UNDER CONSTRUCTION

CONTAINS
For audio recordings click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1960-1969 Sun Schedule <
 
1961-1969 SESSIONS
Sam Phillips Recording Studio
319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee
Hit Records / Songs Of Faith Records / Alley Records / Starday Records / Stax Records
Dixie Records / Nashville Records / Nat Records / Penthouse Records
Teem Records / Zone Records / Briar Records / Sing Records
 
Studio Session for John Reedy & The Stone Mountain Trio, Unknown Date(s) 1961 / Starday Records
Studio Session for Wally Fowler, Unknown Date 1961/1963 / Songs of Faith
Studio Session for Sego Brothers & Naomi, Unknown Date(s) 1962 / Songs of Faith Records
Studio Session for Little Steve & The Sego Brothers, Unknown Date(s) 1962 / Songs of Faith Recordfs
Studio Session for The Speer Family, Unknown Date(s) 1962 / Songs of Faith Records
Studio Session for Bobby Lee Trammell, Unknown Date(s) 1962 / Alley Records
Studio Session for Steve & Dante, Unknown Date(s) 1963 / Stax Records
Studio Session for Art Buchanan, Unknown Date(s) 1963 / Dixie Records
Studio Session for Dean Mathis, Unknown Date(s) 1963 / Nashville Records
Studio Session for Tommy Burk & The Counts, Unknown Date(s) 1963 . Nat Records
Studio Session for Tommy Cogbill, Unknown Date(s) 1963 / Penthouse Records
Studio Session for Charles Brown, Unknown Date(s) 1963 / Teem Records
Studio Session for The Monarchs, Unknown Date(s) 1963 / Zone Records
Studio Session for The Huntsmen, Unknown Date(s) 1963 / Briar Records
Studio Session for The Blue Ridge Quartet, Unknown Date(s) 1963 / Sing Records
 
For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Playlists of the Artists can be found on 706 Union Avenue Sessions of > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The Hit Records Story of Nashville, Tennessee
The Sam Phillips Studio, 319 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee

The Hit record label was part of the Record Service Company, as was it's various sub labels, Spar, Kenilworth, Country & Western, Caravelle, Poncello and Giant Records. The parent company based In Nashville, was set up in 1961 by the record men William ''Bill'' Beasley and Alan Bubis, whom had previously operated the Republic Tennessee record labels. During the early 1950s with moderate success.

Beasley and Bubis saw a gap in the marked for low price budget records of hits of the day, and set up the Spar label in 1961. Recording cover versions of current hits, utilizing the very best of session players and various artists using various alias for the records. Many of these artists was used for the various labels that Beasley and Bubis operated, and when they started the Hit label in early 1962 they stuck to the same formula and many and when they started the Hit label in early 1962 they stuck to the same formula and many of the same artists, (some went on to have big careers like Buzz Cason , Bobby Russell, Sam Baker ,Bruce Channell, Dan Folger, Dick Glaser, Ray Stevens, Jimmy Buffett, Benny Latimore and even Sam Moore of Sam and Dave fame), often using various alias for the Hit Records releases. (Note: Hit Records sold during the 1962 - 1966 period about 120,000 to 130,000 copies of every title issued).

Around the same time as the Spar Record label started up, Sam C. Phillips had opened a new Nashville studio that he had purchased from Billy Sherrill, situated at the Old Cumberland Lodge Building on Seventh Avenue North, and Phillips who was impressed with Sherrill gave him the job of producer and pretty much a free run of the place, but overall manager duties fell to Cecil Scaife who had been involved with Phillips and his management duties with Jerry Lee Lewis.

Sherrill was a great producer and engineer who would soon be cutting his teeth on sessions with the like's of Jerry Lee Lewis amongst others who Sam sent down from Memphis for sessions.

William Beasley and Alan Bubis who was already known to Sam Phillips from there earlier labels based in Nashville, managed to strike up a good deal for studio time at Phillips' new studio on Seventh Avenue, and this is where the majority of the Hit Record label sessions where held between early 1962 thru to the end of 1963. Utilizing the studio with sessions being overseen by Beasley and Bubis, and also some top producers, arranger's and engineers like John Hester (who had previously recorded an album on Phillips International), Bergen White,Ted Jarrett, Tom Sparkman, Jimmy Stuart , Buzz Cason, Billy Sherrill and even Scotty Moore.

This arrangement was a success, and Beasley and Bubis continued to use the studio right up to the point when Sam Phillips sold the studio and it's contents in May of 1964, for $175,000 to Fred Foster, who re-named the studio the Fred Foster Sound Studio and opened up for business in June of 1964, until it's demise and demolition in 1969, when the land was purchased for an insurance company, Fred Foster then opened a new studio in Nashville.

Beasley and Bubis continued using the studio but eventually started to use other studios like Columbia Studios, until they built there own studio. For there various labels like Hit and Country & Western, they continued to release a vast amount of records to fill up the budget rack's across the nation, this went on up to 1969. When other budget labels, like Topps and K-Tell won out and pushed out the others like Hit and Spar, the end was in sight and Beasley and Bubis finally closed the door on there Hit Records operations in Nashville, and the Record Service Company sometime in late 1969.

Although these labels they operated where run as budget cover labels, (45's selling at 39cent's a piece). The Hit, Spar and other sub-labels Beasley and Bubis operated was of a high standard and produced some great recordings overall, and they must be given credit for there efforts, and to note they had a good run of it. With many of these records selling at high prices to collector's worldwide, and there's even been a recent double CD compilation of the Spar masters, using there motto: ''Music is fun for everyone... They had hit on a great idea''.

The recordings from the Hit label where cut at the Sam C. Phillips studio in Nashville between February 1962 through to the early part of 1963. There may have been more (or less) sessions, but it's fairly certain the first tow years worth of sessions for Beasley and Bubis Hit operations was held at the studio.

Some great musicians played on these sessions including the likes of John Hester, Dutch McMillan, Wayne Moss, Lightnin' Chance, Boots Randolph, Jack Grubel, Rex Nelson, Don Scaife, Billy Sherrill and even Scotty Moore.

- Jay Halsey, September 2021

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Cecil Scaife and the ''Songs Of Faith Records'' story of Nashville

After Sam Phillips had purchased the Nashville studio from Billy Sherrill back in late 1960, he set about re-modelling and reinstalling new recording equipment, once satisfied with the improvements he was open for business in March 1962, with a view to use the studio as a custom facility for publishers, labels and recording artists. Sam then installed Cecil Scaife as a studio manager and keeping Billy Sherrill on as engineer and producer, sometimes along with Scotty Moore who was also involved at the Nashville studio.

There first biggest customer came in the form of the Hit and Spar labels owned by William ''Bill'' Beasley and Alan Bubis, who used the studios for there sessions from early 1962 thru 1963. However, sometime in the latter part of 1963 Cecil Scaife jumped ship to become sales manager for William Beasley and Alan Bubis over at Hit Records and all it's sub-labels. Scaife had also set up the Songs Of Faith record label during the early 1962, with input from his brother Don Scaife as producer and even Cecil's wife who was writing songs for some of the artists, and he used the Phillips studio for the labels sessions, when he joined the Beasley and Bubis Hit Records set up. He incorporated the Songs Of Faith label into the fold to become a sister label to Hit Records, and selling the label and the masters to Beasley in 1963.

During the latter part of 1963, Sam Phillips' became weary of the way that the Musicians Union operated to Nashville's strict guidelines, and he felt stiffed by this and shortly after decided to sell the Nashville studio and it's equipment to Fred Foster. The deal was signed in May of 1964, and a clause was added that Sam C. Phillips would not record or own another studio in Nashville. For a five year period, Sam was good to his word, although for a short time he continued to master product for Beasley and Bubis back in his studio on Madison Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee. The last Songs Of Faith album (SOF 120 The Florida Boys Quartet – Up In The Sky) was cut at the Sam C. Phillips Nashville studio in May 1964, then the studio was re-named The Fred Foster Sound Studio and opened up for business in June 1964, until it's demise in 1969, demolished and the land sold of to an insurance company, after which Fred Foster opened his new studio.

Cecil Scaife as sales manager over at the Hit Records operation, had already started to use other studios like the Columbia studio's for the Hit and Songs Of Faith labels sessions during the early part of 1964, and some of the Song Of Faith releases was also issued on Beasley's Country & Western label.

After Cecil Scaife had sold the Songs Of Faith label to William Beasley, he then jumped ship again, and started working for Columbia Records in Nashville, leaving Beasley and Bubis to concentrate on there Hit label operations until it folded in late 1969, due to the likes of strong competition from other new budget labels like K-Tel Records and the Topp's label.

William Beasley and Alan Bubis stayed in Nashville and set up other company's and there own studios like Spar Recording Studio in Nashville, during the 1970s. Then in July of 1973, Cecil Scaife entered into the frame again, and re-purchasing the Songs Of Faith label and master's from William Beasley, who at the time was head of the National Growth Industries.

In effect buying back the label he set up in Nashville a decade earlier, Scaife issued back catalouge from the Songs Of Faith label, that he now owned again, and signed some new artists, with some regional success. The label continued as did Scaife in the music industry, Cecil Scaife passed away at the age of 81. In 2009, passing down the baton to his son to continue the Songs Of Faith story. Cecil Scaife was an important part of the Sam Phillips' and Nashville Recording scene for many years and deserves his rightful credit in the part he played, as does his Songs Of Faith recordings, and his work for Sam C. Phillips

- Jay Halsey, September 2021

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHN REEDY & THE STONE MOUNTAIN TRIO
FOR STARDAY RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
STARDAY SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - DON PIERCE OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY SHERRILL

A singer with a mug like a movie star, John Reedy was part of a family singing act with sister Frances Reedy, who played the guitar accompaniment as well as providing an alto harmony for his smooth lead. Early on, the pair clicked with a gospel number that was apparently the creation of Reedy, although it is most often credited as a traditional number. At any rate, the number of recordings the song "Somebody Touched Me" subsequently received might put Reedy in the running for status as one of the most covered gospel artists. The group under his leadership, the Stone Mountain Hillbillys, also featured brothers Glenn and Julian Ramey filling out the sound with mandolin and banjo respectively. The early recordings of this ensemble are as historic as any from the early days of bluegrass; in fact, the session that produced the lovely aforementioned gospel classic is said to have taken place on the same day in the late 1940s as the Stanley Brothers cut their classic side "White Dove'', but on other sides of town.

