CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1958 Sun Schedule <

1958 SESSIONS (1/1)
January 1, 1958 to January 31, 1958

Studio Session for Charley Pride, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jimmy Isle, 1957/1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Lee Mitchell & Curley Money, 1957/1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Sonny Burgess, 1957/1958 (1) / Sun Records
Studio Sessions for Sonny Burgess, 1957/1958 (2) / Sun Records
Studio Session for George Klein, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Allen Wingate (Allen Page), 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for John Tolleson, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Charlie Feathers, Probably 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Sunrays, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Sonny Burgess, 1958 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Sonny Burgess, Probably 1958 / Sun Records 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

1958

Bought Americans recession with a vengeance and large increases in unemployment over 7.0% (5.2 million) , inflation dipped below 2% in 1958 so those in work earning the average wages of $3,851 per year were quite well off, cars continued to get bigger and heavier with larger engines, but imports continued to grow now with the added Datsun and more Toyotas from Japan. Americas first satellite was launched from Cape Canaveral. This is also the year that the Microchip first developed which is the very early stages of PC's we all now use at work and at home. This was also the year of the Munich air disaster on February 6 in which 7 Manchester United Players died.

1958

In 1958, Ed Pearl, a 21 year-old music enthusiast, opened a club in Los Angeles that became a Mecca for the emerging folk and rock musicians of the 1960s, and a focal point for the progressive cultural and political forces that shaped the times. The original Ash Grove located at 8162 Melrose Avenue, West Hollywood, California, thrived for over 15 years, from 1958 to 1974.

A furniture factory and showroom was converted into the club, (now the site of The Improv). No place in the world offered better blues or a wider variety of great blues performers.

In 1958 Jerry Lee Lewis began with a full date book. There was to be an Allan Freed tour, a Phillips Morris tour, and a tour of Australia and even England later in the year. Before Jerry started on the promotional whirl, though, he was brought back into the studio to find a new hit. Each of the co-writers of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' had submitted songs for consideration: Jack Hammer had sent down a Chuck Berry-esque celebration of teenage life called ''Milkshake Mademoiselle'' that substituted cliches for Berry's mordant wit, and Otis Blackwell had sent down another song based on an exclamation, ''Breathless''.

Billboard magazine begins the Hot 100, expanding the Pop Charts to allow more records to become certified hits.

Rock's songwriting connection to its audience becomes more apparent with the hits "Summertime Blues" by Eddie Cochran, "Sweet Little Sixteen" by Chuck Berry and Leiber & Stoller's #1 hit for the Coasters "Yakety Yak", all focusing on teenagers struggles with parental demands.

Chuck Willis's double-sided posthumous hit "What Am I Living For"/"Hang Up My Rock And Roll Shoes" is the first rock record released in stereo, engineered by Tom Dowd of Atlantic Records.

The power chord first appears in records by guitarists Link Wray and Eddie Cochran.

Distortion for electric guitar is first used by Lowman Pauling of The "5" Royales and a primitive form of fuzz bass is found on some of their records of this time as well.

"Hard Headed Woman" by Elvis Presley becomes the first Rock Record to go "Gold", a new designation for singles established earlier in the year.

It was probably in 1958 that former Sun recording artist Rudy Grayzell relocated to San Jose, California, and signed with Award Records, a tiny offshoot of the Arrow records manufacturing plant. Rudy's San Antonio buddy, Eddy Dugosh, already recorded there, and his first recording was an unreleased cover of Wynoma Carr's 1956 Specialty recording of ''Should I Ever Love Again''.

1958

Sun SLP 1225 ''Dance Album Of...'' by Carl Perkins issued. Reissued with different jacket as ''Teenbeat''.

Shreveport's Will ''Dub'' Jones joins The Coasters, with whom he goes on to sing ''Why's everybody always picking on me'' in their song ''Charlie Brown''.

1958

A new species emerged this year, as exemplified by the finger-snappin' Bobby Darin and the highly emotive Connie Francis: fresh young singers who could appeal to a younger audience without offending Mom and Dad. It was almost as if record execs had performed a lab experiment, merging old crooners with new kids on the block for maximum profit. But the real rockers would have none of it, and Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Buddy Holly kept pushing the rollicking new sound.

1958

Phillips launches a new label, Phillips International, to be run in conjunction with Sun. He has already stopped using his Flip label.

Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash sign with Columbia Records. Perkins leaves Sun immediately and Cash leaves in August when his contract is up, becoming the first big rockabilly artist on the Columbia label.

Golden age of instrumental rock.

Jerry Lee Lewis hits later this year number 1 with "Breathless''.

Elvis is drafted into the Army.

Eddie Cochran overdubs all instruments and vocals on "Summertime Blues" and "C'mon Everybody".

