CONTAINS

1955 SUN SESSIONS (3)
March 1, 1955 to March 31, 1955

> Back Elvis Sun Schedule < 

Live Broadcast Recordings for Elvis Presley, March 5, 1955
Studio Session for Elvis Presley, March 6, 1955
Live Broadcast Recordings for Elvis Presley, March 19, 1955

For Elvis Presley's Biography see > The Sun Biographies <
Elvis Presley's Sun recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

(Above) The Randolph school's vocational building was constructed by the National Youth Administration in 1939 during expansion of the school complex (Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Resources Inventory database). A teacher's house was also constructed , and is located behind the former vocational building. The school closed in 1972 and the building was demolished in 2009. Fortunately, the vocational building was spared and in recent years has served as a community center. A young Elvis Presley played at least 3 times at the Randolph High School, twice on February 1 (canceled) and March 1, 1955, and on January 6, 1956.

MARCH 1, 1955 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley performed in Randolph, Mississippi at the Randolph High School Auditorium, beginning at 8:00 p.m. This performance was a contribution of the canceled show of February 1, 1955.

When the Lincoln was wrecked in Arkansas, Bob Neal brought the car back to Memphis. To his dismay, he learned that the car had not been insured, and because of its current condition, it would only provide a small discount on a purchase of another car.

According to Bob Neal, ''I had made inquires about new transportation. I knew Elvis had his mind set on a Cadillac, a pink Cadillac. Vernon, Elvis' father, told me that there was a little money set back, and asked if I was able to negotiate a deal based on a trade-in of the wreck and on my knowledge of what engagements were on the books for the immediate future. But there was one problem. The Presleys had no credit standing or reputation. As I had expected, nothing would do except the pink Cadillac. But financially, it looked like an impasse. For several days, there were nervous meetings and consultations. Then, Elvis came to the office: ''Mr. Neal, will you do me a favor'? 'If I can, Elvis'. 'Well, the salesman said I could get the Cadillac if I can get somebody to sign for me'. He paused, then beseechingly: 'Will you sign for it for me'''?

Neal and his wife eventually agreed to sign for the car on the condition that it was fully insured.

The press material Neal sent out to concert promoters and disc jockeys already featured a reference to Elvis' ''hobby'' of collecting pink and black, and with the new car the image was further emphasized. Elvis said, ''I kinda thought that would be a gimmick and really, it drew a lot of attention in the trade papers, about the pink suit and the pink car''.

MARCH 1955

Dub Chandler, who opened the De Kalb, Texas, show in March 1955 was living in De Queen during that summer. He remembers a show that Elvis Presley played at the Seiver County fairground. The only other act that he remember is Jim Ed, Maxine and Bonnie Brown.

Chandler believes that the show was part of the annual county fair, making it in late summer-early fall. According to Ernest and Gail Hackworth of Texarkana, who also remember this show, Elvis Presley performed outdoors from the back of a flat bed truck.

In the middle of his act, Elvis Presley broke a string - something that happened with regularity - and as he was handling the guitar to someone off stage, the guitar dropped to the ground. Ernest automatically flinched - he also owned a Martin Dreadnought 20 and knew how much they cost. The Hackworths also believe that Roy Orbison may have played this particular show. A check of the De Queen Bee from May through October 1955 turned up no mention of Elvis Presley.

MARCH 1955

The issue of Country and Western Jamboree was the first national magazine to recognize Elvis Presley's Sun records in a big way. This Chicago-based magazine featured a photo of Elvis Presley, seated, with Sam Phillips and Bob Neal flanking him. Country and Western Jamboree had polled more than five hundred disc jockey’s to analyze Presley's popularity. "Milkcow Blues Boogie" was featured in the magazine's "Movin' Ahead" section, and "I Don't Care If The Sun Don't Shine" was a top ten pick. The magazine also mentioned the first two Sun releases, and praised Elvis Presley's performing style.

There was an immediate impact from Country and Western Jamboree, as well as from an article in Cowboy Songs. Soon, Bob Neal's office was flooded with requests for concert fees and a future booking schedule. Sun Records sent promotional literature to disc jockey’s in Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia. There was a general curiosity about Elvis' music and, as a result of this interest, a Washington, DC, radio station contacted Bob Neal about an interview. Although there was still no firm indication that bookings outside the South were readily available, Neal was ecstatic over the prospect of media coverage in the North.

(Above) This is the original U.S. Armory where Elvis Presley performed on the night of March 2, 1955. Currently the structure is serving as the Jackson County Recycling Center. You could easily see the vast empty hall-like interior from the street through the open bay doors. But the building still retains its original appearance, which predates Elvis' visit by several years.

MARCH 2, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley played a double-header, beginning at 8:00 p.m. at the U.S. Armory in Newport, Arkansas. Here, Elvis Presley, Betty Amos, Jimmy Work and Bob Neal entertained the crowd for two hours.

Immediately following this show, the same group rocked the house at Porky's Rooftop Club where bands often performed on the flat roof. This time of the year the upper area was usually set up with tables for customers. Porky Sellers had opened the place in 1953 as an outdoor facility, but soon put a roof over it. They had one microphone, two 12'' speakers, and a 35-watt amp.

The house P.A. was available for the artists. Porky was duly impressed, but felt that Elvis had to change his attitude, the singer needed more discipline and less cockiness.

These and all of Elvis' other performances during the month will be booked by Bob Neal, who continues to push the Colonel for another Hank Snow tour.

MARCH 4, 1955 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley was passing through Texarkana and stopped at Cheesie Nelson's father's service station on the state line to have his car washed. This was something that he did every time he was in Texarkana. He picked up the telephone and called Cheesie at home and asked him if he wanted to go the De Kalb. Elvis Presley promising to bring him back that night. Cheesie Nelson rode to the show with Elvis in his pink and white Ford Crown Victoria.

That evening Elvis Presley played the Gymnasium of the local High School Auditorium in De Kalb, Texas. Opening for this show was Dub Chandler, his five-piece band and his sister, Becky Alice, fifteen; and Lois Marie, seventeen. Other acts on the bill were Tibby Edwards, Jeanette Hicks, Floyd Cramer and Jimmy Day from the Hayride. Nelson recalls that Elvis Presley received $40 for the date.

The show was booked by Jim LeFan of nearby Texarkana. Chandler summed up Elvis' performance by saying, "He could wiggle out of his clothes without touching them with his hands".

STORY ABOUT DE KALB HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM - Ever since disc jockey Ernest Hackworth (a.k.a. Uncle Dudley) had interviewed Elvis for that December 1954 Texarkana show, he'd kept his eyes and ears peeled for any decent money-making opportunities to waltz through his neck of the woods. He liked that quiet-spoken young man, and he thought Elvis had the correct fuel mixture to blast into orbit but just needed the right launch pad to com bust upon.

So when the Lion's Club of De Kalb, a little town 30 minutes west of Texarkana, announced that it sought a vehicle to dig up a little capital for their cause, Hackworth knew just what to suggest. How about a benefit concert? he asked them. And he knew just the perfect person to pack the house. . . Senor Presley.

As the self-designated revenue-acquirers for the town's Lion's Club, the De Kalb football team thought the idea positively sparkled with its sheer brilliance. Many of them listened faithfully to the Louisiana Hayride broadcasts; several of the players even caught the January 9th New Boston show a few miles down the road. They thought that Elvis would surely be the easiest sale in the world, and in their impromptu poll, three-quarters of the seniors said they'd attend in a heartbeat ... and bring a date.

That already added up to more return than their last two fund raisers combined. The De Kalb football team took a vote and announced that they endorsed the idea 100 percent. Their coach did not.

One day as various members of the team lounged around the locker room organizing the upcoming ticket sales attack, the coach poked his head out of his office and sauntered over to the huddle. He had made a decision, Coach told them. He didn't want his players helping sell tickets for that sex maniac. In the silence that ensued the members looked at each other to determine who would be the first to laugh at what could only be a bad joke. Morris Hodgson drew the short straw.

He stood and adjusted his 6 foot 2 linebacker's frame so that the 747 wingspan he called shoulders would clear the overhead beams. Hodgson inquired politely, I beg your pardon, sir? (That's East Texan for "huh?") Coach repeated himself to much the same reaction.

Trained since in vitro to speak respectfully to elders, Hodgson attempted to correct his coach's errant judgment. Elvis isn't a sex maniac, he told the coach, he's just ... modern. Anyway, the kids love him and they'll pay to see him and that is after all, the point of a benefit concert (...and if you weren't a closet Boone collector, you'd understand this very elementary concept). Even though the last part of that sentence never actually left the linebacker's mouth, the coach must have heard it telepathically, because a shouting match ensued, followed shortly by a rush of testosterone that permeated the already saturated locker room.

