Published for Historical Reasons

At last, a true Elvis Presley item. This book, more of a booklet, what with there only being 64 pages, was originally published in 1970, and has since entered Elvis folklore for reasons which will shortly become clear. Unfortunately, what you see here is only a 1981 reprint, although it's still a relatively scarce publication.

So why is it so revered? Well, you may remember that when Elvis died Albert Goldman kicked up quite a stink with his revelation that Colonel Parker was in reality a Dutchman called Andre Van Kuyk. Whilst this is now common knowledge, back then just after Elvis died, this was askin' to finding out that the Pope was married and had six kids. It was huge. 

And then somebody pointed it out that. There's a guy in Holland called Hans Langbroek, who put that same information in a book seven years before Elvis died. And if you look on page 23, in a chapter called "The Great Snowman - Thomas Andrew Parker", there it is, all matter of fact and nothing much to get excited about. Although now considered to be worth having mainly for it's novelty value, this is a tiny bit of Elvis history. If you ever see it, and the price is right, snap it up.

''The Hillbilly Cat'' is written in the context of circa 1969/1970

He Called It Rock And Roll

You know, yesterday, when I got home I did not feel like doing much at all, so I switched on my music-set and went upstairs to get some records to play.

I sat and put one on for a spin while it was playing I went through a pile of records and selected some to play. While I went through the records my mind wandered back in time and as I got that far I reached for a thick piece of wax. After I put that on I that familiar noise of a 78 record coming over the speakers and after a few seconds ff scratching sound into a high-pitched voice singing; have you heard the news, there's a good rockin' tonight's, that voice is familiar over the world, although it has changed through the years, for it is of Elvis Presley !

Music has changed too and has been played in many a different way, especially in the last twenty years. Each generation one style better than any other and adopted the idols of it. Now music styles are changing so fast that even the men, who write about it as their cannot predict anything any more about the future - anything is possible or can be expected. I have adopted a style too, like the idols belonging to it, and it is that music I want to tell you. But first I shall have to explain a few things about the music styles from which my favorite music Sprang.

From 1945 on two different styles of music were popular at the same time in the United States of America. One style was quite popular in the factory cities of the northern states and was presented to the public by the big bands of Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw and a host of others. After a while the fashion to feature singers and people like Bing Crosby, Rosemary Clooney, Perry Como and Frank Sinatra got very popular for their of singing, which soon was called: ''crooning" - or prostitution of good singing as one critic phrased it. That just was to that criticism of something new is nothing new nowadays. Frankie boy caused the first mass-hysteria in new Paramount Theatre the girls cried, mooned and threw underwear at him and that did not hit as hard as tomatoes, rotten eggs or criticism.

Suddenly, however, Frankie had a great downfall in popularity - loved today, forgotten tomorrow - that could happen to anyone in this kind of business and enough people were ready to take over, like for instance Johnny Ray, who even caused a little more sensation than Frankie, who would make a grand come-back in 1955 as a movie actor in: ''From Here To Eternity" and later also as a singer, by caressing the microphone while crying into it, and on stage at that. Just imagine it!

The other style of music was popular in the southern states, a part of America completely different, hard - cotton country, strict religious feelings - the bible belt, with simple music about everyday life - backed by fiddles and guitars. People sang it on their back door porches when work was done, for it had been there as long as people could remember and thanks to the increasingly better recording techniques it grew and grew in popularity and people like Hank Snow, Gene Autry and Eddy Arnold were big names in this field country music.

It was in the southern states too that there was yet another kind of music, completely different to both other styles, that was largely responsible for the change in music, that brought the sounds I like the music of the negro - rhythm and blues. The negroes at that time made up ten per cent of the total population of the United States. They had to work hard and long to earn a few dollars and so there was little money for anything but food and rent. Negroes also had songs handed down from one generation to another, although their subjects in songs were a little different sometimes they could make sortie extra money by singing for the men who came down to the plantations with recording equipment the recordings mode were sold to small record companies for release end solely sold to the negroes sales usually were never high, around copies was good over 10.000 copies meant a really good sale the small record companies hardly ever had o really good distribution system and could not afford expensive advertising campaigns and due to discrimination their records were not played over radio stations controlled mostly by white people.

Country singers wrote their own material but the crooners rarely did. But they needed new songs just the same and so they borrowed a song once in a while from the negro singers. The songs were arranged to suit them and that made them sound very much the same. Songs like ''Kokomo'' by Perry Como on RCA (original by Gene and Endice on combo), ''Tweedle Dee'' by Georgie Gibbs on Mercury (original by Lavern Baker on Atlantic) and ''Eearth Angel'' by the Crew Cuts on Mercury (original by the Pinquins) were just a few of the cover versions that enjoyed the success which the negroes deserved.

But as always there were exceptions: Bill Haley for instance, with: ''Shake, Rattle and Roll'' and the Crew Cuts with ''Sh-Boom (Life Can Be A Dream)'' in 1954, both songs had arrangements that stuck pretty close to the original treatment by Joe Turner and the Chords and Fats Domino was slowly gaining popularity in and around New Orleans small outfits without established singers started producing similar material for local sole to cash in on it and it did not take much longer before sales grew and grew and announced a change in music.

The change came and surprised a lot of people for it transformed they younger people into a class of their own - teenagers - kids bigger than the little children, but not yet big enough to be accepted as ''grown-ups'', suddenly had their own music, their own style of clothes, infect their own way of life. they bought these new records and loved them and their parents could not possibly share their love for it. In fact the more they detested and criticised their music the more the teenagers liked it. That all happened after the movie ''Blackboard Jungle" was distributed to cinemas all over the world and that movie started with a song called ''Rock Around The Clock", by Bill Haley and his Comets, that would soon grow into a hymn for this new type of music.

Lots of record companies suddenly switched over to this new craze realising that here was a new field not yet exploited. Now the break was there it became bigger and bigger, but it did not just happen like that man, heck no it took a lot of hard work and usually that is soon forgotten after it has finally been achieved. the change in styles was not brought about by just one person, but by many. They all did their share but one person gave it it's biggest boost and made it popular the world all over - Elvis Presley. His name cannot be separated from it and the start of his career was also the start of this music - his music. What it took for Presley was something have always been interested in and that was what I wanted to write about in this little thing here.

It happened some time ago, in fact so long ago that people have long forgotten the days that Alan Freed and his show hit the road - and he called it rock and roll.

There Is No Sound - Like Sun Sound

One of the labels that produced some of the greatest rock and roll singers was the Memphis - based Sun label owned by Sam C. Phillips. Sam was born on a farm in north Alabama in 1923 and practically from his birth on was surrounded by music. He would go and listen to uncle Silas Payne, an old negro, for hours and hours. It is not certain whether uncle Silas got him so interested in music that he went to study it at college, learning to play drums and sousaphone, but however good the college would never have taught him anything about rhythm and blues - the music of uncle Silas, the negro.

He soon found a job with the WLHY radio station, left that to join the WHSL station in 1942. After that he moved to WLEC in Nashville, Tennessee, where he also tried his luck as a country-singer , but unsuccessfully. finally he joined radio station WRAC in Memphis, Tennessee. Here he worked as an announcer engineer and it did not take too long for him to find out that the music he played only differed in subject and that most of the songs sounded the same as a thousand others. This bored him very much and he could very well imagine it bored the public too. It lacked that , something' to make people to it, whether they wanted or not, and one way or another he found out he never had to force himself to listen to the songs of uncle Silas, for those songs had something most popular tunes did not have - excitement!

Sam knew that most of the negro singers were born in the Mississippi Delta or the neighbouring southern states and that their music was recorded either up north in Chicago, Illinois, or along the west coast. But a negro had to work hard and long and usually did not have the time nor the money to make these long journeys, so, with a wife and two children to support, Sam quit his job and bought a broken down recording studio, just on impulse. Here, on 706 Union Avenue at Marshall, he started recording the negro singers with equipment that was far from professional, he sold the recordings to the already established record companies for release. His first recordings were by the now famous '' Blues 'Boy' King and Roscoe Gordon. Most of his material he sold to the Bihari brothers for release on their west coast based labels Modern and RPM and to Leonard and Phill Chess for release on the Chess label.

Some of the material Sam recorded sold very well after it was released, especially the material he recorded by Doctor Ross, Rufus Thomas, Little Walter, Harmonica Frank and Howlin Wolf that he sold to the Chess brothers in Chicago. If it kept on selling the singers were usually offered a contract and moved up north to Chicago, where they recorded subsequently.

In 1953, most of the negro singers left Memphis for either Chicago or Los Angeles where the big record companies were and where they would be better off - they thought. Doctor Ross left Memphis for Chicago. So did James Cotton and Little Milton and slowly Sam lost some of the finest singers he had worked with. Several of the demonstration samples made of late 1952 recordings already indicated that Sam was thinking of starting to release the material he recorded himself on his own label and it was not long before the company was established he called it Sun Records.

Probably the very first record set for release on the label was to have been ''Selling My Whiskey'' by Jackie Boy & Little Walter. The demonstration sample of this recording already had the now famous yellow and brown Sun label stuck on and the record was numbered sun 174. The flip-side of this demonstration sample was an instrumental by Little Walter. The record, however, was never released and the company started it's long list of fine record releases with an instrumental by Johnny London on Sun 175: ''Drivin' Slow'' on one side and ''Flat Tire'' on the other.

The first recordings released on Sun Records were mainly rhythm and blues and success for the label came in 1953 with recordings by Little Junior's Blue Flames, but success also made Herman Parker Jr. forget about his contract with the label when he accepted an offer from Duke Records in Houston, Texas. Sam realised he had to expand his interest to country music and also a vocal group was added to the company for sacred songs and popular tunes and one of their very first records, a later cover version for Johnny Ray, ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'' did not do bad at all that group was the Prisonaires.

Sam also started a recording service so that ordinary people could have their own voice recorded for a couple of dollars either as a message to someone, if they wanted it to be different from the usual letter, or just for fun. It was this not-so-very profitable service that would be the start of something really big in music, something big spelled Elvis Presley!

''If a kid has any music in him and grows up in Memphis, Tennessee, that music is going to come out no matter what'' - Elvis Presley

The Hillbilly Cat

What could I write about Elvis' early life as a child that has not been written before? Therefore I would rather point out the things I thought were most important, although I could not leave out certain things.

It was in 1933, right at the peak of the depression, that Vernon Presley and Gladys Smith hitchiked to the nearby town of Verona, some five miles away from Tupelo, Mississippi, where they both lived, to get married. Vernon did not even have a job to support his wife. A carpenter of profession he built a small, two-roomed house in East Tupelo, a small town three miles from Tupelo on the road to Alabama. The newly-wed Presleys were poor but poverty was common at that time so they were no exception. Both Vernon and Gladys worked in the cotton-fields, but that work was too hard for Gladys so she took a job in a factory. She had to quit that after she became pregnant. On January 8th, 1935, she gave birth to twins, to which Vernon and Gladys matched the names Elvis Aron and Jesse Garon. Jesse, born some twenty minutes after Elvis, died soon after birth.

