Johnny Western who goes on ''Ten Years'', written by Jack Clement, issued in October 1959 also on Columbia. Very nice country song with piano and strong backing. The show ends with a short rendition of Swing Low Sweet Chariot

01 – ''INTRO'' – B.M.I. - (0:54)
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-7 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

02 – ''I GOT STRIPS'' – B.M.I. - (2:31)
Composer: - Johnny Cash-Hank Williams
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-8 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

03 – PICKIN' TIME'' – B.M.I. - (2:49
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-9 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

04 – ''TEN YEARS''** – B.M.I. - (3:03)
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-10 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

According to Johnny Western, ''Jack Clement wrote ''Ten Years'' and I recorded the Columbia Records version of it the night that we recorded ''Johnny Yuma and the Little Drummer Boy''. There was time for one more song; Johnny Cash’s band backed me up on that song. Richard Weize, the president of Bear Family records, always liked that song. Richard interest in releasing that song for ''Unseen Cash'' is because all of Johnny Cash's musicians are on that song and it was written by Clement, who had written so many hit songs for Cash. I loved that song, and it was my first commercial record. ''Paladin'' was my first record, but I consider that a western record and it was for TV''.

05 – ''SWING LOW SWEET CHARIOT'' B.M.I. - (1:51)
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-11 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

06 – ''OUTRO'' – B.M.I. - (1:29)
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Peer International
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - Probably March 1958
Released: - 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17308-12 mono
UNSEEN CASH – LIVE RECORDINGS

Name (Or. No. of Instruments)
Johnny Cash – Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins – Guitar
Marshall Grant – Upright Bass
Johnny Western – Vocals**
Unknown – Piano


Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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