In the left corner, at his first exhibition game, weighing 230 pounds, it's an incensed linebacker on a charitable mission. And in the other corner, returning to the ring after a ten year Twinkie hiatus, we have a 240-pound self-righteous football coach. May the best ego win. Ding ding.

Both men circled each other, analyzing their opponent. Hodgson feinted with a spray of politically correct rhetoric; helping the Lions, feeding the starving orphans, that sort of thing. Suddenly Coach jabbed with an age discrimination barb and Hodgson was forced on the ropes flinging one of his own. Coach sucker punched with a sex-maniac insinuation, but before the referee could break the clinch, Hodgson retaliated with a clean right hook about middle-aged coaches and their alleged inability to recognize sex when they saw it.

Coach grabbed Hodgson (which was probably not the brightest thing to do to an angry linebacker), and Hodgson automatically punched back. The coach flew backward and deracked a set of barbells.

At the inquiry, in front of Principal J. D. Loggins, fighting your coach over a rock 'n roll singer seemed much stupider in hindsight than it had during the heat of the battle. After much discussion, the principal gave his blessing to the ticket sales, but nixed any idea of a Hodgson/Coach rematch.

On the night of the concert, Hodgson manned the ticket table at the front door, mumbling under his breath that for all the trauma and his near expulsion, this concert better drive in bus loads of cash for the blankety-blank Lions, charitable or otherwise.

He didn't have long to grumble; tickets sold briskly and the house bulged with breathing room-only space. Perky Betty Amos, sans the Carlisles, started the evening with a hopping tune, Scotty, Bill, and Jimmy Day pivoting to the beat behind her. After touring East Texas with the Browns, Betty had agreed to a cameo for her old pal Elvis. Meanwhile, Elvis surreptitiously snuck into the high school, friend Cheesie Nelson in tow. Cheesie detached and elbowed his way through the crowd to grab a good spot for the show, while Elvis detoured to the men's locker room, oblivious to the dislodged barbells and the reason for it.

Elvis prepared for the show, his attention distracted by Betty Amos cranking the crowd out on the floor. Normally he spent this portion of the evening pacing like a caged tiger, waiting for his turn to light the room, but his reverie was broken by Willie Cox, the local shutterbug. Toting his Argus c-3.35 millimeter camera, Willie asked Elvis if he minded a few snaps. Elvis told him he didn't mind at all and inquired about the camera.

Diverted by Willie's favorite subject, the two spent the pre-game gabhing about tech-no-gadgets, cars they'd like to own but didn't, girls they'd like to date but couldn't (Elvis's end of the conversation fell a bit sparse here), and sports that neither men played but wanted to. Elvis watched them and Willie shot them.

Next door, the wall thumping ended and Betty queued her bud to make his appearance. Elvis said his temporary alohas and exited the locker room, joining Betty on stage. Willie followed him around for the rest of the evening, snapping pictures whenever he got a good angle, unintentionally establishing the first

East Texas paparazzi. Unlike future photographers too numerous to mention in Elvis's career, Willie had the class to cease and desist when Elvis waylaid his date for the evening, Jo Ann Hawkes.

Footnote: Perhaps it should be mentioned, that although Morris Hodgson continued to tackle through college and listen to Elvis, he never again combined the two sports.

MARCH 5, 1955 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley appeared on that portion of the "Louisiana Hayride" which was telecast by Shreveport, Louisiana, station KWKH-TV, the local CBS affiliate. This was Elvis' first TV performance, and he was introduced on the show by Horage Logan. (Elvis' previous "Louisiana Hayride" shows were broadcast on radio only).

''Guest number 13. What an applause he received!'' wrote Joyce Railsback in her diary. At the Louisiana Hayride, Elvis was now a star. Even over the radio, the ovation greeting his arrival was spectacular. His set seemed to change very little, despite the Hayride's edict that performers maintain a fresh repertoire: ''Tweedlee Dee'', ''Money Honey'', and ''Shake Rattle And Roll'' were not Elvis' own records, but they had become mainstays in his concert appearances, and on the Hayride as well. This Saturday evening, though, he had added another of his Clovers favourites, and enthusiastic revved-up version of their 1954 rhythm and blues hit, ''Little Mama''.

MARCH 1955

When Bob Neal left Cleveland the week before, he was armed with a contact for getting a tryout for the Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts TV shows, and an endorsement from disc jockey Bill Randle that this might be an opportunity for national exposure.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

LIVE BROADCAST RECORDINGS FOR ELVIS PRESLEY
FOR KWKH'S LOUISIANA HAYRIDE, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA, 1954

MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM, 705 GRAND AVENUE AND
MILAM STREET, SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA
SATURDAY MARCH 5, 1955 - VIEWING TIME TV-STATION KWKH
SESSION HOURS: 8:00PM-11:30PM
PRODUCER - HORACE LOGAN

Were recorded from a badly scratched, one of a kind, acetate.

Elvis Presley appeared on that portion of the "Louisiana Hayride" which was telecast by Shreveport, Louisiana, station KWKH-TV, the local CBS affiliate. This was Elvis' first TV performance, and he was introduced on the show by Horage Logan. Elvis' previous "Louisiana Hayride" shows were broadcast on radio only. Even over the radio, the ovation greetings his arrival was spectacular. Elvis set seemed to change very little, despite the Hayride's edict that performers maintain a fresh repertoire, ''Tweedlee Dee'', ''Money Honey'', and ''Shake Rattle And Roll'' were not Elvis' own records, but they had become mainstays in his concert repertoire, and the Hayride as well. This Saturday evening, Elvis had added another of his Clovers favourite, an enthusiastic version of their 1954 rhythm and blues hit, ''Little Mama''.

"TWEEDLEE DEE" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Winfield Scott
Publisher: - Unichappell Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - FRA1-8159 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 5, 1955
Released: - August 3, 2012
First appearance: - FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-1-14 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955
Reissued: - February 19, 2016 MRS Records (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 10054057-1-12 mono
LIVE IN THE 50S - THE COMPLETE CONCERT RECORDINGS

"MONEY HONEY" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:16
Composer: - Jesse Stone
Publisher: - Walden Music Corporation
Matrix number: - FRA1-8160 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January 22, 1955
Recorded: - March 5, 1955
Released: - August 3, 2012
First appearance: - FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-15 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955
Reissued: - February 19, 2016 MRS Records (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 10054057-1-13 mono
LIVE IN THE 50S - THE COMPLETE CONCERT RECORDINGS

"HEARTS OF STONE" - B.M.I. - 1:36
Composer: - Edward Ray-Rudolph Jackson
Publisher: - Regent Music
Matrix number: - FRA1-8161 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 5, 1955
Released: - August 3, 2012
First appearance: - FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-16 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955
Reissued: - February 19, 2016 MRS Records (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 10054057-1-14 mono
LIVE IN THE 50S - THE COMPLETE CONCERT RECORDINGS

"SHAKE, RATTLE AND ROLL" B.M.I. - 1:38
Composer: - Charles Calhoun
Publisher: - Campbell Conelly Corporation Limited
Matrix number: - FRA1-8162 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 5, 1955
Released: - August 3, 2012
First appearance: - FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-17 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955
Reissued: - February 19, 2016 MRS Records (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 10054057-1-15 mono
LIVE IN THE 50S - THE COMPLETE CONCERT RECORDINGS

"LITTLE MAMA" – B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Willie Carrol-Ahmet Ertegun-Carmen Taylor- Gerald Wexler
Publisher: - Chappel Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - FRA1-8163 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 5, 1955
Released: - August 3, 2012
First appearance: - FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-18 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955
Reissued: - February 19, 2016 MRS Records (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 10054057-1-16 mono
LIVE IN THE 50S - THE COMPLETE CONCERT RECORDINGS

"YOU'RE A HEARTBREAKER" – B.M.I. 2:05
Composer: - Charles Alvin Sallee
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - FRA1-8164 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 5, 1955
Released: - August 3, 2012
First appearance: - FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-19 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955
Reissued: - February 19, 2016 MRS Records (CD) 500/200rpm MRS 10054057-1-17 mono
LIVE IN THE 50S - THE COMPLETE CONCERT RECORDINGS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elvis Presley - Vocal and Acoustic Rhythm Guitar (Martin Dreadnought 18)
Scotty Moore - Electric Lead Guitar (Gibson ES 295)
Bill Black - Acoustic Upright Bass (Kay Maestro M-1)
Jimmy Day – Steel Guitar
Floyd Cramer - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Returning to Memphis, Elvis had a recording session in March 1955 for Sun Records. Johnny Bernero was brought in to play drums and augment Scotty Moore's guitar and Bill Black's bass. That night Elvis Presley recorded two full reels of "I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone", a song that Stanley Kesler and Bill Taylor had written expressly for Elvis Presley. It was conceived as a country tune with a blues direction. This original material came from two members of the Snearly Ranch Boys in West Memphis, Arkansas. Trumpeter Bill Taylor and steel guitarist Stanley Kesler worked up "I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone', borrowing the melody from a Campbell's Soup advertisement.

