CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS 10
October 1, 1958 to October 31, 1958

Studio Session for Jimmy Isle, October 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jimmy Demopoulos, Probably End 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jimmy Demopoulos, October 1, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, October 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl McVoy, October 4, 5, 8, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Vernon Taylor, October 27, 31, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jack Clement, October 30, 1958 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1958

Even though he was no longer an Sun employee, but Jud Phillips was not gone from the scene. He made a personal management deal with Jerry Lee Lewis and continued to book and promote him. He also had lingering hopes of remaining attached to Sun through some artists he wanted to get recorded. One afternoon a was an conversation in which he was pitching some of them to Sam Phillips. None of the names meant anything to as he reeled them off, bur for every one that he proposed, Sam would shake his head. The one Jud was hyping the most had a whimsical name, Cookie and the Cupcakes.

Jud was saying that they were an rhythm and blues, or what later heard called swamp-pop, group from Lake Charles, Louisiana, and that they'd had good radio play and sales in the area around the Louisiana and Texas border. Jud thought that with the right recording and promotion, they could generate national sales and compete with East Coast doo-wop groups.

Jud had been booking them as an opening act for Jerry Lee Lewis's shows, and they could grab a crowd, he said. He continued, stressing that they had a good beat for dancing and were a well-behaved group. ''You won't have any trouble with these guys, they're professionals'', he said.

Sam again shook his head to signify a categorical ''no''. ''So you don't want,'' and then repeated the names of all the acts he was pushing, concluding with ''and you don't want Cookie and the Cupcakes''. Jud stated this ironically, with a look of disdain on his face to convey how pigheaded and wrong his brother could be.

Jud and Sam Phillips were a great team, each without peer in his specialty in selling records. But their relationship was always at the point of eruption, perhaps there was a strong element of sibling rivalry in their relationship. In fact, once Jud told he wasn't the favored son, Sam was. At the same time, a recognized an unbreakable bond of blood and love, as well as respect for the talents of the other. Not too long after this conversation, a 45 record showed up in the Sun office with a blue label bearing the name Judd. Employees had heard rumors Jud was starting how own label, and here was the proof, ''Mathilda'', by Cookie and the Cupcakes. It made it to number 47 on the Billboard charts, and Jud booked them on American Bandstand and on an Alan Freed tour. They continued to open for Jerry Lee Lewis, and put out a follow-up to ''Mathilda'', but they never did make it big.

OCTOBER 1958

Jud Phillips takes over the management of Jerry Lee Lewis, but the artist remains with Sun. Sam Phillips re-signed Jerry Lee Lewis to a new five-year contract at the beginning of September 1958, with a 5 percent artist royalty rate (up from the 4 to which he had agreed just nine months earlier) and recognition of a yet-to-be established publishing company in Jerry Lee's name.

The second Ray Smith release on Sun came in October 1958, coupling ''Why Why Why'' with ''You Made A Hit''. Both songs had been recorded some months before, but the decision to lead with a ballad, ''Why Why Why'', was recorded again that September, after which a vocal chorus overdubbing session by The Confederates was hastily arranged.

Billboard' recommended the disc, describing ''Why Why Why'' as a "deeply felt ballad effort" with a "soulful delivery in a slow tempo''. They found ''You Made A Hit'' to be a "good rockabilly blues effort" and again compared Ray's vocal style to that of Elvis Presley. Despite this, the record did not become anything more than a regional hit in some territories. It helped Ray get some more exposure but it didn't catapult him into the really big time.

The singles, PI 3534 ''Crazy Baby'' b/w ''I Was A Fool'' by Ken Cook; PI 3535 ''Bop Train'' b/w ''String Of Pearls-Cha Hot Cha'' by Bill Justis and His Orchestra all issued.

Eddie Bond, who'd recorded at Sun without seeing a release by this point, starts Stomper Time Records from his office at 64 Flicker Street, Memphis.

Sam Phillips released the first Charlie Rich single on the Phillips International label titled PI 3532, ''Philadelphia Baby'' b/w ''Whirlwind'', and it wasn't a very good record, a song Margaret Ann had helped shape with the explicit aim of getting Charlie on Dick Clark's Philadelphia-based American Bandstand, with an equally undistinguished pop artifact on the B-side. Both songs were marked by un-sun-like modulations, adept piano playing, and a throbbing voice that would have been more suited to more throbbing material. The record did get Charlie Rich booked on American Bandstand, but then the appearance was canceled at the last minute. The record didn't really sell, and, Sam Phillips had to admit, it didn't deserve to sell.

OCTOBER 1958

1958 was a big year for Gene Simmons. In April his first single was shipped, albeit some eighteen months after it had been recorded. He was called back into the Sun studio for some more sessions. Club dates around Memphis were plentiful and the future looked fairly bright and assured.

In October 1958 Gene even had a little ''boudoir brawl'', as the local papers called it, to enhance his image. After playing a gig at Danny's Club in West Memphis, Gene and his bass player Jesse Carter noticed that two female patrons were in need of a ride home. Ever the gentlemen, Gene and Jesse Carter escorted the ladies to their front doors and then, to ensure that no harm would befall them, even to their bedroom doors. After his courtesy had been rewarded, Gene fell asleep only to awake a few hours later when he became aware of being beaten with a shoe, which he later discovered to be his own shoe. The gentlemen wielding the shoe seemed to think that he had first call upon the affections of the lady, Mrs. Billie Jean Pennington, a divorced mother. The gentleman had even baby-sat Mrs. Pennington's daughter the previous evening while Billie Jean had cavorted with the rock and roll singer. Gene, realising at once that this was not a regular wake-up call, fled the house in a state of some considerable undress.

And that is what rock and roll singers did in the era before they took heroin and cocaine and bit the heads off live chickens, in case you didn't know. Despite fourteen blows to the head with his own show, Gene went back to Danny's Club the following night to discover a capacity crowd. And that is what a whiff of scandal will do to an artist's drawing power, in case you didn't know.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

After being signed to Sun Records, Jimmy Isle was brought to Memphis to record one session (from which two singles were drawn) with Jack Clement at the helm. Once again, Isle's music is geared to the white teenager marketplace. Its biggest selling point remains the rhythmic hook Isle and company have borrowed from Bo Diddley. Again Billboard was cautiously impressed, assigning both sides (SUN 318) a three star rating. They credited Isle with singing "with spirit and style" and said the sides "should be watched". it is likely that more people watched them than listened to them.