It was his mother Gladys who had a very great influence on Elvis' education. She watched over him and she was the one who taught him to sing songs, not just the country tunes, but all so the songs of the church, for the Presleys were very religious, they belonged to the first Assembly of God's Church; a church that borrows its style of hymn-singing from the negro gospels and they really get involved in the hymns. This style of heavy singing was to have a great influence on Elvis' singing later on. When Elvis grew up the three Presleys became a well-known group at camp-meetings and other religious get-togethers. In 1941 Vernon found work as a painter and the Presleys moved to another somewhat bigger house.

At Lawhon Public school (now a Junior High) Elvis was a shy little boy, except when he could sing, and this is soon noticed by his third-grade teacher Mrs. Grimes, who reports it to head- master Mr. Cole, with the suggestion that young Elvis could very well participate in the singing contest at the forthcoming Alabama/Mississippi State Fair. After some discussion Elvis is handed a note for his parents in which they are asked to give permission to enter Elvis in the competition. Things were not that simple though, for Elvis did not have any musical backing that did not stop him for he just sang without backing and the song was one of his favorites: ''Old Shep'', reports on the event in several magazines made believe he won the first prize, but just who came out first was not important. What was important is that Elvis participated in this contest in 1943 and that he really seemed to have taken a great interest in music.

In the fifth grade, at the age of ten, Elvis participated in another music competition organised by a local radio station. That is why Vernon and Gladys gave him the guitar for his 11th birthday, although at that time Elvis seemed to prefer a bicycle. He took the guitar with him everywhere he went and learned to play it.

Now the war was over American soldiers had returned from Europe and Vernon found himself out of work again. He went north to Memphis and found work there. After he also found a place to live there the Presleys sold off the things they could not take with them and put these they kept into the old Pontiac. They moved into an apartment on Alabama Street on Saturday 16th September 1948. Elvis entered L.C. Humes High school and after some time the Presleys moved to the Lauderdale Courts housing project at 185 Winchester street. At the age of fifteen Elvis started to work as an usher for Mr. Arthur Groom in his Loew's State theatre, a cinema, and moved lawns in the neighbourhood. In 1951 Elvis passed for his driver's license and started to work on evening shifts in Marl Metals product company.

In 1952 Elvis participated in a road-e-o competition organised by the Junior Chamber of Commerce in Memphis and for the first time his photo appeared in a newspaper showing him changing a tire. Most of his high school friends do not remember much about Elvis any more, except that he was very religious and always had his guitar with him. Around Christmas 1952 Elvis was part of the benefit variety show at Humes High, together with some thirty other pupils. Each of them was to perform one song, and the act that got the most applause would be allowed an encore. That night Elvis did a currently popular country tune, ''Cold Cold Icy Fingers" and receiving the most applause, he did an encore.

Shortly after his 18th birthday Elvis Presley was registered for his army duty and that same year he graduated from Humes High after that he entered the services of the Crown Electric company, at 353 Poplar Avenue, owned by Mr. James R. Tipler. He started as a stock-room clerk but soon after that learned to drive the company's delivery truck and went to study at night-school to become an electrician.

All that time his interest in music had grown and every spare minute he had he could be found hanging around radio stations, record companies and negro clubs in Beale Street where he was not allowed in, so he just stayed outside to listen to whatever sound he could pick up.

It was only after finishing school and by getting a job that Elvis was able to save a few dollars to have a recording made so that he could find out what he sounded like. He made that record for his mother's birthday, at least that was published in magazines over and over, but with Elvis graduating in June and Gladys having her birthday in April it must have been a rather late birthday present then and I am more inclined to believe that he just wanted to know what he sounded like. The record must have been very precious to his family anyway, but I guess the birthday present story had more appeal for the publicity stories later on.

So one afternoon Elvis stopped his truck on Union Avenue, grabbed his guitar and went into the shop, told the lady he wanted to cut a song and after he had put down the four dollars he went into the studio. There he strummed the guitar a little and after the light flashed on did two ''My Happiness" (written in 1933 by Betty Peterson (words) and Borney Bergentine (music) and ''That's When Your Heartaches Begin'' (written in 1940 by Fred Fisher (words) and Billy Hill (music). The guitar playing was bad and Elvis' voice kept changing from low key into high, and the other way round, after every few bars or so.

It so happened that Sam Phillips heard that voice in the studio singing a country song with a heavy gospel like voice and he went into the shop asking who was singing in there. That was all that happened then, for Sam returned to his work and so did Elvis.

Sam Phillips went to the Tennessee State Penitentiary again and made some recordings of a group of convicts - The Prisonaires. Another convict handed him a song he had written himself and Sam took it with him for use someday. And so Sam Phillips and Elvis met again, for after nearly a year Elvis returned to cut another two songs at his own expense, ''Casual Love" (the affair was added later) and ''I'll Never Stan In Your Way''. Sam was in his office and again he heard that voice from the studio. He went over there to ask that boy if he was interested in recording some songs that could be released should everything work out, and you can bet Elvis wanted that! So Sam said he would select some material and then give him a call on the phone.

Sam phoned alright and when Elvis arrived he was introduced to some backing musicians Scotty Moore, who played guitar and Bill Black, who played bass. Scotty and Bill had gained great experience in backing country singers on their shows. Sam told Elvis a couple of things and then gave him the lines of the song he was handed by that convict: ''Without You''. They started working together, rehearsed it a couple of times and then the first take was made, many more followed but they could not get it on tape like they wanted it.

That could have been the end of Elvis Presley's career but somehow Sam must have realised that with no musical education at all, and with a voice like this, something could be worked out with the boy if they tried it more than one way.

Elvis, Scotty and Bill met each other every evening to rehearse and work over songs and Scotty and Bill taught Elvis, who had never recorded professionally before, how he could best use his voice as an integral part of the group, and sometimes they were helped by other studio musicians. They started in early June 1954 and worked night after night through just about everything they knew. They recorded songs and then discussed the results to improve their sound, the songs they thought came out best were cut directly onto wax and in the weekends they took these demonstration samples to Sam Phillips to discuss if it was good enough, commercially, to justify its release.

So far the recordings Elvis made at his own expense were the slow ballad type of songs with lots of influence of country music. So this was the first type of songs they worked on, though soon they changed to strict country songs. Country music was so popular at that time in the southern states that they would have to come with some real good sounds, after a month of hard work they got another lucky break. When they came to work on some songs again, one night, Sam was there too, and the boys went in his office to have a chat with him first. Sam played some songs he was thinking of releasing. Both songs were rhythm and blues and he
told them that this type of music was going to be pretty hot someday and he was right. But it was to take at least ten more years before the general public began to appreciate this kind of fine music and then some of its finest performers had already passed away.

Elvis told him he had always liked this kind of music and you could say Sam was a little surprised when he told him that he knew many of the records Sun Records had released like that and, in addition, that he knew some of the songs by other blues singers as well, like those of Big Bill Broonzy and Arthur Crudup. Now that was strange because white people were not at all interested in this jungle-music around that time, in fact most of them did not even know it existed.

Remembering that strange voice of Elvis made him think. He then told the boys he had some idea about what they had been after and went into the studio with them. He asked Elvis which songs he knew and together they started working on the only songs they had neglected so far rhythm and blues songs.

After some rehearsing together they were all surprised with what they got - a rhythm and blues song with a backing that was supposed to be the backing to a country tune, but was not any more, and gospel type vocals by Elvis. They all knew though that they had finally achieved the sound they had been trying to get for so long and that night they worked through several rhythm and blues standards.

That's All Right

For Elvis Presley's first release, Sam selected a song Arthur Crudup recorded for RCA Victor's label in Chicago, September 6th, 1947, ''That's A;; Right'' and for the flip a song based on Bill Monroe s original blue-grass recording, ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' that Elvis recorded during the sessions at which they were still trying to work out a good country sound.

But now that Sam had put a record together what could he do with it? After all the negro deejays would refuse to play it because the singer was white even if he sounded like one of their own and the white deejays would refuse to play it because the boy sounded too much like a negro. Anyway demonstration records were made and Sam took them to radio stations in Memphis to try and persuade deejays to give it a spin and to see how listeners would respond to it. Now there was one deejay in Memphis who featured just about everything in his programme that sounded like music - Dewey Phillips he had a programme on the WHBQ radio station
called ''Red, Hot And Blue'' that started out as a fifteen-minute show but soon become so popular that it was extended to three hours from nine to midnight - and Dewey promised Sam that he would give this little record a spin during is show.

And that he did on Saturday night, July 3rd, 1954, around nine-thirty in the evening. Through the instrumental break he told his listeners about the record and that it was a white boy singing and asked them to phone him during the programme to give their opinion about it. The record had not even finished when the first calls came in asking who this Presley was, where the record was available and to play it again and again. Dewey rang the Presley's to get their son over there as he wanted to interview him over the radio about his record

So they went out looking for him, for that evening Elvis hod told his parents to listen to the WHBQ station and went to the Rialto cinema to watch ''High Noon'', for he was afraid his record might flop. After they found him there he got over to WHBQ where Dewey told him he wanted to talk to him. Over the radio, every time he played ''That's All Right'' again he would turn the volume down and folk to Elvis.

Another Memphis deejay who played the demonstration record was a man who called himself Sleepy-Eye-John. He specialized in country music and he had a show over the WHEM radio station. ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' was the side he played in his programme but it went by unnoticed. ''That's All Right'' did not though, and after only a few days Sam had already many advance orders in and he promptly signed Elvis to a contract with the company.

And so close to the end of July 1954 Sun 209 with ''That's All Right'' and ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' was released and this is what Billboard, the music trade paper, wrote about it in their July 28th, 1954 issue: ''Presley is a potent new chanter who can sock over a tune for either the country or the rhythm and blues markets. On this new disc he comes thru with a solid performance on an rhythm and blues type tune and then on the flip-side does another fine job with a country ditty. A strong new talent.

Elvis Presley - Overnight Sensation

That was the headline over an article in the Press Scimitar, a Memphis newspaper, on July 28th 1954. The Memphis Press Scimitar carried the first article on Elvis after his first record was released on the sun label and the article also carried Elvis Presley's first-ever publicity photo. ''That's All Right'' achieved local fame and that was all, for it did not get any ratings in the national charts. So Sam selected another two songs from the batch recorded previously. ''That's All Right'' was played over a local radio station, but for Sun 210 Sam had something else in his mind.

What Sam had in mind was in fact very simple - he wanted Elvis to promote it himself, in person and on stage. Bob Neal had a booking-agency in Memphis and he was organising a big show with famous country singers like Carl Smith, Slim Whitman, Billy Walker, the Louvin Brothers, Minnie Pearl and Webb Pierce, which was to take place in the down-town Overton Park Shell auditorium in Memphis, on august 10th, 1954. Sam talked Bob into giving Elvis a chance in this show and so Elvis was to appear as a warm-up to Webb Pierce and he did not get any billing.