The Reedy group enjoyed one of the longest sponsorship stints for a band in radio history: 17-and-a-half years on Harlan, KY's WHLN with the furniture company Fuller's paying the ad tabs, to be precise. Only Flatt & Scruggs and their relationship with a certain flour company appears to have the edge on this record. The group also worked for a coal company which sent them to regional radio outlets all around the state, sometimes resulting in as many as four broadcasts each day. Reedy has recalled a typical venue from this era as being an unheated one-room schoolhouse with no electricity, the audience arriving from the mountains on sleds by the light of oil lanterns. The "Somebody Touched Me" number was reputed to be quite popular with the group's audiences, with tall tales growing up of bootleggers tossing 20-dollar bills at Frances Reedy to inspire multiple repeat performances. She reached a tolerance level of some sort when one of these low lives dropped his gun while clumsily trying to pull out a bill, huffing off to the parking lot to regain her composure before she could sing again.

The group also toured in packages with guitarist Chet Atkins during the early days of his career, as well as with the Stanley Brothers, Archie Campbell, and Brother Claude Ely. The latter artist eventually abandoned his country music career to become a preacher. The Reedy group evolved a second career as a gospel outfit on the prompting of Starday producer Don Pierce, but once again it was a natural result of the "Somebody Touched Me" success, since the song's lyrics ostensibly tell the story of a churchgoer deep in prayer who feels a sacred touch. A nice version of the traditional classic "Oh Death" was one fine by-product of the relationship with Starday. The most popular cover of "Somebody Touched Me" was by the sure-voiced Carl Dixon. Best from an artistic standpoint: Dorsey Dixon. Worst from any standpoint: Boxcar Willie. Both brother and sister Reedy continued performing into the 1980s, using the name the Stone Mountain Trio and utilizing a kind of backwards progression, the music of what was originally an innovative early bluegrass outfit becoming more and more traditional and old-timey as the years went on.

- by Eugene Chadbourne (Allmusic)

> I FEEL JESUS / THAT BIG HAND OF GOD <
Composer: - Frances Reedy
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Starday Music
Matrix number: - None - Master (4:5o)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Starday Records (EP) 45rpm standard single SEP 209-A1/2 mono
I FEEL JESUS / THAT BIG HAND OF GOD / MIGHTY HAND OF GOD / JONAH

> MIGHTY HAND OF GOD / JONAH <
Composer: - Frances Reedy-John Reedy
Publisher: - B.M.I. -  Starday Music
Matrix number: - None - Master (4:17)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Starday Records (EP) 45rpm standard single SEP 209-B1/2 mono
MIGHTY HAND OF GOD / JONAH / I FEEL JESUS / THAT BIG HAND OF GOD

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
John Reedy - Vocal and Guitar
Frances Reedy - Vocal and Guitar
Glenn Reedy - Mandolin
Julian Ramey Reedy - Banjo
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WALLY FOWLER FOR SONGS OF FAITH 1961/1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES 1961/1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

> GONNA MAKE MYSELF AT HOME <
Composer: - Wally Fowler
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:54)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963
Released: - 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387-27 mono
SUN GOSPEL

In case you missed Fowler's 1940s mega-hit "Gospel Boogie", here is its first cousin. Recorded some 15 years after the original made the charts, the "Gospel Boogie" idea is still alive and kicking here. The brief guitar break here is a standout.

> NOBODY'S LOOKING BACK <
Composer: - Wally Fowler
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:02)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963
Released: - 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387-18 mono
SUN GOSPEL

Born in Possum Trot, Georgia, Wally Fowler was the youngest of 1 6 children born to a sharecropper. Fowler became a mainstay of gospel music beginning in the 1940s when he first appeared in the John Daniel Quartet and later founded the Oakridge Quartet. Fowler was as much an entrepreneur (publishing, record companies) in the gospel field as a practitioner. His recording of ''Gospel Boogie'' was a maior hit and drew attention to gospel music beyond its traditional barriers. Along with appearances on his own labels, Fowler also recorded for Bullet, Mercury, Decca, Dot and Capitol. His all-night gospel shows on WSM were a major source of exposure for gospel music and many of its practitioners.

It is not altogether clear how this Nashville session, probably dating from 1961, came to reside in the Sun archives. Undoubtedly recorded at Sam Phillips' new studio, the session was either an independent production for his own label, or an audition tape that Fowler hoped to see released on Sun. The session features some slick arrangements and fine guitar picking. Aural evidence suggests that Hank Garland or Chet Atkins may have played lead guitar here.

OLD ENOUGH TO DIE
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

TWO COLD FEET
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

FAITH
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

DICKIE GREEN
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

NOBODY'S LOOKIN' BACK
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

MAKE MYSELF AT HOME
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

SWEET CHARIOR
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

DO YOU KNOW MY JESUS?
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

MORE LIKE JESUS
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

MY CHERIE
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1961/1963

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wally Fowler - Vocal
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR WALLY FOWLER & THE OAK RIDGE QUARTET FOR SONGS OF FAITH

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SONGS OF FAITH SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN 

> LEAD ME TO THAT ROCK <
Composer: - Billy Sherrill
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Hal Leonard Music
Matrix number: - SOF 8 - Master (2:12)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Songs Of Faith (S) 45rpm standard single 1001-A mono
LEAD ME TO THAT ROCK / HOW GREAT THOU ART 

> HOW GREAT THOU ART <
Composer: - Stuart Hine
Publisher: B.M.I. - Universal Music Publishing-Manna Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - SOF 6 - Master (2:27)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Songs Of Faith (S) 45rpm standard single 1001-B mono
HOW GREAT THOU ART / LEAD ME TO THAT ROCK 

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Wally Fowler - Vocal
The Oak Ridge Quartet -Vocals and Vocals Harmony 

Songs Of Faith Records is a gospel label out of Nashville, Tennessee. Founded in 1962 by Cecil Scaife. The Songs Of Faith label eventually became a sister label of the Country & Western Hits label. 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - © 

JOHN ''WALLY'' FOWLER - was an American Southern gospel music singer, manager, and music promoter and businessman. He founded the Oak Ridge Quartet, a gospel act that eventually became the Oak Ridge Boys; and popularized all-night gospel sings. An accomplished songwriter in both the country music and gospel fields, Fowler's composition "Wasted Years" became a gospel music standard. He was known as The Man with a Million Friends and Mr. Gospel Music.

Born on February 15, 1917, near Adairsville, Georgia, Fowler's father was the cotton king of Bartow County, Georgia until the Great Depression left him broken both in health and financially. He then struck out on his own, forming a country music group, Wally Fowler and the Georgia Clodhoppers, which included Chet Atkins on lead guitar. They performed on WNOX-AM in Knoxville, Tennessee and became regulars on ''Mid-day Merry Go Round''. Fowler later formed his harmony quartet, which sang in weekly concerts for children at nearby Oak Ridge, which led to Fowler renaming the group the Oak Ridge Quartet. The group consisted of himself, Lon "Deacon" Freeman, Curly Kinsey and Johnny New.

Fowler moved to Nashville, and from 1946-1950 became a regular part of The Prince Albert Show segment of the Grand Ole Opry on NBC radio. In 1948, he launched his first all-night gospel sing, popularizing a format that would blanket the South over the next two decades. Originating from Nashville's historic Ryman Auditorium and later taken to other major cities across the region, each show featured many of the day's premier Southern gospel quartets.

In the 1950s, he hosted a syndicated television program, The Wally Fowler Show, featuring Wendy Bagwell and the Sunliters, The Speers, The Statesmen and others. He recorded for several labels, but in later years, went into semi-retirement and tended to avoid publicity, although he continued to promote some gospel and variety shows in North Carolina.

On June 3, 1994, Fowler apparently suffered a heart attack while fishing from a dock on Dale Hollow Lake, northeast of Nashville, and his body was found floating in the water. He was survived by his widow, Judy Moss Fowler, and daughters Faith McCoy and Hope Kimmer.

The Oak Ridge Quartet, the core group that would eventually lead to the Oak Ridge Boys was a country group called Wally Fowler and the Georgia Clodhoppers, formed in 1943 in Knoxville, Tennessee. They were requested to perform for staff members and their families restricted during World War II at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in nearby Oak Ridge, Tennessee. They were asked to sing there so often that, eventually, they changed their name to the Oak Ridge Quartet. And because their most popular songs were gospel, Fowler decided to focus solely on southern gospel music. At the time, the quartet was made up of Wally Fowler, Lon "Deacon" Freeman, Curly Kinsey, and Johnny New.

This group began recording in 1947. Wally Fowler And The Oak Ridge Quartet were members of the Grand Ole Opry in the 1940s. In 1949, the other three men split from Fowler to form a new group, Curley Kinsey and the Tennessee Ridge Runners, so Fowler hired an existing group, the Calvary Quartet, to reform the Oak Ridge Quartet. Walt Cornell sang baritone for the Oak Ridge Quartet in the early 1950s. In 1957, Fowler sold the rights to the "Oak Ridge Quartet" name to group member Smitty Gatlin in exchange for forgiveness of a debt. As a result of more personnel changes, the group lost its tenor, so they lowered their arrangements and had Gatlin sing tenor while the pianist, Tommy Fairchild, sang lead. They recorded an album for Cadence Records, then in 1958, they hired Willie Wynn to sing the tenor part, and Fairchild moved back exclusively to the piano. At this point, the group consisted of Fairchild at the piano, Wynn, Gatlin (singing lead), baritone Ron Page, and bass Herman Harper. They recorded an album on the Checker Records label, one on Starday, and three on Skylite. In 1961, Gatlin changed the group's name to "the Oak Ridge Boys" because their producer, Bud Praeger, thought "Oak Ridge Quartet" sounded too old-fashioned for their contemporary sound.

In 1962, Ron Page left, and the group hired Gary McSpadden (who had filled in for Jake Hess in the Statesmen Quartet) as baritone with the understanding from Jake Hess that when he was ready to start a group, he would recruit McSpadden. They recorded another album on Skylite, and then two groundbreaking albums on Warner Brothers. When Hess followed through on that promise, McSpadden quit to join a new group Hess was forming, the Imperials. Jim Hammill (who later became a mainstay in the Kingsmen Quartet) was chosen to be his replacement. They made one album for Festival Records, one for Stateswood (Skylite's budget label), and two more for Skylite. Hammill did not get along with the rest of the group, and William Lee Golden, a newcomer to the music industry, felt that Hamill was hurting the group and asked the group if he could be Hammil's replacement. After Hamill's retirement from the group in 1964, Golden joined as baritone.