Surviving tapes reveal that it was first conceived as a slow blues, and the group recorded it with a guitar figure lifted from the Delmore Brothers' "Blue Stay Away From Me". At some point, however, the group changed their approach and reworked the song into a medium tempo hillbilly shuffle.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ELVIS PRESLEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION 8: SUNDAY MARCH 6, 1955
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

For Elvis Presley's Sun recording(s) click on the available > buttons <

This recording session most likely because the information on the tape reel of the slow version of outtakes of ''I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone'' says March 5, but Elvis was in Shreveport, Louisiana, the session took place likely on Sunday March 6. The original master (Sun 217) probably recorded later in April.

"It was written in the style the way it came out on the original record", recalled Stanley Kesler. "They always experimented with songs, trying them at different tempos and this and that. They tried to do that in a bluesy, slowed-down style but it didn't really work, although there's one of those outtakes that Elvis sings really good. The backing wasn't that good but Elvis really puts his heart into it. There's one cut, I can't remember which one it is but it's really good".

> ''I'M LEFT, YOU'RE RIGHT, SHE'S GONE'' - B.M.I. - 3:00 <
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Bill Taylor
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - SPA1-4281 - Complete Take 1 - Tape Box 6 - Slow Version
Listen as Take 7 in Session Logs.
Recorded: - March 6, 1955
Released: - June 1987
First appearance: - RCA BMG (LP) 33rpm 6414-1-R mono
THE COMPLETE SUN SESSIONS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-2-27 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO - THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

According to Sam Phillips, ''A lot of times it was a tempo that I absolutely knew they weren't going to like, but we were in a situation where we just weren't getting anywhere, and when they came back, to the original tempo, it was like they'd hit a home run. Elvis was a little bit reluctant to lean quite as country on some things as I wanted him to. Not Nashville country, but the simplicity of a melody line. We couldn't jump on the blacks too fast, and we had to stay away from the country, and we knew we were going to be a away, away from the pop''.

The result was radically different from anything the band had done before. Plus as a brand-new song, for which Phillips owned the copyright, additional income would follow.

> ''I'M LEFT, YOU'RE RIGHT, SHE'S GONE'' - B.M.I. - 2:51 <
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Bill Taylor
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - SPA1-4282 - Complete Take 2 - Tape Box 6 - Slow Version
Listen as Take 8 in Session Logs
Recorded: - March 6, 1955
Released: - June 1987
First appearance: - RCA BMG (LP) 33rpm 6414-1-R mono
THE COMPLETE SUN SESSIONS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-2-28 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO - THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

> ''I'M LEFT, YOU'RE RIGHT, SHE'S GONE'' - B.M.I. - 2:51 <
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Bill Taylor
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - SPA1-4284 - Complete Take 3 - Tape Box 6 - Slow Version
Listen as Take 11 in Session Logs
Recorded: - March 6, 1955
Released: - June 1987
First appearance: - RCA BMG (LP) 33rpm 6414-1-R mono
THE COMPLETE SUN SESSIONS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-2-29 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO - THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

> ''I'M LEFT, YOU'RE RIGHT, SHE'S GONE'' - B.M.I. - 0:09 <
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Bill Taylor
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - SPA2-4283 - False Start Take 4 - Tape Box 6 - Slow Version
Listen as Take 10 in Session Logs
Recorded: - March 6, 1955
Released: - June 1987
First appearance: - RCA BMG (LP) 33rpm 6414-1-R mono
THE COMPLETE SUN SESSIONS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-2-30 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO - THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

> ''I'M LEFT, YOU'RE RIGHT, SHE'S GONE'' - B.M.I. - 2:40 <
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Bill Taylor
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - OPA1-4196 - Master Take 5 - Tape Box 6 - Slow Version
Recorded: - March 6, 1955
Released: - 1974
First appearance: - Bopcat Records (LP) 33rpm LP-BP-100 mono
GOOD ROCKING TONIGHT
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-2-31 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO - THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

Reportedly, Sam Phillips first released the version above to Memphis disc jockey’s, but not to the general public. The title "My Baby Is Gone" has been on numerous bootleg releases. The original copyright title was "You're Right, I'm Left, She's Gone". An advertisement for Jimmie Rodgers Memorial Day Celebration in Meridian, Mississippi, on May 26, 1955, printed the title that way.

Steve Sholes Session Notes

Box 6
I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone
7. I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Tempo) 2:44
8. I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Tempo) 2:40
9. I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Tempo) V
10. I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Tempo) Breakdown Full Take
11. I'm Left, You're Right, She's Right (Slow Tempo) V

> ''I'M LEFT, YOU'RE RIGHT, SHE'S GONE'' - B.M.I. - 2:40 <
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Bill Taylor
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - SPA1-4286 - Complete Take 6 - Tape Box 6 - Slow Version
Listen as Take 12 in Session Logs
Recorded: - March 6, 1955
Released: - June 1987
First appearance: - RCA BMG (LP) 33rpm 6414-1-R mono
THE COMPLETE SUN SESSIONS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-2-32 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO - THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

> ''I'M LEFT, YOU'RE RIGHT, SHE'S GONE'' - B.M.I. - 1:35 <
Composer: - Stanley Kesler-Bill Taylor
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - SPA1-4285 - Incomplete Take 7 - Tape Box 6 - Slow Version
Listen as Take 13 in Session Logs
Recorded: - March 6, 1955
Released: - June 1987
First appearance: - RCA BMG (LP) 33rpm 6414-1-R mono
THE COMPLETE SUN SESSIONS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-2-33 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO - THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elvis Presley - Vocal and Acoustic Rhythm Guitar (Martin Dreadnought 18)
Scotty Moore - Electric Lead Guitar (Gibson ES 295)
Bill Black - Acoustic Upright Bass (Kay Maestro M-1)
Jimmie Lott or Johnny Bernero - Drums (Gretsch Round Badge Kit)

For Elvis Presley's Sun recording(s) click on the available > buttons <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

ELBERT ''JOHNNY'' BERNERO - A Sun studio staff drummer between late 1955 and the close of 1958, and drummer for the Dean Beard Band who played on some of Elvis Presley's Sun cuts, although he was never credited, Bernero set a high standard for drummers.

Born in Memphis on September 22, 1931 and started playing drums in 1951 when he joined Smokey Joe Baugh at the 81 Club on Highway 51 in Memphis. He later spent some time with the Jack Hale big band before he became the session drummer at Sun Records in 1955.

Bernero worked across the street from Sun at the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Company. He had an arrangement with his superintendent that he could go across to Sun to cut sessions. In this way, he met Elvis Presley in late 1954 and early 1955. Johnny Bernero played drums for Elvis Presley on "I Forgot To Remember To Forget", "Tryin' To Get To You", "I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone", "Mystery Train" and "When It Rains It Really Pours".

"I was playing with Freddie Burns' band at the old 81 Club on North Second Street at the time", said Johnny Bernero. "I had a very understanding boss at Memphis, Gas & Water Division. If Sam needed me for a session, he would call and I could take off and go down there. I would come back and work longer that day, or another day, to make up for the time lost at work. Elvis paid me fifty dollars a session, which was far more than scale. One night we were recording a good little while. Elvis went into the control booth and talked with Sam a good half-hour. He came out and told me, 'Johnny, we're not going to be able to finish this session'. Still, he paid me the fifty dollars. He was very nice". The session work at Sun became so regular, once or twice a week, that Johnny Bernero left his drums permanently set up in the Sun studio.

By 1956, Bernero was becoming enmeshed in the rockabilly revolution. He had played on the early sides by Warren Smith and joined Warren for many of his gigs, especially those within driving distance of Memphis. Early in the year Elvis Presley called him at the Memphis Light, Gas and Water and asked him to come on the road. Bernero thought it over and then refused. He had five children and realised that life on the road was no life for a married man.

By 1956 Bernero had ditched the ever-unreliable Smokey Joe and replaced him with Thurman "Ted" Enlow for Sun Records and such tunes as "Bernero's Boogie", "Rockin' At The Woodchoppers Ball", and "Cotton Pickin' Boogie" were evidence of Bernero's talent. Bernero who recorded for Memphis' Fox Records in 1955 and had a minor hit with "Rakin' And Scrapin'" for Atlantic Records in 1956.

Johnny Bernero was not a rock and roll drummer, his roots were too deeply implanted in western swing. Bernero started working with Carl McVoy at the VFW Club. They worked as a duo until Ace Cannon came in on tenor sax. By this point, Johnny Bernero had stopped working at Sun and was on the payroll at Hi Records. He arranged with Joe Cuoghi that Ace Cannon be transferred from Fernwood to Hi Records, and Bernero and Cannon agreed to go into the music business together as partners. Together they wrote "Tuff". It was released under Cannon's name but the partnership ended in some acrimony when the first royalty cheque rolled in.