Sun 332 is the last of Jimmy Isle's three Sun singles. By virtually any measure, it is the least effective of the lot. Once again, Isle hangs his hope on a rhythmmic riff but softens the impact of the disk with some sweet girlish voices. The truth is, not many Sun fans ever made it through the first couplet of "What A Life".

Its hard to imagine Warren Smith or Billy Riley with growing pains shooting through their veins. If they ever had them, its a cinch they never whined about them like this. And be assured you're listening to the only Sun record featuring repeated use of the word "strife".

STUDIO SESSION FOR JIMMY ISLE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE OCTOBER 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01 - "WITHOUT A LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Jimmy Isle-Ronnie Isle
Publisher: - Kenny Marlow Music - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 353 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Released: - March 23, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 318-B < mono
WITHOUT A LOVE / TIME WILL TELL
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

02 - "TIME WILL TELL" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Jimmy Isle-Ronnie Isle
Publisher: - Kenny Marlow Music - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 352 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Released: - March 23, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 318-A < mono
TIME WILL TELL / WITHOUT A LOVE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-4-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

03 - "WHAT A LIFE" - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Jimmy Isle-Ronnie Isle
Publisher: - Kenny Marlow Music - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 380 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 332-A < mono
WHAT A LIFE / TOGETHER
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

04 – "TOGETHER" - B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Jimmy Isle-Ronnie Isle
Publisher: - Wonder Music - Kenny Marlow Music
Matrix number: - U 381 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Released: - September 15, 1959
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single > Sun 332-B < mono
TOGETHER/ WHAT A LIFE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-1-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4

Things don't improve much on this side. "Together" is Isle's entry into the Frankie Avalon sweepstakes, which probably wasn't a bad idea in the fall of 1959 when this record was released. In any case, SUN 332 stiffed big time, thereby ending Isle's one year association with the label.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Isle - Vocal
Bill Riley - Guitar
Pat O'Neill - Bass
Tommy Ross - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano
Martin Willis - Sax
Unknown Vocal Chorus

For Biography of Jimmy Isle see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jimmy Isle's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jimmy Demopoulos was son of a Greek immigrant, Nick Demopoulos, who ran the local American Legion Restaurant in Memphis. He first came to prominence at age 18 when he won a singing contest at the 1956 Mid-South Fair. He sang "Moonglow: and told everyone that Eddie Fisher was his favorite artist, as if we couldn't guess. Later that year, he started a course in dentistry, went on the Ted Mack TV show, and auditioned for Lawrence Welk. No surprises there, either.

In 1958, he finally persuaded Bill Justis to take a chance on him. "The thing that worried us", Justis told the Memphis Press Scimitar in January 1959, "is that we were afraid his voice was too good, too clean. He's great. Is he commercial?". Mercifully, the answer was "No!".

STUDIO SESSION FOR JIMMY DEMOPOULIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY END 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

01 - "HOPELESS LOVE" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Gwen McEwen
Publisher: - Justis Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 339 - Master
Recorded: - Probably End 1958
Released: - February 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3537-A < mono
HOPELESS LOVE / IF I HAD MY WAY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-21 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

This track, released simultaneously with Jack Clement's "The Minstrel Show", completed the coup de grace for many Sun fans who were sampling the waters on the PI release schedule. "Hopeless Love" indeed. It's not so much that this is a bad record; it just shouldn't be a Sun record.

02 - "IF I HAD MY WAY" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:45
Composer: - Kendis-Klein
Publisher: - Paul Pioneer
Matrix number: - P 340  - Master
Recorded: - Probably End 1958
Released: - February 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > 3537-B < mono
IF I HAD MY WAY / HOPELESS LOVE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-22 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5
 
Bill Justis chose "If I Had My Way", a 1913 song popularized by barbershop quartets (and revived by Bing Crosby as the title song for a movie in 1940), as the A-side. Sales were probably good among Memphis' Greek community, but insufficiently good to persuade Sam Phillips to take another chance on him. Demopoulos went on to record for Pepper Records before being inducted into the Army as a dental assistant. He later changed his name to Jimmy Damon and worked as a nightclub singer in Chicago for a few years before disappearing from view.
 
03 - "CAREFUL''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably End 1958
 
04 - "SOMEWHERE IN THE WORL''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably End 1958
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Demopoulos – Vocal
Charlie Rich - Piano
Unknown Musicians
 
For Biography of Jimmy Demopoulos see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jimmy Demopoulos' Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JIMMY DEMOPOULOS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY END 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT
MUSICAL DIRECTOR - BILL JUSTIS

01 - "SOMEWHERE IN THE WORLD''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 1, 1958

02 - "JUST LIVE FOR YOUR LETTERS''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 1, 1958

03 - "BABY LET'S ROCK''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 1, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Demopoulos – Vocal
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Jimmy Demopoulos see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jimmy Demopoulos' Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1958

Just southwest of Huntington, Tennessee, an unmarked dirt road leads to a logging camp Carl Mann was born on that road, and returned there after a bizarre odyssey that brought him near the top of the charts and to the ocean playgrounds of the rich and famous. He was playing local radio stations when he was thirteen and had his first hit when he was sixteen, but by the time he was nineteen the party had ended and Mann had taken the bottle for a friend.

Sun's promotion manager, Cecil Scaife, took the initiative to sign Mann. ''We had invited this guy in from Jackson, Tennessee, but his car blew up on him, so we just had the backing group: Carl Mann, Eddie Bush, and W. S Holland. Carl did a beat arrangement of ''Mona Lisa''. He was playing it on the piano and faking a lot of it. I turned the machine on and I remember thinking. ''This ol' boy has the potential of cutting a hit if we can get it right''.

''I couldn't watt for Sam to hear ''Mona Lisa'', but he wasn't interested in it. Weeks and months went by, and then Conway Twitty was on his way into town and called to see if I had any material in our publishing catalogs for him to record. He was coming off ''It's Only Make Believe'', and I had helped get that song off the ground because we had been old friends from Helena. I played Conway the arrangement of ''Mona Lisa'' and he got excited. I said, 'You can borrow the arrangement if you put it out on an LP. I still have hopes of putting it out as a single''. Conway put it out on an LP and then MGM pulled an EP from the album and ''Mona Lisa'' started getting a lot of play in the Midwest.

