- SUNNYVALE RECORDS -

CONTAINS

The Sun Story - Volume 1 - Johnny Cash
The Sun Story - Volume 2 - Charlie Rich
The Sun Story - Volume 3 - Carl Perkins
The Sun Story - Volume 4 - Roy Orbison
The Sun Story - Volume 5 - Jerry Lee Lewis
The Sun Story - Volume 6 - Carl Mann

Sunnyvale Records is a division of GRT. GRT Records was the name of both a United States and a Canadian record label, both created by General Recorded Tape, that existed from 1969 to 1979. Their demise was concurrent with the bankruptcy of their owner, General Recorded Tape. The American branch of GRT Records was founded in 1970.

Artists who released material on GRT Records in the United States included The Mojo Men, Sam Taylor, Lighthouse, Bobby Jameson, Edwards Hand, Terry Bush, Ronnie Hawkins, Colosseum, Mainline, Minnie Riperton, Flower Travellin' Band, Rastus, String Driven Thing, Lotti Golden, Van der Graaf Generator and Steve Hackett. Contrary to original expectations, the label was not a major component of the operations of parent General Recorded Tape. Instead of its record releases being referenced to the GRT label, as originally announced, General Recorded Tape referred to its Chess/Janus record operations. The GRT label had more success with their Nashville operations, but the Nashville office was shut down in 1978.

In 1976, GRT Records established a subsidiary, Sunnyvale Records, which concentrated on releases of interest to an older audience, including releases of old Sun Records material, dixieland, organ, harmonica and accordion music

In contrast to the United States label, the Canadian subsidiary became a major source of original releases by Canadian artists. GRT Records, legally known as GRT of Canada Ltd., was established as the Canadian subsidiary of General Recorded Tape, a California-based company. It was initially based in London, Ontario, as a Canadian distributor of 4-track and 8-track tapes produced in the United States. The company was specifically established to produce records of Canadian artists. Its founding president was Ross Reynolds, who later was the president of MCA Records Canada

The company was relocated to Toronto, Ontario in 1969, and commenced distributing foreign label records and tapes, as well as recording its own artists. By 1976, the foreign labels distributed by GRT in Canada included ABC Records, Dunhill Records, Island Records, Chess Records, Festival Records, Richesse Classique, Westminster Records, America Records, Impulse Records, Musidisc Records, Janus Records, 20th Century Fox Records and Sire Records. In addition to releasing records under the GRT label, other Canadian labels distributed included Axe Records and Daffodil Records. Notable Canadian artists whose records were released by GRT included Dan Hill, Ian Thomas, Downchild Blues Band, Lighthouse, Prism and FM.

GRT Records went bankrupt in 1979, with significant effects on the career progress of certain Canadian artists. The second album release of FM had been scheduled for release one week subsequent to the GRT Records bankruptcy. The Canadian band Prism had sold in excess of 200,000 copies of their album Armageddon, which was released the same year as the GRT bankruptcy. Both 8-track tapes and records by The Ramones were remaindered as a result of the GRT bankruptcy. Paradoxically, the remaindering of Ramones music in Canada is regarded as having contributed to the band's popularity in that country, since their music was discovered by persons who would not otherwise have purchased the music at full price.

 © Original Sun Recordings, licensed from Sun Entertainment, Inc. 

For Biographies of Artists (See: The Sun Biographies)
Most Sun tracks can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on YouTube < click
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 1977 Sunnyvale Records (LP) 33rpm 9330-901 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 1 - JOHNNY CASH
 
The Sun Story of the Sun Record label of Memphis, Tennessee is the story of rock and roll music. It is the story of how one man, label boss Sam C. Phillips, was able to create a legend out of the sound he discovered by putting together the music of black blues and white country music. The Sun label was formed in 1952, and Sam Phillips had been in the recording business less than two years. in that time, though, he learned that what the young people of the world wanted to hear was rhythm music and he knew that the rhythm of his own unknown black artists could provide the basis for a new sound in popular music.

In three years, between 1954 and 1956, Sam Phillips realized his dream by discovering many of the legendary performers in the music industry; first Elvis Presley, then Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee Lewis. Finally, in 1958, he also introduced the listening public to Charlie Rich, the latest superstar to emerge from a career begun in Memphis, Tennessee during the 1950s.

