CONTAINS
For audio recordings click on the available > buttons <
1961 SESSIONS (4-6)
April 1, 1961 to June 30, 1961 
 
Studio Session for Harold Dorman, April 14, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Smith, May 4, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Bily Adams, Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961 / HOTB Records
Studio Session for Bill Yates, Unknown Date Summer 1961 / First Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, June 12, 1961 / Sun Records (32)
Studio Session for Carl Mann, June 13, 1961 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, June 14, 1961 / Sun Records (33)
 
Studio Session for The Squires, Unknown Date(s) 1961 / Chan Records
Studio Session for Jackie Cannon, Unknown Date(s) 1961 / Chan Records
Studio Session for Travis Ricks & The Pearls, Unknown Date(s) 1961 / Pride Records
Studio Session for Ronni Lee, Unknown Date(s) 1961 / Strut Records
 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Playlists of the Artists can be found on 706 Union Avenue Sessions of > YouTube <
  

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

APRIL 1961

Harold Dorman, a native of Sledge, Mississippi, had come to Memphis in 1955 and auditioned at Sun in 1957. Both his songs and his performances were undistinguished, but Roland Janes heard something he liked the singer, and when he and Billy Riley started Rita Records in the fall of 1959 they brought a much-improved Dorman into the studio.

With Jack Clement at the board, they cut ''Mountain Of Love'', which became a one-off hit comparable to ''Tragedy'' the previous spring.

Like Thomas Wayne, Dorman was unable to sustain the momentum, and Rita Records soon folded. Dorman hurried back to Sun, where he recorded three singles, none of which reignited his career. He then turned to songwriting and submitted one of his songs, ''Mississippi Cotton Picking Delta Town'', to Charley Pride, another native of Sledge who had also auditioned at Sun in the late 1950s. It became one of Pride's biggest hits and encouraged him to revive ''Mountain Of Love'' in 1981.

APRIL 1, 1961 SATURDAY

Jerry Kennedy goes to work at Mercury Records in Nashville as an assistant to label president Shelby Singleton. He goes on to produce hits for Mercury and Smah acts as The Staler Brothers, Tom T. Hall, Jerry Lee Lewis (1963), and Roger Miller.

''Tomboy And The Champ'', a movie that honors 4-H, appears in theaters, with Rex Allen in a subordinate role.

APRIL 2, 1961 SUNDAY

Connie Francis recorded the pop hit ''Don't Break The Heart That Loves You'' in New York. Margo Smith revives it for the country audience in 1977.

Buddy Jewell is born in Osceola, Arkansas. After singing on demos for a number of years in Music City, he wins the first ''Nashville Star'' TV competition in 2003, leading to a recording contract and a gold album.

APRIL 3, 1961 MONDAY

American western swing musician, big band leader, actor, and television persona, Spade Cooley beats his wife, Ella Mae, at his home in Kern County, California, and threatens to kill his 14-year-old daughter, Melody, if she tells anyone. Ella Mae is pronounced dead after midnight, and he receives a life sentence for the crime.

On April 26, 1961, Cooley was indicted by a Kern County grand jury for the murder of his wife on April 3 at the couple's Willow Springs ranch home. Cooley's 14-year-old daughter, Melody, reportedly told the jury she watched in terror as her father beat her mother's head against the floor, stomped on her stomach, then crushed a lit cigarette against her skin to see whether she was dead. Cooley claimed his wife had been injured by falling in the shower.

He was unsuccessfully defended by prominent attorney P. Basil Lambros in what was the longest case in county history at the time; and was convicted of first-degree murder by a Kern County jury on August 21, 1961 after unexpectedly withdrawing an insanity plea. He was spared death in the gas chamber and sentenced to life in prison.

Decca released Brenda Lee's pop hit, ''You Can Depend On Me''.

Folk figure Peter Seeger is sentenced in New York to 10 one-year prison terms for contempt of Congress, after a lengthy investigation into Communist activities. The conviction is overturned in 1962. Two years earlier, Seeger's ''Gotta Travel On'' became a country hit for Billy Grammer.

Decca released Ernie Ashworth's ''Forever Gone'', and Columbia released Johnny Cash's ''The Rebel - Johnny Tuma''.

Jimmy Jones performs at the Asbury Park Convention Hall, in New Jersey.

Jerry Lee Lewis re-entered the Hot 100 for the first time in three years with ''What'd I Say''.By the middle of May ''What'd I Say'' had reached number 30 where it pegged out. Jerry was signed to bigger paying venues and his new booking agent, Ray Brown at National Artists Attractions, booked him onto a Battle Of The Century tour with Jackie Wilson.

APRIL 4, 1961 TUESDAY

Fabian returns to South Side High in Philadelphia to receive his high school diploma. He graduates with a B+ average.

APRIL 5, 1961 WEDNESDAY

The Paris Sisters sing ''Be My Boy'' on American Bandstand.

Don Gibson recorded ''Sea Of Heartbreak'' at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

APRIL 6, 1961 THURSDAY

Spade Cooley suffers a heart attack, three days after strangling and beating his wife death. As a result, he's transferred from Bakersfield's Kern County Jail to Kern County General Hospital.

Atlantic Records founder Ahmet Ertegun marries Ioana Maria Banu. Ten years earlier, he earned a hit as a songwriter for Big Joe Turner on ''Chains Of Love'', destined to become a country hit for Mickey Gilley.

APRIL 7, 1961 FRIDAY

The Poni-Tails are at the Twin Coaches Lounge in Pittsburgh.

Gene Pitney is on American Bandstand.

APRIL 8, 1961 SATURDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis appear at the Birmingham Armory in Birmingham, Alabama.

Ray Charles begins a twenty stop tour at the McCormick Place in Chicago. His two days in Chicago gross $34,000 with tickets costing up to $4.00.

APRIL 10, 1961 MONDAY

Del Shannon performs ''Runaway'' on American Bandstand.

Capitol released Buck Owens and Rose Maddox's ''Loose Talk'' and ''Mental Cruelty''.

APRIL 11, 1961 TUESDAY

Bob Dylan becomes a pro, opening for John Lee Hooker at New York's Gerde's Folk City. A number of Dylan's songs becomes country successes, including ''It Ain't Me, Babe'', ''You Ain't Going Nowhere'' and ''To Make You Feel My Love''.

The fledgling Los Aneles Angeles, owned by cowboy singer Gene Autry, play their first regular season baseball game at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. The Angels defeat the Orioles, 7-2.

Jerry Butler, Dee Clark, Maxine Brown, and the Marcels are at the Howard Theater.

APRIL 12, 1961 WEDNESDAY

James Darren appears on Bob Hope's NBC-TV special Darren sings ''Gidget Goes Hawaiian'' and ''Wild About That Girl''.

Freddy Cannon is on American Bandstand.

Soviet Union Yuri Gagarin First Man in Space. The Soviet Union successfully launched the first man into space today taking the prize for "The First Man In Space". Yuri Gagarin , a 27-year-old air force major. He orbited the Earth in 1hr 40 minutes. The next target is to put a man on the moon which the US achieves before the end of the decade. Gagarin completing a full orbit of the planet in under two hours.

The Marty Robbins recording ''El Paso'' wins Best Country and Western Performance during the third annual Grammy Awards.

APRIL 13, 1961 THURSDAY

Tammy Stephens is born in Arlington, Texas. After performing at Opryland, she joins The Girls Next Door, contributing to one Top 10 hit, ''Slow Boat To China'', on Mary Tyler Moore's MTM label.

The Everly Brothers make a guest appearance on NBC-TV's ''The Ford Show'' featuring Tennessee Ernie Ford.

APRIL 14, 1961 FRIDAY

Claude Gray recorded ''My Ears Should Burn (When Fools Are Talked About)'' at the Bradley Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

Review in Billboard says that, ''What'd I Say'' by Jerry Lee Lewis; ''Breatin' In A Brand New Broken Heart'' by Connie Francis; ''Runnin' Scared'' by Roy Orbison; ''I Fall To Pieces'' by Patsy Cline, and ''Some Kind Of Wonderful'' by The Drifters that ''These records, of all those on the Hot 100, have begun to show National sales breakout action this week for the first time. They are recommended to dealers and all other readers as having the greatest potential to go all the way. Previous Billboard Spotlight Picks are marked.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAROLD DORMAN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961
 
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY APRIL 14, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OR TOM SPARKMAN
 
Composer: Harold Dorman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Gando Music – Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 444 - Master (1:57)
Recorded: - April 14, 1961
Released: - May 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single Sun 362-B mono
THERE THEY GO / I'LL STICK BY YOU
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3/16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4
 
This is the first of three Sun releases by Harold Dorman following his success the previous year with ''Mountain Of Love'' on Roland Janes's Rita Records. What a marvellous voice Dorman had! So expressive and so southern.
 
''There They Go'' stems from an session featuring some Music City heavyweights. Hank Garland, Junior Huskey, Buddy Harmon, Floyd Cramer, all the gang were there and the result is a competently produced pop record. The mix is just right, with Dorman's vocal in the foreground and the chorus in a restrained supportive role.

If only more Memphis productions featuring Gene Lowery and his buddies had followed this model.  ''I'll Stick By You'' is perhaps a bit more poppish with a more ''produced'' sound, although even here good sence seems to have prevailed.

Buddy Harmon's drumming adds interest to both sides of the record. There is little doubt that had these same sides been produced elsewhere, say New York, the arrangement might have gotten a tad overblow.
 
It's clear that that rhythmic hook in the release might have featured some strings, but thankfully, no one thought to invite the Memphis symphony to an overdubbing party.
 
Composer: Harold Dorman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Gando Music – Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 443 - Master (2:09)
Recorded: - April 14, 1961
Released: - May 21, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single Sun 362-A mono
I'LL STICK BY YOU / THERE THEY GO
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3/15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4
 
Composer: Harold Dorman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:10)
Recorded: - April 14, 1961
Released: - 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8277-9 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL
 
 Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Harold Dorman – Vocal
Hank Garland – Guitar
Kelton Herston - Guitar
Junior Huskey - Bass
Buddy Harmon – Drums
Floyd Cramer – Piano
 
Mildred Kirkham, Dorothy Ann Dillard,
Gordon Stoker, Louis Dean Nunley - Vocal Chorus
 
For Biography of Harold Dorman see: > The Sun Biographies <
Harold Dorman's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

APRIL 15, 1961 SATURDAY

The Ray Charles revues stops at Detroit's Music Hall and then Cleveland Music Hall grosses $22,000 on $4.00 tickets.