''I took the charts to Sam and said, We're losing a hit', but Sam said, 'We don't put out mediocre product'. There was a disc jockey convention coming up in Miami and I said, 'Sam, unless you tell me not to put out ''Mona Lisa'', I'm gonna put it out and do a promo number in Miami that everyone will remember'. So I put it out, and hired a model to stand in the hotel lobby with a a sash saying 'Ask Me abut ''Mona Lisa''', handing out promo copies. I was telling everyone that we had the original, even though Conway's version had come out first. It was Dick Blonde, who was a top-rated disc jockey in Buffalo, who broke the record for us. He laid on it till it started to cut loose''.

Mann's reveal of ''Mona Lisa'', a Nat King Cole hit from 1951, may not have had the visceral quality that Phillips cherished, but it benefits from an unusual contrast. Mann delivers his vocal straight as an arrow with good range and clear diction: against that vocal is juxtaposed the eccentric guitar of Eddie Bush. Many talented pickers had set up their amps in the old Sun studio and, in his way, Bush was as good as any of them. His fills and solos were harmonically and technically advanced, and he allied sheer technique with a brilliant musical imagination.

''Mona Lisa'' took off, eventually peaking at number 25 on the Billboard charts. Whisked from Huntingdon into a promotional vortex, Mann was booked into New York, and then onto the 1959 Summer Dance Party tour. The Winter Dance Party earlier that year had claimed the lives of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper. As Mann, Skip and Flip, Jo Ann Campbell, and the rest of the performers followed in the footsteps of the earlier tour, they took grim notice of Holly's autograph scratched onto changing room walls.

Phillips' delight was compounded by the outrage he encountered from the publisher of the song, who tried to deny Sun a mechanical license after they'd heard Mann's unorthodox rendition. Phillips had now been a thorn in the side of the industry, a role he relished, for almost a decade.

OCTOBER 1, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Private Elvis Presley arrives in Bremerhaven, West Germany, where he's greeted by an estimated 1,500 fans. He will reside in Europe for the next 17 months, serving out the remainder of his military tour of duty.

OCTOBER 2, 1958 THURSDAY

Roy Drusky recorded his debut single, ''Just About That Time''.

OCTOBER 2-10, 1958

Jerry Lee Lewis performs in Texas with Carl Perkins.

OCTOBER 1959

The innovative guitar style of Eddie Bush underpins the music of Carl Mann who deserved to achieve more than one major hit, ''Mona Lisa''. His first disc for Phillips International quickly elevated Mann to Phillips' best-selling artist, although the competition was admittedly thinner at the time. The lighter and undeniably prettier sound that Mann adopted contrasted sharply with the darker tones that Phillips had nurtured in his earliest artists. However, Mann was indisputably the right horse for the course as the 1950s drew to a close and, in retrospect, it is surprising that he only managed one hit of epic proportions. The follow-ups did well but none could quite recapture the fleeting success of that first Phillips International single.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE OCTOBER 1958
THIS SESSION WAS PAID FOR ON FRIDAY JULY 3, 1959
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - CECIL SCAIFE AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

Carl Mann's scenario is at variance with Cecil Scaife's account. Scaife had been hired as promotion manager shortly after Sam Phillips brother, Jud, left Sun in mid-1958, and he told Billboard (August 10, 1959) that the audition had been arranged for Eddie Bush but that he became interest in Carl's arrangement of "Mona Lisa". Twenty-five years later, Scaife said that the audition was scheduled for Rayburn Anthony, but, Anthony failed to show so the group decided to play for their own amusement.

''Mona Lisa'' was written for the 1950 movie "Captain Carey, U.S.A.", in which it was heard in fragments and only in Italian. It won the Oscar for Best Song.

01(1) - "MONA LISA" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:21
Composer: - Jay Livingston-Ray Evans
Publisher: - Famous Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-23 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-7-15 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

This version here was the first take in one of the boxes - and may well have been Carl's first stab at it. The consistency in the approach is hardly surprising in view of the fact that Carl Mann and his group had been performing the song for years. Eddie Bush had heard the Nat Cole version while he was stationed in Hawaii and, after joining Mann's group, he would sing the song straight (ie. in Cole's ballad style), then Carl would rock it up, and the contrast would usually get a big hand.

"Carl did a beat arrangement of "Mona Lisa", says Scaife. "it was one of my favourite songs, and Carl was playing it on the piano with two fingers of his left hand and three on his right.

He was faking a lot of it, but I turned the machine on and I remember thinking, 'This ole boy has a potential of cutting a hit if we can get it right". Scaife couldn't wait to play "Mona Lisa" for Sam Phillips, but Sam wasn't interest. Weeks and months went by, and then Conway Twitty breezed though town on his way to Nashville to cut a session.

He was short a song or two and called in at Sun to see if Scaife (whom he knew because they had grown up together in Helena, Arkansas) had anything sitting around in the publishing companies he could use. "I told Conway we didn't have anything we owned", remembered Scaife, "but we had an arrangement on "Mona Lisa" that sounded great. I played him Carl's arrangement and he got real excited. He said, 'I don't believe you're gonna give this to me'. I said, 'You can borrow the arrangement if you put it on an LP. I still have hopes of putting it out on Carl as a single".

01(2) - "MONA LISA" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:28
Composer: - Jay Livinston-Ray Evans
Publisher: - Famous Music Corporation
Matrix number: - P 343 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Released: - March 15, 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3539-A < mono
MONA LISA / FOOLISH HEART
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

There was a story that appeared in The Phillips International Scandal Sheet that Conway Twitty came by on the day that Carl Mann was recording "Mona Lisa", but Carl doesn't it remember it that way and its likely that the timeframe was telescoped in the interests of a better story. Twitty memorized Carl's arrangement and taught it to the pickers in Nashville on February 18, 1959. He was also more-or-less true to his word - he didn't put out "Mona Lisa" as a single, but it was pulled from the album for the lead cut on an EP, and it started getting good play in several markets.

"I took the charts to Sam", said Scaife, "I told him, 'We're losing a hit'. Sam said, 'We don't put out mediocre product'. I thought on that for a while, then there was a disc jockey convention coming up in Miami''.

''I just hated to lose the hit. I said, 'Sam, unless you tell me NOT to put out Carl's version of "Mona Lisa" I'm gonna put it out and do a promo number down in Miami that everyone will remember', so I went to Miami and I hired a model to stand in the hotel lobby with a sash saying "Ask Me About Mona Lisa". She was handing out promo copies too. Then I persuaded Sam to let me put out an advertisement in Billboard with the same girl, and I was telling everyone that Carl had the first version even though Conway's had come out first".