The Sun label lasted for seventeen years under its original owner, Sam Phillips, and in that time it climbed from a one-man operation to a million dollar enterprise and then declined again during the 1960s when new forms of music took over. The music recorded by Sun was varied, including country, blues, rhythm and blues, rock and roll and soul, and all the successful artists from Memphis owe much to the existence of the Sun label.

But what really made the name of Sun was Rockabilly - a new music made by young white country singers who used a black beat. And they not only appealed to Southerners in the USA, they were good enough to carry their music all around the world and to present the universal language, rock music.

For the past seventeen years Johnny Cash has been the greatest worldwide ambassador for American country music. He stands alongside Jimmie Rodgers and Hank Williams as one of the truly original and formative artists in country music. His contribution to the fusion of country with popular music has been enormous, and has for the most part been achieved in the best possible way, with no loss in Cash's belief in the basic themes of country music. His love of the music stems from his early life in rural Arkansas, where he was born into the farming community of Kingsland in 1932.

Johnny Cash worked with Sun Records from the middle of 1955 until the middle of 1958, and during that time he contributed to the development of rock music by making country music respected as an integral part of it. Whiles doing this, he helped greatly to put Sun Records on the map. He left the label in 1958 as the top-selling country artist of the year and his old recordings continued to be released on the label for the next five years. The last ones were every bit as good as the first.

The world-famous ''Johnny Cash Sound'' was created at Sun Records. With its sparse rhythm from Cash's guitar and Marshall Grant's string bass playing allied to Luther Perkins' distinctive lead guitar style on the bass strings, a brooding, intense background was set up. This allowed Cash's deliberate, doleful and soulful voice to deliver his homespun country lyrics with great effectiveness. Later, during 1957, when Cash worked at Sun with producer Jack Clement, experiments were successfully made using drums, piano, vocal choruses and more popular lyrics.

The titles on this album show the full range of Johnny Cash's work with Sun Records, and they show the formation of his style which he has never altered or bettered. Like all country singers, the best work of Johnny Cash was captured in a small, primitive studio which matched the rugged atmosphere of his songs. More sophisticated recording equipment was not necessary.

Most of Cash's massive popular hits are included here, such as ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen'' and ''The Ways Of A Woman In Love'', which made Johnny Cash an important artist throughout the USA and eventually the world. These songs were modern and talked to the new rock audience that was growing up, as did ''Get Rhythm'', perhaps the closet Cash came to recording rock and roll in the famous Sun style.

Other songs such as ''Next In Line'' and ''Home Of The Blues'' belong to a more traditional country approach. But in the hands of Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two they are blended into the newly formed ''Johnny Cash Sound'' which was part of the immortal Sun Sound. 
 
Martin Hawkins
 
For music (standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
 
 Side 1: Contains
1 - Ballad Of A Teenage Queen (1957) > Sun 283-A < 
2 - Guess Things Happen That Way (1958) > Sun 295-A <
3 - Cold, Cold Heart (1977)
4 - The Ways Of A Woman In Love (1958) > Sun 302-A < 
5 - Just About Time (1958) > Sun 309-B <
6 - Katy Too (1959) > Sun 321-A < 
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2: Contains
1 - I Forgot To Remember To Forget (1959) > Sun 321-B <
2 - Next In Line (1957) > Sun 266-B <
3 - Home Of The Blues 1957) > Sun 279-A <
4 - Come In Stranger (1958) > Sun 295-B <
5 - Down The Street to 301 (1960) > Sun 343-B < 
6 - Get Rhythm (1956) > Sun 241-A < 
Original Sun Recordings
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 1977 Sunnyvale Records (LP) 33rpm 9330-902 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 2 - CHARLIE RICH
 
The Sun Story of the Sun Record label of Memphis, Tennessee is the story of rock and roll music. It is the story of how one man, label boss Sam C. Phillips, was able to create a legend out of the sound he discovered by putting together the music of black blues and white country music. The Sun label was formed in 1952, and Sam Phillips had been in the recording business less than two years. in that time, though, he learned that what the young people of the world wanted to hear was rhythm music and he knew that the rhythm of his own unknown black artists could provide the basis for a new sound in popular music.

In three years, between 1954 and 1956, Sam Phillips realized his dream by discovering many of the legendary performers in the music industry; first Elvis Presley, then Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee Lewis. Finally, in 1958, he also introduced the listening public to Charlie Rich, the latest superstar to emerge from a career begun in Memphis, Tennessee during the 1950s.