Former Marty Robbins producer Mitch Miller graces the cover of TV Guide.

APRIL 16, 1961 SUNDAY

After making recordings for smaller labels, Claude King has his first session for Columbia Records at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee. He takes his first swipe at ''Big River, Big Man'', which he re-recorded a month later.

MID APRIL 1961

Duane Eddy is on location in Tuscon, Arizona filming ''Thunder of Drums''.

APRIL 17, 1961 MONDAY

Dion appears at the Casino Royal in Washington.

Neil Sedaka is at the Blinstrub's Club in Philadelphia.

JoAnn Campbell is on American Bandstand.

The Bay of Pigs invasion ends in a defeat for the Cuban exiles who had attempted to invade Cuba and overthrow Castro's regime. 118 are killed and 1,202 are captured by Cuban forces.

West Side Story, the film version of the musical, is released. The film features Natalie Wood and Rita Moreno, and a choreographed by Jerome Robbins.

Location shooting for Elvis Presley's movie ''Blue Hawaii'' concludes in the Pacific.

Wanda Jackson recorded ''I May Never Get To Heaven'' and ''Brown Eyed Handsome Man'' in Nashville. The former becomes a Conway Twitty hit in 1979, while the latter Chuck Berry song earns country hit status for Waylon Jennings in 1969.

APRIL 19, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Ricky Nelson sings ''Hello Mary Lou'' on ABC-s ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

APRIL 20, 1961 THURSDAY

Wanda Jackson recorded ''In The Middle Of A Heartache'' in Nashville, Tennessee.

Paul Evans and Johnny Preston open for six days at the Armata Coliseum in Manila, Philippines, that will draw 36,000 fans A brief swing through Australia follows. In all, they are seen by 1000,000.

Pat Boone's TV special features Fabian.

APRIL 21, 1961 FRIDAY

Ernie-K-Doe, Jimmy Jones and Freddie Scott appear at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Music Hall. The Flamingos, the Olympics and the Dells are at Chicago's Regal Theater for a week.

Bobby Lord holds what proves to be his final Columbia recording session.

APRIL 22, 1961 SATURDAY

Patsy Cline makes out her will, leaving to husband Charlie Dick only their furniture, the family car and their record collection.

APRIL 24, 1961 MONDAY

Red Foley is found not guilty in his second trial for tax evasion in the last six months.

Bill Anderson recorded ''Po' Folks''.

Capitol Records released Hank Thompson's version of Jack Guthrie's ''Oklahoma Hills''.

APRIL 25, 1961 TUESDAY

The singles Sun 359 ''Belle Of The Suwanee'' b/w ''Eternally'' by Tracy Pendarvis and Sun 360 ''Groovy Train'' b/w ''Highland Rock'' by Wade Cagle and The Escorts issued.

Johnny Maestro sings ''Model Girl'' on American Bandstand.

Faron Young performs ''Hello Walls'' during a guest stint on Dick Clark's ABC-TV show ''American Bandstand''.

APRIL 27, 1961 THURSDAY

The Roomates sing ''Glory of Love'' on American Bandstand.

The city of Los Angeles issues a resolution offering ''the first cheer'' for the Los Angeles Angels, newly formed by Gene Autry.

APRIL 28, 1961 FRIDAY

The singles, PI 3567 ''Dream'' b/w ''Coming Down With The Blues'' by Jeb Stuart and PI 3568 ''You're Everything'' b/w ''You've Gome Home'' by Nelson Ray issued.

The Biggest Show of Stars for 61 stops in St. Louis and the next day at Chicago's McCormick Place. The two dates brings in $25,000.

The Flamingos, Jerry Butler, the Miracles, Maxine Brown, the Vibrations and Shep and the Limelites are at the Uptown Theater in Philadelphia.

APRIL 29, 1961 SATURDAY

Gilbert ''Cisco'' Houston dies of cancer in San Bernardino, California. A longtime drinking buddy and singing partner of Woody Guthrie, he co-wrote ''Cocaine Blues'', a hit for Roy Hogsed in 11948.

LATE APRIL 1961

Sam Cooke appears for a week at the Flame Show Bar in Detroit.

MAY 1, 1961 MONDAY

Bobby Rydell makes his debut as a nightclub performer at Sciolla's Club in Philadelphia.

Danny and the Juniors are at Casino Royal in Washington, DC for a week.

Neil Sedaka sings ''Little Devil'' on American Bandstand.

Johnny Preston is in Philadelphia to begin a 30 day tour to promote ''I Feel Good''.

MAY 1, 1961 MONDAY

Decca Records released Webb Pierce's ''Sweet Lips''

Roland White and Clarence White appear as members of the fictitious band The Country Boys in an episode of ''The Andy Griffith Show'' on CBS.

MARCH 2, 1961 TUESDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''I Feel So Bad'' backed with ''Wild In The Country'' (RCA Victor 47-7880). "I Feel So Bad" is a song written and originally recorded by Chuck Willis in 1953. Elvis version was recorded on March 12, 1961 in RCA Studio B, in Nashville, Tennessee. Presley recorded a version of the song following the arrangements by Willis and his singing style. Presley's version reached to number 5 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in 1961 and number 15 on Billboard's Top 20 Rhythm And Blues Singles chart the same year. The song, which was released on a AA-sided single in the UK backed with ""Wild In The Country'', reached to number 4 on the UK singles chart, also in 1961.

MAY 3, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Songwriter Harlan Howard recorded the original version of ''She Called Me Baby''. The song becomes a hit for Charlie Rich in 1974.

Fats Domino plays the Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh.

MAY 4, 1961 THURSDAY

Neil Sedaka begins a tour of the Philippines and Australia.

Paul Revere and the Raiders make their national TV debut on American Bandstand and sing ''Like Long Hair''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE SMITH
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MAY 4, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR CECIL SCAIFE

Jerry Lee "Smoochy" Smith, as a studio piano player for Sun Records from 1957 to 1959, Jerry Lee Smoochy Smith was instrumental in creating the Great Memphis Pumping Piano Sound. He played on numerous recording sessions at Sun Records as part of the house band that backed up rockabilly legends such as Billy Lee Riley, Ace Cannon, Warren Smith, and others. Smoochy said, "I'm not listed as piano player many times, 'cause I was young and I wasn't in the Musicians Union. Sam Phillips gave me a dollar for each year of my age to cut those records, and when he listed the session with the Musicians Union, he listed Jerry Lee Lewis as piano player or sometimes Jimmy Wilson".

At Stax, Smoochy Smith recorded with the Mar-Keys and was co-writer of their 1961 million-seller hit "Last Night". He also played on Carla Thomas' first album, "Gee Whiz". In 2008 Smoochy Smith chronicled the life and times of his career in ''The Real Me'' published in 2008. One of the tidbits from this book was about the origin of his nickname Smoochy. At 15 he was playing with a band between features in a Texas movie theatre. While watching the first movie, he met a cute little girl and took her backstage to meet the other band members. As the movie was ending, they looked up and saw a couple kissing in the movie. Jerry asked the girl if she would like to do that, and she said yes. When the band began to perform bandleader Kenny Parchman introduced him to the audience as Smoochy. The name has stuck ever since.

DRUNKEN GAMBLER
Composer: Roosenvelt Sykes
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued

TO EACH HIS OWN
Composer: Jay Livingston-Ray Evans
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Paramount Music
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Smith - Vocal & Piano
Brad Suggs - Guitar
R.W. Stevenson - Bass
Chips Moman - Drums
Ronnie Capone - Saxophone
Huey Jeffries - Steel Guitar

For Biography of Jerry Lee Smith see: : > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

EARLY MAY 1961

Bobby Darin is touring Japan.

MAY 5, 1961 FRIDAY

Ral Donner is on American Bandstand.

The United States launches it's first man in space Alan Shepard on the Freedom 7. President Kennedy asks Congress for $531 million to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade. If you look at the timeline for space travel up to this point the The Soviet Union was consistently one step ahead of the United States, but following the speech by President Kennedy on May 25, 1961 the United States was determined to be the first to put a man on the moon which they achieved on July 20, 1969 when Apollo 11 landed Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr, who became the first human beings to walk on the Moon's surface.

MAY 6, 1961 SATURDAY

Dick Clark, the future producer of the academy of Country Music awards, is officially divorced from his first wife, Barbara.

MAY 8, 1961 MONDAY

As he turns 21, Ricky Nelson officially changes his stage name to Rick Nelson.

Faron Young's version of the Willie Nelson-penned ''Hello Walls'' hits number 1 in Billboard.

For his 21st birthday Ricky Nelson is granted his wish to be called professionally Rick.

Fat Domino is performing at the Showboat in Philadelphia.

Gene McDaniels begins a tour in Minneapolis to promote his new album.

MAY 9, 1961 TUESDAY

An-Margret recorded the pop hit ''I Just Don't Understand'' at RCA Studio B in Nashville, Tennessee. Among the ace musicians on the session, pianist Floyd Cramer, bass player Bob Moore, harmonica man Charlie McCoy and The Jordanaires.

MAY 10, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Danny and the Juniors are on American Bandstand.

MAY 12, 1961 FRIDAY

Gene McDaniels opens at the Village Vanguard in New York City.

Leroy Van Dyke recorded ''Walk On By'' at the Bradley Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

MAY 13, 1961 SATURDAY

The Louvin Brothers recorded the Chet Atkins-penned ''How's The World Treating You''. The song eventually is remake by Alison Kraus and James Taylor, who earn a Grammy nomination for their performance.

Sam Cooke has a SRO for his show at the Keil Auditorium. Also appearing are Hank Ballard and the Midnighters, Clyde McPhatter, Aretha Franklin and the Olympics.