The group recorded another album for Starday and another on Skylite in 1965. In 1966, Gatlin left the group to become a minister of music and, on Golden's recommendation, Duane Allen, formerly of the Southernairs Quartet (and more recently baritone of the Prophets Quartet), was hired to replace him. With Willie Wynn still singing tenor and Herman Harper as bass, the group made another album for Skylite, one for United Artists, and then began recording on the Heart Warming label. Between 1966 and 1973 they made 12 albums with Heart Warming, and the company also released several compilation albums on which they were included during those years. The group also had an album on Vista (Heart Warming's budget label) that included unreleased songs from previous sessions. Harper left the group in 1968 to join the Don Light Talent Agency, before starting his own company, The Harper Agency, which remains one of the most highly-reputable booking agencies in gospel music. Noel Fox, formerly of the Tennesseans and the Harvesters, took over the bass part. In 1970, the Oak Ridge Boys earned their first Grammy award for "Talk About the Good Times".

In late October 1972, Richard Sterban, the bass with J.D. Sumner and the Stamps Quartet left that group and joined the Oak Ridge Boys. This closely followed what was possibly the Stamps Quartet's most famous moment, backing Elvis Presley in his June 10, 1972 concert at Madison Square Garden. The quartet that appeared on "Hee Haw" in 1972 consisted of Willie Wynn, Duane Allen, William Lee Golden, and Richard Sterban. Joe Bonsall, a Philadelphia native who was a member of the Keystone Quartet and recording on Duane Allen's Superior label, joined in October 1973 (coincidentally, both Sterban and Bonsall had been members of the Keystones during the late 1960s, recording much of the ORB's material). That same year the Oak Ridge Boys recorded a single with Johnny Cash and the Carter Family, "Praise the Lord and Pass the Soup", that put them on the country charts for the first time. The group's lineup would remain consistent for the next 15 years.

Source: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE SEGO BROTHERS & NAOMI
FOR SONGS OF FAITH RECORDS 1962

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SONGS OF FAITH SESSION:
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILL BEASLEY AND CECIL SCAIFE
RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY SHERRILL
MASTERED AT BELTONE STUDIO, NEW YORK

Sego Brothers & Naomi Sing The Gospel: A little over a year ago the Sego Brothers and Naomi recorded the first album for us here at Songs Of Faith Records. It was entitled ''Satisfied With Me'', and it was destined to become one of the big gospel and sacred albums of the year. The title song has become a standard best seller in the shops across the country who sell this type of music.

Although the Sego Brothers and Naomi have been organized and singing together as a vocal group for a number of years. ''Satisfied With Me'' was their first major recording effort. The very fact that this album was such a tremendous hit is an indication of the tremendous appeal that is attached to the singing of the Sego Brothers and Naomi.

After such a smashing success with their first album, we here at Songs of Faith were wondering, as the old music saying goes, "Now what can we do for an encore"? The Segos and Naomi quickly came up with an answer, and the "encore" looks as if it will be twice as big as the first album.

The feature of this new album, ''Sorry I Never Knew You'', was placed as a '"Spotlight Of Merit" by the leading music trade journal, ''Billboard Music''. To our knowledge, this is the first time in many many years that a sacred single release has been so honored. The sales on this record have far exceeded anything that we have ever had in this field, and the popularity of the record continues to spread. This album was not scheduled for release for several months. However, due to the tremendous demand generated by the single, we were forced to move up the scheduled release date and rush it out as soon as possible.

The title of this album, The Sego Brothers And Naomi Sing The Gospel, is one of the most appropriate titles that we have ever had, for, in truth, the Segos believe what they sing, and they sing in such a manner that, it you listen, you cannot mistake the meaning behind the words of the song.

''Sorry I Never Knew You'' is but one of the fine selections in this album. It may well prove to be the biggest sacred song to come along in the last decade. We think that this album will hold some other pleasant surprises for you as you listen to James Sego and his fine group singing a heartwarming collection of gospel songs.

This particular album was a pleasure to record, and I think you will find that it will provide you with many hours of inspiration as well as good listening.

> SORRY I NEVER KNEW YOU <
Composer: - Little Faith
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Traditional
Matrix number: FA 1022 - Master (3:56)
Recorded: - Unknown date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-A/1 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> UNTIL THEN <
Composer: - Hamblin
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Hamblin Music
Matrix number: FA 1022 - Master (2:39)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-A/2 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> WHEN I'VE GONE THE LAST MILE <
Composer: - O. Markis
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - John T. Banson
Matrix number: FA 1022 - Master (2:56)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-A/3 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> YOU'VE GOT TO MOVE <
Composer: - Gary Davis-Fred McDowell
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Hal Leonard Music
Matrix number: FA 1022 - Master (1:41)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-A/4 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> I'VE FOUND JESUS <
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Public Domain
Matrix number: FA 1022 - Master (2:29)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-A/5 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> OH COME ANGEL BAND <
Composer: - William Bradbury-Jefferson Hascell
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Hascall Music
Matrix number: FA 1022 - Master (2:57)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-A/6 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

SINCE I GOT THIS FEELING
Composer: - WalterR. Sego
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Tennessee Music Corporation
Matrix number: FA 1023 - Master - Lost
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-B/1 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> WAYWARD TRAVELLER <
Composer: - Walter .R. Sego
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Tennessee Music Corporation
Matrix number: FA 1023 - Master (2:24)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-B/2 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> THE LADDER OF FAITH <
Composer: - Walter .R. Sego
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Tennessee Music Corporation
Matrix number: FA 1023 - Master (2:06)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-B/3 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> FROM THIS THE DAY ON <
Composer: - John Smith-Bennie Smith
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Gospeltone Music
Matrix number: FA 1023 - Master (2:41)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-B/4 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> I'M GOING UP THERE <
Composer: - Walter .R. Sego
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Tennessee Music Corporation
Matrix number: FA 1023 - Master (1:38) 
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-B/5 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

NOTHING HERE TO HINDER ME
Composer: - Sego Brothers
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Tennessee Music Corporation
Matrix number: FA 1023 - Master - Lost
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (LP) 33rpm SOF 110-B/6 stereo
THE SEGO BROTHERS AND NAOMI SINGS THE GOSPEL

> IT'S DIFFERENT NOW <
Composer: - David Beatty
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Public Domain
Matrix number: SOF 45 – Single Master (2:51)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (S) 45rpm SOF 8002-B mono
IT'S DIFFERENT NOW / UNCLOUDY DAY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
James Sego, Walter Sego, Lamar Sego
and Naomi Easters Sego - Vocals and Vocal Harmony.
Unknown Musicians

The Sego Brothers & Naomi recordings can be heard on there playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

NAOMI SEGO - was born in Enigma, Georgia as Naomi Easters. This pioneer of Gospel Music has been ministering in song since 1958. Who inspired her to be the person that she is today? Naomi said that her parents had been a great influence on her life. She said that they were Godly parents and that her dad was a minister. Ironically, her dad was saved under the Sego Brothers' ministry. Naomi said that she was born into a family of seven children. There were four girls and three boys but one of them died at the tender age of ten when Naomi was only three years old.

Naomi met James Sego in 1948 when the Sego family came to Enigma for a homecoming. They were married in 1949 and had two children, Carlton and Ronnie. Ronnie eventually played the drums for the Sego Brothers and Naomi. The group became very popular in their hometown of Macon, Georgia. Later that local popularity became national when they performed their song, ''Satisfied With Me''. It is rumored that Naomi and the Sego Brothers were the first Southern Gospel group ever to sell over a million records when they recorded, ''Sorry, I Never Knew You''. That was back in 1964.

Following this success they appeared on the nationally best known and longest running television program, Gospel Singing Jubilee. They later were invited to perform at The Grand Ole Opry.

From the start, the Sego Brothers and Naomi consisted of James Sego, Walter Sego, Lamar Sego and Naomi Sego. Naomi was married to James. The group changed several times over the years. Lamar left the group back in 1967. James Sego died in 1979 at a very young 51 years old. The other brothers stayed on until about 1979. In 1983, Naomi married Vernon Reader and officially changed the group name to Naomi and the Segos.

Naomi has most certainly had her share of sorrow as well as accomplishments. She lost her first husband James at a young age and her second husband Vernon passed away in 1998. Naomi has also lost her son Ronnie, who passed away in 1996. He had been a diabetic since five years of age. Naomi has eight grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren. Despite the circumstances, Naomi has continued to live the legend that began in 1958. She said that the most wonderful day of her life was when she was saved. She loves the Lord with all of her heart and she has never let anything hinder her ministry for Him.

In spite of the many heartaches and hardships she endured, Naomi pressed on. A string of hit songs, many awards and accomplishments will all serve as a testament to Naomi’s talent, integrity and her dedication over the many years.

In 2001, Naomi Sego was inducted into the Southern Gospel Music Association Hall of Fame and sang with the group for another six years. In 2007, it was announced that Naomi and the Segos would do one more concert. In November of that year, the group sang their last official farewell concert. In 2008, Naomi and the Segos released their final album, Happy Ending. This completed a career for Naomi spanning over 50 years in Gospel Music.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LITTLE STEVE & THE SEGO BROTHERS
FOR SONGS OF FAITH RECORDS 1962

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SONGS OF FAITH SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1962
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILL BEASLEY AND CECIL SCAIFE
RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY SHERRILL

> BECAUSE OF HIM <
Composer: - John Daniel Sumner
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Public Domain
Matrix number: SOF 53 - Single Master (2:43)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (S) 45rpm SOF 8006-B mono
BECAUSE OF HIM / I'VE BEEN CHANGED

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Little Steve - Vocal
The Sego Brothers - Vocals
Unknown Musicians

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE SPEER FAMILY
FOR SONGS OF FAITH RECORDS 1962

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SONGS OF FAITH SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1962
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILL BEASLEY AND CECIL SCAIFE
RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY SHERRILL

> BORN AGAIN <
Composer: - George Coles Stebbins
Publisher: - S.E.S.A.C. - Public Domain
Matrix number: SOF 24 - Single Master (2:08)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: Songs Of Faith (S) 45rpm SOF 1006-B mono
BORN AGAIN / SUPPERTIME

George Coles Stebbins (1846-1945) was a gospel song writer. Stebbins was born February 26, 1846, in Orleans County, New York, where he spent the first 23 years of his life on a farm. In 1869 he moved to Chicago, Illinois, which marked the beginning of his musical career.