Lowman Pauling invents guitar distortion and feedback on the Five Royales' "The Slummer".

RCA introduces the first stereo long-playing records.

Don Kirshner opens offices at the Brill Building (See: May 1958).

David Seville's "The Witch Doctor" and the Tokens' "Tonite I Fell In Love" are the first novelty hits.

Bobby Freeman's "Do You Wanna Dance" begins the "dance craze".

Little Richard quit rock and roll in 1958 to attend Bible college.

Dion and The Belmonts and Laurie Records both had their first hit when the band’s, "I Wonder Why'', made the Top 40.

Jerry Lee Lewis had 34 of his 37 concert dates in the United Kingdom cancelled in 1958 when it was discovered that his new bride with him was also his 13 year old cousin.

Buddy Holly makes his final studio recordings " It Doesn’t Matter Any More," "Moondreams'', ''Raining In My Heart" and "True Love Ways".

The Dick Clark Show TV Show began.

1958

After moved in 1947 to Hernando, just south of Memphis, future Sun recording artist Jimmy Harrell graduated from Hernando High School and then enlisted in the United States Navy. Stationed in San Diego, California, he saw Gene Vincent, and formed an onbase band, the Jim Bobs, with two guys named Bob.

''I got out of the Navy, and there were no jobs'', he said. ''Then we had family get-together in Forest, and my Aunt Peggy said I should come to Jackson. Alton (Lott) lived there then, working at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, so we lived in the same household. Alton didn't care for singing. He just wanted to play the guitar'', said Harrell.

Future Sun recording artist Alton Lott graduated from Forest Hill High School in Jackson, Mississippi and he and Jimmy Harrell cut two songs for Ace entitled ''Looking For Someone'' and ''Got It Made In The Shade'' at Cosmo Recording Studio in New Orleans, Louisiana. Influenced by Scotty Moore and Chuck Berry, Alton remembered seeing Elvis, Scotty and Bill in their early days.

''After I moved to Jackson, Alton and I would sit around and come up with song ideas'', said Harrell. ''Alton had a group that played locally. Right down the street there were was a little recording studio, and there was a trailer outside that said 'Andy Anderson and the Rolling Stones'. We'd rehearse together. Andy had a recording contract, and we said that if he could do it, we could do it. We walked into Ace Records, did an audition, and Johnny Vincent took us to Cosimo's in New Orleans and recorded a joint session with Harry Lee. This would have been around 1957/58. Lee's single was released on Vin that year, but Alton and Jimmy's record went unreleased.

1958

Stax Records is founded in Memphis to promote black music, a name which is synonymous with Southern soul music, began as Satellite Records in Memphis in 1959. Founded by Jim Stewart, a former country fiddler, and Estelle Axton, whose son Charles "Packy" Axton was a saxophonist with the original Mar-Keys, the company had its first Top Ten hit in 1961 with "Gee Whiz" by Carla Thomas (below right with William Bell and Johnny Taylor). During the next few years Stax developed a brand of music which was to have worldwide repercussions.

With its house rhythm section, better known as Booker T. & the MGs, its tight horn section, which later became the Memphis Horns, and its gospel-rooted recording artists - Otis Redding, Sam and Dave-Stax virtually created contemporary soul music, both on its own records and as a Southern base of operations for Atlantic artists such as Don Covay and Wilson Pickett.

The death of Otis Redding in 1967, following a triumphant European tour and a virtually cataclysmic appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival, signaled the end of the first Stax era. Sam and Dave disbanded around the same time, and although they continued to record as a unit, the members of Booker T. & the MGs did more administrative work than session playing. It was left to a new generation of artists and producers to carry on the Stax legacy, and the company did not find itself wanting in either department.

The most innovative and successful of the new breed of Stax artists was Isaac Hayes (left with David Porter), who had been an important songwriter, producer, and session pianist during the company's earlier period; with David Porter, he was responsible for writing and producing Sam and Dave's "Hold On, I'm Coming" and "Soul Man." On his own, Hayes developed a unique blend, part jazz, part soul, part easy listening. He talked on his records in a mellow, bantering manner, and he used an orchestra to provide instrumental cushioning. In many ways Hayes was a founding father of the sweet soul of the 1970s.

But Stax's roster ran the gamut of black popular music. Albert King did his own funky thing, playing his flying-V guitar with bluesy urgency. The Staple Singers were at their artistic peak when they recorded for Stax during the late 1960s and early 1970s, turning out records that blended a utopian social vision with rhythmic excitement. The great Johnnie Taylor was in his prime, testifying on the ins and outs of falling in and out of love with intense passion. Then there were the groups--the Soul Children, who said what was on their minds and attracted a fanatical following in England as well as a large black following in the States, and the smoother but still gritty Emotions. The music behind these singers was more varied than in the early days, and some of it was recorded outside Memphis. But the spirit of Stax was burning as brightly as ever.