Gene Vincent returns to England. He becomes the first American to appear on the British variety television program Thank Your Lucky Stars.

MID MAY 1961

Jerry Lee Lewis is performing every Sunday at Lil' Rebel Room in Memphis while he is on vacation at his home in Hernando, just across the state line in Mississippi.

Freddy Cannon is recuperating from tonsillectomy.

Jackie Wilson is leaving the hospital after recovering from the gunshot wound he suffered on February 15, 1961.

MAY 15, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Kitty Wells' ''Heartbreak Hotel''.

MAY 16, 1961 TUESDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''Air Mail'' and ''Kisses Never Lie''.

MAY 17, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Dion is at the International Club in New York City.

MAY 18, 1961 THURSDAY

Claude King recorded the definitive version of his first hit ''Big River, Big Man'', during an evening session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Country Music Association begins its quarterly board meetings at the Deauville Hotel in Miami Beach. During the two-day gathering, the board votes to establish a Country Music Hall of Fame.

MAY 19, 1961 FRIDAY

Chet Atkins performs for president John F. Kennedy at the annual White House news photographer dinner at a Washington, D.C. With Atkins are bassist Bob Moore, pianist Bill Purcell and drummer Buddy Harmon.

Jerry Lee Lewis is at the Regal theater in Chicago.

MIDDLE MAY 1961

Jerry Lee Lewis's ''What'd I Say'' reached number 30 on the charts, where it pegged out. It wasn't 1958 and ''Great Balls Of Fire'' all over again, but the response was strong enough that a feeling of new life came over Sun's approach to Lewis. In the next few years, Jerry's records took on a soulful cast. It may be that they would have anyway, as Jerry's own ear had led him to Ray Charles in the first place, but the list of releases Sam Phillips put out on Jerry in the months, that followed showed just how hard he was working to color his boy as an rhythm and blues-based artist.

MAY 20, 1961 SATURDAY

Singer and songwriter Dan Wilson is born in Minneapolis. After establishing himself with the pop band Semisonic, he co-writes The Dixie Chiks' Grammy-winning ''Not Ready To Make Nice'' and Dierks Bentley's ''Home''.

MAY 21, 1961 SUNDAY

Brenda Lee recorded the pop hit ''Dum Dum'' in Nashville at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

The singles, Sun 362 ''I'll Stick By You'' b/w ''There They Go'' by Harold Dorman and Sun 363 ''Sugartime'' b/w ''My Treasure'' by Johnny Cash issued.

Gene Vincent begins an eight day tour through South Africa.

MAY 22, 1961 MONDAY

Bass player Dana Williams is born in Dayton, Ohio. He joins Diamond Rio, a band that wins the Country Music Association's Vocal Group award three times. Members of the Grand Ole Opry, the band thrives on tight instrumentation and strong harmonies.

Mary Sue Everly sues for divorce from her husband, The Everly Brothers' Don Everly. He allegedly tells her, ''Babe, you just ain't Hollywood''.

RCA Records released Don Gibson's ''Sea Of Heartbreak''.

MAY 23, 1961 TUESDAY

Little Caesar and the Romans sing ''Those Oldies But Goodies'' on American Bandstand.

Flatt and Scruggs recorded ''Go Home''

Five weeks after location shooting ended in Hawaii, filming for the Elvis Presley movie ''Blue Hawaii'' in Los Angeles, California.

Gene Autry is arrested in North Hollywood and charged with drunk driving after failing a field sobriety test. He's released on $263 bail.

MAY 24, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Buck Owens recorded ''Under The Influence Of Love'' in an afternoon session at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood, California.

MAY 25, 1961 THURSDAY

Roy Drusky recorded ''I Went Out Of My Way (To Make You Happy)''.

Rex Allen recorded the theme to the movie ''Marines, Let's Go'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

President Kennedy asks Congress for $531 million to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade.

MAY 26, 1961 FRIDAY

Following an association with Capitol Records, Jerry Reed holds the first of six recording sessions in a new deal with Columbia. He'll move along to RCA before finally reaching his commercial peak.

Ray Stevens recorded a minor pop hit, ''Jeremiah Peabody's Poly Unsaturated Quick Dissolving Fast Acting Pleasant Tasting Green And Purple Pills'', in his first Mercury session, at Nashville's Bradley Recording Studio.

MAY 27, 1961 SATURDAY

Johnny Cash has a guest acting part on NBC's ''The Deputy'', featuring Henry Fonda.

MAY 28, 1961 SUNDAY

Ernest Tubb recorded ''Though That Door'' during an evening session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.

MAY 29, 1961 MONDAY

Rock singer and songwriter Melissa Etheridge is born in Leavenworth, Kansas. A gritty powerful vocalist, she finds her way into the country charts when Trisha Yearwood scores a minor hit with her song ''You Can Sleep While I Drive'' in 1995.

Decca released The Wilburn Brothers' ''Blue Blue Day''.

Mel Tillis holds his last Columbia recording session. Two of the songs become hits for him when he remakes them in the 1970s, ''Heart Over Mind'' and ''I Ain't Never''.

MAY 31, 1961 WEDNESDAY

Chuck Berry, the author of such country hits as ''Mabellene'', ''Johnny B. Goode'' and ''Brown Eyed Handsome Man'', opens a new family shopping and entertainment site, called Berry Park in Wentzville, Missouri.

There are other artists named Billy Adams in the rock and roll history books, principally a guitarist from Kentucky who recorded for Quincy and Nau-Voo and who has appeared in rocking revival shows at home and abroad. But in Memphis, there was only ever one Billy Adams.

Billy Adams and his recording associate Bill Yates had more singles issued on Sun Records than many of the major names associated with the label.

Because they recorded in the early 1960s rather than the rockabilly 1950s their music has tended to be overshadowed by the soulful developments in black music and the blues tradition that were coming out of Hi, Stax, and other Memphis labels.

Nevertheless, they were important white musicians spearheading Sun's part in the musical convergence in the city some years before the civil rights movement took hold. Adams and Yates frequently worked at the same clubs as the rhythm and blues bands of Willie Mitchell and Gene ''Bowlegs'' Miller.

Unlike the British beat groups who were invading with America with recycled versions of black music,Adams and Yates were part of Memphis's evolving musical scene, black and white. Billy Adams was the band-leader and organiser, a drummer of some note, and a decent singer. Bill Yates was less organised, a pianist of some note, and a really good singer in a range of styles. Often he played as part of Adams's band, but he would regularly disappear to follow other opportunities.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

In 1960, Scotty Moore was hired by Sam Phillips to be Production Manager for Sun Records at the Phillips  studio on Madison Avenue. He took with him the link to HOTB that he had only just set up at Fernwood, and  Cherry's Billy Adams and Bill Yates tapes were mastered for release at Phillips studio at 639 Madison  Avenue. They were not recorded at Sun, though. Jesse Carter remembered: ''Adams sang and played drums  on a session at Hi Records studio. The first record he made, ''Lookin' For My Baby'', was one song we  recorded there, and we made some instrumentals there too''. The Hi studio was named Royal Recording and   
was a converted movie theater at 1320 South Lauderdale in south Memphis.
 
Session Published for Historical Reasons
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY ADAMS
FOR HOTB RECORDS 1961
 
ROYAL RECORDING STUDIO
1320 SOUTH LAUDERDALE STREET, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
HOTB SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) SUMMER 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY RUBEN CHERRY
AND/OR WILLIE MITCHELL
 
It is probably that Billy Adams made one session for Home Of The Blues Records, from which came two discs, and   another session backing Bill Yates. Both he and Yates had a single issued by Ruben Cherry in the fall of 1961, and   both saw a second release more than six months later.
 
HAD THE BLUES (TWIST)
Composer: - Billy Adams
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Delta Haze Music
Matrix number: - 2571 - Master (2:18)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - Fall 1961
First appearance: - Home Of The Blues Records (S) 45rpm HOTB 239 mono
HAD THE BLUES (TWIST) / LOOKING FOR MY BABY (MARY ANN)
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-1 mono
BILLY ADAMS – THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
Billy Adam's debut disc coupled ''Looking For My Baby (Mary Ann)'' with ''Had The Blues )Twist)'', HOTB   239. It was a disc that pretty much ignored the Twist dance craze despite the bracketed attempt to imply that   was the beat in the grooves. It was far more Adams unleasing his long-held love for rocking rhythm and   blues music. ''Looking For My Baby'' was an original song first drafted by bass player Jesse Carter about his   wife May Ann. At about the same time, Bill Yates made his debut on the sister label, First Records, with ''All I   Need Is You'' and ''Mojo'', backed by Adams band.
 
LOOKING FOR MY BABY (MARY ANN)
Composer: - Billy Adams-Jesse Carter
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Delta Haze Music
Matrix number - 2572 - Master (2:42)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - Fall 1961
First appearance: - Home Of The Blues Records (S) 45rpm HOTB 239 mono
LOOKING FOR MY BABY (MARY ANN) / HAD THE BLUES (TWIST)
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-2 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
MEMPHIS TWIST (1)
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued (2:04)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-16 mono
BILLY ADAMS – THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
Here are two versions of ''Memphis Twist'', a really promising recording that was possibly mixed as a single   when the Twist craze tailed off or when HOTB died.
 
MEMPHIS TWIST (2)
|Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (2:02)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-30 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
SEND ME SOME LOVIN'
Composer: - John Marascalco-Loyd Price
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Venice Music
Matrix number: None - Not Originally Issued (3:09)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-17 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
There were a number of unissued songs left over from the HOTB sessions, mainly featuring Bill Yates, but   Billy Adams did leave two more instrumentals, ''Fee Bee'' and ''Send Me Some Loving'', both included here.
 