"I took Carl out on a whirlwind promo trip through Atlanta, Charlotte, Baltimore and New York. Dick Biondi was in New York at the time and Dick called me when I got back and told me he was gonna lay on it 'til he broke it. And he did. Sam Phillips still didn't hear Carl Mann, but he heard the telephone ringing with orders - and that was good enough. Sam also responded to Eddie Bush who had much of the essential weirdness that he cherished in a performer. "Right after Twitty's version came out Sam called me down to sign the contracts", says Carl, acknowledging that he would never have got a Sun contract without Twitty trying to steal his thunder.

"Mona Lisa" had lain around, her mystic smile shunned since 1950 when Nat King Cole had scored the biggest hit of the year with it. Tunesmiths Jay Livinston and Ray Evens had written the song for the movie "Captain Carey Of The U.S.A.", and it won the Oscar for Best Song that year. It was covered for the country market by Moon Mullican, but Carl says it was the Nat King Cole version he remembered.

Against Sam Phillips' better judgement, "Mona Lisa" was released on March 15, 1959 on his Phillips International subsidiary. He didn't own the publishing, and had a fight with Livinston and Evan's publisher over Carl's arrangement, but in the end money greased all the wheels and everyone was happy. Carl Mann was all of sixteen when "Mona Lisa" was released, and he already had six years of performing experience under his belt, but nothing he'd done in those six years would prepare him for what followed.

Sun expert Stuart Colman recalled, ''I first had the pleasure of meeting and working with Carl Mann, by way of a European tour in 1978. Although extremely laid back as a person, he surprised a lot of audience in the way he so accurately recreated his Phillips International material live on stage. Not surprisingly his callingcard, the distinctive "Mona Lisa", was a highlight of the set. We were reacquainted in September 1984, when Carl explained the circumstances that lead up to the recording of his biggest hit.

02 - "INTERVIEW CARL MANN" - B.M.I. - 1:07
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-13 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

"Foolish One" is recorded over out-takes of "Look At That Moon", suggesting that "Look At That Moon" was cut at the same time or before "Mona Lisa" and "Foolish One".

03 - "FOOLISH ONE" - B.M.I. - 1:47
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 344 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Released: - March 15, 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3539-B < mono
FOOLISH ONE / MONA LISA
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

In many ways, it is unfortunate that the attention accorded "Mona Lisa" detracted from the flip side, "Foolish One". As well as being an original its an extraordinarily melodic and spirited outing. It builds considerable tension during the verses shuttling between the 1 and 6-minor chords, all of which is deftly shattered during the release. Its a simple yet beautiful constructed song which allows both Eddie Bush and W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland to shine.

W.S. Holland had a lot of success playing drums behind singers named Carl who came from Jackson, Tennessee. His first successes came with Carl Perkins; later he teamed up with Carl Mann. And this track, the B-side of ''Mona Lisa'' connects these two parts of Holland's work at Sun.

One side of Carl Perkins' final single at Sun was ''Lend Me Your Comb''. That silly teen-oriented song had a Latin feel attached to it because it used the tresillo rhythm, a pattern that originated in Cuba. That Latin rhythm played behind most of the record- verses and guitar solo. But when the song gets to the release the first time, the rhythm shifts to strait rock and roll. W.S. Holland did most of the work in establishing both those rhythmic patterns on ''Lend Me Your Comb'', but his drumming wasn't prominently featured on that record.

Well, that was the end of the Perkins era at Sun. Fast forward 13 months and we're at the beginning of the Carl Mann era. The era begins with ''Foolish One'', a song that, like ''Lend Me Your Comb'', uses the tresillo rhythm in the verses and a straight rock and roll rhythm in the release. But on ''Foolish One'', W.S. Holland is on top of it and his drums is right in front of the recording. He establishes the tresillo rhythm as the tracks begins, and basically stays in command of the record. It's his drum that carries that tresillo rhythm all through the verse; the guitar just provides enough chords to keep the harmony together. The band becomes more like a team rhythmically in the releases and solos. And Holland's surprising way of ending the record is exciting and totally unexpected.

04 - "LOOK AT THAT MOON" - B.M.I. - 1:32
Composer: - Carl Mann-Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date October 1958
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Phonogram Records (LP) 33rpm 6467 027 mono
SUN ROCKABILLYS - VOLUME 3 - PUT YOUR CAT CLOTHES ON
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-24 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

Name(Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal and Piano
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Robert Oatsvall - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

"The first indication we had that "Mona Lisa" was breaking was when, Sun promotion assistant, Barbara Barnes phoned me", remembered Carl Mann. "She asked me how it felt to have a hit record. I said I didn't know because I'd never had one. She said, '"Mona Lisa" was breaking in New York or Buffalo. I said, 'That's tickles me to death. That's what I've always wanted".

Cecil Scaife and Sam Phillips hooked Carl Mann up with the GAC Booking Agency that placed him on a tour of the Midwest following in Buddy Holly's footsteps.

"It was right after Buddy got killed", says Carl. "A lot of dressing rooms had Buddy's autograph in them. It was a weird feeling. They wouldn't let us fly anywhere. There was Skip and Flip, the Addrissi Brothers and Dicky Doo and the Don's. One band backed us all up. We were all basically on the same level riding our first hits. I think Jo-Ann Campbell topped the bill most nights".

It had been almost one year to the day since Jerry Lee Lewis had been drummed out of England and Sam Phillips had sat helpless while his prime asset suddenly became an albatross around his neck. A few weeks later Johnny Cash had quit the label followed by Warren Smith and Roy Orbison. "Mona Lisa" was the best news Sam Phillips had heard in a year, and he was quick to capitalize upon it. He was also quick to guard against it touring very sour very quickly as Lewis' success had done. He sent Cecil Scaife along with Carl Mann to ensure that the young singer did noting inappropriate.