The new Stax producers were at least as important as the artists in determining the Stax sound. One of the most resourceful and versatile was Don Davis, who began a fruitful association with Johnnie Taylor which still continues. Al Jackson, Jr. the great soul drummer who was the backbone of Booker T. & the MGs, became a canny, astute producer, working, often in collaboration with Jim Stewart or other company personnel, with Albert King, the Staple Singers, and the Emotions. Jackson was still heard on drums on many Stax releases; other session musicians included guitarists Vernon Burch, now a recording artist in his own right, and Michael Toles, and keyboard player Marvell Thomas. Al Bell was an important creative force as well as an administrator.

The thing that made Stax go was teamwork. When you visited the studio, which was a converted movie theater on East McLemore, you could feel it. The carpeted halls were always full of groups of people, who seemed to be going to and fro at will, dropping in on friends in their offices, heading down to Studio A to check on the progress of a mixing session, or out to the parking lot where Isaac Hayes's Rolls-Royce sat glittering in the sun. The cooperation between white and black musicians and producers was practically unprecedented; it was one of the secrets of the company's across-the-board success. But it would never have worked without that spirit, and although the spirit was beset by the blows of circumstance, it was in the music until the end, when Stax was adjudicated a bankrupt, in 1975.

But by June 1977, virtually all Stax assets, including all masters, both completed and unfinished recordings, together with all Stax contracts, were purchased by a group which then licensed Fantasy Records to handle all Stax product.

1958

Recording session for Charley Pride at Sun. The tapebox called it ''There My Baby'', but it was heavily based on ''The Stroll'', a recent hit and dance craze. It was sung by a local baseball star with the Memphis Red Sox who harboured a desire to sing. If he had been chosen for a release on Sun, there's no telling how the career of Charley Pride might have developed. Certainly, he wouldn't have been announced to the world as the first black country singer though, oddly enough, he was covering a white record in a foretaste of his career as a black man working in a white idiom.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Strangely, it doesn't rate a mention in his autobiography or his official website but it is a fact that Charley Pride, one of RCA's biggest-selling artists of all time, who registered 36 number 1 country hits, made his first recording for Sun Records. It's strange because most singers are keen to be associated with Sun, whether their records were released or not (and Charley weren't). Stranger still because Sun was just the sort of quirky label where Pride might have thrived eight years before he did make it into the big time.

The official story prefers to highlight that Pride was ''born to poor sharecroppers, one of eleven children in Sledge, Mississippi; a timeless everyman, revered by his musical peers and adored by countless millions of fans around the globe. His golden baritone voice has transcended race and spanned the generation''. Maybe so, but being on Sun never hurt anybody's reputation.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLEY PRIDE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ERNIE BARTON
AND/OR STAN KESLER

Charley Frank Pride was twenty years old when he auditioned at Sun. But, when Charley Pride's breakthrough came in 1966 it was organized by Jack Clement, the same producer who had been at Sun. Whether Jack Clement was there on the actual day, sometime in 1958, when Pride came into 706 Union Avenue is unknown.

1 – ''(THERE'S MY BABY) WALKIN' (THE STROLL)'' - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - C. Otis-N. Lee
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-11-16 mono
SUN RECORDS – THE ROCKING YEARS - YOUR LOVIN' MAN
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-8-11 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

Whoever was there captured Pride singing a song logged as ''There's My Baby'', and sometimes referred to since as ''Walkin' (The Stroll)''. It opens with someone making a sound like footsteps before a basic rhythm set up by guitars and maracas becomes the backdrop to a minimal lyric about walking in the door and walking in the wonderland. Pride sings in an understated way with just a hint of the ubiquitous post-Elvis hot potato style. The song must have been inspired by ''The Stroll'', a hit in the early part of 1958 for a white group, The Diamonds, who specialized in covering rhythm and blues songs.

2 - ''DON'T LET GO''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued - Incomplete
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charley Pride - Vocal
Unknown – Guitar & Maracas

For Biography of Charley Pride see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charley Pride's Sun recording can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JANUARY 1958

Carl Perkins signs with Columbia on January 25th. Having secured themselves a bona fide rock and roll act, Columbia Records were at something of a loss to know what to do with Carl. Their engineers could never capture the funky, bluesy bottom end of Perkins' sound that Sam Phillips had perfected. For his part, Perkins could never recapture his muse. He tried once again to become a teen poet, writing or recorded such songs as ''Pop Let Me Have The Car'' and ''Pink Pedal Pushers'', but those songs sounded nowhere near as convincing as the grim backwoods humour of ''That's Right''.