The Speer Family, (also The Speers) were a Southern gospel family group, founded in 1921 by George Thomas ("Dad") Speer, his wife Lena ("Mom") Speer, and his sister and brother-in-law Pearl and Logan Claborn. Pearl and Logan left the group in 1925 and were replaced by two of George and Lena's children. Over the years, further siblings were added to the line-up and eventually non-family members were added to the group. In 1998, the group was officially retired.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BOBBY LEE TRAMMELL
FOR ALLEY RECORDS 1962

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
ALLEY SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1962
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - SCOTTY MOORE

> I TRIED NOT TO CRY < 
Composer: - Bobby Lee Trammell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Fear Publishing Corporation-Poinsettia Publishing
Matrix number: - 175 - Master (2:56)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Alley Records (S) 45rpm standard single Alley 1004-A mono
I TRIED NOT TO CRY / COME ON BABY
Reissued: - 2020 AMB Records Sample Internet Spotify-15 mono
ARKANSAS TWIST

> COME ON BABY <
Composer: - Bobby Lee Trammell
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Fear Publishing Corporation-Poinsettia Publishing
Matrix number: - 176 - Master (2:30)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1962
Released: - 1962
First appearance: - Alley Records (S) 45rpm standard single Alley 1004-B mono
COME ON BABY / I TRIED NOT TO CRY
Reissued: - 2020 AMB Records Sample Internet Spotify-16 mono
ARKANSAS TWIST

Bobby Lee Trammell was born on January 31, 1934 and was an American rockabilly singer and politician. Trammell was born on a cotton farm near Jonesboro, Arkansas to Wiley and Mae Trammell, who were cotton farmers. Wiley played fiddle and Mae was an organist at a local church; in addition to these influences, Trammell also listened to the Grand Ole Opry and attended services at the local Pentecostal church, where gospel music was sung.

As a high schooler, Trammell played country music, and when Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash toured in Trammell's area in the middle of the 1950s, Perkins invited him to sing a song and told him to talk to Sam Phillips, owner of Sun Records. The meeting came to nothing, but Trammell moved to Long Beach, California soon after in hopes of landing a recording contract. While in California, he took a job in a Ford manufacturing plant. He saw Bobby Bare play at a carnival and convinced Bare to let him come on stage for a few songs. Lefty Frizzell, who was in attendance at the fair, asked him to open for a show at the Jubilee Ballroom, a venue in Baldwin Park, California. Trammell soon was performing there regularly, and won a reputation for Elvis Presley-like spastic gyrations and wildness on stage that occasionally caused controversy. Trammell said: "I was much wilder than Jerry Lee Lewis or Little Richard".

Manager and record label owner Fabor Robison signed Trammell to a contract, and he released his first single, containing the self-penned tunes "Shirley Lee" and "I Sure Do Love You, Baby". The recordings included session musicians James Burton on guitar and James Kirkland on bass. The single sold well and was picked up for national distribution by ABC/Paramount. The song never hit the national charts, but may have sold as many as 250,000 copies. Ricky Nelson covered "Shirley Lee" soon after.

Trammell's career then went through a series of mishaps. He auditioned for The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet, but was not offered a spot. Ricky Nelson had expressed interest in looking at more of Trammell's work, but Trammell did not take the offer seriously. During the recording of his second single, "You Mostest Girl", he was backed by an orchestra and chorus, and he nearly quit his contract over the difficult recording session. Both this single and its follow-up, "My Susie J - My Susie Jane", failed to chart, and by the end of the 1950s, Trammell was performing strictly local dates in California. He staged a protest on the top of a broadcast tower in Los Angeles, against a radio station's refusal to play his record, but when the structure began to collapse, he had to be rescued by local authorities, and was barred from performing in the state.

After returning to Arkansas, Trammell sparred with Jerry Lee Lewis before a gig and destroyed Lewis's piano. After stories of Trammell's misbehavior made the rounds among promoters, he was effectively blackballed as a public performer everywhere.

In 1961 Trammell saw two singles on the Alley label ''Arkansas Twist'' b/w ''It’s All Your Fault''
and ''Come On Baby'' b/w ''I Tried Not To Cry''. The a-side was a twist version of ''Arkansas Stomp'', the b-side a Jimmy Reed style rocker. The second single featured a Chuck Berry type rocker on the top deck and a ''crying'' ballad (i.e., Bobby breaks down in sobs at the end) on the flip. Neither met which much success, even when Bobby took to climbing the tower of the radio stations that refused to play his records. Atlanta even issued an LP ''Arkansas Twist.

Trammell continued recording for small local labels, but his reputation prevented him from getting much radio airplay. He self-distributed the records from his car in the 1960s. He was offered licensing contracts with Warner Bros. Records and others, but he refused them; he recorded for Sims Records through the end of the 1960s. In the 1970s, he played country music, and in the 1980s, he found some success in Europe during the rockabilly revival there. However, at the Rockhouse festival in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, he tried to jump onto his piano but fell, breaking his wrist in the process.

In 1997, Trammell was elected to the Arkansas House of Representatives , where he served until 2002. He unsuccessfully sought a State Senate seat in 2002, losing to Jerry Bookout. He died on February 20, 2008, in his birthplace of Jonesboro.

- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bobby Lee Trammell
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR STEVE AND DANTE
FOR STAX RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
STAX SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1962
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY SHERRILL

Unreleased acetate dating to 1963 with a great stomping beat. Very much in line with the Northern Soul sound, but also a tad bit of the tail end of the teen sound from the early 1960's. Written and performed by Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, Steve Cropper and recorded in 1963 at Sam Phillips Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee.

According to Steve Cropper, ''I got a little into the pop situation and had a friend who wanted to record, a buddy of mine, a duet” he recalls. “We called ourselves Steve & Dante, but the good news is it didn’t make it! If it had of made it then it would’ve changed my whole life. But I was in Nashville, one of the greatest engineers in the world Billy Sherrill was the engineer that day and they had Ace session musicians at the time playing on this thing. I got to see recording in Nashville which was different than the way we did it in Memphis so it was a good education for me''.

> MY GIRL FRIDAY <
Composer: - Steve Cropper
Publisher: - B.M.I. - East Music
Matrix number: - None - Acetate (2:05)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963 Previously Unissued
First appearance: Stax (S) Acetate 45rpm-A mono
MY GIRL FRIDAY / THE GREAT HAS BEEN

> THE GREAT HAS BEEN <
Composer: - Steve Cropper
Publisher: -B.M.I. - East Music
Matrix number: - None - Acetate (2:10)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963 Previously Unissued
First appearance: Stax (S) Acetate 45rpm-B mono
THE GREAT HAS BEEN / MY FIRL FRIDAY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Steve Cropper - Vocal and Guitar
Dante - Vocal (Unidentified)
Unknown - Piano, Bass, Drums, Horns, and Vocal Chorus

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS -©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ART BUCHANAN
FOR DIXIE RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
DIXIE SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) JANUARY 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - SCOTTY MOORE

Art Buchanan (actually Arthur Buchanan), also known as "Art Ontario", is an American country and rockabilly musician. Buchanan began his career with the Wayne County Playboys as a country musician in 1951. He later renamed his band The Pioneers and recorded his first single ''Wiggle Walkin' Boogie'' / ''I'm Proud'' as Art Ontario on the small label Illinois Records. He then moved to the Starday sub-label Dixie Records, where he stayed until 1963 and released three singles under his real name. Notable releases there were a version of ''Hi Yo Silver'' and one of his more popular titles, ''Queen From Bowling Green'', which is on countless compilations. After 1963 he played a single on Flame Records and was still active in the following years. In 1998 Lost Gold Records released the CD Art Ontario AKA Art Buchanan 1957-1993 with his collected works in the USA.

> HI YO SILVER <
Composer: - Art Buchanan
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Tronic Music
Matrix number: - None - Master (1:51)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) January 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Dixie Records (S) 45rpm standard single 45-1002-A mono
HI YO SILVER / I CAN'T HELP
Reissued: - 1998 United States (CD) 500/200rpm Lost Gold 82097-9 mono
ART ONTARIO 1957-1993

I CAN'T HELP IT
Composer: - Hank Williams
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Acuff-Rose Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Master Lost
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) January 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Dixie Records (S) 45rpm standard single 45-1002-B mono
I CAN'T HELP / HI YO SILVER
Reissued: - 1998 United States (CD) 500/200rpm Lost Gold 82097-10 mono
ART ONTARIO 1957-1993

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Art Buchanan
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR DEAN MATHIS
FOR NASHVILLE RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
NASHVILLE SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - SCOTTY MOORE

Born and reared at Niangua, 30 miles northeast of Springfield. the son of farmers, Dean started his career by playing guitar for local square dances and at 20 began singing. He has cut five records, the first one, ''Stubborn Heart'', Nashville, 1962; the second, ''Unfaithful Sweetheart'' in 1963; third. ''Blue Lights And Broken Hearts'', in 1965, was on charts for 23 weeks, was number 1 for 13 weeks and number 11 for a year. It also hit the national charts. The fourth record. ''Too Much Temptation'', was number 14 on the charts, on a national basis, also; and the fifth, ''Nobody Blue''. Dean was on the Grand Ole Opry in 1962 and had his own TV show out of Sedalia in 1955. He also worked (singing) TV out of Springfield and radio out of Topeka. He has toured 25 states singing, and has worked with every major star in the country' field, such as Red Foley, Roy Clark, Loretta Lynn, Hank Thompson, Hawkshaw Hawkins, George Morgan, Grandpa Jones, Rusty Draper and many others.

> CRAZY BUT I'M IN LOVE <
Composer: - Marshall Admire
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Starday Music
Matrix number: - 5530 - Master (2:12)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Nashville Records (S) 45rpm standard single NV 5103-A mono
CRAZY BUT I'M IN LOVE / INFAITHFUL SWEETHEART

> UNFAITHFUL SWEETHEART <
Composer: - Marshall Admire
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Window Music
Matrix number: - 5533 - Master (2:28)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Nashville Records (S) 45rpm standard single NV 5103-B mono
INFAITHFUL SWEETHEART / CRAZY BUT I'M IN LOVE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Dean Mathis
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR TOMMY BURK & THE COUNTS
FOR NAT RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
NAT SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - SCOTTY MOORE

Tommy Burk and the Counts were a big local act in Memphis, every kid in the city would have seen them live or have known about them. They had a career that spanned early 1960s vocal pop to garage.