For Biography of Carl Mann see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Mann's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS -©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MCVOY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: OCTOBER 4, 5, 8, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01 – ''YOU'RE THE ONLY STAR IN MY BLUE HEAVEN'' - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Gene Autry
Publisher: -Shapiro Bernstein & Corporation
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 4, 1958
Released: - February 10, 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD 8318 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL VOLUME 2

02 – ''LONELY HEART''
Composer: - Carl McVoy
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 4, 1958

"I'll Be Satisfied" is the last song that Carl McVoy cut for Sun Records before moving back to Hi Records to concentrate on production work - as engineer and studio musician. The track is a good blend of sanctified gospel and pop music. This kind of hybrid - with its i - 6 minor chord riffs - had great staying power within rock and roll. (It's black equivalent was a career-launcher for The Isley Brothers). Even cousin Jerry Lee dabbled in the genre with "It Won't Happen With Me", SUN 364, but by the time Jerry Lee's record appeared in 1961, cousin Carl was working across town behind the scenes at Hi Records.

03(1) - "I'LL BE SATISFIED" - B.M.I. - 1:43
Composer: - Carl McVoy
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 5, 1958
Released: 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8318-20 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL - VOLUME 2
Reissued: - August 2000 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-18 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

03(2) - "I'LL BE SATISFIED" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Carl McVoy
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 8, 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl McVoy - Vocal and Piano
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Carl McVoy see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl McVoy's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 4, 1958 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley's father and grandmother arrive in West Germany, where Elvis is serving with the Army. Elvis has dinner with his father in Bad Homburg.

''American Bandstand'' host Dick Clark, destined to play a founding role in the Academy of Country Music, appears on the cover of TV Guide.

OCTOBER 5, 1958 SUNDAY

While watching the World Series on TV in his East Peoria, Illinois, home, Lee Stoller hears his wife singing in the kitchen. He convinces her to pursue music for a living, launching the career of Cristy Lane.

Barty Brown, the father of Musical Brownies Milton and Derwood Brown, dies. Both sons served as leaders and original members of the band, one of the influential acts in the development of western swing.

Sometimes-country singer Burl Ives guests on NBC's ''The Dinah Shore Chevy Show''.

OCTOBER 6, 1958 MONDAY

Columbia released Lefty Frizzell's ''Cigarettes And Coffee Blues'', written by Marty Robbins.

OCTOBER 7, 1958 TUESDAY

Singer/songwriter Rex Griffin dies in a New Orleans hospital. Though he recorded for Decca in the late-1930s, he's best remembered for writing Eddy Arnold's ''Just Call Me Lonesome'' and Hank Penny's ''Won't You Tide In My Little Red Wagon''.

OCTOBER 8, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Kraft Music Hall is an umbrella title for several television series aired by NBC in the United States from the 1950s to the 1970s in the musical variety genre, sponsored by Kraft Foods, the producers of a well-known line of cheeses and related dairy products. Their commercials were usually announced by "The Voice of Kraft," Ed Herlihy.

The original Kraft Music Hall was a radio series aired from 1933 to 1949. It was one of the most popular programs of its type, particularly during the period (1936–1946) when it was hosted by Bing Crosby, then by Al Jolson (1947-1949). However, unlike similar programs, it did not make the transition directly to network television; Kraft's early ventures into that field entailed the sponsorship of a famed series of dramas, initially broadcast live, under the title Kraft Television Theatre.

By 1958, Kraft was prepared to revive the Music Hall for television from October 8, 1958 till September 1, 1971. The first host was "Mr. Television", Milton Berle, who had become television's first superstar by hosting an earlier NBC program, the Texaco Star Theater. An alternate summer host in the program's early period was the English comedian and singer Dave King. The program achieved its greatest success while being hosted by Perry Comobeginning in 1959.

In 1966, the program was a summer replacement for The Andy Williams Show, known as the Kraft Summer Music Hall, with singer John Davidson as the host. Comedian George carlin was a featured regular.

Beginning in 1963, Kraft Music Hall specials hosted by Como were presented about once a month, through 1967. During the 1963-1964 and 1964-1965 television seasons, Kraft Suspense Theatre (co-produced by Como's "Roncom Films") was broadcast in the same time slot during the remaining weeks.

In the fall of 1967, the Kraft Music Hall returned as a weekly series, but without Perry Como who abruptly ended his association with Kraft Foods after the 1966-67 season. A policy of guest hosts was implemented, employing some of the leading figures in the U.S. entertainment industry at the time, including Rock Hudson, Lorne Green, George Burns, Dinah Shore and Woody Allen. In 1968, the practice of regular hosts was reinstated, with programs starring, in succession, country singer Eddy Arnold, John Davidson (again) and Ed McMahon. Arnold's programs all featured an appearance by comedian/impressionist John Byner.

Other leading performers who appeared on the Kraft Music Hall on a reasonably frequent basis were Don Rickles, Alan King, Steve Lawrence, Eydie Gorme, Mitzi Gaynor, Bobby Darin, Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, Wayne Newton, Johnny Cash and Simon and Garfunkel.

OCTOBER 9, 1958 THURSDAY

Buck Owens recorded his first charted record, ''Second Fiddle'', during an evening session in Hollywood at the Capitol Tower.

OCTOBER 10, 1958 FRIDAY

Tanya Tucker is born in Seminole, Texas. After emerging as a teenager, she becomes one of country's more feisty females, with a gritty vocal style netting such hits as ''Delta Dawn'', ''Texas (When I Die)'' and ''Down To My Last Teardrop''.

''77 Sunset Strip'' make his debut, is an American television private detective series created byRoy Huggins and starring Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Roger Smith and Edd Byrnes. Each episode was one hour long.

The show was the subject of an ownership battle between Roy Huggins andWarner Brothers, which was the proximate cause of Huggins' departure from the studio. The series was based on novels and short stories written by Huggins prior to his arrival at Warner, but, as a matter of legal record, derived from a brief Caribbean theatrical release of its pilot, ''Girl On The Run''. The show ran from October 10, 1958 – February 7, 1964.

OCTOBER 11, 1958 SATURDAY

Marty Robbins recorded ''The Hanging Tree'', the theme song for a Gary Cooper movie, during the early-morning hours at Hollywood's Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

OCTOBER 13, 1958 MONDAY

The Everly Brothers recorded ''Problems'' in Nashville at RCA Studio B.

Decca released Jimmy Martin's ''Rock Hearts''.

OCTOBER 14, 1958 TUESDAY

Roy Acuff arrives in Frankfurt, West Germany, where he performs for American troops at the beginning of a two-month USO tour of Europe.

OCTOBER 15, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Jackie Wilson recorded ''Lonely Teardrops''. The song later becomes a country hit when it's re-recorded by Narvel Felts.