Shortly after Carl Perkins signed with Columbia, one of the Sun session pickers, Roland Janes, went to Nashville to cut a session. He found himself in the same studio as Perkins and cared little for what he heard: ''Carl had got rid of his Gibson'', recalled Janes, ''and bought a Strat. The Gibson had a much better sound for what he was doing. He'd also bought one of those Echoplex Amp that sounded great when Scotty Moore used them but didn't suit Carl's style at all. Then they were recording in Bradley's studio where you could take the Sun studio, put in a corner and not even notice it was there. The sound of Carl's band was leaping around the room. He needed the intimacy of the Sun studio.

1958

Jud Phillips departs to set up his own label and Cecil Scaife takes over his role as promotion manager.

Johnny Cash signs with Columbia on August 1st, the same month that Roy Orbison relocates to RCA Victor. Ernie Barton becomes an in-house producer.

After Hayden's Phillips International record had been out for some months, and he realised that ''Love My Baby'' wasn't going to be a hit, he found that he had a decision to make. The first flush of mid-South rockabilly was over and by early 1958 there were now many other singers like him trying to make their way in the path of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and the few successful ones. The performing and recording options in Memphis were limited and so when Hayden was offered a regular gig in Chicago in May 1958, he took it. ''This guy said that he wanted me to work regularly at a new club that was starting up, the Tally Ho Club out in Highwood to the north of Chicago. I wasn't doing too much in Memphis, and so I said I would move up there. I worked four or five nights a week there at the Tally Ho and I played other clubs also in the circuit between Milwaukee, Detroit and Indianapolis. I played with different people for a while but mostly played with a guitarist and drummer I had met at the Tally Ho. Travis Westmoreland played electric lead guitar Bob Miller was on drums, and I played acoustic guitar. They were professional musicians and they helped me make one hell of a sound for three pieces''.

JANUARY 1958

The singles PI 3421 ''Treat Me Right'' b/w ''I'm On The Way Home'' by Cliff, Ed and Barbara Thomas and PI 3526 ''You Are My Sunshine'' b/w/ ''Tootsie'' by Carl McVoy issued.

The U.S. launches the Explorer 1 satellite during January of 1958. Explorer 1 was first the satellite to be launched by the United States. The Soviet Union had already launched the world’s first satellite with Sputnik 1 in October of the previous year. The Explorer 1 was launched on a Jupiter C rocket and was used to measure the radiation in Earth’s orbit. The satellite successfully orbited Earth over 58,000 times before it re-entered the atmosphere in 1970. The success of the Explorer 1 satellite was an important milestone in the earliest years of the space race between the United States and Soviet Union.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Jimmy Isle and his brother Ronnie grew up in Nashville. They wrote many songs together: Jimmy has 39 entries in the B.M.I database (almost all of them co-written with his brother) and Ronnie 69. As a singer, Jimmy first appeared on the scene in 1957, with "Stay By My Side"/ "Baby-O" on the Chicago-based Bally label. The next year he recorded what is probably his best rocker, "Goin' Wild" for Morris Levy's Roulette label (4065).

Written by Ronnie Isle, "Goin' Wild" featured a group called The Southlanders on vocal backup, as well as some excellent work from the lead guitarist. A few months later, Ronnie Isle came up with an interesting rocking instrumental, "Wicked"/"Bad Sunburn" on MGM 12682, credited to Ron Isle and the Blisters.

At some point in 1958, Jimmy recorded "Diamond Ring" and "I've Been Waitin'" at a demo studio, Fidelity Recording, in Nashville. Fidelity was owned by Gary Walker, a songwriter from Springfield, Missouri.

Walker leased these masters to Sun Records in October 1958, and Sun picked up Isle's contract. The most obvious selling feature of "Diamond Ring" (Sun 306) and Isle's other releases was a rhythmic hook.

After being signed to Sun, Jimmy was brought to Memphis to record one session (produced by Jack Clement) from which two singles were drawn. The backing was supplied by Billy Riley (guitar), Pat O'Neill (bass), Tommy Ross (drums), Charlie Rich (piano) and Martin Willis (sax). "Without A Love"/"Time Will Tell" (Sun 318) was released in March 1959 and, like "Diamond Ring" was geared to the white teenage market. Billboard assigned both sides a three star rating, crediting Isle with singing "with spirit and style". In honesty, Jimmy's three Sun singles were not among the greatest music the legendary label released, and the third one, "What A Life"/"Together" (Sun 332) was easily the least effective of the lot, softened as it was by sweet girl voices. It stiffed big time, thereby ending Isle's one y ear association with the label. Jimmy moved to the Everest label, on which he had three singles released (1959-60). After a slight lull, he turned up on Mala in 1963 and on Diamond in 1964, after which he disappeared. His brother Ronnie had releases on Metro (1959), Image (1960) and Warwick (1961) and later died in a car wreck. According to Hank Davis, Jimmy is still living in Nashville.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JIMMY ISLE