He was introduced to the audience and greeted with polite applause, after which he performed two of his own favorite country songs, ''Old Shep'' and ''That's When Your Heartaches Begin''. If Elvis expected anything to happen he must have been mighty disappointed, for nothing did happen that afternoon and somewhat disappointed he returned to Sun Records. There he found Sam and Dewey Phillips and they listened to what happened that afternoon. Sam was not able to go along with Elvis there that night so they decided Dewey would, not, however, without telling him exactly what to do. Amongst the cream of country singers Elvis was nothing different with country songs, but he was with songs like ''That's All Right'' so Dewey told him to go out there but not to sing any country songs

After Dewey introduced him to the audience Elvis shouted ''Well'', and went right into ''Good Rockin' Tonight''. Elvis Presley was pretty nervous that night, I suppose especially after his flop in the afternoon show. ''Good Rockin' Tonight'' however, was something different from the country songs performed so far and the audience certainly was surprised. But after the first moments of surprise they listened to the music - and liked it! After the first song Elvis and the boys went right into ''That's All Right'', which was supposed to be his final song. This song the audience knew or had at least heard about. After Elvis finished they wanted to hear more and Elvis, now just as surprised as they had been, gave it to them. When he finally made his way backstage he met Webb Pierce, who had been waiting to go on, and Webb did not understand anything of it either. What he did understand was that he did not have to go on stage any more. The show was over already.

Sun 210 was somewhat similar to 209 - a rhythm and blues song on one side and a country song on the other. The rhythm and blues tune was one written by Roy Brown ''Good Rockin' Tonight'' and the country song was written by Mack David ''I Don't Care If The Sun Don't Shine''.

After his two record releases Elvis and the boys started to play shows outside Memphis. Usually they took copies of their records to the local deejay and asked him to feature them in his programme, while they themselves featured the songs in the shows they gave.

Things did not only just happen, it took a lot of hard work although most stories published nowadays suggest that. Written on the sleeve of one of the demonstration records of Sun 209 were some figures, which I believe account for the number of copies made of this particular Sun record. They read : August 27th, 1954 copies, October 25th, 1954 300 copies, January 31th, 1955: 250 copies, April 28th, 1955: 100 copies, August 22nd, 1955. 100 copies, November 3rd, 1955: copies and November 25th, 1955: another 700 copies, what we see from these figures is that ''That\s All Right'' sold steadily in the first months after its release and although sales dropped after the batch of records made in January 1955 it still sold steadily, only now in a smaller quantity. There are no figures for July 1954 when ''That's All Right'' was released. The reason for this, I think, is that it was only after the first sudden success of ''That's All right'' that Sam decided to keep track on Elvis' record sales. Another thing these figures show is that Sam still had another batch of records made of Sun 209 after Elvis had already left the label to join RCA Victor.

The Great Snowman - Thomas Andrew Parker

A man walked the streets in Memphis one evening and picked up the faint sounds of a record coming from a place where young people hang around and listen to a juke-box. Music was his profession and these sounds had aroused his interest so he went inside, asked one of the kids about the record and after he had put a nickel in the juke-box listened to it again, that nickel has made him a millionaire, for that man was Thomas Andrew Parker.

He was born in a travelling circus and an orphan at early age. Then his uncle took him into his care and he travelled up and down the country with him and the great Parker pony circus. After he left his uncle he had many jobs from dog-catcher in Tampa, Florida, to hot-dog seller and medicine man of the famous hadacol brand medicine, which cured everything, except your money problems, and finally manager and millionaire. That is briefly what the ''Time'' magazine of may 1960 wrote about Colonel Tom Parker's life, and, reading it, I wondered if he dictated it himself.

Something more like the truth would have been. Born June 26th, 1909 , in Breda, Holland, christened Andreas Cornelius van Kuijk. Moved to England in 1929, and, after a few months, moved from there to the West Indies, and finally moved to the United States. Worked there as a dog-catcher alright, end hot-dog seller an a even with a travelling circus. Finally he joined the U.S. Army in 1931 and left that again in 1936, with an injured back and a small pension. After he left the army he wrote home for the last time, told them he had now changed his name to Thomas Andrew Parker and started to sell the cure-everything medicine, then he must have realised that if he could sell this to people he could sell them anything and he was right there. He started selling people, or rather he promoted them, like he did with the governors of the States of Louisiana and Tennessee. He was not only rewarded in money but also with the honorary title of Colonel. He switched to promoting country singers when country music became mighty popular after the war was over, although he started out in this field as manager of Tom Mix, who became famous through movies. In 1947 he brought Tom Mix over to London and booked him into the plush Savoy hotel. The next evening Mr. Tom Mix arrived in the foyer - on his horse! That this little incident caused some fuss is quite understandable and the press, tipped off by Parker, carried the story in every newspaper. After that he became manager of some of the most famous country singers around, like Eddy Arnold, Gene Autry and Hank Snow, who at that time made many a hit record. With the money they earned they set up a booking-agency and Parker's part here was the promotion of the show's organised and for these shows he could really on famous singers that had invested some of their earnings in the agency.

Then Parker heard the sounds of ''That's All Right'' coming from this place and that was the first time he heard about Elvis Presley. He did not run to him, however, right then he only talked about this young singer with Hank Snow and together they discussed if they could get any bookings for the boy, and they usually could.

In fact it was through the Hank Snow/Parker booking-agency that Elvis appeared in radio station WSM's ever famous Grand Ole Opry show. Some eight weeks after the release of his first Sun Record, the Grand Ole Opry show was the nation's top country show and was broadcast by radio WSM ( we shield millions, the motto of the insurance company, which built the broadcasting service) in Nashville. Part of the show was not only broadcast over the radio, but also screened on television, and it was one Saturday night in August, 1954, that the emcee announced at the finish of a barnstorming show that next week's guest would be a very young country singer from Memphis called ''The Hillbilly Cat''. The next week the hillbilly cat took the air, unlike the other country singers that appeared in the Opry show he did not perform in a fancy cowboy outfit, neither did some of his songs have anything to do with country music. The pretty spoilt audience who were used to the cream of country music did not appreciate his music so much. Maybe it was because he was completely different, maybe it was because they did not like the way he performed and although he re-appeared on the show on October 22nd, 1954, he was never really very popular with the audience as he was with the audience of the Louisiana Hayride show. The Louisiana Hayride show was broadcast over radio station KWKH in Shreveport, Louisiana, and started in 1948.

One of the regular guests in the Hayride shows was Slim Whitman, who also appeared in Memphis, and when he returned to Shreveport for another performance he told producer Horace Logan about what happened back in Memphis with this kid. Logan sent out for copies of the Presley Sun records and after a few plays contacted Elvis and the boys through Sam Phillips to get him on the programme, and soon after the grand Ole Opry performance Elvis, Scotty and Bill appeared in the Louisiana Hayride show, announced and introduced by Frank Page they sang, ''That's All Right'' and ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky''.

Elvis and the boys re-appeared on the show and after their second guest appearance they were signed to a contract for regular appearances. Then after some months contracts were changed for they had gained some fame around Shreveport now guaranteeing them more money and also their act was increased to fifteen to twenty minutes, and from that time on they appeared every week.

While he appeared in the Hayride shows he also lent his voice to a commercial for southern-made dough-nuts, which went something like this ''you can get 'em pipin' hot, after four p.m., you can get 'em pipin' not, after four p.m., you can get 'em pipin' hot, southern-made doughnuts hit the spot, you can get 'em pipin' hot, after four p.m''.

It was in the Hayride shows also that he featured most of the songs that have not been released even to this day, he appeared in shows together with country singers like George Jones, the late Jim Reeves, Bob Luman, Wanda Jackson and Faron Young. While Elvis appeared in the Hayride shows he also performed in the neighbouring towns, like in New Orleans where he played to 75 people in an old barn in 1954.

Through the Hank Snow Parker agency Elvis and the boys became part of a big country show that played 40 one-night stands. Star of the show was Hank Snow himself and billing also included Hank son Jimmie Rodgers Snow and Onie Wheeler. The show appeared in towns throughout the southern states, from east to west coast, most of the country singers performed in smart cowboy outfits but not Elvis. He wore real gone clothes, long coats, pegged pants, pink and black shirts with blazing stripo. His performance was different as well-crazy movements, spreading his feet apart, moving from the mike and right back. Most of the towns he appeared in have long been forgotten although I know he appeared in Norfolk, Virginia, and Jacksonville, Florida.

Just before Elvis started the tour another Presley Sun record was released: Sun 215. Again it was in the same line as the preceding two records. The rhythm and blues song this time was ''Milkcow Blues Boogie'' and Presley's version was based on Kokomo Arnold's 1934 recording for American Decca, although lyrics were changed as the ones by Arnold were highly suggestive. The flip-side was ''You're A Heartbreaker'' written in 1955 for Elvis by Jack Sallee.

Elvis and the boys also appeared at the opening of a new Katz drugstore in Memphis and he made his first visit to the Kennedy Veteran's Hospital soon after ''That's All Right'' was released. Apart from that he often visited Dewey Phillips and talked to him, while Dewey was on the air with his show, about how things went and often Dewey talked him into singing some of the popular songs, like ''Juanita''' by Chuck Willis.

The Road To Fame

In 1955 Elvis and the boys worked themselves up to success. They were indeed on the road to fame. Right from the outset Elvis and the boys never really had a manager, either Elvis himself or one of the boys handled bookings, but things changed in 1955, for Elvis and the boys signed a contract with Bob Neal in January 1955.

But that was not all, for on March 3rd, 1955, Elvis Presley appeared in that part of the Louisiana Hayride show which was screened on television. Encouraged by that small success Neal took Elvis and the boys to New York to audition for the Arthur Godfrey talent show, which was broadcast all over the United states and which gave young and unknown talent a change to reach fame. They listened politely and afterwards sad they would send word, but word never came. It was during this visit to New York that Elvis went to see Bo Diddley at the Apollo theatre and after the show was over went backstage to Bo's dressing-room, where they did some singing together just for fun. People have often said, that after Elvis watched Bo Diddley his stage-act strongly resembled that of Bo and whether that was true or not I could not say. I do know, however, that if it was Bo Diddley took it as a great compliment.

In the meantime Parker never let Elvis out of his sight and the more he looked the better he liked what he saw! After a while he must have realised what good promotion and management could do for the boy and with the experience in managing some of the most famous country singers, he knew exactly how he could get the best. Parker met Arnold Shaw, working in music business himself, but mostly in the northern states, in his home in Madison, Tennessee, in March 1955.

Here Shaw heard about Elvis Presley for the very first time when Parker told him and played all six of the sides released on the Sun label. He also told Shaw he was to become the boy' s next manager when his contract with Neal expired, that Elvis and the boys had somewhat of a reputation in the southern states and that they were now ready to take the northern states apart as well.