They had about ten 45s on various labels, including a local hit with a garage-styled version of ''Stormy Weather'' and ''Without Me'' backed with a version of ''Maggie's Farm'' on Southern Artists 2026. They are also supposed to be the group behind A. Jacks & The Cleansers ''Stronger Than Dirt'' on Clean 110.

> STORMY WEATHER <
Composer: - Arlen-Koehler
Publisher: - A.S.C.A.P. - Mills Music
Matrix number: - YW27797 - Master (2:34)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Nat Records (S) 45rpm standard single Nat-101-A mono
STORMY WEATHER / TRUE LOVE'S GONE
Reissued: 1963 Smash Records (S) 45rpm standard single S1821-A mono
STORMY WEATHER / TRUE LOVE'S GONE

Memphis Master To Smash
CHICAGO - Smash Records has picked up a fast-selling master on the Nat label, "Stormy Weather" by The Counts. According to Charlie Fach, Smash topper, the disk has already sold over 5,000 copies in Memphis alone. The Counts are a group of students at Memphis State University. Memphis appears to be hot territory for the development of hits for Smash, for the label picked up its first Dickey Lee master out of Memphis, and also its current single ''"I'm Movin' On'' by Matt Lucas''. (Cash Box, April 27, 1963)

> TRUE LOVE'S GONE <
Composer: - Tommy Burk
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Press Music
Matrix number: - YW27798 - Master (2:16)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Nat Records (S) 45rpm standard single Nat-101-B mono
TRUE LOVE'S GONE / STORMY WEATHER
Reissued: 1963 Smash Records (S) 45rpm standard single S1821-B mono
TRUE LOVE'S GONE / STORMY WEATHER

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Counts consisting of
Tommy Burk - Vocals
Wayne Thompson - Guitar
Mike Stoker - Bass
Thomas Boggs - Drums
John Greer, Steve O’Keefe and Dan Morelock - Unknown.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR TOMMY COGBILL
FOR PENTHOUSE RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
PENTHOUSE SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - SCOTTY MOORE

Tommy Cogbill, a native of Johnson Grove, Tennessee, Cogbill took to the guitar at a young age and eventually made his way toward the electric bass. In the mid 1960’s, he began picking up sessions in Memphis with a group including Gene Christman on drums, Chips Moman and Reggie Young on guitar, and Bobby Emmons on keys. Of ten hired by Jerry Wexler for artists on Atlantic records, the group traveled between the hubs of soul music - Muscle Shoals, Memphis, Nashville, and New York. While he frequently recorded at American Sound Studios (owned by Chips Moman), he’s one of the few bass players from that era who regularly bounced around to different cities and studios. By the late 1960’s, he had recorded with artists including Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, Dusty Springfield, and Elvis Presley, among others. Cogbill soon began stretching his muscles as a producer, working with Neil Diamond (producing the song ''Sweet Caroline''), The Box Tops, and Arthur Alexander. In addition to producing, he continued his career as a bass player throughout the 1970s and recorded with country artists and singer songwriters including Kris Kristofferson, J.J. Cale, Bob Seger, Jimmy Buffett, and Townes Van Zandt. Tommy Cogbill passed away in 1982 at the age of 50 due to a stroke.

> LIVERPOOL EXPRESS (PART I) <
Composer: - Cogbill-Buckalow-Perkins-Hughes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Studio Music
Matrix number: - P-127 - Master (1:57)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Penthouse Records (S) 45rpm standard single P 5002-A mono
LIVERPOOL EXPRESS (PART I) / LIVERPOOL EXPRESS (PART 11)

> LIVERPOOL EXPRESS (PART II) <
Composer: - Cogbill-Buckalow-Perkins-Hughes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Studio Music
Matrix number: - P-128 - Master (1:57)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Penthouse Records (S) 45rpm standard single P 5002-B mono
LIVERPOOL EXPRESS (PART II) / LIVERPOOL EXPRESS (PART 1)

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Tommy Cogbill - Bass Guitar

Probably Musicians
Gene Chrisman - Drums
Chips Moman - Guitar
Reggie Young - Guitar
Bobby Emmons - Keyboard
Unknown - Harmonica (2)
Unknown - Horns

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLES BROWN
FOR TEEM RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
TEEM SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - SCOTTY MOORE

> MERRY CHRISTMAS <
Composer: - Charles Brown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ace Publishing
Matrix number: - 1008X - Master (2:53)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Teem Records (S) 45rpm standard single 1113-63-A mono
MERRY CHRISTMAS BABY / CHRISTMAS FINDS ME OH SO SAM

> CHRISTMAS FINDS ME OH SO SAD <
Composer: - Charles Brown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Ace Publishing
Matrix number: - 1008X - Master (3:08)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Teem Records (S) 45rpm standard single 1113-63-BA mono
CHRISTMAS FINDS ME OH SO SAM / MERRY CHRISTMAS BABY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charles Brown - Vocal and Piano
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

TONY RUSSELL ''CHARLES'' BROWN -  was an American blues singer and pianist whose soft-toned, slow-paced blues-club style influenced blues performance in the 1940s and 1950s. Between 1949 and 1952, Brown had seven Top 10 hits in the U.S. Billboard Rhythm & Blues chart. His best-selling recordings included are "Driftin' Blues" and "Merry Christmas Baby".

Brown was born on September 13, 1922 in Texas City, Texas. As a child he loved music and received classical music training on the piano. He graduated from Central High School in Galveston, Texas , in 1939 and Prairie View A&M College in 1942 with a degree in chemistry. He then became a chemistry teacher at George Washington Carver High School in Baytown, Texas, a mustard gas worker at the Pine Bluff Arsenal at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and an apprentice electrician at a shipyard in Richmond, California, before settling in Los Angeles in 1943.

In Los Angeles, an influx of African Americans from the South during World War II created an integrated nightclub scene in which black performers tended to minimize the rougher blues elements of their style. The blues-club style of a light rhythm bass and right-hand tinkling of the piano and smooth vocals became popular, epitomized by the jazz piano of Nat King Cole. When Cole left Los Angeles to perform nationally, his place was taken by Johnny Moore's Three Blazers, featuring Brown's gentle piano and vocals.

The Three Blazers signed with Exclusive Records, and their 1945 recording of "Drifting Blues", with Brown on piano and vocals, stayed on the U.S. Billboard Rhythm & Blues chart for six months, putting Brown at the forefront of a musical evolution that changed American musical performance. Brown led the group in a series of further hits for Aladdin over the next three years, including "New Orleans Blues" and the original version of "Merry Christmas Baby" (both in 1947) and "More Than You Know" (1948). Brown's style dominated the influential Southern California club scene on Central Avenue, in Los Angeles, during that period. He influenced such performers as Floyd Dixon, Cecil Gant, Ivory Joe Hunter, Percy Mayfield, Johnny Ace and Ray Charles.

In the late 1940s, a rising demand for blues was driven by a growing audience among white teenagers in the South, which quickly spread north and west. Blues singers such as Louis Jordan, Wynonie Harris and Roy Brown were getting much of the attention, but what writer Charles Keil dubs "the postwar Texas clean-up movement in blues" was also beginning to have an influence, driven by blues artists such as T-Bone Walker, Amos Milburn and Brown. Their singing was lighter and more relaxed, and they worked with bands and combos that had saxophone sections and played from arrangements.

Brown left the Three Blazers in 1948 and formed his own trio with Eddie Williams (bass) and Charles Norris (guitar). He signed with Aladdin Records and had immediate success with "Get Yourself Another Fool" and then had one of his biggest hits, "Trouble Blues", in 1949, which stayed at number one on the Billboard Rhythm & Blues chart for 15 weeks in the summer of that year. He followed with "In the Evening When the Sun Goes Down", "Homesick Blues", and "My Baby's Gone", before having another Rhythm & Blues chart-topping hit with "Black Night", which stayed at number one for 14 weeks from March to June 1951.

His final hit for several years was "Hard Times" in 1951. Brown's approach was too mellow to survive the transition to the harsher rhythms of rock and roll, despite his recording in Cosimo Matassa's New Orleans studio in 1956, and he faded from national attention. Though he was unable to compete with the more aggressive sound that was increasing in popularity, he had a small, devoted audience, and his songs were covered by the likes of John Lee Hooker and Lowell Fulson.

His "Please Come Home for Christmas", a hit for King Records in 1960, remained seasonally popular. "Please Come Home for Christmas" had sold over one million copies by 1968 and was awarded a gold disc in that year. In the 1960s Brown recorded two albums for Mainstream Records.

In the 1980s Brown made a series of appearances at the New York City nightclub Tramps. As a result of these appearances he signed a recording contract with Blue Side Records and recorded One More for the Road in three days. Blue Side Records closed soon after, but distribution of its records was picked up by Alligator Records. Soon after the success of ''One More For The Road'', Bonnie Raitt helped usher in a comeback tour for Brown.

He began a recording and performing career again, under the musical direction of the guitarist Danny Caron, to greater success than he had achieved since the 1950s. Other members of Charles's touring ensemble included Clifford Solomon on tenor saxophone, Ruth Davies on bass and Gaylord Birch on drums. Several records received Grammy Award nominations. In the 1980s Brown toured widely as the opening act for Raitt.

Brown was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1996 and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999. He was a recipient of a 1997 National Heritage Fellowship awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts, which is the highest honor in the folk and traditional arts in the United States.

Brown was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album three times: in 1991 for ''All My Life'', 1992 for ''Someone To Love'' and 1995 for Charles Brown's ''Cool Christmas Blues''. Between 1987 and 2005, he was nominated for seventeen Blues Music Awards (formerly known as the W. C. Handy Awards) in multiple categories, with a win in the Blues Instrumentalist: Piano/Keyboard category in 1991, and wins in the Male Blues Vocalist category in 1993 and 1995.