FEE BEE
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued (2:29)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-15 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
BIG M (1)
Composer: - Billy Adams
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Delta Haze Music
Matrix number: - 2578 - master (2:05)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - Late 1962
First appearance: - Home Of The Blues Records (S) 45rpm HOTB 242 mono
BIG M / MY HAPPINESS
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-3 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
In the late spring of 1962, Billy Adams' second disc appeared, ''My Happiness'' and ''Big Me'', HOTB 242.   Both sides were instrumentals, picking up the then-current theme in Memphis for tough, bluesy sax-led   sounds. Adam and his band members had worked often with Bill Black and Ace Cannon and the members of  Booker T. and the MGs, and theirs was almost a communal Memphis sound, Billboard gave ''Big M'' a rating   of 3 stars (Moderate sales potential) on May 5, 1962. Despite this, a royalty statement for the first half of   1962 shows that Adams' discs did not get too far out of Memphis, with his first selling 400 copies, his second   just 275 to date, and that Adams was $38 short of making any money. However, the second disc was reissued   on Apt as part of the deal with ABC and it was listed in Billboard on October 27, 1962 as a new release.  There was no detailed review but both sides were again given 3 stars. Bill Yates also saw a second disc   issued at this time when HOTB licensed two titles to Bethlehem Records.
 
MY HAPPINESS
Composer: - Betty Peterson-Borney Bergantine - Written in 1933
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Chappell Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - 2577 - Master (2:16)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) Summer 1961
Released: - Late 1962
First appearance: - Home Of The Blues Records (S) 45rpm HOTB 242 mono
MY HAPPINESS / BIG M
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1716-4 mono
BILLY ADAMS - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Adam - Vocal
Billy Yates - Piano & Organ
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Jesse Carter - Bass
Gene Parker - Drums
Russ Carlton - Saxophone
 
For Biography of Billy Adams see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy Adams' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

SUMMER 1961

Ruben Cherry and Celia Camp diversified in mid 1961 by setting up subsidiary labels to issue music produced and bankrolled by independent producers. The Zab, Rufus, Six-O-Six (named after the store address where Cherry lived as a child), and First Records labels were an effort to ring the changes. Mrs. Camp was wheeling and dealing in more than records: Billboard reported on May 22, 1961: ''Memphis: Mrs. Celia G. Camp has purchased the majority of the stock in Southern Amusement Company from her exhusband... the largest phonograph and game operation in the mid-South... Camp began his coin machine empire in 1938, with Mrs. Camp's help. They founded Southern Distributing Company with Kenneth Wilson. Wilson has long since left the field and is now a multi-millionaire builder and president of Holiday Inns Inc... Mrs. Camp owns Music Systems Inc, 407 Madison Avenue, where her office is, a background music operation. Mrs. Camp also owns oil wells in Kentucky, Illinois, and Arkansas. A year ago she helped found HOTB record company and is secretary-treasurer of it. She has put up the money for its operation. They are hoping to become a hit-producing record company, have great hopes for the Five Royales they are recording''. These hopes soon met the reality of average sales figures, and Camp brought in her nephew, Wolf Lebowitz, a Memphis-born journalist and photographer, who hawked the label around the northern record business. By November 1961 Billboard was reporting: ''Chicago – Vee Jay president Ewart Abner has worked out an agreement with Ruben Cherry's label HOTB to distribute the latter's records. Future HOTB releases will be issued on Vee Jay with an additional emblem of HOTB''. Soon, the label would transfer this arrangement to ABC-Paramount Records and their Apt subsidiary.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

There are other artists named Bill Yates in the Southern music history books, principally an Appalachian bass   player who led bluegrass bands for many years, and a modern-day-country singer. But, in Memphis music,   there was only one Bill Yates .
 
Bill Yates and his recording partner Billy Adams had more singles issued on Sun Records than many of the   major names associated with the label. Because they recorded in the early 1960s rather than the rockabilly   1950s their music has tended to be overshadowed by the soulful developments in black music and the blues   tradition that were coming out of Hi, Stax, and other Memphis labels. Nevertheless, they were important   white musicians spearheading Sun's part in the musical convergence in the city some years before the civil   rights movement took hold. Adams and Yates frequently worked at the same clubs as the rhythm and blues   bands of Willie Mitchell and Gene ''Bowlegs'' Miller. Unlike the British beat groups who were invading with   America with recycled versions of black music, Adams and Yates were part of Memphis's evolving musical   scene, black and white.
 
Billy Adams was the band-leader and organiser, a drummer of some note, and a decent singer. Bill Yates was   less organised, a pianist of some note, and a really good singer. He played as part of Adams's band and on his   own account. He was comfortable with almost any style of music and many have been seen at Sun as the   new white hope after the loss of Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich.
 
It is probably that Bill Yates made at least two vocal sessions for Home Of The Blues, one led by John   Osborne at Pepper and another for Ruben Cherry at the Royal studio, as well as the session(s) backing Billy   Adams as vocalist. Both singers had a single issued by Cherry in the fall of 1961, and both saw a second  release more than six months later.
 
Session Published for Historical Reasons
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR BILL YATES
FOR FIRST RECORDS 1961
 
PEPPER RECORDING STUDIO
62 DIANA STREET, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
FIRST SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE SUMMER 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JOHN OSBORNE
 
Although Bill Yates played keyboards on Adams first session, it seems that his own vocal debut was made at   the Pepper studio and funded by a local entertainment entrepreneur, John Osborne. Pepper Records, located   in midtown at the junction of Diana Street and Union Avenue , was owned by John Pepper, one of the   original stakeholders in radio WDIA, and whose main business was in producing advertising jingles. The   record label was dropped when the ads business expanded as Pepper-Tanner with new partners. John  Osborne was part of Elvis Presley's entourage at the time he met and recorded Bill Yates, according to   reports in the Memphis Press-Scimitar.
 
ALL I NEED IS YOU
Composer: - Bill Yates-John Osborne
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - F 102 - Master (2:33)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: First Records (S) 45rpm First 101 mono
ALL I NEED IS YOU / MOJO
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-2 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
While Billy Adams' discs both appeared on HOTB, Bill Yates made his debut, as Billy Yates, on the sister   label, First Records, funded by Osborne, with ''All I Need Is You'' and ''Mojo''. Yates provides a full-on   account of how he's got his ''Mojo'' working, with enough lyric changes and asides to go some way to justify  Osborne giving himself and Billy the composer credit for this well-known blues theme popularized by   Muddy Waters. ''All I Need Is You'' is an impassioned ballad of considerable quality and real soulfulness.   Yates overdubbed bluesy harmonica parts on both songs. His disc appeared around December 1961 when  Cherry and Camp formed First Records and issued three discs; the other two being by Mary Miller and Del   Monte. Yates' disc label credited John Osborne as producer and publisher of the songs and it is possible he   was acting Yates' manager at the time. He had managed various acts in Memphis, including the Lazenby   Twins who had a small hit with ''Wondering'' on Pepper Records late in 1958, and Osborne has issued discs   by the twins on his ABO label, a Division of Osborne Shows Inc. in the 1950s. Osborne was managing Mary   Miller at the time of her First disc in 1961. He had big hopes for the young teenager, Billboard reporting on   May 18, 1963: ''Songstress Mary Miller of Memphis, sweet 16 and very pretty, was a big hit at her recent   night club debut at Desert Inn, Las Vegas. Was signed to appear at Harrah's, Lake Tahoe, and may get a film   contract''. The high hopes didn't last long though, Billboard taking up the story six months later on October   19: ''Ward Hodge, Memphis investor, sued John Osborne, 38, in circuit court for $1 million, changing breach   of contract. Osborne is managing up and coming singer Mary Miller. Hodge's bill said Osborne brought the   singer to him, he took them to Hollywood, met producers, record officials, got her started, and had by   contract half interest in the agent's fee of 30%''. It is possible that Bill Yates was also promoted in Hollywood   at this time. Hid nephew remembers him having bit parts in western movies.
 
MOJO
Composer: - Bill Yates-John Osborne
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - F 103 - Master (2:30)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: First Records (S) 45rpm First 101 mono
MOJO / ALL I NEED IS YOU
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-1 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
FOOL AROUND WITH LOVE (1)
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - B 6665 - Master (2:27)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - November 1962
First appearance: - Bethlehem Records (S) 45rpm Bethlehem 3039 mono
FOOL AROUND WITH LOVE / BLUES LIKE MIDNIGHT
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-4 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
After the initial three discs on First, the label was folded and Cherry and Camp started to look to other outlets   for Bill Yates. In the summer of fall of 1962 they leased two of his sides to King Records of Cincinnati for   issue on their Bethlehem subsidiary. ''Fool Around With Love'' was a strong song, written by Carl Perkins,   and picked up by Yates when they played shows together. The flipside of Bethlehem 3039 was the   atmospheric ''Blues Like Midnight'', a song credited to Celia Camp and possibly even written by her. The   HOITB master tape of these two titles bears the date June 24, 1962 but this could be when a copy was made   to send to Bethlehem. The Bethlehem sessions and release schedules show that Yates' disc was issued around   November 1962.
 
(I'LL NEVER) FOOL AROUND WITH LOVE (NO MORE) (1)
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - None - HOTB Not Originally Issued (2:11)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-14 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
BLUES LIKE MIDNIGHT (1)
Composer: - Celia G. Camp
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - B 6666 - Master (2:12)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - November 1962
First appearance: - Bethlehem Records (S) 45rpm Bethlehem 3039 mono
BLUES LIKE MIDNIGHT / FOOL AROUND WITH LOVE
Reissued: - June 14, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-3 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
BLUES LIKE MIDNIGHT (2)
Composer: - Celia G. Camp
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Osborne Music
Matrix number: - None - HOTB Not Originally Issued (1:38)
Recorded: - Unknown Date Summer 1961
Released: - June 14, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17277-13 mono
BILL YATES - THE SUN YEARS PLUS
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Bill Yates - Vocal, Piano, Organ, Harmonica
Lee Adkins - Guitar
Vance Yates or Donald Dunn - Bass
Billy Adams - Drums
Russ Carlton – Saxophone
 
An updated sales statement for the first 6 months of Yates disc on First Records showed that 724 copies had   been sold, but that after session costs and advances Billy was still $457 away from making any money. A   statement to Osborne Music covering the first half of 1962 showed that a further 651 copies had been sold,   making less than 1400 copies in the first year.
 