When Shaw left he must have been pretty impressed with what he heard for he told everyone in the business about him, and in the business Shaw was someone who knew what he was talking about in July 1955 yet another Presley record was released: Sun 217, also according to the same principle as the preceding records. ''Baby Let's Play House'' was written by Arthur Gunter, who also recorded it for the Excello label. Elvis stuck pretty close to Gunter's treatment, although he changed the lyrics to suit himself. The flip-side was ''I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone'' written for Elvis by Stanley A. Kesler and William E. Taylor. ''Baby Let's Play House'' entered the Billboard's country charts on August 6th, 1955.

Sun's Newest Star

Lucky Elvis Presley - ''Sun s Newest Star'' at 19 he is already enjoying the first reality of his life's dream: to sing for people and to hear the spontaneous applause that means he's made a hit! When Elvis was a youngster down in Tupelo, Mississippi, folks used to stop him ''Sing for us Elvis" and he would... standing on the street corner, on the street and say: ''anywhere someone wanted to or at school... or in church in the hot Mississippi sun hear him, he'd sing''. Now the same thing is happening all over again. when he's recognised on the street or at any ''Sing for us Elvis'', and it's all because of a tremendous new public place, people call out: record he waxed on the Sun label - a record that was a ''first''in several ways.

''That's All Right'' and ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' were Elvis' first professional work of any kind. He's a self taught musician and worked out his unique style while listening to records and picking out the tunes on a cheap ($ 2.98) guitar. One day he drifted into a Memphis recording studio to make a personal record just to get an idea how he sounded - and was heard by Sam Phillips, prexy of Sun record company, who thought that with a little work and polish the boy might make the grade as a commercial artist to several months of hard work did the trick and ''That's All Right'' and ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' had an astounding reception all
over the nation.

The disc also represented something new in records, the unusual pairing of an rhythm and blues number with a country standard. The original and distinctive styling of the young artist has made both sides of the record acceptable to a much wider audience than the usual song which must be ''That's All Right'' for example was a tremendous hit with teenagers put in just one category. And in Memphis, where the record broke first, the current greeting among the teenagers is still a rhythmical line from the song: ''ta dee dah dee dee dah''.

Elvis, of course is a teenager too. Just 19, he's been out of high school but one year - and the big (6 feeter) blonde guy likes nothing better than to spend an afternoon practising football with some of the youngsters in the neighbourhood. Other hobbies of Elvis' include movies, listening to records - and eating!

Stories of the singer's appetite are many. His girl-friend, Dixie declares that recently at one he ate 8 deluxe cheeseburgers, 2 bacon-lettuce-tomato sandwiches - and topped it off with 3 chocolate milk shakes.

Since the release of his two-sided hit Elvis has been making personal appearances and bringing the house down every time. As the featured entertainer at the grand opening of a new business arcade he played to a wildly enthusiastic audience of more than 3,000 - who could not restrain themselves and started dancing and jitterbugging when Elvis Sang ''That's All Right''. Incidentally the latest pairing by the boy features ''You're A Heartbreaker'' backed with ''Milkcow Blues Boogie'' - both fine offerings.

Undoubtedly the fact that Elvis grew up in Mississippi hearing, ''sure nuf'' rhythm and blues songs done in their true, spontaneous manner accounts for his being able to give such an authentic treatment to such songs. He feels each deeply and intimately and makes the listener feel it too. According to thousands of new fans ''That's All Right''.

Who Was The Pied Piper Of Cleveland

After Shaw returned to the northern states one of the very first people he told about Elvis Presley was Bill Randle, deejay with radio station were in Cleveland, Ohio. Shaw talked Randle into sending for the Presley Sun records and after they arrived he featured them in his daily shows.

On radio station were another deejay, Tommy Edwards, had a country show every Saturday night at the Circle theatre and after Randle told Tommy Edwards that the Presley records were very popular he decided to bring Elvis over for a show. And so one Saturday night in 1955 Elvis and the boys appeared in one of the northern states for the first time. Some of his Sun songs became so popular they got in the charts of radio station were.

At that time Universal Films, for one reason or another, suddenly decided to be progressive and to make a movie about some of the unknown singers and groups who were rapidly becoming popular with a different sort of music. Mr. Bill Randle advised them and with his help they staged two shows, one at St. Michael's Hall and one at Brooklyn High school in Cleveland.

But adviser was not Randle's only part in the movie, he also introduced the singers to the audience. And they had some singers there: Elvis Presley, Bill Haley & the Comets, the Four Lads and Pat Boone. Universal filmed both shows and also the rehearsals for it, the singers dressing up and more things like that. Some of the songs Bill and the boys did that night were ''Crazy Man, Crazy'' Cowboy Polka" and ''Hot Rock". The songs the Four Lads and Pat Boone did I could not tell you, but Elvis and the boys did ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'', I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' and they nearly lifted the roof off Brooklyn High with ''That's All Right;; and ''Good Rockin' Tonight''.

If you still did not know it, the Pied Piper of Cleveland was Elvis Presley.

His popularity in Cleveland grew so much and so fast that Universe made him the star the movie, that would never be in the cinemas. For before the movie was even finished Elvis reached fame, changed labels, and that was the reason why it stayed in the Universal vaults never to be shown. I would not be at all surprised if Mr. Tom Parker had something to do with that as well.

The Sun Went Down

Yet Randle was not the only one to be told about Elvis Presley by Arnold Show. He also tipped off Gene Weiss, talent-scout for Columbia Records, and advised him to go and watch the boy if he ever had the chance, and he did. Weiss reported what he saw to Mitch Miller, who at that time was production manager for Columbia records. Mitch contacted both Randle and Shaw again, still not at all impressed by Presley.

Then, in September, 1955, the last of the five Presley Sun records was released in the same line as the preceding four. One side of Sun 223 was ''Mystery Train'' written and recorded by by Herman Parker Jr. and released on Sun 192 in 1953. The other side was ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'', a song written for Elvis by Stanley Kesler and Charlie Feathers. It was usually the song based on a rhythm and blues tune that was successful. This time the country song was more successful. For ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' entered Billboard's country charts on October 8th, 1955, and only left it after thirty-four weeks in the charts on June 9th, 1956.

At that time Elvis had already developed his sensational stage act with the bumps and grinds, wailing and screeching, and the rotating ''pelvis'' which gave him one of the most well-known nicknames in the world: ''Elvis The Pelvis''. Humphrey Bogart called him ''Elvis The Pretzel'' others have called him unprintable names and already the first ministers of the bible belt were preaching against him. That cry would soon be taken up by others in pulpits across the country.

Critics were used to singers who sang about their lost loves and broken hearts with a happy smile on their face and this was something different. In fact they were so flabbergasted that they could not find any words to describe his way of performing, and when they finally found those words they could hardly stop writing any more - all in a negative way. Elvis always said that the music was responsible for his movements for he felt it inside and just had to respond to it.

Now who was right there? From the film clippings I saw I could not say his way of performing was obscene, but some years passed and things sure changed. However would not say that Elvis' movements on stage were obscene exactly - it was just that a lot of others people thought they were.

But it were not just ministers who condemned Elvis Presley's way of performing, when Elvis made a return visit to Jacksonville, Florida, to play a two-night stand there in 1955, the mothers of Jacksonville marched down to town hall to protest against his stage act and the city council told him to cool it down on his last day. And that he did for the police came down there to film the show and the only thing he moved was his little finger. all six of the performances were sold out though, and one of the guys in the audience there was Johnny Tillotson, at that time still completely unknown.

He also played a one-night stand in Miami, Florida, during that tour and that town brought him all the luck he could possibly want. For in the audience out there that night was a woman who wrote songs and she had just written one around a phrase she picked up from a man lying in the street - stoned. That night, in the audience, she felt and realised that this singer put some feelings in the songs he performed, but moreover he was able to make his audience feel it just as much. After the show she went backstage and offered the song to him. That woman was Mae Boren Axton, the phrase she wrote the song around was: ''I'm so lonely I could die'' and the song was ''Heartbreak Hotel''.

Arnold Shaw continued to talk about Elvis Presley - in fact he never stopped talking about him - and very soon some of the other leading American record companies were hot on Presley's trail, each trying to talk him into signing a contract with its label, but all this interest did not cause Elvis to take any hurried decisions, thanks probably to Parker, who now saw the chance to handle things right - his way.

He travelled to New York and settled himself in at the Warwick Hotel together with Bob Neal, and with him a statement from Presley's parents which said he was allowed to make any deal regarding their son's recording contract. For at that time Bob Neal still was Elvis Presley's manager. Now Tom Parker was manager of Hank Snow and Eddie Arnold and both of them had recording contracts with RCA-Victor, but somehow he had not so far been able to get the people at Victor interested in Elvis Presley, things had changed a little now and RCA was no longer the only party to deal with.

Things for RCA were handled by Mr. Steve Sholes, who joined Victor in 1929 as a messenger boy in the radio department, his heart was more in music and so in 1936 he got himself transferred to disc sales, and during the mid-thirties gained much experience in recording jazz as well as classical music. When country music caught on really big after the second World War he was heading RCA's division in that field. One day, while driving along the highway he had his car radio on and ''That's All Right'' was played over a local radio station and that was enough to arouse his interest.

On November 20th, 1955, Elvis Presley's contract with Bob Neal expired and he signed with Parker, who from then on quit managing Hank Snow and Eddy Arnold. Two days later, on November 22nd, 1955, things were finally settled and Elvis Presley signed with RCA-Victor. Dee Kilpatrick, who handled affairs for the Mercury label, offered dollars. Mitch Miller, for Columbia, was not prepared to go higher than 15,000 but Steve Sholes topped them all and offered 35.000 dollars for a change of contract, and he got it. He also saw to it that he secured rights to all the released as well as the unreleased recordings made by the Sun label to ensure that nobody else got the profit from the money RCA invested.

Now why on earth did Sam Phillips sell Elvis Presley's recording contract? Did he really need the money that badly that he had to sell him, for he still owed Elvis about 5,000 dollars in back royalties. Incidentally these 5000 dollars were also paid by RCA, while 10,000 dollars came from the Aberbach brothers and the rest of the money was invested by RCA it-self. And on the other hand, what made RCA pay 40,000 dollars for a recording artist with only five records to his name of which only one reached a high chart rating? And What is more, what made RCA release all five of his Sun records again in the space of a few weeks, starting with the last one ''Mystery Train''.

Anyway, the records started chasing each other up the charts and at the end of 1955, ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' was heading Billboard's country charts and Elvis Presley was nominated the new recording star of the year. Close to Christmas that year Elvis Presley appeared in Humes High variety show to raise money for their descretionar fund and the show was organised by one of his former teachers Mrs. Mildred Scrivener.