Brown died of congestive heart failure on January 21, 1999 in Oakland, California, and was interred at Inglewood Park Cemetery, in Inglewood, California.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE MONARCHS
FOR ZONE RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
ZONE SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - SCOTTY MOORE

> FRIDAY NIGHT <
Composer: - C. McAllister-J. Jones
Publisher: - B.M.I. - E&M Publisher & Vanden
Matrix number: - Z 1105 - Master (2:03)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Zone Records (S) 45rpm standard single Z 1067-A mono
FRIDAY NIGHT / EL BANDITO

> EL BANDITO <
Composer: - C. McAllister-J. Jones
Publisher: - B.M.I. - E&M Publisher & Vanden
Matrix number: - Z 1106 - Master (1:49)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Zone Records (S) 45rpm standard single Z 1067-B mono
EL BANDITO / FRIDAY NIGHT

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Monarchs
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE HUNTSMEN
FOR BRIAR RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
BRIAR SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - GENE KENNEDY & BILL ''HOSS'' ALLEN
RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY SHERRILL
STEREO ENGINEER - CECIL SCAIFE

In 1961, three Wake Forrest College freshmen discovered they had a mutual interest in folk music. It all happened as Bob Hicks and John Memory walked past Wayne Burroughs room in a dormitory. They heard a guitar. That was enough. The two fetched their own instruments, introduced themselves to Burroughs and thus launched an evening of trio song. The practice sessions became ritual and by the following spring the three freshmen had developed into a coherent and expressive group.

Their talents were immediately recognized on campus and they were called upon to entertain at function after function, winding up that first year with top billing at the freshman dance. Local niteries were also seeking out the group and making or of their unique talents.

After a summer hiatus the trio reconvened. Then they had more luck than anyone could expect. They discovered that the campus Homecoming Queen, lovely, Linda Sutherland, could sing. Moreover, she shared the same devout interest in folk music as the boys. They lost no time in making her a regular member because her voice provided the ultimate quality which put the group far above the ordinary. Thus, The Huntsmen, as herein presented were formed.

Dick Bennick, with radio station WTOB at Winston-Salem, took note of the furore. The Huntsmen were stirring up at Wake Forrest. He lent his efforts to their professional development via Gene Kennedy with Hermitage Productions of Nashville, Tennessee, which resulted in this first album compilation of folk songs. The Huntsmen were thrust into the realm of professional music by bookings at the Dayton Beach Festival of folk music, the Azalea Festival in Wilmington, North Carolina and several other exclusive conclaves.

Too often folk music is modernized beyond validity. Not so by The Huntsmen! They preserve the atmosphere of a past time as they recreate in song a robust era of American history. Consider their virtuosity in such songs as ''Fenario'', ''Ox Driver'' and ''Sinner Man''. They wring from ''500 Miles'' every ounce of its nostalgie quality.

''Cryderville Jail'' transports us back to a tune of desperados. It was hard times indeed when mother and father refused their sons jaill. This song appears under many titles - often Texas city jails. The Huntsmen lend it authentic quality.

''Railroad Bill'' unlike ''John Henry'', was a rowdy, fierce man. According to the hundreds of verses collected, he did every sinful and lawless act known to men. The best of these verses are presented herein.

What Robin Hood is to England, ''Jesse James'' is to most Americans. He is pictured in song as a good-natured man who took from the rich to give the the poor. Jesse was using the alias of ''Howard'' when shot by Robert Ford in Saint Joseph, Missouri.

A rousing interpretation by The Huntsmen of ''This Little Light Of Mine'' evokes a vision of a primitive American country-gospel camp meeting. Indeed, The Huntsmen hurl us through an emotional richen as they turn talented fingers and capable voices toward expression of a musical cross-section of Americana. The effect is lasting! When the song is done - when the album is put away - there lingers, still, a haunting, refreshing memory. It is this power to generate an empathy - a sparkling afterthought, which marks The Huntsmen as truly great talents. It is this same power which will send this album spinning on your hi-fi turntable for many years to come

- Bob Ferguson

> JESSE JAMES <
Composer: - Bentley Ball-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Public Domain
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-A - Master (2:38)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-A/1 stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-A/1 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

"Jesse James" is a 19th-century American folk song about the outlaw of the same name, first recorded by Bentley Ball in 1919 and subsequently by many others, including Bascom Lamar Lunsford, Vernon Dalhart, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, The Kingston Trio, The Pogues, The Ramblin' Riversiders, The Country Gentlemen, Willy DeVille, Van Morrison, Grandpa Jones, Bob Seger, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Carl Sandburg, Sons of the Pioneers, Johnny Cash, Liam Clancy, Mungo Jerry and Bruce Springsteen. Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.

Robert Ford, who killed Jesse, was a James' gang member. Mr. Howard was the alias that James lived under in Saint Joseph, Missouri at the time of his killing. It is the most famous song about James. Part of the song is heard at the end of the 1939 movie, ''Jesse James''. The song was used in a 1958 episode of the TV western series ''Lawman'', in which the marshal tries to get Robert Ford (played by Martin Landau) out of town safely. Ry Cooder's arrangement of the song plays over the end credits of Walter Hill's 1980 movie ''The Long Riders'' and a portion of the song is performed on-screen by Nick Cave, who plays a strolling balladeer in a bar patronized by Robert Ford in the 2007 movie ''The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford''.

Woody Guthrie also wrote the song ''Jesus Christ'' based on the same melody and lyrical structure. The song "Ballad Of October 16" from the album ''Songs for John Doe'' by the Almanac Singers is based on the same melody and has lyrical similarities.

The folksinger Almeda Riddle, born Almeda James, was a first cousin twice removed of Frank and Jesse James. On a recording of the song she noted, "I'm sure you've read of Frank and Jesse James. Well, my father's grandfather and their father (Robert S. James) was brothers. I never was ashamed of the James boys was my cousins, but neither was I proud of it''.

The composer of the song is unknown, but it is attributed in the lyrics of some versions to a to "Billy Gashade" or ""Billy LaShade", though no historical record exists for anyone under either name. This song is popular in the bluegrass repertoire; it is usually played as an instrumental, most often in the key of B.

> SINNER MAN <
Composer: - Will Holt-Lex Baxter-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Kobalt Music
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-A - Master (2:24)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-A/2 stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-A/2 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

"Sinner Man" or "Sinnerman" is a song written by Will Holt, an American from Portland, Maine, and popularized in both caucasian and African American cultures, where it has become a traditional spiritual song. It has been recorded by a number of performers and has been incorporated in many other of the media and arts. The lyrics describe a sinner attempting to hide from divine justice on Judgment Day. It was recorded in the 1950s by Les Baxter, the Swan Silvertones, the Weavers and others, before Nina Simone recorded an extended version in 1965.

The earliest recording of the song to bear the title "Sinner Man" was by the Les Baxter Orchestra in 1956, as the B-side of the Capitol Records single "Tango Of The Drums". The lead vocal was by folk singer Will Holt, who shared the credit for writing the song with Baxter. However, the song clearly bears a close resemblance, in both melody and lyrics, to "On The Judgement Day", which was recorded by gospel group The Sensational Nightingales in 1954 and released the following year on the Peacock label. The writing of The Sensational Nightingales' song was credited to two of the group's singers, Julius Cheeks and Ernest James. Some of the lyrics in "Sinner Man", including "The rock cried out, 'No hiding place'", appear to derive from those in the spiritual, "No Hiding Place Down Here", recorded in 1928 by the Old South Quartette.

A version of "Sinner Man" released in 1956, by Swedish-American folk singer William Clauson, credited Baxter, Holt, Cheeks and James as co-writers. Another gospel group, the Swan Silvertones, released their version of the song in 1957 on the Vee-Jay label, and folk singer Guy Carawan issued a version in 1958. Carawan wrote that he had learned the song in 1956 from Bob Gibson. Most modern recorded versions derive from the 1956 recording by Les Baxter. Further changes and additions were codified in 1959 by the folk music group the Weavers. The Weavers' performance of the song appears on their compilation albums ''Gospel'' and ''Reunion at Carnegie Hall Part 2''.

> DARK AS A DUNGEON <
Composer: - Merl Travis-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Merl's Girl Music
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-A - Master (3:28)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-A/3 stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-A/3 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

"Dark As A Dungeon" is a song written by singer-songwriter Merle Travis in 1946. It is a lament about the danger and drudgery of being a coal miner in a shaft mine. It has become a rallying song among miners seeking improved working conditions.

The song achieved much of its fame when it was performed by Johnny Cash in his Folsom Prison concert (At Folsom Prison). During this live performance, one of the prisoners in the background was laughing, and Cash started to chuckle. He gently admonished the man, "No laughing during the song, please!" The man yelled something about "Hell!" and Cash answered, "I know, 'hell'!" When he finished the song, Cash made a comment that was largely repeated, somewhat out of context, by Joaquin Phoenix in the 2005 film ''Walk The Line””: "I just wanted to tell you that this show is being recorded for an album released on Columbia Records, so you can't say 'hell' or 'shit' or anything like that''.

> APPLE JUICE <
Composer: - The Huntsmen-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-A - Master (2:24)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-A/4 stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-A/4 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

> RAILROAD BILL <
Composer: - Morris Slater-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Strings Printed Music Press
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-A - Master (2:10)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-A/5 stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-A/5 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

Morris Slater (died March 7, 1896) was an African American murderer, notable for many dramatic escapes from the law. He acquired the name Railroad Bill from his vendetta against the railroads, which started when he was thrown off a moving train for not paying. He committed armed robberies from freight-trains, killing many railroad officials and lawmen. Although there was a price on his head for some years, he evaded capture through ingenuity and exceptional athletic power. He was eventually shot dead in an ambush at a store which he was known to visit. He is celebrated in the folk-ballad Railroad Bill, made famous by Lonnie Donegan, among others.

The song "Railroad Bill" is a blues ballad that dates to the 19th century and has been performed and recorded by many folk artists throughout the 20th century. People have conjectured that the subject of the song is an African American outlaw named Morris Slater who robbed freight trains in the 1890s. Slater's nickname was Railroad Bill. Only a few of the song's dozens of stanzas seem to refer specifically to Slater's activities. The majority of the stanzas are quite general. Was "Railroad Bill" written about Slater? Or did Slater get his nickname from what was a preexisting song, with the verses specific to him being added later?

> 500 MILES <
Composer: - Hedy West-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Atzal Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-B - Master (3:11)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-B/1stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-B/1 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

"500 Miles" (also known as "500 Miles Away from Home" or "Railroaders' Lament") is a song made popular in the United States and Europe during the 1960s folk revival. The simple repetitive lyrics offer a lament by a traveler who is far from home, out of money and too ashamed to return.

The song is generally credited as being written by Hedy West, and a 1961 copyright is held by Atzal Music, Inc. "500 Miles" is West's "most anthologized song". Some recordings have also credited Curly Williams, or John Phillips as co-writers, although Phillips admitted he had only rearranged it and "didn't deserve the credit". David Neale writes that "500 Miles" may be related to the older folk song "900 Miles" (Roud 4959), which may itself have origins in the southern American fiddle tunes "Reuben's Train" and "Train 45". Johnny Cash is known to have included "500 Miles" on his list of 100 essential country songs in the early 1970s.