"Ace said, 'John, you know this is the first chance I've had to make any real money and I just can't see giving half of it away'. My countenance fell. Anyway, after some legal proceedings, I ended up getting 30% of what I was entitled to".

After that embittering experience, Johnny Bernero soon quit the music business and even sold his drums, and became an insurance salesman. For many years listeners wondered who the uncredited drummer was on some of Elvis Presley's Sun recordings, falsely believing that it was D.J. Fontana. But Fontana has stated that he never played on any Sun record. Johnny Bernero was the session drummer that Sam Phillips used when he wanted to change his musical direction. However, he left behind a small but wonderful legacy of music rooted in his first love, western swing. Johnny Bernero died of respiratory failure on July 28, 2001 in Fulton, Kentucky, at the age of 69. He is burial at the Water Valley Graves County, Kentucky.

MARCH 6, 1955 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley was booked on a five-day tour with Jimmy Work, Whitey "Duke Of Paducah" Ford, and Betty Amos. The tour swung through Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Missouri.

MARCH 7, 1955 MONDAY

Elvis Presley, Scotty Moore, and Bill Black are now the headliners on a show at the City Auditorium in Paris, Tennessee, made up for the most part of lesser-known artists like Betty Amos, Onie Wheeler, and Jimmy Work.

MARCH 8, 19555 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley, Betty Amos, and Jimmy Work returned to Arkansas, to play an 8:00 p.m. Date in St. Helena at the Catholic Club Auditorium.

MARCH 9, 1955 WEDNESDAY

At 8:00 p.m., Elvis Presley and Onie Wheeler, along with the two entertainers from the previous day, played the Armory in Poplar Bluff, Missouri. Tickets were a minimal 75-cents for adults and 50-cents for children. Elvis Presley gave a wild show and the crowd would not let him leave the stage until he broke every string on his guitar.

In a letter to his associate, Tom Diskin, Colonel Tom Parker complains once again that they can't waste time and money on Presley without being assured of exclusive control on certain dates and places. He does not want Bob Neal or any other promoter benefit from the effort and expense he puts into opening up new territory for the young Presley.

ONIE WHEELER - Elvis Presley first met Onie Wheeler in Sikeston the previous January. Wheeler, a Sikeston native, toured with Elvis constantly from March to June 1955.

He began working on KWOC radio in 1945, and by 1955 he was recording hot country in a rock and roll vein "Onie's Bop" for Columbia Records while still singing on his own radio show on KWOC. Beginning in 1957, he had several sessions for Sun Records with one single "Jump Right Out Of This Jukebox"/"Tell 'Em Off" (SUN 313), released in February 1959. In May 25, 1983, Wheeler died suddenly while performing on stage with the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee.

According to Karen Wheeler, daughter of Onie Wheelers recalls, ''I met Elvis when I was about six years old. We were living in Sikeston, Missouri at the time, and my daddy and Elvis were going to be performing at the Sikeston Armory (more likely Poplar Bluff because there is no supporting evidence for the show that time in Sikeston). Daddy wanted mama to see Elvis and his shows, because he thought that Elvis was one of the best entertainers there was.

He couldn't stop bragging about Elvis to mama. So finally, mama said she would come. I was sitting in the audience with her, and when Elvis came out on stage, I asked mama what was wrong with him''.

''Because he looked all sleepy-eyed and acted strange compared to other entertainers that I had seen before. My mama said, 'He's just an old smart alec'! Somebody that knew Elvis and my daddy went back and told them what my mama had said.

This hurt Elvis so bad because he really thought a lot of my daddy and wanted to make a good impression on daddy's family. So when we came backstage to meet Elvis, the first thing he did was pick me up and tell me how cute I was. Then he focused on mama. They ended up sitting on a bench and talking for a long time. Elvis was determined that my mama was going to like him. And she absolutely loved him after that. Elvis could do not wrong in my mama's eyes'', Karen said.

(Above) Left to right; Gene Smith (Elvis' cousin), Betty Amos, Helen Hobgood (Bob Neal's wife), Scotty Moore, Charles Neal, Elvis Presley, and Bob Neal. Standing: Onie Wheeler and Bill Black at a restaurant in Clarksdale, Mississippi, March 10, 1955.

MARCH 10, 1955 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley performed in Clarksdale, Mississippi, at the City Auditorium. His 8:00 p.m. show featured humour from Bob Neal and songs from Jimmy Work and Betty Amos. The show's emcee was "Fiddling" Bill Cantrell, a local favorite. Adults could get in for $1.00 and $75- cents while children were admitted for 50-cents.

According to Shirley Fleming, ''We had been out playing tennis. Here comes the pinkest car I had ever seen. My friend Carol Black, she was a good-looking girl and a flirt, said, 'That's Elvis', and the race started. We caught them and they pulled over. After the show, Elvis went outside to talk to the girls. I was the chaperone, Carol was the one Elvis fancied, and I had the Brownie camera, and I wasn't really an Elvis fan.

Scotty and Bill wanted to get home. We talked about the Hayride and Scotty said, 'It sure is a long way for what you made''.

Harry Lalcheim cables the Colonel that he has set up the Godfrey audition for March 23, and should Elvis win first place, he will appear on Godfrey's morning TV show for the following three weeks.

MARCH 11, 1955 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley and the band performed at Jimmie Thompson' Arena, Alexandria, Louisiana.

MARCH 12, 1955 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley once again appeared on the "Louisiana Hayride" in Shreveport, Louisiana.

MARCH 13, 1955 SUNDAY

Elvis for private reasons in Memphis.

MARCH 14, 1955 MONDAY

Elvis Presley made an appearance on the "Town And Country Jubilee" in Washington, DC., hosted by Jimmie Dean and broadcast over WMAL-TV (the local ABC-TV affiliate) at 5:30 p.m. Elvis was interviewed by Dean, but he did not perform. Elvis Presley discussed rockabilly music with his host. There was enough interest in Presley's future to attract New York television producers.

Colonel Tom Parker agrees to pay for the trip to the Arthur Godfrey show after securing Neal's promise to protect the Colonel's interest in any bookings that may arise from the tryout.

After the show, Elvis Presley took a train to New York and auditioned for the "Arthur Godfrey Talents Scouts" TV show.

MARCH 15, 1955 TUESDAY

Unbeknownst to Elvis Presley, an invitation from Colonel Tom Parker to join the Hank Snow Jamboree as a regular was just a couple of months away, but, in the confusion surrounding his future, Elvis Presley reluctantly agreed to sign one-year contract with Bob Neal on this date, giving Neal a 15 percent commission and subject to renewal in March 1956, when, if necessary, it could be revised again.

There was a profitable concert market opening to Elvis Presley, so it was financially expedient to buy out some of his appearances on the "Louisiana Hayride" to ensure his availability. It cost Elvis Presley 4400 a month to be freed from his regular Saturday night "Hayride" appearances, but the expense gave him the option of accepting more lucrative dates.

Elvis Presley was now approaching a concert market that quaranteed $500 to $750 a night, and there were plenty of good bookings available at that price. Despite a friendly agreement which freed film from the "Hayride", Elvis Presley told Horace Logan that he still wanted to appear from time to time. Logan realized that Elvis Presley had roots in the "Hayride", and he urged the youngster to come onto the show whenever possible.

Elvis signs an amended one-year àgreement with Bob Neal from which Neal receive a 15 percent management fee.

MARCH 16, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Most likely Elvis Presley play a ''small time Grand Ole Opry'', type show at Ruffin Theater, Covington, Tennessee, promoted by theater owner Jack Sallee, writer of ''You're A Heartbreaker'', and the local radio station. It seems likely that he returns to the area to play the Tipton County Fair later in the year.

Sometime in March, Bill Black wrecks the Lincoln under a hay truck in Arkansas. Elvis borrows the family car from Jim Ed and Maxine Brown for a brief Texas tour that may have included dates not yet identified.

MARCH 16, 1955 WEDNESDAY

Most likely Elvis Presley play a ''small time Grand Ole Opry'', type show at Ruffin Theater, Covington, Tennessee, promoted by theater owner Jack Sallee, writer of ''You're A Heartbreaker'', and the local radio station. It seems likely that he returns to the area to play the Tipton County Fair later in the year.

Sometime in March, Bill Black wrecks the Lincoln under a hay truck in Arkansas. Elvis borrows the family car from Jim Ed and Maxine Brown for a brief Texas tour that may have included dates not yet identified.