For Biography of Bill Yates see: > The Sun Biographies <
Bill Yates' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1, 1961 THURSDAY

Tex Ritter throws a party for the Los Angeles Dodgers at his home in Toluca Lake, California. The guests include first baseman Gil Hodges and pitchers Don Drysdale and Ron Perranoski.

JUNE 4, 1961 SUNDAY

Jim Reeves recorded ''What Would You Do?'' and ''Stand At The Window'' in the afternoon at Nashville's RCA Studio B.

JUNE 5, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Bill Anderson's ''Po' Folks'', and Bill Anderson recorded ''Mama Sang A Song''.

JUNE 10, 1961 SATURDAY

Mel and Mary McDaniel get married.

JUNE 12, 1961 MONDAY

Decca released Don Winter's only country hit, ''Too Many Times''.

Columbia released Claude King's debut single, ''Big River, Big Man'', and also released Carl Smith's ''Kisses Never Lie''.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

''I Love You Because'' was likewise rejuvenated in a pop-country vein at a second Nashville date on June 12. This session saw Lewis record the ''A'' sides of two attempts to repeat the success of ''What'd I Say'' with material aimed squarely at the pop market, ''It Won't Happen With Me'', which was coupled with the aforementioned ''Cold Cold heart'' on Sun 364, and ''Save The Last Dance For Me'', paired for a release, Sun 367), with one of numerous recordings of ''As Long As I Live'', the latter having been taped eighteen months earlier in Memphis. Notwithstanding the very strong qualities of Jerrty Lee's interpretation of ''Save The Last Dance For Me'', which surely deserved widespread recognition, its chances of success were blighted by the song's familiarity in the wake of The Drifters' version; though might it have fared better if the exuberant ''I Love You Because'' had been selected for the flip? And despite Jerry Lee's spirited approach, ''It Won't Happen With Me'' suffered from being exactly what it was; a rather silly pop song. Neither release made an impression in terms of the hoped-for chart action. (*)
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961
 
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JUNE 12, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OR TOM SPARKMAN
 
Composer: - Ray Evans
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 (3:09)
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30116-B3 mono
SUN: THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 9  MORE REBEL ROCKABILLY
Reissued: -  October 2015  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-13/5 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS
 
''It Won't Happen With Me'' chosen as the follow up to ''What'd I Say'', this song stems from Jerry's second Nashville session and was released almost immediately after he recorded it in June, 1961. There was a lot of momentum in Jerry's career and no one wanted to squander it. Hopes must have been high for this one. Certainly, it was as commercial selfconscious as anything Jerry had ever recorded. In truth, the song was a fine vehicle for our man; it gave him a chance to trash the competition while extolling his own virtues. The song begins in true pop-gospel fashion, shuttling between 1 and 6-minor chords, with some simulated Raelets along for the ride. The lyrics is a Who's Who of pop stars of the day, from Fabian to Jackie Wilson. Not even Elvis is safe. There are also references to pop hits, like Ricky Nelson's ''Traveling Man'' from April, 1961. Yet, there is something really bizarre about the lyric. If you listen closely, what Jerry seems to be saying is ''Look, honey, why mess around with all those other guys? Sure they'll have casual sex with you and treat you like a groupie. But ''me'', I'll take you seriously. I'll even marry' you''. The truth is, given Jerry's matrimonial history, this song is more than an empty promise.
 
Composer: - Ray Evans
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Stereo Master Take 2 (2:52)
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/11 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015  -  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16/10 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS
 
Composer: - Ray Evans
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 448 - Take 2 Master (2:52)
Recorded: - June 12, 1961
Released: - August 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single Sun 364-B mono
IT WON'T HAPPEN WITH ME / COLD COLD HEART
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-3/19 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4
 
Composer: - Chuck Willis
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Progressive Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Unknown Take
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 102-11-A2 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS – THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/12 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
 
"I Love You Because" is a 1949 song written and originally recorded by Leon Payne. The single went to number four on the Billboard Country & Western Best Seller lists and spent two weeks at number one on the Country & Western Disk Jockey List, spending a total of thirty-two weeks on the chart. "I Love You Because" was Payne's only song to make the country charts. "I Love You Because" has been covered by several artists throughout the years like Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Hank Locklin and many more.
 
In 1950, Ernest Tubb a number 2 and Clyde Moody each recorded their own version both making the Top 10 on the Country & Western charts. In 1963, Al Martino recorded the most successful version of the song peaking at number three on the Hot 100 and number one on the Middle-Road (or Easy Listening) chart for two weeks in May that year.
 
In 1964, Jim Reeves took the song to number five in the United Kingdom. In 1976, the song was the title track of a posthumous Jim Reeves album, which peaked at number 24 on the Billboard Country chart. The single version reached to number 54 in the United States that year. In 1983, Roger Whittaker got the song "into the lower reaches of the country chart''.
 
The 1956/1957 version of ''I Love You Because'' is performed at a very slow and plodding tempo, though it’s not without its charm and features some nice piano. This remained unissued until the 1983 ''The Sun Years'' box-set. Far better is this faster June 1961 version (though the backing singers are a bit annoying), first released on ''Original Golden Hits Volume Three'' in 1971. Lastly is the beautiful 1969 version, released on ''Country Music Hall Of Fame Hits Vollume 1''.
 
Composer: - Leon Payne
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Acuff Rose Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None – Fast - Unknown Take (1:53)
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - December 1971
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 128-B4 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - ORIGINAL GOLDEN HITS VOLUME 3
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/13 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
When ''It Won't Happen With Me'' didn't sustain any chart action, Sun came quickly with another single. Jerry again had one finger on the pulse of teen America with his reprise of the Drifters' ''Save The Last Dance For Me''. With its notably brief running time, the record is a consummate pop record, aimed directly at the AM radio playlists. The song, of course, is excellent. Its pedigree had been well established in the Fall of 1960. Jerry's version sports some crisp and lively drumwork and memorable pounding piano. To its detriment was the overpowering choral work. But, then, there had been similar complains about the  excessive violins on the Drifters original record.
 
Composer: - Doc Pomus-Mort Schuman
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Rumbalero Music
Matrix number: - None - Stereo Master (1:48)
Recorded: - June 12, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/14 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-16/13 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS
 
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Rumbalero Music
Matrix number: - U 453 - Master (1:48)
Recorded: - June 12, 1961
Released: - September 1, 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 45rpm standard single Sun 367-A mono
SAVE THE LAST DANCE FOR ME / AS LONG AS I LIVE
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15804-4/1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 4
 
"Save The Last Dance For Me" is the title of a popular song written by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman, first recorded in 1960 by The Drifters, with Ben E. King on lead vocals. In a 1990 interview songwriter Doc Pomus tells the story of the song being recorded by the Drifters and originally designated as the B-side of the record. He credits Dick Clark with turning the record over and realizing ''Save The Last Dance'' was the stronger song.
 
The Drifters' version of the song would go on to spend three non-consecutive weeks at  number 1 on the U.S. pop chart, in addition to logging one week atop the U.S. Rhythm and Blues chart.In the UK, the Drifters' recording reached number 2 in December 1960. This single was produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, two noted American music producers who at the time had an apprentice relationship with a then-unknown Phil Spector. Although he was working with Leiber and Stoller at the time, it is unknown whether Spector assisted with the production of this record; however, many Spector fans have noticed similarities between this record and other music he would eventually produce on his own.
 
Damita Jo had a hit with one of the answer songs of this era called "I'll Save The Last Dance For You". In the song, the narrator tells his lover she is free to mingle and socialize throughout the evening, but to make sure to save him the dance at the end of the night. During an interview on Elvis Costello's show ''Spectacle'', Lou Reed, who worked with Pomus, said the song was written on the day of Pomus' wedding while the wheelchair-bound groom watched his bride dancing with their guests. Pomus had polio and at times used crutches to get around. His wife, Willi Burke, however, was a Broadway actress and dancer. The song gives his perspective of telling his wife to have fun dancing, but reminds her who will be taking her home and "in whose arms you're gonna be''. Musicians on the Drifters' recording were: Bucky Pizzarelli, Allen Hanlon (guitar), Lloyd Trotman (bass), and Gary Chester (drums).
 
Emmylou Harris covered the song in a country/bluegrass style in 1979, including it on her ''Blue Kentucky Girl'' album. Also released as a single, her version reached the top-ten on the U.S. country singles chart in mid-1979. In late 1983, Dolly Parton recorded "Save The Last Dance for Me", releasing it as a single in late December; the song subsequently appeared on Parton's album of 1950s and 1960s covers ''The Great Pretender'', released in January 1984. Reaching the top ten on the country singles chart in late February, the single also crossed over, reaching  number45 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States.
 
''Save The Last Dance For Me" was later covered by Canadian crooner Michael Bublé, and released as the third and final single from his second major-label studio album, ''It's Time''. The song was heavily remixed for its release as a single. For its release as a single, the song was heavily remixed, with mixes from producers including Ralphi Rosario and Eddie Baez. All of the chart positions for the single are for each of the remixed versions of the song respectively. The single first peaked at number 22 on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play Chart in September 2005. After Bublé performed the album version of the song during the closing credits of the film ''The Wedding Date'', this version was released to radio, peaking at number 5 on the Billboard adult contemporary chart, as well as reaching number 99 on the Billboard Hot 100. The music video for the track was once again directed by Noble Jones, who directed the videos for both of the album's previous singles, ''Home'' and ''Feeling Good''. The music video was choreographed by Raymondo Chan, a Salsa Latin dance coach and performer. It was shot in Vancouver, Canada.
 