The most commercially successful version of the song was Bobby Bare's in 1963. His version became a Top 10 hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, as well as a Top 5 hit on both the Country and Adult Contemporary charts.

The song appears on the 1961 eponymous debut album by The Journeymen; this may have been its first release. The song was heard on the February, 1962 Kingston Trio live album ''College Concert'' (a 1962 US number 3). It was further popularized by Peter, Paul and Mary, who included the song on their debut album in May 1962. American country music singer Bobby Bare recorded a version with new lyrics, which became a hit single in 1963. Dick and Dee Dee released a version of the song on their 1964 album, ''Turn Around''. The song was covered by Sonny & Cher on their 1965 album ''Look At Us''. This version was played over the credits of the 1966 BBC TV film ''Cathy Come Home''. The lyrics feature heavily in the Bob Dylan song "I Was Young When I Left Home''. Bluegrass versions were recorded by The Country Gentlemen on their album 25 Years and The Seldom Scene on their album ''Act I''. The Hooters recorded a version of this song with additional lyrics, dedicated to the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Peter, Paul and Mary provided background vocals for them, as well. This version is on the album ''Zig Zag''. It has also been recorded by The Huntsmen in 1963, Terry Callier (as ″900 Miles″ on The New Folk Sound of Terry Callier), Lonnie Donegan, the Brothers Four, Glen Campbell, Johnny Rivers, Reba McEntire, Jackie DeShannon, The Seekers, Elvis Presley (home recording), Peter and Gordon, Eric Bibb, Hootenanny Singers, Joan Baez, Takako Matsu, The Persuasions, Slater Rhea and many others. Recently, the song has been recorded by Justin Timberlake, Carey Mulligan and Stark Sands for the soundtrack of the film Inside Llewyn Davis. Czech singer Waldemar Matuška sang a cover ''Tisíc mil''. Rosanne Cash covered the song on her 2009 album "The List".

> FENARIO <
Composer: - Philip Lesh-Robert Hall Weir-Jerome J. Garcia-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Universal Music Publishing
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-B - Master (2:51)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-B/2stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-B/2 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

The Bonnie Lass o' Fyvie (Roud # 545) is a Scottish folk song about a thwarted romance between a soldier and a girl. Like many folk songs, the authorship is unattributed, there is no strict version of the lyrics, and it is often referred to by its opening line "There once was a troop o' Irish dragoons". The song is also known by a variety of other names, the most common of them being "Peggy-O", "Fennario", and "The Maid of Fife".

The song is about the unrequited love of a captain of Irish dragoons for a beautiful Scottish girl in Fyvie. The narration is in the third person, through the voice of one of the captain's soldiers. The captain promises the girl material comfort and happiness, but the girl refuses the captain's advances saying she would not marry a foreigner or a soldier. The captain subsequently leaves Fyvie. In two different variations of the song, he threatens to burn the town(s) if his offer is rejected, or alternately save the town if his offer is accepted. He later dies of a broken heart, or battle wounds, or possibly both. Several variations on this theme exist. The soldier also proposes marriage in some versions. Some versions have the girl declare her love for the soldier, but only to be stopped short by a reluctant mother.

The oldest known version of the Scottish ballad is called "The Bonnie Lass O' Fyvie". Another early transcribed version is given under the title "Bonnie Barbara-O". An early English version "Handsome Polly-O" is also present, though in slightly different settings. Another English version is called "Pretty Peggy of Derby". The song probably travelled with Scottish immigrants to America. It is recorded in the classic English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians by Cecil Sharp. Variants of the song refer to the War of 1812 and the American Civil War. A Dixie version of the song makes the final resting place of the captain to be Louisiana.

Over time, the name of Fyvie also got corrupted, and phonetically similar permutations like "Fennario", "Fernario", "Finario", "Fidio", "Ivory" or "Ireo" were placed in its stead to fit the metre and rhyme. As a result, the song is commonly referred to as "Fennario". The 1960s folk music movement saw "Peggy-O" become a common song in many concerts owing to its clear melody and lilting rhyme.

The song was originally composed and sung in Scots. It then made its way into mainstream English, but retains its Scottish flavour. Words like birk (for birch), lass and bonnie are typically Scots as are words like brae (hill) and braw (splendid). As is typical of such cases, quite a few of the less familiar words degenerated into nonsense words as the song travelled over cultures, the most interesting ones probably being Ethanside for Ythanside (banks of the River Ythan), and brasselgeicht for braes o' Gight (hills of Gight).

Many traditional singers have recorded versions of the song, including Scotsman John Strachan (from close to Fyvie) and the Irish singer Thomas Moran. Many Scottish recordings made by James Madison Carpenter between 1929 and 1934, including one of the Aberdeenshire singer Bell Duncan (1849-1934), can be heard on the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library website.

The Southern American version of the song was arranged for the harmonica by Bob Dylan on his eponymous debut album in 1962, under the title "Pretty Peggy-O". He starts off the song with the introduction "I've been around this whole country but I never yet found Fennario", as a playful remark on the fact that the song has been borrowed and cut off its original "setting". Dylan began playing the song live again in the 90s, using the lyrics and melody of the Grateful Dead version. Joan Baez recorded a lyrical version under the title "Fennario" on her 1963 Vanguard Records album Joan Baez in ''Concert, Part 2''.

Simon and Garfunkel also recorded a heavily harmonized arrangement of the song titled "Peggy-O" as part of their ''Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M'' album of 1964 and Columbia Records studio recordings of the 1960s (which was released on the box set The Columbia Studio Recordings (1964-1970) in 2001). Simon and Garfunkel sing the variant of the song where the captain threatens to burn the city down if his advances are refused.

> CRYDERVILLE JAIL <
Composer: - John Lomax-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Sony Music
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-B - Master (2:20)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-B/3stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-B/3 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

Complaints about prison life. "It's hard times in (Cryderville) jail, It's hard times, poor boy. Durant jail beats no jail at all; If you want to catch hell, got to Wichita Falls. Lice and the bedbugs have threatened my life''. The song was composed by Sam Houston, a white desperado and horse stealer, while he was in jail in Austin, Texas, in 1880. He was sentenced to twenty-five years in Huntsville. George Winn, then a colored boy of fourteen, heard him, and the song made a deep impression. George said, when he gave the song to me, that he had not thought of it in fifteen years' (Lomax 140). Alternate titles/related songs: "I've been spending six long months in Fond du Lac Jail'', "Cryderville Jail'', "Waco Jail'', "Dallas Jail'', "New Orleans Jail''.

> OX DRIVER <
Composer: - H. R. Weaver -Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Public Domain
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-B - Master (2:26)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-B/4stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-B/4 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

> THIS LITTLE LIGHT OF MINE <
Composer: - Traditional-Arranged Bill ''Hoss'' Allen
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Public Domain
Matrix number: - 992-LP-PC-106-B - Master (2:04)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Briar International (LP) 33rpm M 106-B/5stereo
PRESENTING - THE HUNTSMEN
Reissued: - 1963 London (LP) 33rpm SH-U.8175-B/5 stereo
THE HUNTSMEN

"This Little Light Of Mine" is a popular gospel song of unknown origin. It was often reported to be written for children in the 1920s by Harry Dixon Loes, but he never claimed credit for the original version of the song, and the Moody Bible Institute where he worked said he did not write it. It was later adapted by Zilphia Horton, amongst many other activists, in connection with the civil rights movement.

The origin of the song is unclear, but the phrase "This little light of mine" appears published in poetry by 1925 by Edward G. Ivins, a writer in Montana. In 1931, the song is mentioned in a Los Angeles newspaper as "Deaconess Anderson's song". In 1932, the song was mentioned in a 1932 Missouri newspaper. In 1933, the song was mentioned in newspapers as being sung by a chorus at an African Methodist Episcopal conference in Helena, Montana and then various other churches around the United States later that year. In June 1934 John Lomax and Alan Lomax recorded the earliest known recording of the song when they recorded Jim Boyd of Jacksonville, Texas singing at the State Penitentiary in Huntsville, Texas. In 1939 Lomax returned to Texas with Ruby Lomax during their Southern States Recording Trip and recorded the song again. This song and others were sung by a black woman, Doris McMurray who was imprisoned at Thomas Goree Unit in Texas and said that she learned the song from her grandmother in Waco. She sang the following lyrics, taught to her by her grandmother:

Many other verses have been added over the years, including impromptu lines appropriate to the occasion. The song is sung around the world, with the simple lyrics and tune resonating with all ages. Harry Dixon Loes, who studied at the Moody Bible Institute and the American Conservatory of Music, was a musical composer and teacher, who wrote or co-wrote several other gospel songs. He wrote a popular adaptation of the song "This Little Light of Mine" in the 1940's, but never copyrighted or claimed credit for writing the original, which remains of unknown origin. Often thought of as an African-American spiritual, it can be found in The United Methodist Hymnal, #585, adapted by William Farley Smith in 1987, and in the Unitarian Universalist Hymn Book, Singing the Living Tradition, #118, with harmonies by Horace Clarence Boyer.

Some claim the song takes its theme from some of Jesus's remarks to his followers. Matthew 5:14-16 of the King James Version gives: "Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid. Neither do men light a candle and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house. Let your light shine before men, that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven''. The parallel passage in Luke 11:33 of the King James Version gives: "No man, when he hath lighted a candle, putteth it in a secret place, neither under a bushel, but on a candlestick, that they which come in may see the light''. Given that the source is unknown and God and Jesus are not mentioned in the words, it is equally possible that the song reflects a global longing to be seen as a good person trying to make the world a better place.

The song was sung by Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Godmother of Rock And Roll, as early as 1960. The song has also been secularised into "This Little Girl Of Mine" as recorded by Ray Charles in 1956 and later The Everly Brothers. It has often been published with a set of hand movements to be used for the instruction of children.