MARCH 17, 1955 THURSDAY

Although Ray Campi played a style of music popularized by Elvis Presley, he didn’t go to any of the three shows Presley played in town in Austin, Texas at The Dessau Hall, the Sportcenter and the Skyline City Coliseum where Elvis opened for Hank Snow. Also featured on the show the local musicians Doug and The Fallstaf Swing Boys.

''If you weren’t Elvis, you didn’t like Elvis, at the time'', Campi said. The Memphis Cat had everything that eluded Campi, most notably fame, screaming girls and a fleet of brand new Cadillacs.

But the first time Elvis Presley played in the area, at Dessau Hall on March 17, 1955, only about 75 people showed up. The only disc jockey in town that had been playing his records was KVET’s rhythm and blues jock Lavada Durst, so most people thought he was black. And not many white kids went to black shows back then.

Another resident of Austin, booking agent D.R. Price said, ''About 100 people showed up for the weekend performance and that in a hall that seated 700. He didn't fill it uplike Bob Wills did. The only problem we had was getting him on the bandstand. They drove in and sat out front 'till time to go on. I went outside to see what was the matter, and he was chewing his fingernails. Another problem was that most of the folks had come out to dance and just weren't ready for Elvis. So after Elvis was through, his band stayed on the stand and ran through a few dance numbers to please the crowd.

Leon Carter, an musician said, ''The crowd was thin; real bad. They didn't get no publicity on him. Nobody knew him. We had about sixteen people. One older couple came in. They came up close to the bandstand as he was performing, and I heard the lady say to her husband, ''That kid is bogus. I'm leaving''.

MARCH 19, 1955 SATURDAY

After a disappointing turned at Austin's Dessau Hall two nights before, the Elvis band cast their sights on College Station, Texas, home of Texas A&M University, and future Heisman Trophy winner John David Crow, who had just joined the football team that year and looked rather promising.

Elvis arrived at the G. Rolle White Coliseum on the Texas A&M campus in overdrive. Elvis and his band members promised a three-concert deal to Biff Collie, the prominent disc jockey in Houston who gave the group one of their first breaks.

Eagles Hall expected them at 8 p.m., and Bryan/College Station lay northeast of Houston about one hour's drive for normal people. Elvis, Scotty and Bill could do it in thirty-five minutes after the farmers relinquished the two-lane roads to the speed-aholics for the evening.

Elvis asked the promotors if they minded if he and the band played early, much to the audible groans of the other singers. Billed fourth or not, no one wanted perform after Elvis on these traveling Hayride shows. The audience often left after his stint. Perhaps they didn't want the mood spoiled. Increasingly, no one wanted to perform Elvis either. Ever since Hawkins, Elvis attracted a large contingency of teenagers that followed him to any concert near them.

Unfortunately, they didn't hide their impatience very well and rustled rudely while the earlier singers tried to play.

Then tonight, Elvis Presley pulled off a double-header. He opened the evening at 8:00 p.m. in College Station, Texas, at the G. Rolle White Coliseum on the campus of Texas A&M University.

Headlining were Flatt and Scruggs, Little Jimmy Dickens, Archie Campbell, Wilma Burgess, and Debbie Day. Elvis Presley came on early in the show.

After he completed his performance, he speed down State Route 6, eighty miles to Houston. He closed the show at the Cooks Hoedown Eagle's Hall on the "Grand Prize Saturday Night Jamboree", which was broadcast over KPRC, 950 AM. The show ran from 8:00 to 11:00 p.m.

Tommy Sands was the opening act, and, in recalling how Elvis Presley performed, Tommy Sands felt that he appeared to have something to prove. "I could see a drive in Elvis Presley that most of us didn't have", Sands remembered. "He knew what he wanted and went after it". Elvis Presley pulled out all the stops, and the audience loved the show.

Appearing with Elvis Presley and Tommy Sands that night were, the Dixie Drifters, the Brown Brothers and Sonny Burns, among others. Normally a Saturday night radio show on KNUZ, it was occasionally simulcast on television.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

LIVE BROADCAST RECORDINGS FOR ELVIS PRESLEY
FOR KPRC-TV/RADIO GRAND PRICE JAMBOREE 1955

COOKS HOEDOWN EAGLE'S HALL, HOUSTON, TEXAS
LIVE RECORDING 8:00-11:00PM SATURDAY MARCH 19, 1955
REISSUE PRODUCERS - STANLEY KESLER AND BILL HEFFERMAN
RECORDING ENGINEERS - STANLEY KESLER & DISCJOCKEY HOOT GIBSON
EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS - GOLDEN EDITION LIMITED

Elvis Presley and his band arrived late and played shortly after midnight.

The producers said to be performances from three shows recorded in March. The tapes with the remaining songs from these shows have been destroyed. The recordings were officially released by the United Kingdom record company Virgin in 1979, after having circulated on bootlegs for some time. Elvis Presley appeared in Houston, Texas, at the Eagle's Hall for the "Grand Prize Jamboree". The show was broadcast simultaneously over KPRC-TV and KNUZ radio.

Also on the bill were Hoot Gibson (not the film star, but a disc-jockey on KGNY, Cary, Indiana), Sonny Burns, the Brown Brothers, Tommy Sands, James O'Gwynn, Coye Wilcox, the Dixie Drifters, Ernie Hunter, and Herbie Remington. The show ran from 8:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. The April 2nd issue of Billboard mentioned that Elvis Presley may have had other dates in the Houston area.

"GOOD ROCKIN' TONIGHT" - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Roy Brown
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music Incorporated - Blue Ridge Music
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 19, 1955
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Virgin Records (LP) 33rpm KING 1 mono
THE FIRST YEARS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-20 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

"BABY LET'S PLAY HOUSE" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Arthur Gunter
Publisher: - Fort Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 19, 1955
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Virgin Records (LP) 33rpm KING 1 mono
THE FIRST YEARS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-21 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

''Baby Let's Play House'' probably from a different performance the same week.

"BLUE MOON OF KENTUCKY" - B.M.I. - 1:26
Composer: - William Smith "Bill" Monroe
Publisher: - Peer International Corporation
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 19, 1955
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Virgin Records (LP) 33rpm KING 1 mono
THE FIRST YEARS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-22 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

"I GOT A WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:21
Composer: - Ray Charles
Publisher: - Progressive Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 19, 1955
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Virgin Records (LP) 33rpm KING 1 mono
THE FIRST YEARS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-23 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

"THAT'S ALL RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 1:30
Composer: - Arthur Crudup
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - March 19, 1955
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Virgin Records (LP) 33rpm KING 1 mono
THE FIRST YEARS
Reissued: August 3, 2012 FTD Records (CD) 500/200rpm 506020-975049-3-24 mono
A BOY FROM TUPELO – THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS 1953-1955

"SCOTTY MOORE TELLS THE STORY OF THE FIRST YEAR" - B.M.I. - 21:13
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Virgin Records (LP) 33rpm KING 1 mono
THE FIRST YEARS
Reissued: - 1983 RCA (LP) 33rpm PL-10504 mono
THE FIRST YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Elvis Presley - Vocal and Acoustic Rhythm Guitar (Martin Dreadnought 18)
Scotty Moore - Electric Lead Guitar (Gibson ES 295)
Bill Black - Acoustic Upright Bass (Kay Maestro M-1)
Dominic Joseph Fontana - Drums (Gretsch Round Badge Kit)

The five songs by Elvis Presley, Scotty Moore, Bill Black, and D.J. Fontana contained on this recording were from a live appearance at Eagle's Hall, Houston, Texas, March 19, 1955. It took months of investigation, and scores of interviews to uncover sufficient information and documentation to establish that as fact. Twenty-three years after a whirlwind career in which myth and fact often were one and the same, memories of the living are clouded with the dust of time, and the dead offer only that which the living can perceive. The tape recording of this performance by the group did believed to be the first concert ever recorded.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

(Above) ''The First Years'', released in 1979 on the HALW, Inc. HALW 00001 label, the release originated in the USA. The cover, which is printed in black and white, features an early promo, perhaps the first, of Elvis, Scotty and Bill under which the track listing appears. The original release has a number embossed in the upper right had corner of the cover. The back of the cover has a copy of Elvis’ original July 12, 1954 personal contract with Scotty Moore. Because Elvis was only 19 at the time and was a minor, his parents had to sign as well. There are several other photos as well.

The LP has pink labels and black text; side one is titled “The First Year ” and side two “Elvis Presley Live ”. The first side has a now familiar but still incredibly interesting interview with Scotty Moore regarding their first meeting, first recording, and early shows. The interview runs as a monologue with the questions edited out. The Starlight Wrangler situation was interesting. The second side also has now familiar material from Eagles’ Hall from early 1955 ( March 19, 1955 to be exact ), mis-credited as Cook’s Hoedown Club. The sound quality on both sides is excellent given a good pressing and minimal surface noise.

The LP was counterfeited twice circa 1980, neither of which have the embossed number on the cover. The first has lighter pink labels with both sides both titled “The First Year ”. The second has yellow labels with black text. Both subsequent releases have degraded artwork due to copying.