The Sun label lasted for seventeen years under its original owner, Sam Phillips, and in that time it climbed from a one-man operation to a million dollar enterprise and then declined again during the 1960s when new forms of music took over. The music recorded by Sun was varied, including country, blues, rhythm and blues, rock and roll and soul, and all the successful artists from Memphis owe much to the existence of the Sun label.

But what really made the name of Sun was Rockabilly - a new music made by young white country singers who used a black beat. And they not only appealed to Southerners in the USA, they were good enough to carry their music all around the world and to present the universal language, rock music.
 
Charlie Rich is the newest superstar of country and country-pop music. He was the last of the six major stars to be found by the Sun label, although his records were in fact issued on the sister label, Phillips International. When he took ''Lonely Weekends'' to the top of the American popular charts in 1960, he seemed set for the great international success that he has only achieved during the past two years.
 
His style then was much the same as now, for Charlie Rich is one of the few truly original stylists in popular music, Why should he change when his own unique style includes to many different parts? It includes a large jazz influence which makes him different from the rest of the Sun artists. But it also includes country, blues and rock influences which give the Charlie Rich sound much of it's strenght.
 
Charlie Rich was born some fifty miles north of Memphis at Colt in Arkansas on 14 December 1934, and he loved much of his early life on a cotton farm. Most of the Sun country and rockabilly artists came from this type of background, but although Charlie showed an interest in music it was at first mainly the jazz of Stan Kenton and then Dave Brubeck. He went to high school and later University and during this time he learned to play piano and saxophone, and his interest in music was encouraged by his wife, singer and songwriter Margaret Ann.
 
Charlie Rich first became involved with the Sun label as a songwriter and session musician in 1957 and 1958, and he helped write Johnny Cash's hit, ''The Ways Of A Woman In Love'', which was just the first of many hits he wrote for other people. His piano playing who helped to make hits for others.
 
In late 1958, Sam Phillips gave Charlie his first chance as a solo artist, and he made some fine rock and roll songs like ''Breakup'', and ''Rebound'' which were modelled on the style of Jerry Lee Lewis. During 1959, though, Rich was allowed to give expression to his jazz influences and he came up with an entirely new sound to ''Lonely Weekends''. His success at this time was slowed by the fact that he sounded vocally rather like Elvis Presley, but his praising of a song was entirely different and his real influence on popular music has only recently been fully realized.
 
The timeless, original style of Charlie Rich is brilliance shown on this album, through the bluesy ''Sittin' And Thinkin'' and ''Midnight Blues'' to the raunchy ''Goodbye Mary Ann'' and ''Baby I Need You'' to the softly styled ''That's How Much I Love You''.
 
Charlie Rich wrote most of these songs, and in his writing as much as in his singing and playing he provided as important element in the immortal ''Sun Sound''.
 
Martin Hawkins
 
 For music (standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons < 
 
Side 1: Contains
1 - Lonely Weekends (1960) > PI 3552-A <
2 - Sittin' And Thinkin' (1962) > PI 3582-A <
3 - Gentle As A Lamb (1977)
4 - Midnight Blues (1977)
5 - Goodbye Mary Ann (1977)
6 - Breakup (1960) PLP 1970
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2: Contains
1 - C.C. Rider
2 - Rebound (1959) > PI 3542-A <
3 - My Baby Done Left Me (1977)
4 - Big Man (1959) < PI 3542-B <
5 - That's How Much I Love You (1960) PLP 1970
6 - Baby I Need You (1977)
Original Sun Recordings
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 1977 Sunnyvale Records (LP) 33rpm 9330-903 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 3 - CARL PERKINS
 
The Sun Story of the Sun Record label of Memphis, Tennessee is the story of rock and roll music. It is the story of how one man, label boss Sam C. Phillips, was able to create a legend out of the sound he discovered by putting together the music of black blues and white country music. The Sun label was formed in 1952, and Sam Phillips had been in the recording business less than two years. in that time, though, he learned that what the young people of the world wanted to hear was rhythm music and he knew that the rhythm of his own unknown black artists could provide the basis for a new sound in popular music.