Other significant recordings, Jay and the Americans released a cover version of the song on their 1962 album, ''She Cried''. In 1960 Polydor Records published a German cover version with lyrics by Kurt Schwabach and singer Ivo Robić and the German text is no translation. In 1961 Ivo Robic did a German song to this tune called "Mit 17 Fangt Das Leben Erst An" (Live begins at 17). Buck Owens released a cover version in 1962; it peaked at number 11 on the US country charts and appeared on the album ''Together Again.'' The Swinging Blue Jeans recorded a version in 1964 for their first UK studio album ''Blue Jeans A Swinging'' on HMV 1802. Ike and Tina Turner recorded and released a cover version of the song on their 1966 album, ''River Deep - Mountain High''. Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a two different versions of the song during his later years on Sun Records on June 12, 1961, in Nashville's Sam Phillips's studio. The Swedish group the Spotnicks had an instrumental version of the song, called "Valentina" on their 1964 album ''The Spotnicks In Spain''. Billy Joe Royal released a version of the song on his 1967 for his album, ''Billy Joe Royal Featuring Hush''.
 
During the Get Back/Let It Be sessions of January 1969, the Beatles played a short, impromptu variation of this song. It was in the original lineup of songs to be included on the album that would become ''Let It Be'', although it was later scrapped. However, their version has appeared on many bootleg releases, including 2 LP set "The Black Album" (not to be confused with their official released ''The White Album'' issued before). In 1969, John Rowles recorded a version arranged and conducted by British arranger, bandleader, Johnny Arthey, released on 7" vinyl by MCA-UK the following year. Harry Nilsson covered the song, in a rather dark fashion, on his 1974 album, ''Pussy Cats'', which was produced by his friend and drinking buddy John Lennon. The Walkmen did a cover of ''Pussy Cats'' which included "Save The Last Dance For Me". Also in 1974, the Canadian group the DeFranco Family reached number 18 on the Billboard pop chart with their version of "Save The Last Dance For Me", with lead vocals sung by the 14-year-old group member Tony DeFranco.
 
Patti LaBelle included a disco-flavored cover of the song as the lead track on her 1978 album, T''asty''. In 1978, country music singer-songwriter Ron Shaw recorded the song on Pacific Challenger Records; this version reached the Top 40 on the Billboard country music chart. In 1979, Marcia Hines covered the song for her album, ''Ooh Child''. The Forgotten Rebels recorded the song on their 1981 album ''This Ain't Hollywood''. The song was covered by Mud in 1982. In 1983 Herbie Armstrong included a haunting version of the song on his solo album ''Back Against The Wall''. Mort Shuman himself endorsed it, certain it would be a hit. Sadly the distribution company went bust and only 800 copies of the CD were ever distributed. The song was translated into French by André Salvet and François Llenas and recorded by, among others, Petula Clark, Dalida, and Mort Shuman himself.
 
Geno Delafose recorded the song as a zydeco version on the CD ''LaChason Perdu'' in 1998 on Rounder Records. Bruce Willis released a version which appears on his 1989 album, ''If It Don't Kill You, It Just Makes You Stronger''. ''An Intimate Evening With Anne Murray'' is a live album by Canadian singer Anne Murray, recorded December 18, 1986 performed on MTV, released in 1997 and features the song. In 2000, Japanese band The Neatbeats recorded the song for their album ''Everybody Need!''. Irish singer Daniel O'Donnell recorded it on his 2003 album, ''Daniel In Blue Jeans''. In the 2000s, UK musician and ex-band member of Fox, Herbie Armstrong, recorded a slower, minor version of the song and released it as a single from his album, ''Last Dance''. In 2003, the Troggs recorded their version of this song on an album with rerecorded songs, called "Wild Thing". In 2010, Jerry Lawson and Talk of the Town performed this song on the second season of the album ''Sing Off''. In 2012 Leonard Cohen performed this song as a part of his Old Ideas World tour. In 2010, Matchbox 20 lead singer Rob Thomas performed a live acoustic version at the 2010 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony. In 2012, the Bally Ramblers recorded it for their debut album, and in 2012, American composer and producer Kramer covered the song and included it on his sixth album ''The Brill Building''.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis – Vocal & Piano
Wayne Moss - Guitar
Kelton Kelso Herston – Guitar
Bob Moore – Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon – Drums
Marvin Hughes - Possibly Piano on some tracks
Unknown Vocal Group
 
For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 1961

Carl Mann recorded at Phillips's Nashville studio in June 1961, as his success slowly ebbed. Like most of Sun's diminishing roster, he preferred the sound at the Nashville studio to the Madison Avenue studio. Carl also hoped that he'd be allowed to cut more country music.

''Deep down I wanted to do country music'', he says. ''Every time I went to record I'd do some country songs for Sam and he'd say, Naw, that's too country', but I slipped a few in there. ''Í Can't Forget You'' was a song Carl Belew wrote for Patsy Cline. We put it on the back of ''Some Enchanted Evening'', a song I did not want to.

At some point there was a convict between Phillips and Eddie Bush. The details are fuzzy, but it probably centered around Phillips's unwillingness to pay Musicians Union scale on sessions that went nowhere, or the lack of promotion accorded Bush's solo single. At some point, Phillips expended quite a lot of tape on Bush and got as far as issuing a single, and its lack of success might have accounted for some of Bush's pique. He appears to have a gone back to the Louisiana Hayride for a while to play with Carl Belew, but the dates, as always, are hazy.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

For the first session of 1961, Carl Mann headed east to Nashville rather then west to Memphis from his home near Jackson. He arrived at Sam's new studio on 7th Avenue North in Nashville to find Jud Phillips slumped over drunk in the secretary's chair.  Jud had apparently been told by someone that Carl didn't arrive sufficiently prepared for session work and he woke up long enough to chew him out. Sam arrived a little later and acted as nominal producer. Billy Sherrill, the resident engineer, was behind the board.
 
It is a matter of some curiosity why Carl opted to re-cut ''Ain't Got No Home'' and ''Blueberry Hill''. The entire band was comprised of Nashville session men plus Eddie Bush, and they seem intent on recapturing the feel of Carl's earlier versions. They were largely successful, but as Phillips already had the first version  nestled away in a tape box, what was the point of re-cutting them? With twenty-five years separating him from Sam's inscrutable logic, Carl could only venture that ''Sam may have wanted to try out his new studio, maybe compare it to something he had previously done in Memphis''.
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961
 
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
319 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: TUESDAY JUNE 13, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - SAM PHILLIPS  AND/OR BILLY SHERRILL
RECORDING ENGINEER - JIM LOCKHART AND/OR TOM SPARKMAN
 
Composer: - Marijohn Wilkin-Danny Dill
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Cedarwood Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (3:12)
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Star Club (LP) 33rpm Jan 33-8022-14 mono
CARL MANN - 14 UNISSUED SIDES
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2/19 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA
 
Composer: - Carl Mann-Kelso Herston
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Master (3:11)
Recorded: - June 13, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1993
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2/20 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA
 
''If I Could Change You'' is a really beautiful country song, written by Carl and Eddie Bush. Unfortunately, Bush was broke as usual and managed to sell his rights to picker Kelso Herston. Business transactions of this nature were hardly new to Nashville. Just ask Willie Nelson. There is a vaguely Faron Young-ish quality to Mann's voice on this track but the biggest news for his fans is that there was nothing formulaic about either side of this record. For the first time Carl Mann was free to make his own music.
 
Finally, listen to the quality of these recording, made at Phillips' Nashville studio, compared with the untamed spaciness that still characterized Madison Avenue. It was comparisons like this that ultimately help to Sam Phillips to bite the bullet and bring in technical help to correct the acoustic problems at his Memphis
studio.
 
Composer: - Carl Mann-Kelso Herston
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 402 - Master (3:12)
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - July 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3569-A mono
IF I COULD CHANGE YOU / I AIN'T GOT NO HOME
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3/16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

This Carl Mann record, his next-toast for Phillips, is worth special attention for several reasons. First, most listeners will notice that this is not the version of ''I Ain't Got No Home'' they are used to hearing Carl first recorded the song in October 1959 and it appeared on his original LP. The song had long been part of his stage repertoire and someone decided it might not be a bad idea to put it out as a single. What the hell, nothing else seemed to be selling. However, instead of releasing the album track, Carl journeyed east to Nashville to re-cut the song in the new Phillips studio. This time Carl left his trusty sideman home and used Nashville's finest pickers and grinners (Kelso Herston, Bob Moore, Buddy Harmon, Pig Robbins). 

The session log from June, 1961 does not list Eddie Bush, but it's hard to believe that it's anybody but Bush on there. Bush was a transient (some would argue vagrant comes closer to truth) and it is unlikely he was a member of any musician union. It was one thing to bury that omission in Memphis; quite another in Nashville. And so the re-cut version of ''Home'' made its way on to the single. Most Sun collectors have long ago concluded that it is inferior to the original album cut although there is some undeniable energy here. Do you get the feeling that the band should have talked through the ending before starting to record this track?
 
Composer: - Clarence Frogman Henry
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Folkways Music
Matrix number: - P 403 - Master (2:47)
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - July 1961
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single PI 3569-B mono
AIN'T GOT NO HOME / IF I COULD CHANGE YOU
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-3/15 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6
 
Carl Mann recorded the previously ''Blueberry Hill'' and Carl was happy with the sound of the new studio and he thought the single that coupled ''Ain't Got No Home'' with ''If I Could Change You'' held some promise, but once again it failed to recapture the magic he had sparked so effortlessly with ''Mona Lisa''.
 