THE COOKS HOEDOWN RECORDINGS - The only notation on the tape to indicate a time or place of the recording was the announcer introducing Presley as being in Houston, Texas. The announcer was later discovered to be Bob Winsett Hunter, now living in Memphis, Tennessee, who was working at KPRC radio in 1954 and 1955.

It was also established that only two musicians were playing with Elvis Presley on the recording, indicating a time before D.J. Fontana permanently joined the group as the drummer. Scotty Moore, the original guitarist with Elvis, was contacted for affirmation of his appearance on the tape.

That was the beginning of hours of discovery of here to unknown facts about the first year in the dynamic career of the three young men from Memphis.

Scotty Moore tells the story on this recording of what it was like, how they survived weeks of playing and hoping without pay, what the audience reaction was to this phenomena, how the first record was made, how the style of music was born, and much more. The photographs appearing in the booklet are from collections of Scotty Moore, and his former wife Bobbie Moore. Bill Collie, Nashville, Tennessee, one of the country music world's best known voices and strongest supporters, contributed immeasurably by recalling his part in the bookings of the group in the Houston area and as one of the first country disc jockey’s in the Nation to play the Sun recordings of Elvis Presley. Fate was also kind in providing the service of Stanley Kesler, author of "I Forgot To Remember To Forget" and "You're Right, I'm Left, She's Gone" as producer-engineer, and to assist in the research. Reprints of newspapers ads and stories courtesy of the Houston Post, The Houston Chronicle, and Scripts-Howard Newspaper, Incorporated.

THRU THE KALEIDOSCOPE – Like Alice in Wonderland, it all appeared to have inverse logic. The thing that were supposed to make sense were becoming obsolete or extinct, and the thing that seemed absolutely senseless found huge acceptance in a world hone mad with matter, money and morals. One hundred sixty-five million John Q Publics living in the United States in 1954 had adopted the personality of the Mad Hatter Hare in Lewis Carrol's famous story, in a hurry to get to a very important place. They didn't know where, they just knew it was someplace else.

James Dean had struck they key note in "Rebel Without A Cause", only to meet with an early demise in a collision with one of nature's more stable creations. Senator Joseph McCarthney had a cause that founds its way into 26 million American homes via television, that marvellous new wonder in black and white.

In bringing about the demise of McCarthney a nation was exposed to its divisions. The United States Supreme Court in the landmark case of Brown VS. The United States ruled that "separate but equal" was no longer acceptable to the Court's interpretation of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution. Immediate racial de-segregation of the nation's public schools was ordered and the long, sordid story of implementation began.

Eddie Fisher, a popular singer of the moment, left America's Sweetheart, Debbie Reynold's, for the world's most glamorous woman, Elizabeth Taylor. We were building bomb shelters in our basements, backyards and office buildings while the scientist exploded the second Hydrogen Bomp in the Bikini atoll. The result was a new fashion in swim attire named for the de-nuded island. In a matter of days, Dr. Enrico Fermi, Italian physicist, who had spear-headed the development of the original Atomic Bomp, died of cancer, and the nation's first Atomic submarine Nautilus, was launched at Groton, Connecticut. The French capitulated to the Communist Vietmin in Indochina, thereby clearing the way for the establishment of North Vietnam. Jonas Salk inoculated nine hundred thousands school children with anti-poliomyelitis vaccine. The TV moguls cancelled Sid Ceasar's highly successful "Show Of Shows", and brought us the monotone, cryptic dialogue of the Los Angeles cop Jack Wedd's Dragnet. This was all in 1954, and, if that wasn't enough to made a Phi Betta Kappa key look like a pass to the local Play Boy Club, we learned to launch at war as we watched John Patrick's play "Teahouse Of The August Moon", saw brilliance in Jack Kerouac's dissertation on gasoline pumps in his essay, "On The Road", and enjoyed watching Betty Furness make love to a Westinghouse refrigerator each week on Playhouse 90.

These were the signs of the time. It is small wonder then that when Scotty Moore met Elvis Presley for the first time in mid-1954, neither gave a second thought to the illogical coupling of "race" music and Hillbilly songs. Perhaps Bill Black with his genius for comedy was the only one of the three to see humour of it all. It was quite one thing to get together and amuse themselves with their little joke, but it was something else to entertain the megalomania of record producer Sam Phillips and assume that here was the new music of the nation. Ah, but as I said this was 1954, and nobody knew where they were going; only that they were in a hurry to get there. It was as if the messenger was far more important than the message. And so he was. Message came later. For now it was show-time, and the world was treated to one of the greatest shows of all time.

Elvis Presley, Scotty Moore, and Bill Black took their thing to the world on Phillips' Sun Recordings of "Blue Moon Of Kentucky" and "That's All Right", and the world took to the new music like Alice at the Queen's tea party. They were praised, cursed, adored, banned, and generally regarded as responsible for everything that was happening in the nation, good and bad. Here was the most inventive creation to come to the recording medium since the hole in the center of the label. More than the records, though, it was the personal appearance, the real live see him in person thing, that blew people's minds. How it all started, and where it began are the focal points of this recording. What it begot is well known history by now. For the first time you may hear the overture to one helluva show. After a year of pain-staking research of one years in the lives of a number of my friends, both present and past, without whom there would never have been a story to tell, here Ladies and Gentlement is "The First Year".

- Liner notes by Bill Hefferman

MARCH 20, 1955 SUNDAY

According to a brief mention in Billboard, April 2, 1955, Elvis Presley may have been in the Houston area for several days playing other shows booked by Biff Collie and Jack Starness, Jr. No doubt two of these appearances were at Magnolia Gardens this afternoon and at Cook's Hoedown Club, Houston, Texas, in the evening.

In an interview with Biff Collie, Elvis Presley complained about getting rest on the road. Collie ask, "I known the problem on these tours is getting enough rest to go on the stage. How do you manage to get enough rest". Elvis said, "Well, I don't. In fact, don't any of us get much rest. It's a lot of work when you do three shows a day. We do four shows sometimes". Collie ask, "So you just have to catch it when you can"?. Elvis said, "That's right. Then usually, when it's all over with, there's a lot of people around and, well, you just don't get much rest". And Collie ask, "Between towns, you have to climb in the sack somewhere to rest awhile". Elvis said, "That's right. We average about four to five hours (of sleep) a night".

MARCH 21, 1955 MONDAY

According to Sally Reese resident of Parkin says, that Elvis Presley performed at the Parkin High School in Parkin, Arkansas. ''I sat on the front row. Remember he had on either pink pants and a chartreuse jacket or chartreuse pants and a pink jacket. They didn't go together, they were so bright. And I remember I screamed and yelled, like everybody else. I was the first one on the stage to get his autograph. My father was at the show. He sat at the back of the auditorium, but unlike some other parents it didn't disturb him. The suit was satin! We stormed that stage. It affected you that way. I had never experienced anything like that. It was fantastic''.

On this date, a incoming rejection letter to Sam Phillips of Sun Record Company from a Los Angeles record manufacturer. Simply put, an Elvis Presley rejection letter from a Los Angeles record distributor who couldn’t have known that a year later, Elvis would change the world with ''Heartbreak Hotel''.

''Elvis Presley records would not sell in Los Angeles'', Nate Duroff of the Monarch Record states flatly in this letter on white Monarch stationery, paraphrasing another record exec. ''I know for a fact that western and hillbilly out here ‘stinks’ as far as sales… southern blues are very weak in sales also… a rock and roll in western and hillbilly, such as Bill Haley records would move good out here''. Duroff then signed the letter in blue pen.

MARCH 22 / 23, 1955 TUESDAY / WEDNESDAY

Elvis Presley travelled for the first time in an airplane to New York City to audition for "Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts" TV show on the CBS building on 49 East, 52nd Street. His performance did not impress the producers, and Elvis was not accepted for the show. The Arthur Godfrey talent coordinators were note accustomed to spending much time with new acts. They watched Elvis Presley perform and quickly rejected him. Nervous and erratic, Elvis Presley had made an unfavourable impression.

Godfrey's talent coordinator told Elvis Presley that he was just not suited for national television. Much like the initial response at "Grand Ole Opry", Godfrey's program director made fun of Elvis' music.

The executives who auditioned new acts were heavily influenced by Frank Sinatra, Perry Como, Nat King Cole, and Frankie Lee. If a singer didn't have the vocal affectations and stylings of pop crooners like these, it was difficult to secure a spot on the Godfrey shows.

"We went up there and didn't pass the audition", recalled Scotty Moore. "I don't remember it as such. We didn't know enough about the showbiz to know what was goin' on. It was somethin' Bob Neal had set up, and we were in awe of going to New York and seeing the big city".