DEMO STUDIO, FIDELITY RECORDING, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: 1957 / 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER: GARY WALKER

Jimmy Isle and his brother Ronnie were from Nashville, Tennessee, and, at some point in 1957 or 1958 Jimmy recorded these compositions at a demo session at Fidelity Recording in Nashville. Fidelity was owned by Gary Walker, a songwriter from the Springfield, Missouri area, who had come to Nashville in the wake of his biggest hit, Jim Reeves' "According To My Heart". He later ripped Lowery Music, and later still started Nashville famous used record stores, the Great Escape.

Gary Walker leased these masters to Sun Records in October 1958, and Sun picked up Isle's contract. If these sides ever contained any bite or trace of southern music, they were obscured by the hovering presence of the chorus. Isle's music is essentially geared for the white teenage market. Its most obvious selling feature, here as on his other releases, was a rhythmic hook.

01 - "DIAMOND RING" - B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Jimmy Isle-Ronnie Isle
Publisher: - Kenny Mark Music
Matrix number: - U 325 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - October 25, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 306-B < mono
DIAMOND RING / I'VE BEEN WAITIN'
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

02 - "I'VE BEEN WAITIN'" - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Jimmy Isle-Ronnie Isle
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 324 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - October 25, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 306-A < mono
I'VE BEEN WAITIN' / DIAMOND RING
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Isle - Vocal and Guitar
Ronnie Isle - Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Jimmy Isle see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jimmy Isle's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR LEE MITCHELL & CURLEY MONEY
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957-1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1957/1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

01 - "CHAIN GANG CHARLIE" - B.M.I. - 1:28
Composer: - Curley Money
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - 1998
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8137-4 mono
UNISSUED SUN MASTERS
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-12 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

02 - "STOP YOUR KNOCKIN'" - B.M.I.
Composer: - Curley Money
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Bison Bop (LP) 33rpm BP-LP 2003-1 mono
CURLEY MONEY
Reissued: - 1985 Buffalo Bop (LP) 33rpm BP-LP 2003-1 mono
CURLEY MONEY

Didn't record for Sun, unless you count a namecheck on Phillips International 3530 beneath Lee Mitchell's name. One of the songs that Mitchell recorded but didn't release was "Chain Gang Charlie", a song Curley Money had recorded for his company, Rambler Records in Columbus, Georgia. Its Curley's original we have here, and it sits at Sun in a Rambler Records tape box.

03 - "THE FROG" - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 327 - Master - Instrumental
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3530-A < mono
THE FROG / A LITTLE BLUE BIRD TOLD ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Now this should have been the real follow-up to Bill Justis' "Raunchy". Slap Bill Justis' name on it and you're set to go. I mean, hell, that's Justis playing sax on "The Frog". Why not just credit him and be done with it? Ironically, the formula here is closer to the original record of "Raunchy" than anything subsequently issued under Justis' name. Even beyond the saxwork, we have that weird hoedown guitar (courtesy of Billy Riley) and a guitar break that lies strikingly close to the original Justis record.

What's unclear at this point is what role Mitchell played in all this. In a recent interview with Colin Escott, Mitchell disavowed any involvement in "The Frog". Despite the label credit to the Curley Money Combo, it was Sun session guys all the way. Money had done no more than bring Mitchell to Sun Records.

It's hard to figure out Curley Money's involvement in Lee Mitchell's Phillips International record. His name is on the credits, and its possible that his band worked with Mitchell on "Blue Bird". At some point, Mitchell drove to Sun with Helms, and its possible that Curley Money went with them.

04 - "A LITTLE BLUE BIRD TOLD ME" - B.M.I. - 2:12
Composer: - G. Bozeman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 328 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - June 1958
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3530-B < mono
A LITTLE BLUE BIRD TOLD ME / THE FROG
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-4-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Lee Mitchell - Vocal
Curley Money Trio

Billy Riley - Guitar
Jack Clement - Bass
Bill Justis - Saxophone
Jimmy M. Van Eaton - Drums
Charlie Rich - Piano

For Biography of Lee Mitchell and Curley Money see: > The Sun Biographies <
Lee Mitchell and Curley Money's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

UNTOLD SUN STORIES BY LEE MITCHELL - "I was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1936. Grover C. Mitchell is my real name. I worked sideshows in Fort Benning, Georgia, national Guard Armories, skating rinks... that sort of thing. I played drums and sing. I had a good feel for making up songs, and I'd sing 'em on the bandstand right after I'd made 'em up. If the people liked 'em, I'd go home and write down the lyrics. "Blue Bird" was recorded at WRBL-TV Columbus by Ben Parsons, who ran a talent programma and was on radio too.