Composer: - Al Lewis-Larry Stock-Vincent Rose
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Chappell Music Publishers
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued (1:49)
Recorded: - June 13, 1961
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Spotlight Records (LP) 33rpm SPO-131 mono
CARL MANN - THE SUN STORY - VOLUME 6
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-2/21 stereo
CARL MANN - MONA LISA
 
''Blueberry Hill'' was originally recorded by Gene Autry in 1940 for the film ''The Singing Hill'' but was soon picked up by other artists and producers who realised the simple little song had the makings of a classic. Countless artists have put their own stamp on the song but it is the version of Fats Domino, released in 1956, which had best stood the test of time. Domino's influential oeuvre has compassed pianobased rhythm and blues, rock and roll, zydeco, Cajun and boogie woogie. It was almost certainly his version - lilting rock and roll which the quartet was best acquainted with. According to several reports, Elvis started the session with this song. Needless to say the piano parts would have been put in Jerry Lee's hands. ''Blueberry Hill'' has been recorded by numerous acts over the years, from the Glenn Miller Orchestra in 1940 to Led Zeppelin, who performed it live at the Los Angeles Forum in 1970 at a concert from which a bootleg album called ''Live At Blueberry Hill'' subsequently appeared.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal, Piano and Guitar
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Kelton Kelso Herston - Guitar
Bob Moore - Bass
Murray Buddy Harmon - Drums
Hargus M. ''Pig'' Robbins - Piano
 
Anita Kerr Singers consisting of
Anita Kerr, Dottie Dillard, Gil Writh, and Louis Nunley- Vocal Chorus
 
For Biography of Carl Mann see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Mann's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
FOR SUN RECORDS 1961
 
SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: WEDNESDAY JUNE 14, 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM PHILLIPS
AND/OR SCOTTY MOORE OR UNKNOWN
 
In the meantime, Jerry Lee's only registered day of work in 1961 at the Madison Avenue studio, on June 14, saw him getting the measure of a couple of numbers associated with Fats Domino, at least two more readings of ''My Blue Monday'' adding to those recorded back at 706 Union in 1959, together with a single take of Fat's own ''My Girl Josephine''. The latter was the sole product of this session to be released during the currency of Lewis's contract at Sun, when included on ''Jerry Lee's Greatest''. Both this song and a rival candidate for that exercise, his first attempt at Chuck Berry's ''Sweet Little Sixteen'', would be returned to a year or so later. At one stage Jerry Lee takes something of a back seat to allow sax player Ace Cannon to lead on a ''jam'' instrumental which, since its first outing in 1975, has been graced with the rather unimaginative title ''Lewis Workout''. On its first release in 1983 this anonymous tape was attributed to a session at the 706 Union Avenue studio in 1959. However, on the strength of the similarity of the arrangement both to the intro of ''High Powered Woman'' and the fade-out of ''Hello Josephine'', it is believed that its rightful place in the continuum is alongside these titles. (*)
 
Composer: - Jerry Lee Lewis
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Instrumental - Unknown Take (3:15)
Recorded: - June 14, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1980
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30006-B7
RARE JERRY LEE LEWIS - VOLUME 1
Reissued:  - September 1989  Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/2 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
 
My Girl Josephine" is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino recorded the song on Imperial records (Imperial 5704) in 1960, and it charted number 7 on the Billboard Rhythm & Blues charts and number 14 on the Billboard pop charts.  According to Allmusic, the song has also been performed by The Bill Black Combo, Curley Bridges, Van Broussard, Snooks Eaglin, Chris Farlowe, The Flamin' Groovies, Michael Herman, The Holmes Brothers, Jerry Jaye, Jerry Lee Lewis, Sandy Nelson, Tracy Pendarvis, Queen Ida & Her Zydeco Band, Noel Redding, Warren Storm, Super Cat, and Billy Vera, among others.
 
Composer: -Dave Bartholomew-Antoine ''Fats'' Domino
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Bartholomew Music
Matrix number: - None - Count-In - Take 10 - LP Stereo Master (1:45)
Recorded: - June 14, 1961
Released: - December 1961
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SLP 1265-B6 mono
JERRY LEE'S GREATEST!
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/15 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
 
Only two albums were issued during Jerry’s 1956-1963 stay at Sun, ''Jerry Lee Lewis'' in 1958 and ''Jerry Lee’s Greatest'' in late 1961, the latter of which featured this song ''Hello Josephine'', driven along by some very fine sax playing from Johnny ‘Ace’ Cannon. For some reason Jerry recorded the song again 12 months later, this time with some fine guitar work by Roland Janes (or was it Scotty Moore?) replacing Johnny’s sax, though this wasn’t issued until the 1969 ''Rockin’, Rhythm & Blues'' album (a 3rd version was cut at a session a week after the 2nd one, but this sounds like little more than a rough session warm-up so isn't included in this analysis). It’s difficult to choose between the two, though the 1962 cut features a more expressive vocal.
 
"My Girl Josephine" is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino recorded the song on Imperial Records (Imperial 5704) in 1960, and it charted number 7 on the Billboard Rhythm And Blues charts and number 14 on the Billboard pop charts. The song is also listed and recorded as "Josephine" and "Hello Josephine" in various cover versions. According to AllMusic, the song has also been performed by Bill Black's Combo, Curley Bridges, Van Broussard, Snooks Eaglin, Chris Farlowe, the Flamin' Groovies, Michael Herman, the Holmes Brothers, Jerry Jaye, Jerry Lee Lewis, Sandy Nelson, Tracy Pendarvis, Queen Ida & Her Zydeco Band, Noel Redding, Warren Storm, Super Cat, Them, and Billy Vera, among others.
 
Composer: - Sonny Terry
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Take 5 (2:02)
Recorded: - June 14, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - August 1977
First appearance: - Sun International (LP) 33rpm Sun LP 1000-B1 mono
GOLDEN ROCK 'N' ROLL
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7-16 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
 
Two very different recordings of ''High Powered Woman'' were recorded at Sun, though none were released until well into the 1970s. This 1961 version features a ‘Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On’ intro and some very fine saxophone, and wasn’t released until the Sun International ''Golden Rock And Roll'' collection in 1977. The January 4, 1962 cut features a strong Ray Charles influence right down to the ''What’d I Say'' inspired intro, though at around 1 minute and 43 seconds it’s even shorter than the 2 minute version from a year earlier.
 
Composer: - Walter Donaldson-George Whiting
Publisher: - B.M.I. - George Whiting Music - Donaldson Music
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 (2:01)
Recorded: - June 14, 1961 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 109-2/1 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60'S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/17 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
 
My Blue Heaven" is a popular song written by Walter Donaldson with lyrics by George A. Whiting. It has become part of various fake book collections. In 1928, "My Blue Heaven" became a huge hit on Victor 20964-A for crooner Gene Austin, accompanied by the Victor Orchestra as directed by Nat Shilkret; it charted for 26 weeks, stayed at number 1 and sold over five million copies becoming one of the best selling singles of all time. In 1928, Blue Amberol Records released an instrumental piano version by Muriel Pollock (issue number 5471). The music for "My Blue Heaven" was written in 1924.
 
Donaldson wrote it one afternoon at the Friars Club in New York while waiting for his turn at the billiard table. The song was written while Donaldson was under contract to Irving Berlin, working for Berlin's publishing company, Irving Berlin Inc. George Whiting wrote lyrics adapted for Donaldson's music, and for a while, performed it in his vaudeville act; three years later, Tommy Lyman started singing it on the radio as his theme song.
 
Donaldson established his own publishing company in 1928, and his rights in the song were apparently assigned to his company at that time, with the song listed as having been published by George Whiting Music and Donaldson Music. The song was subject to copyright in 1925 and 1927. These copyrights were renewed in 1953 and 1955, after the death of both composers, at which time the rights in the song were owned by Leo Feist, Inc.. The rights were thereafter assigned to the EMI Catalogue Partnership, controlled and administered by EMI Feist Catalog Inc.
 
The song has become a standard. Hit versions were also recorded by Jimmie Lunceford in 1935 and Fats Domino in 1956. The Fats Domino version was a two sided hit, with, "I'm In Love Again" and reached number nineteen on the Billboard magazine charts and number five on the Rhythm & Blues Best Sellers chart. Mary Lou Williams recording a version for her 1964 Folkways Records album Mary Lou Williams Presents (F 2843); Smithsonian Folkways re-issued the recording as part of its 2004 album Mary Lou Williams Presents Black Christ of the Andes (SFW40816).
 
Composer: - Walter Donaldson-George Whiting
Publisher: - B.M.I. - George Whiting Music - Donaldson Music.
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Slow Take 4 (2:36)
Recorded: - June 14, 1961  - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1989
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sun Box 109-2/2 mono
SUN RECORDS INTO THE 60S - FEEL SO GOOD
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/18 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
 
"Sweet Little Sixteen" is a rock and roll song written and originally performed by Chuck Berry (Chess), who released it as a single in January 1958. It reached number 2 on the Billboard charts, Berry's highest position ever on the charts, with the exception of the suggestive number one hit "My Ding-A-Ling" in 1972. "Sweet Little Sixteen" also reached number one on the Rhythm & Blues Best Sellers chart. Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song number 272 on their list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time in 2004.
 
Eddie Cochran performed a live version in 1960 which was released posthumously on his ''On The Air'' album. There is a cover version by Joe Brown and the Bruvvers on their 1962 album ''Pictures Of You''.
 
The Beach Boys' 1963 song "Surfin' USA" has virtually the same melody, with new lyrics that focus on the Beach Boys' ongoing theme of surfing. Following litigation by Chuck Berry the song is credited to Chuck Berry and Brian Wilson.
 
Between 1963 and 1965 the Beatles performed the song on BBC radio. It can be heard on the compilation album Live at the BBC. John Lennon recorded the song again for his album Rock 'n' Roll. The Animals' version is available on their 1966 album Animalisms. Ten Years After released a live version of this song on their 1970 album Watt. Jesse Colin Young also covered it on his 1972 album Together. Fictional synth pop band Silicon Teens recorded a version of the song for their 1980 album Music For Parties released on Mute Records.
 
Rock and roll artist Jerry Lee Lewis also covered this song for Sun Records and later with Beatles drummer Ringo Starr; this version appeared on Lewis's 2006 duet album ''Last Man Standing''. The Rolling Stones covered this song on their 1978 US Tour.
 