In three years, between 1954 and 1956, Sam Phillips realized his dream by discovering many of the legendary performers in the music industry; first Elvis Presley, then Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee Lewis. Finally, in 1958, he also introduced the listening public to Charlie Rich, the latest superstar to emerge from a career begun in Memphis, Tennessee during the 1950s.

The Sun label lasted for seventeen years under its original owner, Sam Phillips, and in that time it climbed from a one-man operation to a million dollar enterprise and then declined again during the 1960s when new forms of music took over. The music recorded by Sun was varied, including country, blues, rhythm and blues, rock and roll and soul, and all the successful artists from Memphis owe much to the existence of the Sun label.

But what really made the name of Sun was Rockabilly - a new music made by young white country singers who used a black beat. And they not only appealed to Southerners in the USA, they were good enough to carry their music all around the world and to present the universal language, rock music.
 
The story of Carl Perkins sums up the story of the success of the Sun Record Company. This success was based on transforming country singers into the new style of Rockabilly, and involved the development of a rock and roll rhythm and ''today'' lyrics that would appeal to a young audience.
 
It was one song and one artist that made Sun Records into a national known organisation. The song was ''Blue Suede Shoes'' and the artist Carl Perkins. When this song went to the top of American country, blues and popular records charts in 1956 it was the first ever to top all three charts and it signalled the beginning of a tremendous five-year period of success for the Sun label. Without this record, the Sun label would have remained a local labelstruggling to exist on sales of regionally-based blues and hillbilly music. By mixing these styles into a song which summed up the new young approach to life, and by backing up his euphoric expressive vocals with powerfully rocking licks from his talented guitar style. Carl Perkins was the person who as much as anybody else was responsible for the place now held by Sun Records in the history of American popular music.
 
Sun Records was the founder of Southern rock and roll. Sam Phillips had made experiments with mixing blues and country music since 1954, and he had found Elvis Presley. But in the music of Carl Perkins everything came together perfectly. His recordings are the classic expression of how a pure hillbilly country style such as that heard on his first recordings in 1955, ''Turn Around Me'' and ''Let's The Jukebox Keep On Playing'', could be transformed into the raunchy, bopping rockabilly of ''Honey Don't'' and ''Boppin' The Blues'', and then into the pounding rock of ''Matchbox'' and ''G;ad All Over''
 
Carl Perkins was a very poor Southern farm boy, born in Tiptonville, Tennessee in 1932, and his music was capable of great sadness born of poverty. But it is amazing how much happiness, life and vitality his musical style had. Carl Perkins was always proud and glad he had escaped poverty and become a success, and he celebrated through his music itself, just as he had once sought to escape his cares of his farming life throught singing songs for his own enjoyment.
 
Carl Perkins' career with Sun Records was the most successful of all Sun artists in terms of quality sounds. He never made a bad record. But as far as commercial success was concerned, he was unlucky. Just as ''Blue Suede Shoes'' had become the biggest rock and roll hit in the history of the music up to that time, Perkins was injured in an automobile accident and his career was badly affected.
 
Rockabilly music was the popular music of the American South through the 1950s, and for a short time in 1956-1958 it also became the most popular form of white rock and roll music. By the time Perkins recovered from his injury, his place at the top had been lost, but his prime influence on the development of the immortal ''Sun Sound'' can never be denies.
Martin Hawkins
 
 For music (standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
  
Side 1: Contains
1 - Blue Suede Shoes (1955) > Sun 234-A <
2 - Boppin' The Blues (1956) > Sun 243-A <
3 - Your True Love (1957) > Sun 261-B <
4 - Matchbox (1957) > Sun 261-A <
5 - Only You (1958) SLP-1225
6 - Turn Around (1955) > Flip 501-B < 
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2: Contains
1 - Let The Jukebox Keep On Playing (1955) > Sun 224-A <
2 - Glad All Over (1957) > Sun 287-B <
3 - Tennessee (1955) > Sun 235-B < Unissued
4 - Honey Don't (1955) > Sun 234-B < 
5 - All Mama's Children (1956) > Sun 243-B <
6 - Dixie Fried (1956) > Sun 249-B < 
Original Sun Recordings
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 1977 Sunnyvale Records (LP) 33rpm 9330-904 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 4 - ROY ORBISON
 
The Sun Story of the Sun Record label of Memphis, Tennessee is the story of rock and roll music. It is the story of how one man, label boss Sam C. Phillips, was able to create a legend out of the sound he discovered by putting together the music of black blues and white country music. The Sun label was formed in 1952, and Sam Phillips had been in the recording business less than two years. in that time, though, he learned that what the young people of the world wanted to hear was rhythm music and he knew that the rhythm of his own unknown black artists could provide the basis for a new sound in popular music.