OCTOBER 17, 1958 FRIDAY

Alan Jackson is born in Newman, Georgia. The first artist signed to Arista Records' country division in 1989, he becomes a traditional icon thanks to such hits as 'Don't Rock The Jukebox'', ''Chattahoochee'', ''Gone Country'' and ''Where Were You (When The World Stopped Turning)''.

Jimmie Skinner recorded ''dark Hollow'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville.

OCTOBER 19, 1958 SUNDAY

Brenda Lee recorded ''Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

OCTOBER 20, 1958 MONDAY

Jay Perkins dies from a brain tumor, with his brother, Carl Perkins, holding his hand. Jay played guitar along with Carl on ''Blue Suede Shoes''.

Capitol released Tennessee Ernie Ford's ''The Star Carol'' album.

Ray Price's ''City Lights'' becomes the first song written by Bill Anderson to hit number 1 on the Billboard country singles chart.

OCTOBER 21, 1958 TUESDAY

Buddy Holly recorded ''True Love Ways'', ''Raining In My Heart'' and ''It Doesn't Matter Anymore'' at Pythian Hall in New York. ''True Love Ways'' becomes a country hit for Mickey Gilley in 1980.

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's two-sided hit ''One Night'' and ''I Got Stung'' ( RCA Victor 47-7410).

Following the show-business retirement of his wife, Gracie Allen, ''The George Burns Show'' debuts on CBS. The comedian becomes a country singer in 1979, with his recording of ''I Wish I Was Eighteen Again''.

OCTOBER 22, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Butch Baker is born in Sweetwater, Tennessee. He lands a number of singles on the country chart for Mercury during the 1980s and joins Hank Williams Jr. on the 1988 multi-artist hit ''Young Country''.

The Jordanaires take a guest slot on ''The Milton Berle Show'' on NBC.

OCTOBER 22, 1958 WEDNESDAY

With his career as a rock singer fading fast, Carl Perkins turned back to the honky tonks. He also turned to the bottle. His alcoholism was precipitated by the death of his brother Jay from a malignant brain tumour on this day. The respect in which Jay was held was evidenced by the artists who performed at a memorial concert held in Memphis on November 14.

Johnny Cash organized the event and enlisted the help of Jerry Lee Lewis, Webb Pierce, Dickey Lee, Ernest Tubb, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Sonny Burgess, Slim Rhodes, Thomas Wayne, Curtis Gordon, Merle Travis, Lefty Frizzell, the Collins Kids and Joe Maphis. The event raised over $4000 for Perkins' widow.

By the end of 1958, Carl Perkins had severed his ties with Bob Neal who had moved to California with Johnny Cash. He was booked through the Jim Denny Artist Bureau in Nashville who also handled his music publishing via Cedarwood.

The growing affiliation with Nashville began to be reflected in the direction his music was taken. After recordings a hasty album of rock and roll cover versions, Perkins began to orients his music increasingly towards the country mainstream. The maudlin element in his writing and performance which had kept under control by Sam Phillips began to assume a higher profile.

OCTOBER 23, 1958 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley attends a Bill Haley concert in Frankfurt, West Germany.

OCTOBER 25, 1958 SATURDAY

Mark Miller, of Sawyer Brown, is born in Dayton, Ohio. He becomes the lead singer for the group, which begins earning hits after winning ''Star Search'' in 1984. The band claims the Country Music Association's Vocal Group of the Year award in 1977.

The cover of TV Guide features comedian George Burns, destined to net a country hit with his 1979 recording of ''I Wish I Was Eighteen Again''.

The singles Sun 306, Jimmy Isle's ''I've Been Waiting'' b/w ''Diamond Ring''; "Born To Lose" b/w ''(Nothing Can Change) My Love For You'' (Sun 307) by Ernie Chaffin and Sun 308, Ray Smith's ''Why, Why, Why b/w ''You Made A Hit'' are released.

OCTOBER 26, 1958 SUNDAY

The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''Which One Is To Blame''.

OCTOBER 27, 1958 MONDAY

Kitty Wells recorded ''Mommy For A Day'' during the afternoon at Nashville's Bradley Film and Recording Studio. She also recorded ''All The Time;;, a Mel Tillis song destined to become a hit for Jack Greene.

OCTOBER 28, 1958 TUESDAY

Buddy Holly holds his final recording session, three months before he dies in a plane crash. Holly had become the first person to produce Waylon Jennings, and his song ''True Love Ways'' would later become a country hit for Mickey Gilley.

Ron Hemby, of The Buffalo Club, is born. He serves as lead singer for the group, which earns a hit in 1997 with the smooth ''If She Don't Love You''. The act breaks up before a second album ever made.

OCTOBER 29, 1958 WEDNESDAY

Bill Haley and His Comets perform in Stuttgart, West Germany. In the audience is private Elvis Presley, watching Haley for the second time in less than a week.

OCTOBER 31, 1958 FRIDAY

Mel McDaniel makes money for performing for the first time when he appear at a talent contest in school in Okmulgee, Oklahoma.

Songwriter Sandy Knox is born. Her credits include the Reba McEntire and Linda Davis duet ''Does He Love You'' and McEntire's ''She Thinks His Name Was John''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Perhaps more than anything else, these recordings by Vernon Taylor help define the kind of music Sun was contributing to the pantheon of rock and roll in late 1958. Sam Phillips had seen Taylor, then based in Washington, D.C., on American Bandstand and brought him to Sun records, and that in itself was an indication of changing times at Sun. Gone is the frenetic energy pf previous years. In its place is a more controlled kind of enthusiasm. There is something about Taylor's voice to suggest he might have been a wildman under different circumstances, but there was nothing about this October, 1958 date organized by Jack Clement that would coax any wildness from Taylor.

STUDIO SESSION FOR VERNON TAYLOR
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 27-31, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01 - "BREEZE" - A.S.C.A.P.
Composer: - MacDonald-Joe Goodwin-James Hanley
Publisher: - Shapiro Berhstein and Company
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958
Released: - Sun Unissued

01(2) - "BREEZE" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:05
Composer: - MacDonald-Joe Goodwin-James Hanley
Publisher: - Shapiro Berhstein and Company
Matrix number: - U 332 - Master
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958
Released: - November 12, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 310-A < mono
BREEZE / TODAY IS A BLUE DAY
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-13 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

But all is not lost. This side is unexpectedly good. Given that Clement's tune was the focus of most promotional effort, it is curious that Sam Phillips would allow a song he did not own, "Breeze", to be used in a supporting role.