Already the next record, one of the very first recorded for RCA, brought the final change for Elvis Presley it changed the music scene so much and so fast that most people would hardly believe what was happening and whether they would want to accept it or not it would happen anyway for with that record the wildest craze in music business started.

Sun Is Rising

''Heartbreak Hotel'' hit the world harder than anything ever before! Rock and roll was the sound and I have to admit there were good and there were bad rock and roll sounds as ways. The bad rock and roll sounds have long been forgotten but the good ones are still played even today!

Elvis Presley was the hottest thing in rock and roll so he was blamed for all the bad things about it. Practically all record companies had switched to rock and roll, but they were a little late though. Sam knew it had to come and he worked on it and when it came he had the best right in the palm of his hand. Through the years 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960 and 1961. Sun released some of the finest rock and roll songs ever. The label grew bigger and Sam became richer and richer - just like Elvis.

Elvis went in the army and returned, different it seemed! His first songs released were certainly not bad but you could already feel that the rough sound was lacking in more and more of his songs and also his voice had softened.

Sam built another recording studio at 639 Madison Avenue and eventually they moved in there and left 706 Union Avenue. Both Elvis and Sam lost interest in what they were doing somewhere along the line. Sun Records released fewer and fewer records and the material released became of poorer quality - Elvis churned out one movie after another and his songs were as bad as the movies. Only the bonus songs on his soundtrack albums, mostly left over from sessions in the early sixties, were anything like up to his standard since they were recorded specifically for record release. It was only thanks to his great routine and the loyalty of his fans that Elvis did not disappear from the music scene completely.

And although they complained the Elvis fans were getting what they deserved for if they could have dropped him then, he would have been forced to make a change a few years sooner! But that is asking the impossible.

In 1967 the change was made and Elvis recorded some songs for record release - and with other musicians! His December 3rd, 1968, television special brought the final change for he appeared on some kind of stage again and with an audience! In August 1969 he really went out on the town Las Vegas, Nevada - and I can tell you they are used to something there, but his stage appearances turned the town upside down! RCA, as always, cleverly managed to mess up the recordings they made and released the worst extracts they could
choose from the shows.

Sam Phillips also seemed to have taken a real interest in recording again with Dane Stinit and in 1968 he became involved with the Holiday Inn motel corporation. In 1969 Sam's Sun sound was sold to Shelby Singleton Jr's Corporation. If you thought that was the end of Sun Records then you were wrong, for Mr. Singleton junior has been more than busy, making available a lot of the old Sun sounds as well as some unreleased material. Personally I feel that Sam did not sell the company, but came to some sort of agreement that allowed Shelby Singleton to release the material he wanted to and could. Apart from that Sam also built a new studio at 605 Chelsea Avenue in Memphis and believe me he did not build that for nothing.

Elvis Presley is one of the finest examples of Hollywood commercialism spoiling all the fine qualities. For the past ten years he was dead, mentally that is, his body reacted like a computer to an inserted programme - I have always wondered what he felt then, what happened to him for him to let this happen? One thing know is that nobody, except Sam Phillips, has ever been able to make him put over these qualities, instead of that they tried to run his life for him. He knows better, for he is one of the priviliged few who feel music and can make you feel it too if he wants to but so far he has never bothered, except perhaps in his live shows. There is not another performer in the sense that Elvis Presley is performer, for he is electrifying! Yet it seems someone pulled out the plug at one stage and I am glad that Elvis Presley finally plugged himself in again.

Elvis Presley you have been fool but who am I to say that to one of the greatest singers ever born? I am only too glad to see most of if happen!

The Sounds That Were And Are Not

The sounds that were recorded by Sun and are not yet released. What do I know about them? Well, I will tell you for that is one of the most interesting, but also one of the most difficult subjects to talk about. The list of songs that are rumoured to have been recorded by Sun records grows and grows each year. Here again reports on early shows, radio shows and television appearances are sometimes very useful.

First of all there are the recordings ''My Happiness'' ''That's When Your Heartaches Begin'', ''Casual Love'' and ''I'll Never Stand In Your Way'', these songs are private recordings Elvis pays for himself and they are cut directly on to wax, so there is no master tape of them. The first time Elvis enters Sun Records to cut some songs for record release he, Scotty and Bill start working on the song ''Without You'', but after numerous tries, give up. From then on they start working on many songs trying to achieve a sound that will be good enough for release. They go through standards, country songs and finally land on rhythm and blue tunes. They cut many songs, but the question is did they cut them directly on to wax or on to a master tape, and does Sam Phillips keep all these demonstration samples and tapes then? I think he does, maybe not the songs that cannot possibly be released for a technical reason but how else can RCA release songs like ''Blue Moon'' then?

Then Elvis starts his personal appearances and becomes a regular guest with the Louisiana Hayride show audience. In the Louisiana Hayride shows he features most of the songs that are not released so far. On the night of October 19th, 1954, for instance, Elvis appears in the Hayride Show for the third time and the songs he sings that night are: , ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'', ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'', ''I Love You Because'', ''Just Because'' and ''Uncle Pen'' in live shows, like in the Cow Palace in San Fransisco, together with another song that never is to be released: ''Tennessee Partner''.

The unreleased songs Elvis sings in the Hayride show are: ''Oakie Boogie'', ''That's That's The Stuff (You Gotta Watch)'' ''Gone'', ''Give Me More More, More (Of Your kisses)", ''Tennessee Saturday Night'', ''Blue Guitar'', ''Always Late (With Your Kisses)'', ''Last Train To Memphis'' ''Crying Heart Blues'' and ''Uncle Pen". One of these shows is taped from the radio and four songs appear on two singles, ''Tennessee Saturday Night'', ''Last Train To Memphis'', Gone'', and ''Uncle Penn''. The songs are cut directly on to wax and made for early Elvis collectors.

In early 1956 Hill and Range Inc. in New York publish ''The Elvis Presley Album Of Juke Box Favorites'' a song book with some of Elvis' great hits, but music is also given to the songs: ''Blue Guitar'', ''Always Late (With Your Kisses)'', ''Tennessee Saturday Night'', ''Gone'', ''Give Me More More More (Of Your Kisses)'', ''Oakie Boogie'' and ''That's The Stuff (You Gotta Watch)''. Hill and Range Inc. are sole representative for Elvis Presley Music, Gladys Music and Elvis Presley Enterprises, when song copyrights are involved. Now why do they include the music to these songs in a book with famous songs by Elvis? This album is published short-before the first RCA album is released. and I wonder if these songs should be on it, but are replaced by others shortly before its release!

In the summer of 1955 people talk for weeks about Elvis Presley's appearance in town and papers start publishing stories about him, and his sudden success. Music papers write comments about his chart ratings with local radio stations and report about one of his records ''Uncle Pen'' reaching the number one spot with radio stations in the Niagara Falls. The record is available there and on the flipside is ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' the label says it is a Sun record, although the familiar music notes around the edge are missing. When ''Uncle Pen" is riding high in the local charts there Sun release another Presley record and soon, ''Uncle Pen" disappears forever. ''I Forgot To Remember To Forget'' is one of the sides of the new Sun release, and is exactly the same recording as released on the flip of ''Uncle Pen''. That I think is proof enough that the recordings are in fact made by the Sun label in Memphis although they are not released on the label but through a pirate company. I can very well imagine for instance that ''Uncle Pen'' comes from the same session as ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' as both songs are written by Bill Monroe.

The sound of the record is not too good in quality, although you will immediately spot the famous ''rough" Sun sound. Also it is most certainly a studio recording for there is no live audience so it is not taken from one of his many radio shows. on the original recording by Bill Monroe there is the line: ''Uncle Pen'' played the fiddle and the old piano that you will hear on Elvis' version too only the southern drawl makes it almost impossible to understand the words and then there is a guitar break like Scotty plays them on about every released Sun song. Elvis version of the song is slower than the original blue grass treatment by Monroe but faster than the most famous version of this song by Porter Wagoner on RCA maybe that also is the reason that RCA never released the Presley recording of this song, for ''Uncle Pen" by Porter Wagoner sells well right from the start and it sells still today and sales figures are over copies now.

Ok, if you are still wondering how that pirate company was able to release ''Uncle Pen'' then I think I better tell you. I most certainly believe that this recording comes from a demonstration record made of this recording for the Sun label by Sheldon in Chicago and one way or another the pirate company gets it, and that will also explain the poorer quality of the recording.

Now this might sound hard for you to believe, I know that, but do not think it is impossible for thanks to one of my fine friends in the United States I traced another demonstration sample with released as well as unreleased Sun material on. One of these recordings is another take of a song which is released. it is ''I\m Left, You're Right, She's Gone'' and there is no doubt about it that the singer is Elvis Presley!

I do not think that this other take will ever be released and that is a pity for a lot of the songs that have been released up to now do not have the quality this take has! So let me try and describe this recording to you. The words are quite different although they basically tell the same story. Also there is another verse that is not on the released recording and the other way round. The backing is completely different as well for it I just consists of Scotty's electric guitar and that voice, that is the most different of all - so bluesy! It is very clear that Sam could not issue this for it sounds ever so much like a slow blues song that the people would not accept it like that. They talk about white singers singing the blues nowadays, well Presley was already singing it when most of them were still in junior school - and how! For I feel words cannot describe this song nor can they relay the impact it has and I only hope you now have some idea about what it is like.

But let us get back to our subject again, for the question still remains if these songs mentioned here are recorded for the Sun label. And to be honest I think they are. At least the songs mentioned in the ''Elvis Presley Album Of Juke Box Favorites'', for what other reason can you think off to mention them in this book? RCA always denies that they have any unreleased Sun material in their vaults, but suddenly in 1965, after they release the ''Elvis For Everyone'', they confirm that one of the songs on this album is a Sun recording, but it is replaced at last minute by another song and they are even kind enough to reveal its title ''Tennessee Saturday Night''. So, this ''Tennessee Saturday Night" recording exists and why should not the others mentioned in the juke box album exist as well?

Another ghost thing in Elvis Presley Sun records is an album called: ''Rockin' With Elvis''. Now is there an album on Sun or isn't there? If there is then not many copies are issued. If you have singer, however, whose popularity is growing and growing after the release of a few records the next thing to do is to release an album and Sam Phillips is smart enough to realise that. Then RCA buys Presley's recording contract as well as the released and unreleased recordings. Some of these songs appear on the first Elvis Presley album and that is the end of it - not for the fans, however.

News of the possible release of some unreleased Sun material crops up every year. In 1959 RCA is desperate for there are no Presley recordings for release any more at least according to reports in magazines - and RCA will now release an album with material recorded by Sun Records. That is the first time the rumour crops up and then the New Musical Express blows new life in them by announcing the release of ''Uncle pen" by Elvis Presley as the first release of the Pyramid label (Pyramid IA 1596), flipside is ''Tribute To The King" medley of four Elvis songs by the Anthony Hedley orchestra. June 23rd, 1967, many Elvis fans ask their record dealer about the record but as far as they know it is not available - and they are right!