In three years, between 1954 and 1956, Sam Phillips realized his dream by discovering many of the legendary performers in the music industry; first Elvis Presley, then Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee Lewis. Finally, in 1958, he also introduced the listening public to Charlie Rich, the latest superstar to emerge from a career begun in Memphis, Tennessee during the 1950s.

The Sun label lasted for seventeen years under its original owner, Sam Phillips, and in that time it climbed from a one-man operation to a million dollar enterprise and then declined again during the 1960s when new forms of music took over. The music recorded by Sun was varied, including country, blues, rhythm and blues, rock and roll and soul, and all the successful artists from Memphis owe much to the existence of the Sun label.

But what really made the name of Sun was Rockabilly - a new music made by young white country singers who used a black beat. And they not only appealed to Southerners in the USA, they were good enough to carry their music all around the world and to present the universal language, rock music.
 
In the 1960s, Roy Orbison became one of the most popular singers of that generation. He was the greatest ballad singer in pop music combining his country music roots with pop music sentimentality.
 
But he had not begun his career in that way. He had started out as a youngster in the town of Wink in Texas during the 1940s, who wanted to get into the music business. In those days in Texas, the only way was through country music. That was the dominant style. Roy Orbison gained a TV show in Odessa, Texas in 1954 and it was then that he first came into contact with the name Sun Records. This was when he met Elvis Presley, a young singer from Sun in Memphis, who was starting to make country records with a rhythm and blues beat, Rockabilly records.
 
Orbison decided that the new style was the passport to success and he spent over a year practising the style. He was a good guitarist and developed a very sharp, cutting style on the electric guitar, based on Scotty Moore and Carl Perkins but having elements of his owns ideas. Vocally, he had a higher, thinner voice than most rockabilly singers, but this was perhaps an advantage as it made him different.
 
In 1956, Orbison gained a record contract with Sun Records, and he had a lot of local success in the American South with his first release, ''Ooby Dooby''. This was a song written by fellow Sun artists Wade Moore and Dick Penner who had spent some time at the University of Northern Texas with Roy Orbison when he was a geology student.
 
Orbison was always aiming to be an entertainer, and he admits that his early days singing rockabilly in Memphis were most enjoyable and valuable for him when he later turned to ballads.
 
The three ballads on this album, ''Devil Doll'', ''It's Too Late'' and ''Trying To Get To You'', show very much how Orbison's style developed out of country music. The classic-style rockabilly songs like, ''You're My Baby'' and ''Rock House'' were developed from that, but with much stronger drum rhythms, and he addition of piano and vocal choruses on the later songs like ''Sweet And Easy To Love'' and ''This Kind Of Love'' complete the development into full-blooded rock and roll.
 
Although Roy Orbison may not be famous for his early rockabilly recordings, there is no doubt that they stand comparison with anything he has recorded. He fitted well into the Sun format and contributed much with his songwriting and recorded performances for the immortal 'Sun Sound''.
 Martin Hawkins
 
 For music (standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
  
Side 1: Contains
1 - Ooby Dooby (1956) > Sun 242-A <
2 - You're My Baby (1956) > Sun 251-A <  
3 - Mean Little Mama (1961) SLP 1260
4 - I Never Knew (1961) SLP 1260
5 - Devil Doll (1957) > Sun 265-B <
6 - Rock House (1956) > Sun 251-B < 
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2: Contains
1 - This Kind Of Love (1961) SLP 1260
2 - It's Too Late (1961) SLP 1260
3 - Trying To Get To You (1961) SLP 1260
4 - You're Gonna Cry (1961) SLP 1260
5 - Sweet And Easy To Love (1957) > Sun 265-A <
Original Sun Recordings
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 1977 Sunnyvale Records (LP) 33rpm 9330-905 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 5 - JERRY LEE LEWIS
 
The Sun Story of the Sun Record label of Memphis, Tennessee is the story of rock and roll music. It is the story of how one man, label boss Sam C. Phillips, was able to create a legend out of the sound he discovered by putting together the music of black blues and white country music. The Sun label was formed in 1952, and Sam Phillips had been in the recording business less than two years. in that time, though, he learned that what the young people of the world wanted to hear was rhythm music and he knew that the rhythm of his own unknown black artists could provide the basis for a new sound in popular music.