While in New York, Elvis is reported to have gone to Harlem to see Bo Diddley perform at the Apollo Theatre. Also in mid-March, Elvis Presley stopped his regular weekly appearances on the "Louisiana Hayride" to concentrate on spreading his popularity outside of the South and Southwest. However, since his contract with the "Hayride" until October 1955, it cost $400 a week to get him out of a contract which only paid him eighteen dollars a show.

"I don't remember Elvis seeing Bo Didley", recalled Scotty Moore, "he may have. Bill and I didn't go, but Bob Neal might have taken him over there".

When Bob Neal arrived at the airport, Elvis and his parents were already there. According to Bob Neal, ''I doubt that he had slept much, but he was literally bubbling with excitement. Freshly scrubbed and dressed in his best, his eyes were dancing with exhilaration, and the famous one-sided grin seemed to light up the drab old airport. 'Is everything all ready, Mr. Neal'? I assured him that we were all ready to go, tickets in hand, and that he would enjoy flying. It was his first flight, and there was more than a little nervous apprehension in his expression. There was a jolly roar from the building entrance as Black came in carrying the old stand-up bass fiddle under one arm and a small suitcase in the other hand. Scotty followed with his guitar, amp, and other personal effects in tow. Almost immediately we were faced with our first problem. 'Sir, you'll have to check that instrument as baggage', the attendant said, indicating the bass fiddle. 'What'! Bill screamed. 'No Sir, no way I'm gonna check this instrument. Why? It'd probably get all messed up. I gotta carry it with me'. After a flurry of give and take and quoting regulations, Elvis nervously cleared his throat and spoke to the counter man. 'Sir, my name is Elvis Presley. We are goin' to New York for the Arthur Godfrey program, and we just gotta have the bass fiddle 'cause it's part of the show. I sure would appreciate it if you could let us carry it with us'.

The attended happened to like Elvis' records, and an autograph was exchanged for some airline flexibility, eventually placing the bass fiddle in the seat next to Bill all buckled up With a hug to his father, and a tearful goodbye to his mother, Elvis was on his way to New York. They checked into an inexpensive but clean hotel with the smallest double rooms Neal had ever seen. He and Elvis shared one room, Scotty and Bill, and the bass fiddle had the room next door. After freshening up, Neal took them all out to the sights in the fading light of the early evening.

''A short cab ride took us to the studios for the Godfrey auditions, says Bob Neal, ''Elvis and company stood quietly, with only an occasional chuckle, as I told the receptionist who we were. She looked over her list of appointments and told us to find a seat until we were called. There were several equally nervous acts sitting and waiting their turn, all occasionally glancing around the room at the others waiting, wondering what talents they might have''.

After about forty-five minutes, the long-awaited call came, and Elvis, Scotty, and Bill carried their instruments through the door. I followed and watched as technicians helped them arrange equipment and make brief voice tests for the microphones. Then, an impatient female voice came through the talk back speakers: 'All right, let's go. We have a lot of people waiting'.

''Elvis nodded at Bill and Scotty, and the studio began to rock with the familiar beat of ''That's All Right'', at first with slight restraint, and then, as the stage fright faded, with an all out performance of the trio. As the song ended, there was unearthly silence in the studio with no applause to punctuate the ending. Then the unseen voice said: 'Okay. Got another one'? This time it was ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'', and Presley warmed to the task with some of the moderate gyrations he made famous and a hint of the one-sided smile that became so well known. Though there was no live audience to watch him, Elvis gave it everything he had. Again, then quiet, and, 'Let's have one more'. Now the tempo became electric, Bill Black swinging back and forth as he slapped the bass with Scotty, no trace of emotion, his eyes closed tight to the beat of ''Baby Let's Play House''. I could see through the window of the dimly lit control room and could not help noticing that some of the shadowy figures behind the glass were swaying with the excitement of the rhythm and I suddenly had a feeling that Elvis really had their attention, maybe he would make it. Elvis seemed pleased with the overall performance: 'I reckon we just have to wait to hear from them, won't we'? 'I'm afraid that's all we can do now', I said. The call never came''.

ARTHUR GODFREY'S TALENT SCOUTS CBS-TV SERIES (1948-1958) - hosted by Arthur Godfrey (nicknamed as The Old Redhead), which had been created by Irving Mansfield, the onetime husband of author Jacqueline Susann. Elvis Presley and the Blue Moon Boys (Scotty Moore and Bill Black) went to New York City in March 1955 to audition for "Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scout". They were turned down. At nearly the same time, Pat Boone auditioned for the show and won first place. He later became a regular on Godfrey's other TV series, "Arthur Godfrey and His Friends".

Buddy Holly and the Crickets win first place on the show in 1956, his recording of "A Rose And A Baby Rith" Colonial 420 and ABC Paramount 9725) was released. The song reached number 6 on the charts.

Other artists who made their TV debuts on "Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts" included Steve Lawrence, Connie Francis, Jimmie Rodgers, Tony Bennett, Guy Mitchell, Rosemary Clooney, the Chordettes, Carmel Quin, and Patsy Cline, who made her debut in 1957 singing "Dig A Little Deeper". In 1954 the Foggy River Boys, with lead singer Charlie Franklin Hodge, also won on the program. Elvis recalled watching that particular episode.

MARCH 24, 1955 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley perform at the T.A. Futrell High School Auditorium in Marianna, Arkansas. Also on the bill Bud Deckerman and Onie Wheeler. Show starts at 8:00 p.m.. Admission is 50c and $1:00.

Donna Webb remembers going to the show at the T.A. Futrell High School in Marianna. Donna and her friends had heard about Elvis on the Red, Hot and Blue show from Memphis when the first record came out.

''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' was the title that stuck. She and her girlfriends would take the train, coming from Helena, stopping at the depot in Marianna, and ride up to Memphis to buy Elvis' records there. Some of the girls knew Basil Scaife (aka Cecil Scaife), a disc jockey at the radio station in Helena.

Cecil arranged the show and got front row seats for the girls. Elvis arrived in his pink Cadillac wearing a navy blue suit with shirt unbuttoned. There was a decent crows, and Elvis dedicated songs to each of the girls. He sang, ''I Got A Woman'' to Donna. The next night there was a show in Dermott, but Donna's mother wouldn't give her permission to go.

According to Wilson Kell, ''I didn't know who Elvis Presley was. I was a football coach. The high school principal said, 'Could you come to the school tonight, and lock up for a singer who's gonna come'? So I went, and locked up, and let everybody in, and locked up afterwards. When it was over, I was ready to go home. There were a lot of people up on the stage with him. It was a combination of a gym and an auditorium and had a stage at one end. I waited for about 15 to 20 minutes, so they just kept standing there talking, so finally I said, 'Look, I'm going to lock up and go home. If you want to talk anymore, I would appreciate it if you would all go outside''.

(Above) Scotty Moore, Elvis Presley, Dermott-McGehee announcer Doug Ward, Bill Black, and state trooper Kenneth McKee at the Tin City Truck Stop and Restaurant in Dermott, Arkansas, March 25, 1955.

MARCH 25, 1955 FRIDAY

Elvis Presley and the band perform at Dermott High School in Dermott, Arkansas. The show was sponsored by the Senior Class and started at 7:30 p.m. Admission: adults 75 cents, and children 50 cents.

Lonnie Strange remember, ''In 1955, my grandfather, Kenneth McKee (I called him Gengan), was an Arkansas State Trooper stationed in Dumas. A local man named O.T. Coley and his wife ran a truck stop and restaurant in Dermott called the Twin City Diner. It was a place to sit, visit, and drink coffee with local people, which is something my grandfather did very well. He was 27 years old when he made the acquaintance of three young men on a journey to make their marks on the world. They were on their way to be on the Louisiana Hayride, a radio show based out of Shreveport, Louisiana. My grandfather visited with them on a fairly regular basis, and on this particular day, a picture was taken of them drinking coffee. My grandfather, dressed in his state trooper uniform, had his picture made with Bill Black, Scotty Moore, and Elvis Presley, who was holding my grandfather's revolver. Gengan was always very proud of this picture, and he could say that he knew Elvis and the Blue Moon Boys before they were really famous. We've had the picture hanging in our house for years. I asked about it when I was a little girl, and he said, 'Yes, Elvis did have blue suede shoes on''.

Pat Scavo says, ''The first time we heard it, the rhythm and blues sound, was from the station between Dermott and McGehee, and that's where we heard that Elvis would be in Dermott and give a concert. So we absolutely went down by the carload to see him perform. When we heard him on the radio, he sounded like a black man, and we were used to dancing to all the jitterbug songs. ''Honey Hush'', ''Shake Rattle And Roll'', so when we saw that he was white, we couldn't actually believe that that voice was coming out of him. All the girls screaming, and the boys were behind us fanning us with their handkerchiefs, because we were going bananas. My dad kept saying, 'A flash in the night. He will never last''. The concert was a fundraiser for the Dermott Senior Class trip and was co-ordinated by Billy Mac Hartness. Billy Mac asked us if we could take Elvis and the Blue Moon Boys to someone's house since there was no place in Dermott to wind down after the concert. So, Pat Lally said we could all go to her house in McGehee, and we did, and had to get permission from our parents to stay out late''.