Composer: - Chuck Berry
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Arc Music
Matrix number: - None – Count-In - Take 2 (2:40)
Recorded: - June 14, 1961  - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1989
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-7/19 stereo
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1963
Reissued: - October 2015   Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-13/15 stereo
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS
 
Backed by a band that includes Ace Cannon’s honking sax and drummer Gene Chrisman (who incidentally also played drums on the 1982 ''My Fingers Do The Talkin'' album), it’s surprisingly that Sam Phillips didn’t see the potential of this great version. 12 months later he cut another 4 takes, of which the slowest of these was selected as a single soon afterwards. Though the tempo drags a bit, it has a great vocal & a memorable bass guitar intro from session man R.W. McGhee. The fastest alternate take from this session was chosen for the ''Rockin’, Rhythm & Blues'' album in 1969, while the other two takes weren’t released until the late 1980s/early 1990s. The 1977 version would potentially be the ultimate cut if it weren’t for the backing vocalists’ “oohs” and “ahhs”, but this was still one of the stronger tracks on his final Mercury album, 1978’s ''Keeps Rockin''. The 2005 version is a duet with Ringo Starr, and although he isn’t the greatest of singers, he’s perfect for this (as is his drumming style). The fact that they were actually in the studio together at the time makes this one of the most enjoyable and spontaneous-sounding tracks on the 2006 ‘Last Man Standing’ album.
 
Other recordings of ''Sweet Little Sixteen'' are John Lennon (Capitol; Bill Black's Combo (Hi); Bobby Vee (Liberty); Jesse Colin Young (Warner Bross.); The Beatles (Bellaphon); The Animals (MGM). Also available on early live recordings of The Beatles (Poludor), and on the United Artists release of a Britsh TV soundtrack featuring Eddie Cochran.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis – Vocal & Piano
Brad Suggs - Guitar
Jay W. Brown – Bass
Gene Chrisman – Drums
John Ace Cannon - Saxophone
 
For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JUNE 14, 1961 FRIDAY

Patsy Cline is seriously injured in a head-on collision in Nashville. Two passengers in the other car die, while Cline receives a dislocated hip and a cut across her forehead.

JUNE 15, 1961 SATURDAY

20th Century-Fox offers a sneak preview of Elvis Presley's ''Wild In The Country'' in Memphis. Viewers can choose between two endings, deciding whether Hope Land dies at the end. The viewers choose for her to live.

JUNE 17, 1961 MONDAY

With Patsy Cline in the hospital from a car accident, Loretta Lynn dedicates ''I Fall To Pieces'' to Cline on Ernest Tubb's ''Midnite Jamboree'' radio show. Cline's husband, Charlie Dick, asks Lynn to come meet Cline in the hospital the next day.

Lawrence Welk, who appeared on the country charts with Red Foley, makes the cover of TV Guide.

JUNE 22, 1961 SATURDAY

''Wild In The Country'' opens, with Elvis Presley, Hope Lang, and Tuesday Weld.

JUNE 24, 1961 SUNDAY

Rollin ''Oscar'' Sullivan, of Lonzo and Oscar, marries Geneva Busby.

JUNE 25, 1961 FRIDAY

Sun 361 ''I'll Wait Forever'' b/w ''I Can't Show How I Feel'' by Anita Wood issued.

JUNE 26, 1961 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley recorded ''Little Sister'' ( RCA Victor 37-7908) at Nashville's RCA Studio B. ''Little Sister" is a rock and roll roll song written by Doc Pomus and Mort Schuman, who enjoyed a number 5 hit with it on the Billboard Hot 100. The single (as a double A-side with "(Marie's The Name) His Latest Flame'' also reached number 1 in the United Kingdon Singles Chart. Lead guitar was played by Hank Garland, with backing vocals by the The Jordanaires featuring the distinctive bass voice of Ray Walker.

Presley performs the song as part of a medley with "Get Back" in the 1970 rockumentary film ''Elvis: That's the Way It Is''. The song would later be covered by such artists as Dwight Yoakam, Robert Plant, The Nighthawks, The Staggers, Pearl Jam, Ry Cooder and Jesse and the Rippers. The song lyric makes mention of "Jim Dandy" which was the title of a 1956 song "Jim Dandy" by LaVern Baker. An answer song to "Little Sister", with the same melody but different lyrics, was recorded and released under the title "Hey, Memphis" by Baker on Atlantic Records (Atlantic 2119-A) in September 1961.

Decca released Brenda Lee's pop hit ''Dum Dum'', and The Wilburn Brothers recorded ''Trouble's Back In Town''.

JUNE 29, 1961 THURSDAY

Skeeter Davis recorded ''Optimistic''.

''The Ford Show'' an NBC variety program starring Tennessee Ernie Ford and Molly Bee, ends its run in prime-time.

JUNE 30, 1961 FRIDAY

Two live performances for Jerry Lee Lewis, Charlie Rich for WVOK's Dixie Jamboree at the City Auditorium, Birmingham, Arkansas. The shows also featured Bobby Vee, Jack Scott, Faron Young, Del Shannon, Gene Pitney, and many more. Admission $2,25. After the show dance party at the Birmingham Guard Armory.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE SQUIRES
FOR CHAN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
CHAN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS

MOVIN' OUT
Composer: - The Squires
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Stur-Ville Music
Matrix number: - CH 1A / 61-XY-843 MGM - Master (2:23)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Chan Records (S) 45rpm standard single Chan 102-A mono
MOVIN' OUT / OUR THEME
Reissued: 1961 MGM Records (S) 45rpm standard single MGM K13044-A mono
MOVIN' OUT / OUR THEME

The Squires from Chattanooga, Tennessee and formed in 1959 and "Movin' Out" was a regional success in several markets including Tulsa Oklahoma. Active in the early to mid 1960's they released a couple singles on Chan Records and eventually signed with MGM Records.

OUR THEME
Composer: - The Squires
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Stur-Ville Music
Matrix number: - CH 1B / 61-XY-844 MGM - Master (2:23)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: -Chan Records (S) 45rpm standard single Chan 102-B mono
OUR THEME / MOVIN' OUT
Reissued: 1961 MGM Records (S) 45rpm standard single MGM K13044-B mono
MOVIN' OUT / OUR THEME

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Squires consisting of
Ted Ledfort - Lead Guitar
Larry Blanks - Guitar
Don Jackson - Tenor Saxophone
Jimmy Harris - Piano
Allen Lutes - Bass
Butch Thomas - Drums
Allen Dennis - Manager

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR JACKIE CANNON
FOR CHAN RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
CHAN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS

Jackie Cannon was a American country and rock and roll singer who made two recordings in the early 1960s, then faded into obscurity. Cannon was born in 1939 in Palmer, Tennessee. His first record was made for the small Chan label in Oklahoma and was quickly leased to Chess for national distribution. No photograph of Jackie Cannon has been located.

PROOF OF YOUR LOVE
Composer: - Jackie Cannon
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Buna Publishing
Matrix number: - 3-A / U-11282 Chess - Master (2:02)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Chan Records (S) 45rpm standard single Chan 103-A mono
PROOF OF YOUR LOVE / CHILL BUMPS
Reissued: 1961 Chess Records (S) 45rpm standard single Chess 1807-A mono
PROOF OF YOUR LOVE / CHILL BUMPS

CHILL BUMPS
Composer: - Jackie Cannon
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Stur-Ville Publishing
Matrix number: - 3-B / U-11283 Chess - Master (2:18)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Chan Records (S) 45rpm standard single Chan 103-B mono
CHILL BUMPS / PROOF OF YOUR LOVE
Reissued: 1961 Chess Records (S0 45rpm standard single Chess 1807-B mono
CHILL BUMPS / PROOF OF YOUR LOVE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jackie Cannon - Vocal and Guitar
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR TRAVIS RICKS & THE PEARLS
FOR PRIDE RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
PRIDE SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - CHARLES DERRICK & ALLEN LAWSON
RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM PHILLIPS

South Carolina music man Charles Derrick is most closely associated with the great Kip Anderson whom he produced on some of the best ever southern soul. But Anderson wasn’t the only vocalist he worked with and Travis Ricks may just be the ''best of the rest''. Ricks and his band the Pearls were a good draw in South Carolina in the early 1960s but he only seems to have made a couple of 45s. The rare one on Pride has a rocking ''No Need To Cry'' and a goodish ballad in ''Lost Pride'' on it - but this does sound more like a demo than a fully realised production as the only accompaniment is an out of tune honky tonk piano, guitar, bass and drums. And in fact it may well have been just that as the New York based Ordell release entitled ''Little Girl Don’t You Cry'' has a very similar structure, chord changes and lyrics, as well as the same sobbing female voice.

NO NEED TO CRY
Composer: - Norman Richards-Charles Derrick
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Winn All Music-Tomeria Music
Matrix number: - SO. 1302 - Master (2:19)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Pride Records (S) 45rpm standard single Pride 501-A mono
NO NEED TO CRY / LOST PRIDE

LOST PRIDE
Composer: - Norman Richards-Charles Derrick
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Winn All Music-Tomeria Music
Matrix number: - SO. 1303 - Master (2:05)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - 1961
First appearance: - Pride Records (S) 45rpm standard single Pride 501-B mono
LOST PRIDE / NO NEED TO CRY

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Travis Ricks & The Pearls
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR RONNI LEE
FOR STRUT RECORDS 1961

SAM PHILLIPS RECORDING STUDIO
639 MADISON AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STRUT SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE(S) 1961
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER - JAY RAINWATER
RECORDING ENGINEER - SCOTTY MOORE

TEACH ME TIGER
Composer: - N. Tempo
Publisher: - A.S.C.A.P. - Arragian & Chantler Music
Matrix number: - S-A / 61-B-17 Everest - Master (2:26)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - July 16, 1961
First appearance: - Strut Records (S) 45rpm standard single Strut 4269-A mono
TEACH ME TIGER / LOVE ME WITH YOUR EYES
Reissued: - 1961 Everest Records (S) 45rpm standard single Everest 19472-A mono
TEACH ME TIGER / LOVE ME WITH YOUR EYES

LOVE ME WITH YOUR EYES
Composer: - Dick Flood
Publisher: - B.M.I. - Lowery Music Corporation
Matrix number: - S-B / 61-B-18 Everest - Master (2:15)
Recorded: - Unknown Date(s) 1961
Released: - July 16, 1961
First appearance: - Strut Records (S) 45rpm standard single Strut 4269-B mono
LOVE ME WITH YOUR EYES / TEACH ME TIGER
Reissued: - 1961 Everest Records (S) 45rpm standard single Everest 19472-B mono
LOVE ME WITH YOUR EYES / TEACH ME TIGER

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ronni Lee - Vocal
More Details Unknown

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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