In three years, between 1954 and 1956, Sam Phillips realized his dream by discovering many of the legendary performers in the music industry; first Elvis Presley, then Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee Lewis. Finally, in 1958, he also introduced the listening public to Charlie Rich, the latest superstar to emerge from a career begun in Memphis, Tennessee during the 1950s.

The Sun label lasted for seventeen years under its original owner, Sam Phillips, and in that time it climbed from a one-man operation to a million dollar enterprise and then declined again during the 1960s when new forms of music took over. The music recorded by Sun was varied, including country, blues, rhythm and blues, rock and roll and soul, and all the successful artists from Memphis owe much to the existence of the Sun label.

But what really made the name of Sun was Rockabilly - a new music made by young white country singers who used a black beat. And they not only appealed to Southerners in the USA, they were good enough to carry their music all around the world and to present the universal language, rock music.
 
More than anybody else, the Sun Record Company and its success is associated with Jerry Lee Lewis. By 1956, Sam Phillips had already discovered Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, and Roy Orbison. He had already forged a new sound in popular music by allowing these artists to add the beat of rhythm and blues to their country roots.
 
But when he found Jerry Lee Lewis, he found something else entirely. He discovered the most prodigious talented country vocalist and pianist ever to emerge into rock music. Jerry Lee Lewis not only had the sheer vocal and pianistic ability and desire to tackle any kind of song, be it country, blues, rock or soul, he also had the drive to be the best in whatever he did. Further, he believed that he was the best, and out of this conviction he was able to develop a completely unique style that would transform any song and make it fit into the Jerry Lee Lewis style. He was in addition a fantastic stage performer, and a natural artist for promotion nationally and world-wide.
 
The Lewis style, called the ''Pumping Piano'', was dynamic. He began interpreting country standards, like ''Lovesick Blues'' on this album. But soon he was scoring huge hit-records with a more rocking style, of which ''Breathless'', High School Confidential'' and ''Lovin' Up A Storm'' are good examples.
 
Lewis also loved to record songs associated with other rock singers  and these include ''Breakup'', ''Hound Dog'' and ''Jailhouse Rock''. Lewis was a country, born in Ferriday in backwoods Louisiana in 1935, and knew nothing about the rules of music. All he knew was the country and blues he heard in Southern clubs and bars during the 1940s, and it is proably because of this background that he could turn equally well to any type of song. Evidence of this was shown when he recorded the old 1940s jazz-blues tune ''Let The Good Times Roll'', and made ot sound like a Lewis original just like all the rest. Lewis didn't need to be a composer,
 
The factor that comes most clearly from Lewis;s records in the sheer power of his own singing and piano playing. However, there is no doubt that there was a very important contrubution made by the Sun session musiciabs, Roland Janes, the guitarist, and James Van Eaton, the drummer.
 
These two musicians appear on most of the tracks on this album, and they were also present on a majority of records made during the late 1950s heyday of Sun Records. It was not only the top-selling lead names, but also the session man who made up the immortal ''Sun Sound'', a sound captured in its fully developed form in the incomparable recordings of the label's premier star, Jerry Lee Lewis.
 Martin Hawkins
 
 For music (standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons < 
 
Side 1: Contains
1 - Breathless (1958) > Sun 288-A <
2 - High School Confidential (1958) > Sun 296-A <
3 - Break Up (1977)
4 - Frankie And Johnny (1961) SLP-1265
5 - Hong Kong Blues (1977)
6 - Hound Dog (1977)
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2: Contains
1 - Jailhouse Rock (1977)
2 - Let The Good Times Roll (1977)
3 - Let's Talk About Us (1959) > Sun 324-A < 
4 - Lovesick Blues (1977)
5 - Lovin' Up A Storm (1959) > Sun 317-A < 
6 - Milkshake Mademoiselle (1977)
Original Sun Recordings
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
© 1977 Sunnyvale Records (LP) 33rpm 9330-906 mono
THE SUN STORY VOLUME 6 - CARL MANN
 
The Sun Story of the Sun Record label of Memphis, Tennessee is the story of rock and roll music. It is the story of how one man, label boss Sam C. Phillips, was able to create a legend out of the sound he discovered by putting together the music of black blues and white country music. The Sun label was formed in 1952, and Sam Phillips had been in the recording business less than two years. in that time, though, he learned that what the young people of the world wanted to hear was rhythm music and he knew that the rhythm of his own unknown black artists could provide the basis for a new sound in popular music.