It was Taylor's choice, he had first heard "Breeze" on Cowboy Copas' 1948 hit recording, although it was a pop song principally authored by James (Zing Went The Strings Of My Heart) Hanley and Joe (When You're Smiling) Goodwin. Taylor made in the centerpiece of a wonderfully understated arrangement.

There is a marvellous bluesy tension to this side. the 1-4 chord shuttling between verses creates a fine groove and Taylor's vocal is just right, avoiding all the pitfalls for over-emoting. The guitar work during the chorus ("It's an ill wind...") is striking and moody.

Billboard got on the case in short order, giving this record a Pick Hit in November, 1958. They said that Taylor had a "refreshingly distinctive style" and predicted that "with exposure, the lad could have himself a two sided winner". Those are strong words, but the marketplace turned a deaf ear, and so have Sun fans. It may by time to reassess. True, this is no "Miss Froggie", and Taylor's isn't Warren Smith, but "Breeze" is a damn fine record in its own right.

03(1) - "TODAY IS A BLUE DAY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1- Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958
Released: - 1995
First appearance: - Eagle Records (CD) 500/200rpm EA-R 90120-15 mono
VERNON TAYLOR - THERE'S ONLY ONE... YOUR LOVIN' MAN

The popifies folk-country version of ''Today Is A Blue day'' that was released on Sun 310 gave no hint of the unissued versions in the vault that lay awaiting discovery. Vernon Taylor was one of Jack Clement's projects and, truth be told, one of his successful ones. Of greatest interest here is the powerful drumming by Jimmy M. Van Eaton that drives the alternates takes. In particular, the way the drums come thunderling in for the second half of the verse (''Maybe there will be..'') brings this alternates to life.

Although Van Eaton was also around for the session that spawned the issued version, none of the energy that happens here so effortlessly appears there. If you know Sun 310, you can't help but marvel at what was passed over in the interest of catering to a changing marketplace that wanted the edge taken off its music. That seems to have been a major loss in general, but especially at Sun.

03(2) - "TODAY IS A BLUE DAY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 11 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958
Released: - 1995
First appearance: - Eagle Records (CD) 500/200rpm EA-R 90120-29 mono
VERNON TAYLOR - THERE'S ONLY ONE... YOUR LOVIN' MAN

03(3) - "TODAY IS A BLUE DAY" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958
Released: - 1995
First appearance: - Eagle Records (CD) 500/200rpm EA-R 90120-26 mono
VERNON TAYLOR - THERE'S ONLY ONE... YOUR LOVIN' MAN

03(4) - "TODAY IS A BLUE DAY" - B.M.I. - 2:00
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 333 - Master
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958 - Vocal Chorus Overdub
Released: - November 12, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 310-B < mono
TODAY IS A BLUE DAY / BREEZE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-14 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

On "Today Is A Blue Day", Jack Clement has written his own entry in the Don Gibson sweepstakes, emulating such hits as "Blue Blue Day". You can hear the quirky edge to Jimmy Van Eaton's drumming and wish it were more prominent, but its too deep in the mix to offset the effects of Clement's high string guitar (another bow to Don Gibson's record), and the choral overdub. This is just going to be a pop record, no matter how much you wish it would cut through and rock.

04(1) - ''YOUR LOVIN' MAN'' - 1 - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: – Vernon Taylor
Published: – Hi-Lo Music Incorporated:
Matrix number: - None - take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958
Released: 1975
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30147-6 mono
RAUNCHY ROCKABILLYS
Reissued: -1986 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm Charly 36-19 mono
THE BEST OF SUN ROCKABILLY - VOLUME 2

''Your Lovin' Man'' is vintage Sun rockabilly that could have been recorded two years earlier than its October 1958 session date, might have made Taylor a star. The guitar solo has echoes of the ''Love My Baby'' sound. But what makes the track a lock is the stellar drumming of Jimmy Van Eaton. His thundering rim shots take the song's release (''Why should I worry....'') to a whole other level.

If this session had taken place in 1956, there seems little doubt that one of the multiple takes of ''Your Lovin' Man'' would have seen the light of day. But this was the end of 1958 and Jack Clement was running the show. Clement had his eyes on the price and with Frankie Avalon, the Kingston Trio and the Teddy Bears on the charts, it's unlikely that straight-ahead rockabilly with heavy drum work like this was going to make it on to Sun's release schedule.

04(2) - ''YOUR LOVIN' MAN'' - 2 - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Vernon Taylor
Published: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958
Released: 1995
First appearance: - Eagle Records Germany (CD) 500/200rpm EA-R90120-18 mono
VERNON TAYLOR - THERE'S ONLY YOU... YOUR LOVIN' MAN
Reissued: - February 2017 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16273-23 mono
GREAT DRUMS AT SUN

05(1) - ''BLUE DAY TOMORROW'' - B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Vernon Taylor
Published: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 27-31, 1958
Released: 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8236-11 mono
ESSENTIAL SUN ROCKABILLIES - VOLUME 4

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Vernon Taylor - Vocal and Guitar
Cliff Acred - Bass
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jack Clement - Guitar
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of Vernon Taylor see: > The Sun Biographies <
Vernon Taylor's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1958

In a late-1958 issue of the Phillips International Scandal Sheet, Barbara Barnes spotlighted an exciting single, ''Tom Dooley'', that Capitol had issued by the Kingston Trio. The bay Area group sang an updated version of an old North Carolina ballad, recorded with an energetic guitar and banjo backing. It eventually made it to number 1 on the Billboard charts.

The success of ''Tom Dooley'' encouraged her to think that Jack Clement might have a chance with the emerging folk-music audience that was forming in New York's Greenwich Village and a few other scattered locations. On February 17, 1958, Jack Clement had recorded ''Ten Years'', which had a balled feeling, he had traveled to RCA's Nashville studio to get the sound he wanted on his second release, ''The Black Haired Man''. He produced both records, but while in Nashville he renewed acquaintance with Chet Atkins, the celebrated finger-picking guitar pioneer and ''Nashville Sound'' producer, who incidentally felt him out about working for him at RCA.