We used a vocal group from Phoenix City, Alabama, the Charmettes, who were twelve, thirteen and fourteen year old. I had a manager then, Bob Helms. You can jerk a manager out of the bushes if it looks like you're gonna make it, and this guy latched onto me''.

''He worked for Dixie Distributing and he took the master to Sam Phillips and Sam liked it. Helms never done anything else for me, though. I got a lot of bad advice. I still got a lot of stuff lingering out there in the dark somewhere".

"After Sun, I recorded for some hometown outfits. Got a lot of records out on Curley Money's Rambler Records. I wrote some more songs. All the time I was working in a steel mill in Atlanta, but I'm retired now".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SONNY BURGESS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES 1957/1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

The rhythm and blues charts provided a regular source of material for sequestering by rockabilly performers during the fifties, and it was to Clyde McPhatter and The Drifters that the astute Sonny Burgess looked for "What'cha Gonna Do". Even with all of the Sun trappings in place a single didn't materialise, yet on the plus side pianist Kern Kennedy underwrote the track with an early slab of the blues-driven "Memphis Beat", a figure that would become par for the course during the sixties.

01 - "OH MAMA" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1022-2 mono
SONNY BURGESS - WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-3 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

02 - "TRUCKIN' DOWN THE AVENUE" - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1027-3 mono
SONNY BURGESS AND THE PACERS
Reissued:- 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-4 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

03 - "WHAT'CHA GONNA DO" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Ahmet Nugetre
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Mistitled "Higher"*.
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - 1982 - Not Originally Issued
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CFM 508-5 mono
DIXIE BOP
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-6 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1959

Sonny Burgess and The Pacers loved rhythm and blues music and probably listened to more of it than most rockabilly singers (with the exception of Elvis, of course). On ''What'cha Gonna Do'' they've taken a vintage track by Clyde McPhatter and the Drifters, recorded in February 1954, and made it their own. Sonny was no match for Clyde, but his band retains some of the raw enthusiasm of the original. Of necessity they've turned more adult concerns into teen fluff about dating. And they've made a telling change in Clyde's original: ''What you gonna do / when the church is on fire'' has become (probably at Sam's insistence) ''What you gonna do / when your house is on fire''

There's no harm in those changes since McPhatter's original was not going to cross over into the pop market and somebody had to ''translate'' it for the white folks, so why not Sonny and his pals from Arkansas? In any case, all that is academic since Sam Phillips never saw fit to release the track. It became one of many worthy Sonny Burgess tracks that remained in the vault for 20-30 years awaiting the Sun archeologists from Europe in the 1970s and 1980s.

Drummer Bobby Crafford does a fine job on this track. His work is driving, which is precisely what the track needs. During the final 12 bars, his backbeat nearly pushes the needle through the top of the level meter on Sam's tape machine. Today (2017), old friends Bobby Grafford and Sonny Burgess still perform together.

04 - "SO GLAD YOU'RE MINE" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Arthur Crudup
Publisher: - Crudup Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Labelled "Oo-Wee" on tape box; piano intro.
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1027-9 mono
SONNY BURGESS AND THE PACERS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-5 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

05 - "SO GLAD YOU'RE MINE" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Arthur Crudup
Publisher: - Crudup Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - Unknown - Alternate Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Labelled "Changed My Mind" on tape box; guitar intro.
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - 1978 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30115-A-4 mono
SUN THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 8 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-8 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

06 - "FEELIN' GOOD" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Herman Parker
Publisher: - Delta Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - Unknown - Mistitled "Feel So Good".*
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30136-10 mono, dub off disc
SONNY BURGESS - THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-7 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

07 - "ONE NIGHT OF SIN" - B.M.I. - 3:08
Composer: - Dave Bartholomew-Pearl King
Publisher: - Travis Music - EMI-United Artist Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30115-A-5 mono
SUN THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 8 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-9 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

08 - "ALWAYS WILL" - B.M.I. - 3:12
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1039-2 mono
V' 3 - SONNY BURGESS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-10 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

09 - "LITTLE TOWN BABY" - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records 1978 (LP) 33rpm CR 30115-A-6 mono
SUN THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 8 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-11 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

10 - "YOU'RE NOT THE ONE FOR ME" - .M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30136-7 mono, dub off disc
SONNY BURGESS – THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-12 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

11 - "MR. BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30115-A-3 mono
SUN THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 8 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-13 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
Possibly J.C. Caughron - Guitar
Johnny Ray Hubbard - Bass
Kern Kennedy - Piano
Bobby Crafford – Drums