Now is it all to get free publicity that Pyramid Records puts this ad in the time? On request they state they do have a master tape of the recording but that they cannot release it due to technical reasons. Around that time there is another ad in the New Musical Express offering a demonstration sample of the record ''Uncle Pen" by Elvis Presley for sale. I never received a reply on my letter to box 0029 though!

A few months after that rumours start again, this time, it says, four extended play albums will be released in England only and they will contain some of the Sun songs not yet released. Titles of the songs on the first extended play album are already mentioned, but again it is more wishful thinking. If that is not enough rumours about a complete album start circulating. ''Early Elvis'' is the title of this Camden album and again one mentions the same old songs, and again nothing happens. In fact I am already wondering what rumours this year will bring. They will probably be rumours only, for personally I doubt very much whether these songs will ever be released.

The person who always objects to the release of any of this material is the man who calls himself Colonel Tom Parker. His reason is that styles are different now and the quality of the recordings is far better, and although commercially speaking he might be right, I think it is a pretty poor reason. For Elvis Presley is that big now that he can afford not to be commercial and his fans will buy it anyway! There is no sound like Sun Sound is a saying going round and indeed amongst the Sun recordings you will find some of the finest sounds ever released on wax and personally I rate Elvis Presley's Sun recordings amongst the finest ever waxed and than Mr. Parker's reasoning almost sounds like a bad joke !

I think that the decision whether these songs will stay in the RCA vaults forever can only be influenced by one man; the guy who is responsible for recording them in the first place - Elvis Presley. For he is the only one who might be able to change Mr. Parker's mind. But does he still know they exist? I think there is a slight chance he knows - ''Tiger Man" shows that! So far I think that the only chance we will ever have of hearing them will be if something happens to Elvis Presley - a tragic accident, like with Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran. and then we will first of all get all the RCA recordings that are not released and then finally, may be; the unissued Sun material, but that will take them at least another 25 years and I cannot imagine myself rocking to, ''Tennessee Saturday Night" at that age. Can you?

And so these interesting recordings stay in the RCA vaults where they do not belong - they belong on wax - and if Elvis Presley does not care to change that then they will stay there forever - and that is a damn pity!

A Million Dollars... Worth Of Sound

That is the end of Elvis Presley's time with the Sun label. Elvis goes on and becomes famous and so does Sam Phillips, for after Elvis leaves Sun Records soon has another young man under contract that brings success to the company. That young man is Carl Lee Perkins. On December 26th, 1955, he cuts a song that is an instant hit: ''Blue Suede Shoes" and more hits for Carl follow. Another young man that starts with Sun when Elvis is still with the label is Johnny Cash and he brings Sun Records the first gold record for his song ''I Walk The Line''.

It is during one of Elvis' many personal appearances that Scotty Moore spots Johnny Cash in a show and he thinks that he is so good that he takes him to Sam Phillips to audition for a recording contract. Phillips does some test-recordings but is not completely satisfied with the religious songs Johnny performs and tells him to come back if he finds some suitable country songs, which he thinks will fit Johnny better. Johnny does even better than that and writes a couple of country songs himself. From the songs cut then Sam selects two songs for immediate release on June 26th, 1955, on Sun 221: ''Hey, Porter" and ''Cry, Cry, Cry''. Sam gets so many requests in for ''Cry, Cry, Cry'' that Johnny is added to the show with Elvis Presley, Scotty, Bill and D.J. Fontana, Webb Pierce and a couple of others to make a short tour of one night stands through some of the southern states.

Most successful on the Sun label, however, is a wild blond kid with the name of Jerry Lee Lewis, who puts in another few gold records for the company.

Elvis does not forget Sun Records and Sam Phillips, though, now that he is with RCA-Victor. Often he drops by and spends some time chatting and watching other singers put their songs on tape. Most of his visits there go by unnoticed, without leaving a trace, not even noticed by news-hunting photographers, who are always around wherever Elvis appears, and so most people never even hear about what is the biggest sensation in sound.

It all happens at 706 Union Avenue, a place that is empty now that Jody's Barber Shop moved out of it recently, but if you peek through the filthy windows you can still see the pieces of acoustic board in some places still covering the walls. One day in 1956 Carl Perkins is recording a few songs for his next releases and what starts as an ordinary recording session turns out to be something very special. Carl feels that for the backing of his songs they should use a piano also. So Sam phones a kid that is hanging around his place frequently and when he arrives they run some test recordings on him to see if he can be of any use - that kid is Jerry Lee. And after the ''okay" is given from the control-room they start working on the songs and Jerry plays the piano for just a few dollars. The songs they cut are ''Your True Love'', Matchbox'' and watching from the control-room is Carl's friend Johnny Cash.

Now there is some confusion about which songs Jerry plays the piano on. Both Jerry and Carl say he plays on ''Your True Love'', but Jerry denies himself that he plays on ''Matchbox", while Carl says Jerry plays on this song too. Anyway while they are recording a Cadillac stops outside 706 Union and Elvis arrives with two of his friends: Cliff Gleaves and Marilyn Evans - and he also brings a photographer. Through the shop he goes into the control-room and when the session is over both Elvis and Johnny go into the studio to have a chat with everybody.

Then Elvis sits down at the piano and starts playing the intro to a song he just cut himself, Fats Domino's ''Blueberry Hill''. Before he even starts singing Carl picks up the guitar again and the others gather round to join in on the vocals. Sam Phillips, still in the control-room, knows what he has out there in the studio and almost immediately he has the master tape rolling, and he catches every sound on tape. After they finish ''Blueberry Hill'' they go into ''Island Of Golden Dreams'', and after that more songs follow, from traditionals to church songs like ''I Won't Have To Cross The Jordan Alone'' and :: The Old Rugged Cross. After some songs Johnny takes Over the guitar playing from Carl and after three hours it is all over. They talk about supergroups now, well I tell you here is one and I doubt very much if there is another one like it - not even today!

The photos that photographer takes that day appear in a magazine in the United States in May 1957, and that is the only thing we see from that session. Sam Phillips says the tape is still around somewhere in his place and that his attempts to release some of the recordings so far are not successful, for RCA Victor is not prepared to settle on an agreement.

Recently though whispers are going around that one of the songs is released on the Sun label. The song that warrants special interest is Greenback Dollar (Watch And Chain)'' by Ray Harris on Sun 272. Ray is said to have arrived to cut some songs after the boys are finished, he starts to work on some songs and when he needs a vocal backing group the boys assist, while Johnny Cash also plays rhythm guitar and Elvis plays the piano. A close listen to the song reveals that all these instruments are there and the boys in the backing group are really living up and you will hear some shouting that reminds very much of Johnny's shouting during some of his instrumental breaks in records. However the people who can give any clues here just do not seem to want to and with all these singers under contract, practically all with different companies, one can understand why they are very careful. So we will probably never find out if this rumour is true! Whenever I hear the solid piano playing on ''Your True Love'' I cannot help thinking of that day in 1956 when sounds of a supergroup pour out of four golden throats to wave a magic spell for three full hours. sounds that are recorded never to be released a million dollars worth of sound!

Odd Sounds Around

Odd sounds around... and there are a few around I can tell you! Most of the singers you hear about them are wild guesses. I will tell you some things about them that will strike you, but nevertheless are very close to the truth, I feel!

There is no greater love than what I feel for you right, that is a line from ''No Greater Love'' by Billy ''The Kid" Emerson released on Sun 219. Play the guitar Alvin is another line and certainly not ''plat the guitar Elvis...'' as they report in some articles recently. They also justify or try to justify it by quoting the Sun matrix numbers of the Presley and Emerson recordings but it is more than clear there is hardly any system in these numbers. If you have this record yourself play it and you will agree! Most record collectors do not have it though and then rumours start and spread fast - big!

I love music - and not only Elvis Presley music that means that I am usually very interested in recordings that are something special and you can understand how glad I am with the ''Elvis For Everyone" album for there certainly are some interesting songs on that album!

Now you play ''When It rains It Really Pours'' and what do you think? a real good sound is it not? and real different too! A sound that fits Elvis so much you would think they invented it for him especially. He likes it, I know that, and yet he hardly ever bothers to put some of that sound on tape for record release - but here is an exception! And a hard one to get to know anything about. The backing line-up is piano, drums, ordinary bass and a hard driving electric lead guitar. The song does not have the echo sound of the Presley Sun recordings and yet is in electronically reprocessed stereo, which could mean it comes from a session before his army hitch, but not only this can prove it is an old Elvis recording - the sound does even more! Listen, man, just listen!

But that is not enough for I want to know more! The thing is how do you get to know more when the people that can tell you just do not bother too! You play and play all the Elvis songs of old times, listen and compare, discuss and listen again and then finally something might strike you. The lead guitar then? That sounds much like either a ''Fender" or a ''Moss-rite'' guitar and the bass sounds like the one Bill Black plays. But how about the piano and drums? That makes you think, or that should make you think, and so you start to play the Presley songs all over again until it finally strikes you that there is something about the piano and the drums for after numerous plays you will find that the piano sounds exactly the same in the songs recorded for the ''Jailhouse rock'' soundtrack. But it is the drums really that give the most important clue! Listen, man, and then it will strike you that it is exactly the same drummer on the ''Jailhouse Rock" songs as on ''When It Rains, It Really Pours''. Musically speaking he plays wrong, for he plays after the solocomp. That makes you think even more for D.J. Fontana, who plays on all of the old songs, never plays like that and that means it is not him who is playing the drums - but then who is? There is one startling thought for you and here are some more! The only guy that plays like that is the drummer in the Black combo"! You do not believe it? I can understand that, but listen for yourself man and you will. Now do not get me wrong, I am not saying that it is the ''Bill Black Combo" playing here it is the drummer that plays in the ''Bill Black Combo". Elvis cuts the ''Jailhouse Rock" soundtrack songs on June 14th, 1957, and Bill is still working with him then. On the other hand some of the ''Fernwood" releases of that time sound very much like the Bill Black Combo that becomes famous later on. Is Bill Black around that time already trying to put a group together? This song is also a rhythm and blues traditional now, but it is the first one to get a completely rhythm and blues treatment by Elvis and it sounds very much like another song released in 1960 on the ''Elvis Is Back" album: ''Reconsider Baby'' but the backing is more full on this one. I am also wondering whether this song is the only one recorded like this, in this style, in June 1957. Hee, but do not put the album away yet, turn it over to the other side and play ''Tomorrow Night'' and what do you hear? Here is the backing line-up: harp, electric bass guitar, electric lead guitar and a vocal group.

So we will take look at these particular instruments and start with the vocal group. It is not mentioned on the album label and it does not sound like the Jordanaires at the voices you will recognize are those of the Anita Kerr singers, that is those of Anita Kerr, Gil Wright and Dottie Dillard but the deep voice does not sound like that of Louis Nunley as his voice never sounds that deep, no, this voice sounds more like that of Ray Walker of the Jordanaires and that is an odd combination!