According to Pat Lally, ''He came to my house for a party after the show. We were so tickled that he would come, I could just envision myself sitting right close up to him in the car, and then they put the bass fiddle down in the middle. I was on one side of the bass fiddle; he was on the other. I was crushed''.

''My mother said I could have a few kids over to dance, but there were over a hundred, and my mother was about to have a conniption fit. She said she knew she would know when he came in the door, because all the kids would be screaming and hollering. When he hit that door, you could have heard a pin drop. Everybody was standing with their mouths open, because he was actually there. Elvis asked Pat Scavo, who was one of our best friends, where the little boy's room was, and she was so dumbfounded that he had spoken to her, that she could just point, not talk. We saved everything he touched. We made a shrine. The basketball, the cup he drank out of, the towel he used to dry his hair. He was at my house from about 10 'till 2 in the morning''.

''We couldn't get him to come up and be around the kids, he didn't know how to dance with the girls. He just didn't know how to handle it. He actually stayed back and talked to my mother all the time. He didn't have much to say to anybody, and he talked about his mother with my mother. She said he was the nicest young man. She fell in love for the second time. He asked me, at 2 o'clock in the morning, if I would show him to town. Now, McGehee had a population of 5000 people, and they roll up the sidewalk when it gets dark. So my mother told him she didn't think there would be anything to see at 2 o'clock in the morning, and he said, 'I respect your wishes, and if I had a daughter, I wouldn't let her go out with a total stranger'. That won her over right there'''.

MARCH 26, 1955 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley returned to Shreveport for an appearance on the "Louisiana Hayride" with newcomer Al Ferrier. This item appeared in the April issue of a country music magazine: "Faron Young is playing the Jamboree at the Circle Theater, Cleveland March 26 with Elvis Presley, Wilburn and York Bros. and Justin Tubb filling in the rest of the month".

Sentence syntax is a little confusing here. One might assume that Young was playing the Circle Theater with Elvis Presley on March 26. Billboard also ran an item on the Circle Theater on February 12, 1955, and it stated "Elvis Presley set for similar stint in March".

The Hillbilly Jamboree in Cleveland was a Saturday night affair. Most shows featured only one "headliner" along with the Jamboree regulars. Newspapers ads for the Circle Theater indicate that Mac Wiseman, not Faron Young, headlined on March 26. The York Brothers did play the Circle Theater on March 12 with Justin Tubb appearing there March 19. On April 2, the headliners at the Hillbilly Jamboree were Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs.

It is doubtful if Elvis Presley was ever scheduled for the Circle Theater in March, and both of the news stories are confusing only in light of his February 26 appearance. On Saturdays in March 1955, Elvis Presley was scheduled to perform in Shreveport on the Louisiana Hayride on March 5, 12, and 26, and he was in Houston on March 19 and April 2.

MARCH 27, 1955 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley performed at the Airmen's Club, Shreveport, Louisiana. Elvis Presley will be headliner on a musical comedy stage show. Backing up with Scotty Moore and Bill Black. Elvis expected to repeat some of his tunes at the Airmen's Club that late night, in addition to mixing up a few country tunes with some pop and novelty numbers.

MARCH 28, 1955 MONDAY

Later that night, Elvis Presley performed at the local Big Creek High School Auditorium 8:00 p.m. in Big Creek, Mississippi, sponsored by the senior class of the Big Creek High School. Admission for this special feature will be 50 cents and 75 cents.

MARCH 29, 1955 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley, Scotty Moore, and Bill Black appeared at the local High School Auditorium in Toccopola, Mississippi. Reliable evidence has not been uncovered but according to Ed Bounds, ''Oxford is my home; real close to Toccopola. We had a little meet place on the square, the Oxford square, at the confederate monument.

We'd just get together and meet, and decide what we were gonna do for the night, you know, a bunch of guys running around. I was fixing to be a senior in high school, and so were all the other guys.

We were just sitting there and up drives this pink Cadillac with a big bass fiddle strapped on top, and Elvis was driving the car, and he said, 'Can you all help us out? How do we get to Toccopola'? I had an old '48 Ford and I just said, 'Why don;t you just follow us'?

Toccopola is way out in the country, and we were considered city boys. Well, we decided we were gonna buy a ticket and see the show. But they told us, to avoid trouble with the local boys, 'You'll have to go and sit on the other side''.

Bill White remember that Elvis broke his guitar strings that night. ''It was people from all around at the show. The gym was full. It was a small town, but the gym was fairly big. I was in the 11th grade, and I was president of the class. We lived about 3/4 of a mile from the school, and my whole family went, because our class was sponsoring the show. We got 40 percent and they got 60. Bob Neal was the emcee. The reason we were able to get them was because of Mrs. Taylor (teacher). One of out sponsors was Kemmons Wilson's cousin or sister, and he had some kind of connection. (Kemmons Wilson was the owner of Holiday Inn, and a friend of Sam Phillips). I remember my daddy saying, If that guy who broke the guitar strings make it in country music, then I quit'''.

The Colonel voices his concern to Bob Neal once again about Sun Records. It is very difficult, he says, to interest promoters outside of the small range of Sun's distribution in the young singer. He asks Neal to find out from Sam Phillips where the records are selling so that he can seek out promoters in those areas.

MARCH 30, 1955 WEDNESDAY

At 8:00 p.m., Elvis Presley, Betty Amos and Onie Wheeler, along with T. Tommy and his band, packed the house at a jamboree at the High School Auditorium in El Dorado, Arkansas. This evening's show was sponsored by Mike Michael of KDMS radio in El Dorado. Before that, the folks getting ready for the annual El Dorado Days celebration had no earthly idea what was about to hit them.

The show was billed as a Louisiana Hayride road show and there were some big names - Jimmy Lee, Rusty and Doug Kershaw - headlining the gig. Mike Michaels, a local disc jockey who hailed from Memphis, and was the Emcee, he invited a local band of young kids to open the show.

They had their own show on El Dorado's main station on Saturday. Everybody around those parts knew the Chiltling Switch Roadrunners. How did they come by a name like that?

"That's the name of the town we came from", said Bobby Bird. "We were a group of young boys ages seven to thirteen. Mike booked us to open the show at War Memorial Stadium. Before the show, Elvis asked me if I would tune his guitar. He sat there in his car signing autographs while I tuned it. It was that D-18 Martin with the unborn calfskin with "Elvis Presley" dyed in pink on it".

"After awhile, Elvis asked, 'You got my guitar tuned?' I said, 'Yeah'. He took it and went on stage. Before he went on, Scotty and Bill were doing most of the talking. Bill was doing most of the talking. But when Elvis took the stage, it was his show! He was not the headliner, but he stole the show. It was the greatest performance I had ever see. He went up there on that stage wearing violet pants, a black shirt, orange jacket and white bucks. "That's All Right" was the only song of his we knew at the time. He sang maybe a halfdozen songs during his part of the program".

"While Elvis was singing and dancing about, the fans were hollerin' and shooting firecrackers", Bird said. "Girls were falling out of the bleachers, fainting. It was like being hit by a hammer. Not everyone in the audience took so well to Elvis Presley. "Some boys get mad because of the effect Elvis was having on the girls", said Bird. "They let the air out of the tires of his Cadillac. They had to bring in a tow truck with an air tank to re-inflate those tires. It didn't seem to bother Elvis at all. he just sat there patiently in his car signing autographs. He was very polite. You could tell even then he was on his way".

Lura Impson wrote in her April 1955 T. Tommy Time newsletter: ''On March 30th, we had a ball in El Dorado. We had a wonderful show! Haven't had so much fun in a long time! The show featured T. Tommy, Elvis 'the Cat' Presley, Bob Neal, Betty Amos, Floyd Cramer, Jimmy Day, Al Hobson, Breacher Hartness, Onie Wheeler. I enjoyed meeting Elvis Presley's manager, Bob Neal, and fanclub president Helen Hobgood. They are wonderful people and everything was lovely, except we had a big juice flat, and on T. Tommy's car, too. Of course we had no trouble fixing it, 'cus there were seven of us in the car. We had plenty of help from all directions''.

MARCH 31, 1955 THURSDAY

Elvis Presley and Onie Wheeler travelled to Longview, Texas, for this evening's show at the Reo Palm Isle. Admission was $1.00. Although not specified in pre-performance ads, the entertainment at the Reo Palm Isle usually began about 9:00 p.m. and the stage show was followed by several hours of country dancing.

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