For Biography of Sonny Burgess see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sonny Burgess' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SONNY BURGESS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATES 1957/1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

With the exception of Jerry Lee Lewis, Sonny Burgess probably left more prime material unreleased in the Sun vaults than any other artist. Even given the high stabdard of what Burgess left behind, the next track is a gem - eminent worthy of release back in 1957 or so when it was recorded. What stands out for us today is the wonderful Chuck Berrysque lyric (rhyming radio stations with U - nited nations); the great instrumental sound, and, not least, Roy Orbison's vocal support behind Burgess. Any student or Orbi's career will recognize that its a short distance between the "bop bop badi do wah's" here and "Dom dom dom dombie doo wah's" - that began Phase 2 of Orbison's career in 1960 with "Only The Lonely". The great chord changes here are anchored by an all but ordinary flatted 6 chord - a touch introduced to rockabilly by Carl Perkins in "Honey Don't". And that memorable guitar figure that drives this record also makes a brief appearance in Joe Maphis's stellar guitar solo on Rockey Nelson's "Waitin' In School".

01(1) - "FIND MY BABY FOR ME" - B.M.I. - 0:28
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - 2x False Start - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-14 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1959

01(2) - "FIND MY BABY FOR ME" - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30136-5 mono, dub off disc
SONNY BURGESS – THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-15 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 – 1959

01(3) - "FIND MY BABY FOR ME/
SADIE BROWN (SADIE'S BACK IN TOWN) (INCOMPLETE)" - B.M.I. - 3:24
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - November 1986
First appearances: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 106-6-7 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE ROCKING YEARS - WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - May 29, 2013 Bear Family Record (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17313-4-18 mono
THE SUN ROCK BOX 1954 - 1959

02 - "TOMORROW NIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Bourne Company
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/58
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30115-A-8 mono
SUN THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 8 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-16 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

Both of the titles above are on the same session reel.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
J.C Caughron - Guitar
Johnny Ray Hubbard - Bass
Kern Kennedy - Piano
Bobby Crafford - Drums
Unknown - Vocal Chorus include Roy Orbison

For Biography of Sonny Burgess see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sonny Burgess' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

George Klein was a long-time Memphis disc jockey and member of Elvis Presley's inner circle. Klein actually had two releases on Sun Records - one the Jerry Lee Lewis novelty record ("The Return Of Jerry Lee") created to make light of his 1958 British tour debacle. Klein's second Sun release was the forgettable March 1961 ''U.T. Party''.

What we have here is an entirely different matter. Although it may have been something of a theological stretch for him, Klein performs a traditional southern Baptist hymn in the very style that served as nightly entertainment at Elvis' house. In all likelihood, Klein has simply taken a bit of Graceland and transported it to 706 Union.

This tape fragment, probably a spontaneous warmup track, also features the dynamic piano work of Ed Thomas, another Memphis media personality, whose records with younger brother Cliff were released on Phillips International.

STUDIO SESSION FOR GEORGE KLEIN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

01 - "POCKETFUL OF SNOW"
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably 1958

02 - "LORD LEAD ME HOME" - B.M.I. - 1:11
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1958
Released: - 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387-16 mono
SUN GOSPEL
Reissued: - December 16, 2008 Licensemusic (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - CHRISTMAS GREATS - VOLUME 2

03 - "OH, LORD, REMEMBER ME"
Composer: - Traditional
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
George Klein - Vocal
Ed Thomas - Vocal and Piano
Probably Elvis Presley - Off Mic

For Biography of George Klein see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Allen Wingate, who game to Tennessee from De Land, Florida, had some measure of success not with Sun Records, but rather with the Moon label in Memphis, owned by Cordell Jackson. Wingate recorded for Moon Records under the name Allen Page and was a member of The Big Four, who served as the label's de facto house band. Page or Wingate had at least five records appear under his name for Moon and wrote several songs recorded by other artists for the label.

Other than his connection with one single by Ernie Barton, it seems that Alan Wingate had far more impact on Moon Records than its better known celestial rival across town.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ALLEN WINGATE (ALLEN PAGE)
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Allen Wingate saw his name on one Sun? Phillips International single - as composer of both sides of Ernie Barton's 1958 "Raining The Blues" (PI 3528). That label actually reads "Al and Jo-Ann Wingate". As these demos reveal, Wingate was a competent composer and performer with a genuine feel for the darker, more sullen side of rockabilly.