That is not the only funny thing about this recording for the electric bass used here has a very special sound as well as it does not sound like the guitars used on other Presley recordings in fact it shows some likeness to the guitar picking on Chet Atkins recordings especially the finishing chords sound like the ones Chet plays on many of his fine recordings. Also the harp playing is reminiscent to that in the Chet Atkins recordings and usually Chet plays that himself.

Elvis' voice does not sound the same as on his recordings and the sound on the voices of the Anita Kerr singers is like the sound on Elvis' voice so I think they are not dubbed in later on and apart from that there is an echo on the voices of Elvis and the Anita Kerr singers! The song, however, is in mono on this album and that gives some food for thought. If you play through the whole album though you will find out that also, ''Sound Advice'', ''Santa Lucia'' and ''Summer Kisses, Winter Tears'' are in mono and certainly these songs are recorded in stereo, so all these things give me a firm reason to believe this song is from the summer 1963 session when Elvis and Chet work together on some songs for release on the ''Time Together" or ''Voice And Guitar" album. The album is not released so far and if the other songs sound like ''Tomorrow Night'' I cannot understand why not!

A Song Is Waxed

A song is waxed. But before it is waxed it has to be recorded first - everybody knows that! I have not been able to find out much about the recording dates. To Elvis Presley's Sun recordings for the people who could know would not be bothered to tell me. That did not discourage me though for usually the order in which the songs are recorded can very easily be traced by the master tape numbers on the records. So I played them over and over again and wrote down everything that I thought might be of some help.

With the knowledge of now here all Elvis Presley's Sun recordings: click on the available > buttons <

Memphis Recording Service Acetates

1 - My Happiness 2:33 > Acetate <
(Betty Peterson-Borney Bergantine)
Recorded July 18, 1953 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar)
*- The Great Performances 2227-1-R (A-1) (August 1990)

2 - That's When Your Heartaches Begin 2:52 > Acetate <
(William Raskin-George Brown-Fred Fisher)
Recorded July 18, 1953 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar)
* - The Complete 50s Masters 07863-66050(6) (6-1) (June 23, 1992)

''That's When Your Hearteaches Begin'' ends (with the words ''that's the end'') just after what would normally have been a midsong recitation, although it's not clear whether this was intentional. 

3 - I'll Never Stand in Your Way 2:06 > Acetate <
(Hy Heath-Fred Rose)
Recorded January 4, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar)
* - Platinum - A Life In Music 07863-67469(2) (1-1) (July 15, 1997) 

4 - It Wouldn't Be The Same Without You 2:09 > Acetate <
(Jimmy Wakely-Fred Rose)
Recorded January 4, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar)
* - Sunrise - Elvis Presley 07863-67675(2) (2-4) (1999) 

Sun Masters 

5 - Harbor Lights (2:38) > CPL1-1349 (A-1) <
(Jimmy Kennedy-Hugh Williams)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Legendary Performer - Volume 2 Album CPL1-1349 (A-1) (January 8, 1976) 

6 - I Love You Because (Unprocessed Master Edit) (2:43) > LPM-1254 (A-5) <
(Leon Payne)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Elvis Presley LPM-1254 (A-5) (March 23, 1956) 

The RCA master of "I Love You Because" is a splice of Takes 2 and 4, leaving out the spoken part. When Elvis transferred to RCA, the company received a tape referred to in Steve ShoIes' notes as " 'That's All Right' plus two other selections"; it is unclear whether these "other selections" were Presley recordings. 

7 - That's All Right (45rpm Master) 2:00 > Sun 209-A <
(Arthur Crudup)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Single Sun 209 (July 19, 1954) 

8 - Blue Moon of Kentucky (45rpm Master) (2:07) > Sun 209-B <
(Bill Monroe)
Recorded July 7, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Single Sun 209 (July 19, 1954) 

9 - Blue Moon (2:44) > LPM-1254 (B-5) <
(Lorentz Hart-Richard Rodgers)
Likely recorded between August 15 and 19, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Elvis Presley LPM-1254 (B-5) (March 23, 1956) 

The tape is dated with a sticker on the plastic reel: ''8/19. Wed Nite." 

10 - Tomorrow Night (3:01) > 6414-1-R (2-5) <
(Sam Coslow-Will Grosz)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (2-5) (June 30, 1987) 

11 - I'll Never Let You Go (Little Darlin') (2:27) > LPM-1254 (B-4) <
(Jimmy Wakely)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Elvis Presley LPM-1254 (B-4) (March 23, 1956) 

12 - I Don't Care if the Sun Don't Shine (2:32) > Sun 210-B <
(Mack David)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Single Sun 210 (September 22, 1954) 

13 - Just Because (2:34) > LPM-1254 (A-6) <
(Bob Shelton-Joe Shelton-Sid Robin)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Possibly Buddy Cunningham (brushes on snare drum)
* - Elvis Presley LPM-1254 (A-6) (March 23, 1956) 

14 - Good Rockin' Tonight (2:15) > Sun 210-A <
(Roy Brown)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Single Sun 210 (September 22, 1954) 

The listing for "Tomorrow Night" reflects the first release of the complete, undubbed master, which included a long gap in the middle apparently intended for a guitar solo. The song was first released in 1965 on the RCA album ''Elvis For Everyone'' (LSP/LPM 3450), in a version overdubbed with guitar, harmonica, and backing vocals. An edited version of the original undubbed master, with the space for the solo edited cut, was released on ''The Complete Sun Sessions'' (6414-2-R). According to Steve Sholes' original notes on the fifteen Sun tapes purchased by RCA, the following number of takes were definitely recorded: "Satistied'', 1; "I'll Never Let You Go'', 10; "I Don't Care If The Sun Don't Shine'', 3; "Just Because'', 17; "Good Rockin' Tonight'' 2. There may have been many more, as Sam Phillips recorded over many Presley tapes. The Sun tapes that RCA did receive from these sessions were lost in a vault "clean-out" In 1959. 

15 - Milkcow Blues Boogie (2:39) > Sun 215-A <
(Kokomo Arnold)
Recorded December 20, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass), Jimmie ''James'' Lott (drums)
Single Sun 215 (January 8, 1955) 

16 - You're A Heartbreaker (2:13) > Sun 215-B <
(Jack Sallee)
Recorded December 20, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass), Jimmie ''James'' Lott (drums)
Single Sun 215 (January 8, 1955) 

A payment slip at November 15 seems to indicate a session date, but it may be a falsification; December 8 has also been mentioned as a possible date for the session. Its more than likely that other songs were tried out on the session, although apparently no other tapes survive. RCA never received master tapes or outtakes from this session from Sun; their masters were dubbed from a Sun 78 rpm. 

18 - Baby Let's Play House (2:19) > Sun 217-B <
(Arthur Gunter)
Recorded February 4/5, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Jimmie Lott or Johnny Bernero (drums)
Single Sun 217 (April 25, 1955) 

RCA received, and subsequently lost, a tape from this session including two takes of "I Got A Woman'', two takes (including the master) of "Baby Let's Play House'', and one take of "Trying To Get To You''. The recording date is generally mentioned as February 5, but given that Elvis performed at the Hayride that night, its more likely to have been earlier that week. 

17. I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (My Baby Is Gone) (Take 5 Master) (2:43) > LP-100 (A-2) <
(Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Good Rocking Tonight Bop Cat LP-100 (A-2) (1974) 

19 - I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone 2:38 > Sun 217-A < 
(Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded mid-April 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Jimmie Lott or Johnny Bernero (drums)
Single Sun 217 (April 25, 1955) 

This songs slow version, take 5, was first released on the Dutch bootleg ''Good Rocking Tonight'' in 1974, but it is not known whether this was ever considered as a master take. 

20 - I Forgot to Remember to Forget (2:31) > Sun 223-B <
(Stan Kesler-Charlie Feathers)
Recorded July 11, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass), Johnny Bernero (drums)
Single Sun 223 (August 1, 1955) 

21 - Mystery Train (2:30) > Sun 223-A > 
(Junior Parker-Sam Phillips)
Recorded July 11, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass), Johnny Bernero (drums)
Single Sun 223 (August 1, 1955) 

22 - Tryin' to Get To You (2:36) > LPM-1254 (B-2)<
(Charles Singleton-Rosemarie McCoy)
Recorded July 11, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Johnny Bernero (drums), Probably Doug Poindexter (guitar),
Probably Smokey Joe Baugh or Frank Tolley (piano)
* - Elvis Presley LPM-1254 (B-2) (March 23, 1956) 

Elvis's acoustic guitar drops out at the mix on ''Trying To Get To You'', supporting the suggestion that the piano part, barely audible in the track, maybe his own. 

23 - When It Rains It Pours (2:06) > CPL1-4848 (A-1) <
(William Emerson)
Recorded November 1-4, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass), Johnny Bernero (drums)
* - Elvis A Legendary Performer - Volume 4 CPL1-4848 (A-1) November 1983 

Take 10 is not an official master, but probably the best take. 

RCA Master 

24 - That's All Right (RCA Single Version) (1:59)
(Arthur Crudup)
Recorded July 5, 1954 Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Single 20/47 6380 (December 20, 1954) 

25 - Blue Moon of Kentucky (RCA single version) 2:05
(Bill Monroe)
Recorded July 5, 1954 Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Single 20/47-6380 (December 20, 1954) 

26 - I Love You Because (RCA LP Version) (2:45)
(Leon Payne)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Elvis Presley LPM-1254 (A-6) (March 23, 1956) 

27 - Tomorrow Night (RCA LP Version) (2:53) > LSP/LPM-3450 (A-5) <
(Sam Coslow-Will Grosz)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Chet Atkins (guitar), Grady Martin guitar), Henry Strzelecki (bass), Buddy Harman (drums),
Charlie McCoy (harmonica), Anita Kerr Singers (backing vocals)
* - Elvis For Everyone LSP/LPM-3450 (A-5) (July 19, 1965) 

Original Sun Recordings
* - First Appearance

Sun Studio Sessions

1- Harbor Lights (FS Take 1, 2x FS Take 2 Breakdown) (0:33) > Takes 1-2 <
(Jimmy Kennedy-Hugh Williams)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Takes 1-2 * - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-1) (2012)

2 - Harbor Lights (Complete Take 3) (2:53) > Take 3 Master <
(Jimmy Kennedy-Hugh Williams)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Elvis: Today, Tomorrow And Forever 0768-66155(4) (1-1) (June 25, 2002)

3 - Harbor Lights (Complete Take 4) (2:38) > Take 4 <
(Jimmy Kennedy-Hugh Williams)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-3) (2012)

4 - Harbor Lights (FS Take 5, LFS Take 6) (1:23) > Takes 5-6 <
(Jimmy Kennedy-Hugh Williams)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-4) (2012)

5 - Harbor Lights (Complete Take 7) (2:25) > Take 7 <
(Jimmy Kennedy-Hugh Williams)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-5) (2012)