In three years, between 1954 and 1956, Sam Phillips realized his dream by discovering many of the legendary performers in the music industry; first Elvis Presley, then Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee Lewis. Finally, in 1958, he also introduced the listening public to Charlie Rich, the latest superstar to emerge from a career begun in Memphis, Tennessee during the 1950s.

The Sun label lasted for seventeen years under its original owner, Sam Phillips, and in that time it climbed from a one-man operation to a million dollar enterprise and then declined again during the 1960s when new forms of music took over. The music recorded by Sun was varied, including country, blues, rhythm and blues, rock and roll and soul, and all the successful artists from Memphis owe much to the existence of the Sun label.

But what really made the name of Sun was Rockabilly - a new music made by young white country singers who used a black beat. And they not only appealed to Southerners in the USA, they were good enough to carry their music all around the world and to present the universal language, rock music.
 
The story of Carl Mann is that of the last top-selling record artist discovered by Sam Phillips. He was a young singer and pianist who, in 1959, reached the top of the American charts with ''Mona Lisa'' and who with any luck might have become an established country artist.
 
Mann and his group, the Kool Kats, came from Jackson, Tennessee. In 1958, when Mann had just left school, they recorded for a small Memphis label, Jackson, owned by Jim Stewart. Their first recordings were published by Sam Phillips' Knox Music, and early in 1959 the group was brought to Phillips' attention. Immediately, Phillips offered Mann a contract with his own label, Phillips International, Mann's band was also put under contract and guitarist Eddie Bush later had one record issued under his own name, as he had on Jaxon. The bass player was Robert Oatswell and the drummer was W.S. Holland, who had formerly been with Carl Perkins on Sun.
 
Carl Mann was only seventeen when he became a part of the Memphis music scene, but he had already evolved the basis of a very effective late rock and roll style that worked extremely well when covering standards like ''Mona Lisa'', ''Pretend'', or ''South Of The Border'', Mann was not able to recapture the impact of his first million-selling single, but he did become Phillips International's second biggest seller, behind Charlie Rich, and his recordings continued to be leased even after he left the company early in 1962. He later recorded in Nashville with labels like Monument, and recently, ABC, Dot.
 
He enjoyed seven single releases and an album on Phillips International, usually retaining his own particular style of rolling piano and controlled vocals complemented by Eddie Bush's dampened guitar figures. Usually his sessions were produced in Memphis, and most of the selections on this album come from the early sessions there at the original Sun studio. He did record also at a new studio in Memphis, and at Sun's Nashville studio under the direction of Billy Sherrill, Scotty Moore and Kelso Herston. In later years, Roy Roy Stevenson replaced Robert Oatswell as bass player, and James Van Eaton took over drums from Holland when he left to join Johnny Cash. This new line-up tackles brilliantly the country standard ''Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes'', and the recording is a fitting final track for the album.
 
The style of Carl Mann is an instantly recognizable and individual one, and deserves to be widely heard. It was developed from pianista like Jerry Lee Lewis and Charlie Rich, but brings its own elements to the others which made up the immortal ''Sun Sound''.
 
 Martin Hawkins
 
 For music (standard singles) on YouTube click on the available > buttons < 
 
Side 1: Contains
1 - Mona Lisa (1959) > PI 3539-A <
2 - Too Young (1977)
3 - Kansas City (1977)
4 - Don't Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes (1977)
5 - Baby I Don't Care (1960) > PI 3558-A < (Eddie Bush)
6 - Blueberry Hill (1977)
Original Sun Recordings

Side 2: Contains
1 - Ubangi Stomp (1977)
2 - South Of The Border (1960) > PI 3555-A <
3 - Crazy Fool (1977)
4 - Pretend (1959) > PI 3546-B <
5 - Mexicali Rose (1977)
6 - Rockin' Love (1959) > PI 3546-A <
Original Sun Recordings
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

> Page Up <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©