Under the influence of Zilphia Horton, Fannie Lou Hamer, and others, it eventually became a Civil Rights anthem in the 1950s and 1960s, especially the version by Bettie Mae Fikes. The Kingston Trio recorded it on College Concert in 1962, and The Seekers for their second UK album, ''Hide & Seekers'' (also known as ''The Four & Only Seekers'') in 1964. Over time it also became a very popular children's song, recorded and performed by the likes of Raffi in the 1980s from his album Rise and Shine, releasing it as a single. It is sometimes included in Christian children's song books. Odetta and the Boys Choir of Harlem performed the song on the Late Show with David Letterman on September 17, 2001, on the first show after Letterman resumed broadcasting, after having been off the air for several nights following the events of 9/11. Reverend Osagyefo Sekou and other counter-protesters sang "This Little Light Of Mine" defiantly before a crowd of white supremacists and alt-right supporters gathered for the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, VA in 2018.

The song featured on Hoyt Axton's 1963 album ''Thunder 'N Lightnin''' named "This Little Light". LZ7 took their version of the song also named "This Little Light" to number 26 in the UK Singles Chart. The song is also sung in several scenes of the 1994 film ''Corrina, Corrina'' starring Whoopi Goldberg and Ray Liotta.
The song was mixed with You Can't Be A Beacon by The Masters V (Later: J.D. Sumner and the Stamps) in 1988. Meghan Markle and Prince Harry chose to end their wedding in May 2018 with a version of the iconic song.

Name (Or. No. of Instruments)
Linda Sutherland - Vocal
Wayne Burroughs - Vocal and Banjo
Bob Hicks - Vocal and Guitar
John Memory - Vocal, Guitar and Bass

Linda Sutherland, a beautiful and talented song-tress, calls Macon, Georgia her home. She is a speech major and has appeared in numerous campus productions. Wayne Burroughs, a banjo player and avid folk music enthusiast, is from Arlington, Virginia. He is a psychology major. Bob Hicks, guitarist and comedian, is from Long Island, New York. He and Wayne are most of the arrangements for the group. He is a pre-dental student. John Memory, a tenor, guitarist and bass singer, compose songs at times. He is from Wagram, North Carolina and is studying pre-law.

Some liner notes taken from: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Huntsmen recordings of this session can also be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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The Blue Ridge Quartet was organized by Frank Stamps's Stamps Quartet Music Company of Texas. They started in Raleigh, North Carolina, but ultimately settled in Spartanburg, South Carolina. When they began in Raleigh at the beginning of 1946 they operated out of radio station WRAL. Among the original members of the group in 1946 were Leonard "Red" Mathis, tenor; James Smith, lead; Wayne Roseberry, baritone; Shaw Eiland, bass; and William Cunningham, pianist. Eiland and Roseberry were former members of the Stamps-Baxter Lone Star Quartet, also headquartered in Raleigh. After a short time Elmo Fagg and Jack Taylor, both from the Lone Star Quartet, joined them. It wasn't long before Wayne Roseberry left and Everett Payne became the baritone singer.

Burl Strevel joined the quartet in 1947 to sing bass, and they moved over to WDBB radio in Burlington, NC. In 1948 they moved to WSPA radio Spartanburg, SC and dropped the "Stamps" name. Former Lone Star Quartet lead and baritone Clarence Turbyfill joined to sing tenor. In 1949, Kenny Gates became the Blue Ridge Quartet's pianist. When Turbyfill left in 1950, Ed Sprouse became the group's tenor. When Payne left in 1953, Gates picked up the additional duty of singing the baritone part. This lineup of Sprouse, Fagg, Gates, and Strevel remained together for a number of years.

Around 1956, Strevel left to join the Sunshine Boys. After some turnover, the bass slot was filled by George Younce. Jim Hamill was hired for the baritone slot with Gates remaining at piano. After a year or so, Bill Crowe replaced Hamill and began a long tenure with the Blue Ridge Quartet.

When George Younce left the group to join the Cathedral Quartet in 1964, Burl Strevel returned to sing bass. Shortly after, former Sunshine Boys member Fred Daniel replaced Ed Sprouse at the tenor position.
When Elmo Fagg retired in 1968, he was replaced by Laverne Tripp. Beginning in the 1970s there were several years of unprecedented chart success and group popularity. Don Seabolt replaced Fred Daniel in 1972 and Jim Wood also filled the lead slot later in the decade.

The Blue Ridge Quartet shared a number one song on the Singing News chart with the Oak Ridge Boys from February through November 1971. The song was "I Know''. Other number one songs for the group include ''That Day Is Almost Here'' (December 1971-February 1972) and ''After Calvary'' (October-November 1972).

Burl Strevel died of a heart attack on November 12, 1981. After that point, Bill Crowe owned and managed the group until they disbanded in January 1985.

- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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STUDIO SESSION FOR THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET
FOR SING RECORDS 1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SING SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1963
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - MEURICE LEFEVRE
RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY SHERRILL & TOMMY STRONG
MASTERED AT RCA STUDIO, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

This album cover features a picture of the Blue Ridge Quartet's newest way of travel. This coach is especially outfitted for the boys with all the comforts of home, and it should be. Each year they travel almost one-tenth of a million miles and approximately 2.000 hours in their bus!

The lower level features eight reclining luxury seats, a snack bar, and rest room. The upper deck houses the sleeping quarters which include 6 beds, individual closets, and a reading table.

The Blue Ridge Quartet scored another first in gospel music they hasn't a mobile telephone installed in their old bus two years ago. Their new number JL 5-2306, channel JL, YJ, or JR. You may also reach them when they are ''passing thru'' your town by calling CCradio KDD 41941. They monitor channel 11 and would be happy to talk with you. AM radio plays throughout the bus and furnishes background music, news, etc.

We at Sing Records wish to congratulate the Blue Ridge Quartet on their move up and hope you enjoy this album as much as the boys are enjoying their Bus.

- Meurice LeFevre

> SWEET PEACE WITHIN <
Composer: - Ed Sprouse-P. Hughes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1347 - Master (3:23)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-A/1 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> DOWN THE SAWDUST TRAIL <
Composer: - Millie Lou Pace
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1347 - Master (3:38)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-A/2 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> VALLEY OF MY DREAMS <
Composer: - Kenny Gates
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1347 - Master (3:24)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-A/3 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> NOW THE DAY IS OVER <
Composer: - S. Baring-Gould-Public Domain
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1347 - Master (2:58)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-A/4 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> MY SAVIOR CARES FOR ME <
Composer: - Kenny Gates
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFever Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1347 - Master (4:02)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-A/5 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> IT WAS LOVE <
Composer: - P. Hughes-A. LeFevre
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1347 - Master (2:47)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-A/6 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> HE'S LIVING IN MY HEART <
Composer: - Larry Goss
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1348 - Master (2:21)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-B/1 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> TOUCH THE HAND OF THE LORD <
Composer: - C. Goodman-J. Davis
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1348 - Master (2:53)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-B/2 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> LORD I'VE TRIED <
Composer: - Jimmy Jones
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1348 - Master (3:12)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-B/3 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> HE IS THE ONE I NEED MOST <
Composer: - Henry Slaughter
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1348 - Master (3:34)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-B/4 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> JESUS IS EVERYTHING TO ME <
Composer: - Jimmy Jones
Publisher: - B.M.I. - LeFevre Sing Music (2:30)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-B/5 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

> BETTER HURRY UP <
Composer: - James B. Paris
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Stamps Baxter Music
Matrix number: - PR4M5-1348 - Master (2:25)
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1963
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sing Records (LP) 33rpm MFSP 457-B/6 stereo
THE BLUE RIDGE QUARTET - PASSING THRU

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Crowe, Elmo Fagg, George Younce, Ed Sprouse - Vocals
Kenny Gates - Vocal and Piano

Wayne Moss - Lead Guitar
Lightnin' Chance - Bass
Jack Greubel - Drums
Rex Nelon - Rhythm Guitar
Boots Randolph - Vibes

The Blue Ridge Quartet recordings can also be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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> Page Up <

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UNDER CONSTRUCTION

STUDIO SESSION FOR CUSTOM RECORDING ARTISTS 
FOR HIT RECORDS 1962-1963

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
HIT SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1962
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - TED JARRETT
RECORDING ENGINEER - BILLY SHERRILL AND/OR SCOTTY MOORE

RIDE
Composer: - Sheldon-Leon
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Woodcrest-Check Cilt Music
Matrix number: - 6099 - Master (2:09)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1962
Released: - December 1962
First appearance: - Hit Records (S) 45rpm standard single Hit 40-A mono
RIDE / BOBBY'S GIRL

U.S. soul singer Peggie Gaines apparently also recorded under the names Peggy Thompson, Mary Sue, June Richards and Betty White.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Peggie Gaines
More Details Unknown

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BOBBY'S GIRL
Composer: - Hoffman-Klein
Publisher: - B.M.I. - A.M.E. Music
Matrix number: 6098 - Master (2:17)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1962
Released: - December 1962
First appearance: - Hit Records (S) 45rpm standard single Hit 40-B mono
BOBBY'S GIRL / RIDE

Connie was actually born Connie Sue Landers on April 19, 1944 in Austin, Texas. While she was classmates at Hillsboro High in Nashville, Connie formed the Teen-Notes with Don Whitley and Bob McClain. They were chosen as one of the "Discoveries of the Week" at the summer park concerts in 1958.

At this time, they attract the attention of a producer who has them sign on NRC (National Recording Corp) NRC Records was started in Atlanta Georgia in the late 1950's and had a large output of records until the late 1960's. The Group cut "Let Us Pretend" b/w "I See The Image Of You" which will be released in 1959 as Connie & The Cones.

With this single, the group performed in the area and its surroundings and quickly became popular. Connie & the Cones sign a recording contract with Roulette Records when they cut two singles in 1960, "Lonely Girl's Prayer" b/w "I Love My Teddy Bear" and "Take All The Kisses" b/w "No Time For Tears".

After the group’s break-up, Connie recorded a variety of sound-alike and original compositions for about 4 years for the Hit Records label of Nashville as Connie Landers, Connie Dee or Connie . When she was fresh out of High School, Connie was asked to audition for Leroy Van Dyke when she was around 20 or 21. It was for the Auctioneers, a trio of girls who traveled to performances with Leroy. They were Connie Sue Landers, Barbara Voorhies, Sally Harrison . Connie Sue Landers died of cancer on January 30, 2005, she was 60 years old.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Connie Landers
Unknown Vocal Chores

Probably
Jerry Kennedy - Guitar
Harold Bradley - Guitar
Kelton D ''Kelso'' Herston - Guitar
Bob Moore - Bass
Murrey ''Buddy'' Harman - Drums
Hargus ''Pig'' Robbins - Piano
Ray Stevens - Organ, Piano
Homer ''Boots'' Randolph - Saxophone

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