6 - Harbor Lights (Take 8 Breakdown) (0:26) > Take 8 <
(Jimmy Kennedy-Hugh Williams)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-6) (2012)

7 - I Love You Because (FS Take 1) (0:23) > Take 1 <
(Leon Payne)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R (2) (3-2) (June 30, 1987)

8 - I Love You Because (Complete Take 2) (3:28) > Take 2 <
(Leon Payne)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Legendary Performer - Volume 1 CPL1-0341(A-2) (January 15, 1974)

9 - I Love You Because (Complete Take 3) (3:36) > Take 3 <
(Leon Payne)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-1) (June 30, 1987)

10 - I Love You Because (Take 4 Breakdown) (0:40) > Take 4 <
(Leon Payne)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-2) (June 30, 1987)

11 - I Love You Because (Complete Take 5) (3:28) > Take 5 <
(Leon Payne)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-3) (June 30, 1987)

12 - That's All Right (FS Take 1, FS Take 2) (0:20) > Takes 1-2 <
(Arthur Crudup)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
*- A Golden Celebration CPM6-5172(6) (1-2) (October 1984)

13 - That's All Right (Complete Take 3) (1:58) > Take 3 <
(Arthur Crudup)
Recorded July 5, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Sunrise - Elvis Presley 07863-67675(2) (2-6) (1999)

14 - Blue Moon Of Kentucky (Alternate Take Breakdown) (1:08) > Alternate Take <
(Bill Monroe)
Recorded July 6/7, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Good Rocking Tonight Bop Cat LP-100 (A-5) (1974)

15 - Blue Moon (FS Take 1, FS Take 2, FS Take 3) (0:38) > Takes 1-3 <
(Lorentz Hart-Richard Rodgers)
Recorded between August 15 and 19, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-15) (2012)

16 - Blue Moon (Complete Take 4) (2:59) > Take 4 <
(Lorentz Hart-Richard Rodgers)
Recorded between August 15 and 19, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete 50s Masters 07863-66050(6) (6-7) (June 23, 1992)

17 - Blue Moon (Complete Take 5) (3:25) > Take 5 <
(Lorentz Hart-Richard Rodgers)
Recorded between August 15 and 19, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Platinum - A Life In Music 07863-67469(4) (1-3) July 15, 1997

18 - Blue Moon (FS Take 6, FS Take 7) (0:53) > Takes 6-7 <
(Lorentz Hart-Richard Rodgers)
Recorded between August 15 and 19, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-18) (2012)

19 - Blue Moon (Complete Take 8) (3:01) > Take 8 <
(Lorentz Hart-Richard Rodgers)
Recorded between August 15 and 19, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Sunrise 07863-67676(2) (2-8) (February 9, 1999)

20 - Blue Moon (Complete Take 9 Master) (2:44) > Take 9 Master <
(Lorentz Hart-Richard Rodgers)
Recorded between August 15 and 19, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Elvis Presley LPM 1254 (B-5) (March 23, 1956)

21 - Dialogue (Fragment before ''Tomorrow Night'') (0:11)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-21) (2012)

22 - I'll Never Let You Go (Little Darlin') (Incomplete Take and Master) (0:49) > LP-100/LPM-1254 <
(Jimmy Wakely)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Good Rocking Tonight Bop Cat LP-100 (A-5) (1974)

23 - Good Rockin' Tonight (Fragment) (0:10)
(Roy Brown)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-23) (2012)

24 - I Don't Care if the Sun Don't Shine (Incomplete Take 1, FS Take 2) (1:13) > Takes 1-2 <
(Mack David)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Good Rocking Tonight Bop Cat LP-100 (A-3) (1974)

25 - I Don't Care if the Sun Don't Shine (Complete Take 3 Master) (2:35) > Take 3 Master <
(Mack David)
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, Memphis.
Recorded between September 12-16, 1954 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - Good Rocking Tonight Bop Cat LP-100 (A-3) (1974)

26 - I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Version) (Complete Take 1) (3:00) > Take 1 <
(Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-4) (June 30, 1987)

27 - I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Version) (Complete Take 2) (2:51) > Take 2 <
(Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-5) (June 30, 1987)

28 - I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Version) (Complete Take 3) (2:51) > Take 3 <
(Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-6) (June 30, 1987)

29 - I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Version) (FS Take 4) (0:10) > Take 4 <
Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-6) (June 30, 1987)

30 - I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Version) (Complete Take 5 Master) (2:40) > Take 5 Master <
Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-9) (June 30, 1987)

31 - I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Version) (Complete Take 6) (2:40) > Take 6 <
Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-7) (June 30, 1987)

32 - I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone (Slow Version) (Incomplete Take 7) (1:35) > Take 7 <
(Stan Kesler-Bill Taylor)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - The Complete Sun Sessions 6414-1-R(2) (4-8) (June 30, 1987)

33 - How Do You Think I Feel (Guitar Rehearsals, Take 1) (3:17)
(Wayne Walker- Webb Pierce)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - When All Was Kool (Mystery Train) 2001 (1-13) (1990)

> Tracks 33-34 Rehearsals <

34 - How Do You Think I Feel (Guitar Rehearsals) (1:14)
(Wayne Walker- Webb Pierce)
Recorded March 6, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley (vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
* - When All Was Kool (Mystery Train) 2001 (1-13) (1990)

35 - When It Rains, It Really Pours (Incomplete Take 1) 1:37 > Take 1 <
(William Emerson)
Recorded November 1-4, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Johnny Bernero (drums)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-35) (2012)

36 - When It Rains, It Really Pours (Take 2, Chatter, Rehearsal) 2:12) > Take 2, Rehearsal <
(William Emerson)
Recorded November 1-4, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Johnny Bernero (drums)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-36) (2012)

37 - When It Rains, It Really Pours (LFS Take 3, Chatter, FS Take 4) (2:14) > Take 3 Take 4 <
(William Emerson)
Recorded November 1-4, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Johnny Bernero (drums)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-37) (2012)

38 - When It Rains, It Pours (Complete Take 5 Master) (2:02) > Take 5 Master <
(William Emerson)
Recorded November 1-4, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Johnny Bernero (drums)
* - Elvis A Legendary Performer - Volume 4 CPL1-4848 (November 1983)

39 - When It Rains, It Really Pours (Chatter, Rehearsal Take 6, FS Take 7) (1:40) > Take 6, Take 7 <
(William Emerson)
Recorded November 1-4, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Johnny Bernero (drums)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-39) (2012)

40 - When It Rains, It Really Pours (LFS Take 8) 1:40) > Take 8 <
(William Emerson)
Recorded November 1-4, 1955 at Sun Studio, 706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee
Elvis Presley Vocal and guitar), Scotty Moore (lead guitar), Bill Black (upright bass)
Johnny Bernero (drums)
* - A Boy From Tupelo 506020-975049(3) (2-40) (2012)

Original Sun Recordings
* - First Appearance

After the first publication of the book in 1970 it received many favorible reviews for being the first book to give in depth information about the start of Elvis Presley's career. From that time on much information on the subject was brought to light. Although scale of the facts stated in the book were heavily criticised they proved to be correct, or at least partially correct.

Although the first printing was sold out within a year after it's publication requests for copies still reach me today. This has urged me to reprint (1981) the book in it's original form, except for the photographs. Nearly all of them were replaced. Amongst these new photographs many are very rare and are seen here for the first time in print. So much new information was brought to light that a third edition is very possible. I will comment on some of the material in the first printing below.

In the meantime Elvis Presley has passed away and it is sadly enough to see my assumption on page 36 of the first printing was right. Elvis had to die first to make some of the material recorded for Sun Records available. Part of the Million Dollar recording session was made available - unofficially - first by an un identified record company and then by Charly Records of England. After Shelby Singleton announced the release of this material on Sun Records RCA got a court order preventing the release. Sleeves and records had already been prepared, but had to stay in the warehouses. As Charly records is representing Sun Records and have released it on the Sun label, I feel they may face the same legal trouble. From the release it was shown the session took place in December 1956, which was also confirmed by a December, 29, 1956 article in a music trade paper.

The dub of ''I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone'' described in the first printing has found it's way to record in an unofficial release as "My Baby Is Gone". Some alternative takes of ''I Don't Care If The Sun Was Shine'', ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' and ''I Never Let You Go (Little Darlin')'' also surfaced on record. RCA released ''Harbor Lights'' on one of the ''Legendary Performer Volumes'' after the song was found in one of the drawer's of Steve Sholes desk, years after his death.

Also some songs from the Hayride shows do exist on dubs. Unofficial releases of these songs were made available in various couplings. Released were: ''That's All Right'' and ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky'' from 1954, and "Tweedle Dee" from 1955. Not released but in existance are dubs of: "That's All Right'', ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky", "Baby, Let's Play House" and "Maybeline" from 1955. Rumoured to exist is also "Rock Around The Clock". Also released was part of a live tape recorded for a Houston radio station containing: "Good Rockin' Tonight", ''Baby, Let's Play House", "Blue Moon Of Kentucky'', ''I Got A Woman" and "That's all Right''.

"Tomorrow Night" is originally a Sun recording. RCA confirmed Chet Atkins did some overdubbing on the tape. The overdubbing was done directly to the one track master, so the original Sun recording no longer exists.

"I Love You Because" has a 1956 RCA master tape number as Steve Sholes spliced track 1 and 3 together for release. On one of the other volumes of the Legendary Performer releases by RCA the complete take 1 was released.

In early 1956 an article in the New Musical Express stated "Uncle Pan''(mistakenly written for Pen) to be the new Elvis Presley release. However, all information pointed to a 1955 summer pirate release.

The writer of "Good rockin' Tonight" was mistakenly written as Ray brown on the Sun 45 label, while no music publishing company is mentioned on both the 45 and 78 record label.

The song "Without Love", rumoured to be recorded for Sun Records was a wrong-written tittle for "Without You".

It has just been confirmed that the rushes of the "Pied Piper Of Cleveland" movie shot in 1955 at Cleveland, Ohio, still do exist. It seems that only a certain amount of money is needed to bring this priceless material to the light of day. It will most possibly be the only material that will show Elvis Presley in his early career days on stage performing at least three songs and you be able to hear these renditions too as there is sound to the film, which is lacking with all other early day on stage material.

I would like to thank the following people, without their help this book would lack many a thing: Stan Govaard, Adri Stum, Bob Greenham, Robert Loers, Roger Ford, Hank Taylor, Wanda Jackson, Red Smith, Thonas Flensby, the Memphis Press Scimitar, Bill Randle, Maria Columbus and Ger Rijff. Thanks also goes to Piet Schreuder for his work on the cover.

Copyright 1970 © by Hans Langbroek
First printing 1970
Second printing 1981

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced by any form or by any means without written permission of copyright owner, excepting brief quotations used in connection with reviews or essays wrutten specifically for inclusion in magazines and newspapers.

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