''Ten Years'' didn't catch on, but Sun hoped the next release would do better. For ''The Black Haired Man'', Sun prepared a special flyer intended to depict both the collegiate and country-folk sides of Jack Clement. Bill and Joy Webb, a husband-and-wife team Sun patronized when they needed nice pictures made, photographed Jack sitting beside a large rustic-looking fireplace that conveniently happened to be in the apartment Sandra Pirtle and Barbara Barnes were renting at that time. He was wearing an L.L. Bean-looking plaid shirt and khakis. They had gone to Lulius Lewis to get the shirt, and Barbara suggested the buttondown collar, hoping that this would look both a little preppy and a little country with the plaid. Barbara Barnes says, ''He got a nice haircut that showed off his wavy hair, but I had neglected to mention shoes, and I thought the effect was marred a little by the sandals he showed up in. The photos turned out to be just right for the outside of the flyer, which bore the legend, ''Inside Lies the Story of the Black-Haired Man'', with ''Sun 311'' in the corner. We got nice reviews in the trades and a great feature article in the Memphis paper''.

''I bore down so hard on our distributors to buy the record that Willie Roessner, the promo man for our Kansas City distributor, asked me if Jack were my boyfriend'', Barbara says. ''Some of the pop stations put it on their lists, as did several country stations, but the record just didn't take off. As with Bill Justis and his releases, Jack couldn't leave his day-to-day job in the studio to go on the road for the exposure. Whether this promotion would have helped, I can't say, but as it was, the record was a big disappointment.

It was ironic that Jack Clement written hits for Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis and other songs for Roy Orbison and others, but he couldn't find many listeners for his own work. But he had so many irons in the fire and wasn't worried that his records didn't become hits.

SUN-LINERS - Jack Clement is a name that followers of the music industry associate with the hit songs he has written - "Ballad Of A Teenage Queen" and "Guess Things Happen That Way" (recorded by Johnny Cash); "It'll Be Me" and "Fools Like Me" (recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis); and many others. We predict that Jack Clement will soon be known as a big name among record artists. His new release "The Black-Haired Man" has all the components of a hit record - original material, "finished" arrangement and production, an interesting sound, and a truly talented artist. The flip "Wrong" is a typical Clement tune - simple melody, single message, a very appealing ballad.

Jack's tunes somehow ring 'true'. They're obviously the product of a basically sincere ongwriter. Although his lyrics are not at all sophisticated, they make very good sence; the words, not only the sound, mean something. In spite of a lot of good-natured kidding by his co-workers, Jack has delved seriously onto a study of traditional folk ballads as a background for his efforts at creating new stories to be told in up-dated folk style.

Jack's first release on Sun, "Ten Years", was a ballad. Introduced with a minimum of fanfare, the tune quickly made the "most played" Country and Western charts.

We know the disc jockey's and fans who made "Ten Years" a success will welcome Jack Clement's new release, and we hope those not already acquainted with this rising new artist will take time to hear "The Black-Haired Man".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

''In spite of a lot of good natured kidding from his co-workers, Jack has delved seriously into a study of traditional folk ballads as a background for his efforts at creating new stories to be told in updated folk style''.

Thus wrote Sun's promotion staffer Barbara Barnes in an attempt to sell Jack Clement as part of the great continuum of folk balladry. He was obviously straddling two stools, country music and the ersatz folk revivalism of the Kinston Trio and their lik. As a story-song this does have a great deal of merit and hardly justifies the hours of research that Ms. Barnes seemed to think Clement had devoted to it. Quite simply, it sounds as though Clement had concocted the tune for Johnny Cash and then decided to record it himself. He kept the chorus under control and there is an undeniable drive to the song but its prettiness was very markedly different from the country music that Phillips had recorded in the same studio a few years earlier.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JACK CLEMENT
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY OCTOBER 30, 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

Its anybody's guess why this record wasn't a hit in the folkcrazed, country crossover market of 1958. Billboard concurred. They gave both sides a four star rating and, in classic Billboardese, said of Clement "The cat has real talent, both as to cleffing and chanting". Despite their admonition to "Watch this one", the record went nowhere.

01 - "THE BLACK HAIRED MAN" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 334 - Master
Recorded: - October 30, 1958
Released: - November 20, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 311-A < mono
THE BLACK HAIRED MAN / WRONG
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

This is a fast, rhythmic development of the Johnny Cash beat, a gunfighter ballad of real class and a fairly successful record. The flip, "Wrong" is light, singalong country pop with a prominent acoustic guitar from Jack. This sound was ahead of its time and is not too different from Clement circa 1986.

"The Black Haired Man" has been saluted by the trade publications as a potential best-seller. Billboard reviewed it as a "Scoop Of The Week". Already it has been picked for "spotlight" play on radio stations in Boston, Kansas City, Omaha and Baltimore. Written by Jack Clement, it is in the currently popular folk vein of "Tom Dooley" and "Travelin' On". The publisher is Jack Clement Music Incorporated, the guitar accompaniment is by him, and the other instrumental parts were arranged by him.

His RCA Victor single, "Edge Of Town", works the same theme as "The Black Haired Man". Unlike many folk morality tales, Clement chooses to end this opus on a cliffhanger. We have no idea who will survive the battle: the slick stranger or the half drunk character with the shaking hand. These are not good odds, a fact made even clearer by the final resolution to a minor key - a deft and unusual bit of arranging.

In addition to his talents as a singer/songwriter, Jack Clement could claim a high degree of studio savvy in the role of recording engineer. During an interview in the early week of 2002 in Nashville, he outlined the everyday circumstances of a Sun studio session. His technical speciality was without doubt the art of microphone placement and here he explores the largely untested world of overdubbing, by adding harmonica an percussion after the main track had been recorded.

02 - "INTERVIEW JACK CLEMENT" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Released: - 2002
First appearance: - Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-8-2 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

03 - "WRONG" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Jack Clement Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 335 - Master
Recorded: - October 30, 1958
Released: - November 20, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 311-B < mono
WRONG / THE BLACK HAIRED MAN
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3
 
This must have stood a fair chance of success in the pop sweepstake. The prominently mic'd brushwork provides a fine drive to the record in much the same way that the deadened acoustic guitar underpinned many of Johnny Cash's best recordings with a similar sound.
 
"Wrong" might have been an ideal follow-up to "Guess Things Happen That Way", and, in Cash's hands, it might have been a hit. Clement seemed obsessed with the idea to tall dark strangers moving into town and threatening to take his baby away. The man had obviously seen lots of movies or lived in a really bad neighbourhood.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jack Clement - Vocal, Guitar, Harmonica and Drums
Billy Riley - Guitar
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Cliff Acred - Bass
Unknown Chorus
 
For Biography of Jack Clement see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jack Clement's Sun/PI recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
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