01 - "WHAT ELSE COULD I DO" - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - Allen Wingate
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1958
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-5 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

"What Else Could I Do?" features s string bass and some Sun-sounding echo. The opening to this track recalls the sintrumental figure used by Barton his version of "Raining The Blues". The lead guitar provides some countryish licks in a style not unlike Scotty Moore's on Elvis earliest recordings. Of Wingate's three demos, this one alone sounds as if it might have been recorded at Sun. Certainly, it embodies the best of understated rockabilly - a sparse instrumental track (acoustic guitar, lead electric and heavy slap bass to drive the rhythm). The vocal is sexy and understated, and the overall effect is quite hypnotic in a style that finds expression today in some of Chris Isaak's recordings.

The remaining two demos have a different recorded sound and are more likely to have been mailed in from home. Wingate's version of "Raining The Blues" is far sunnier than Barton's released version. Despite a fine lead guitar track, the absence of vocal echo and slap bass on this demo show just how important these elements were to the overall mystique of rockabilly. Despite these lacks, it is interesting to hear how Barton's memorable record began life as a mailed-in demo. "Should Be You" features a stop-time rhythm and fine performance by Wingate, again revealing his affinity for this music.

02 - "SHOULD BE YOU" - B.M.I. - 1:43
Composer: - Allen Wingate
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1958
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-17 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

03 - "RAINING THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 1:41
Composer: - Allen Wingate-Jo Ann Wingate
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date Probably 1958
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-29 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Allen Wingate - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Alan Wingate see: > The Sun Biographies <
Alan Wingate's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHN TOLLESON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

The Sun vaults seem to hold an inexhaustible supply of material like this. It is almost certain that John Tolleson recorded these demos around 1958 and mailed them into Sun. That interested somebody enough to keep them for future reference, neatly filed away with Tolleson's name misspelled. Unfortunately for the artist, that magic phone call or letter never came. And when John Tolleson still lives in Fayetteville, Arkansas, he never had had the thrill of seeing his name on a yellow Sun label.

These release of this material would no doubt have pleased him, although there was no shortage of material out there bearing the names John Tolleson or Johnnie Tolleson or Tommie Tolleson - all of which appear to have been moms du disque for our man, John.

"Searchin' For My Baby" shows that Tolleson could rock his way around the keyboard, although he saddles himself with some stilted lyrics when he starts rhyming "gaj" with "pal". Those kinds of lyrics were at home on a Jimmie Rodgers record thirty years before Tolleson walked into a studio.

01 - "SEARCHIN' FOR MY BABY" - B.M.I. - 1:27
Composer: - John Tolleson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-6 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17
Reissued: - May 28, 2009 Burning Love Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - ROCKABILLY ON FIRE

"Hickory Nut Mountain" features a Bo Diddley rhythm - a less ordinary approach to rockabilly that will be familiar to Sun fans from Billy Riley's "No Name Girl" and Tommy Blake's "Sweetie Pie". Buddy Holly fans will think of "Not Fade Away". And on the more obscure front, there's Jody Reynolds' "Daisy Mae".

02 - "HICKORY NUT MOUNTAIN" - B.M.I. - 1:23
Composer: - John Tolleson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-15 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17
Reissued: - May 28, 2009 Burning Love Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - ROCKABILLY ON FIRE

"Rocky Road Blues" was probably learned from Ronnie Self's 1957 single, although its possible that Tolleson also know Bill Monroe's original.

03 - "ROCKY ROAD BLUES'' - B.M.I. - 1:48
Composer: - Bill Monroe
Publisher: - Southern Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-25 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17
Reissued: - May 28, 2009 Burning Love Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - ROCKABILLY ON FIRE

"Don't Sweetheart Me" surely represented one of the more creative titles in the demo in-basket, although it features some odd rhyming patterns.

04 - "DON'T SWEETHEART ME" - B.M.I. - 1:21
Composer: - John Tolleson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - August 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-33 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17
Reissued: - May 28, 2009 Burning Love Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
VARIOUS ARTISTS - ROCKABILLY ON FIRE

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
John Tolleson - Vocal and Piano
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of John Tolleson see: > The Sun Biographies <
John Tolleson's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©
 
STUDIO SESSION FOR CHARLIE FEATHERS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958
 
SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: POSSIBLE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN
 
Charlie Feathers and an unidentified second guitarist (probably Quinton Claunch) turn their hands to one of the mellowest and most affecting ballads in the Sun vaults. It was a demo that was pitched to Tommy Tucker who recorded it for Hi Records in 1959. Claunch claims to have written the song single-handedly and then given 33% to Cantrell because of their longstanding agreement and another 33% to Feathers in exchange for singing the demo. Jim Denny at Cedarwood Music in Nashville reportedly offered to get a major artist to cut it if he could get the publishing, but Hi's Joe Cuoghi turned him down. Feathers' vocal is noticeably free of the vocal gimmickry that became his trademark when the results might be destined for release. This is simply a wonderful performance with a plaintive, almost folky quality.
 
01 - "MAN IN LOVE" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - Charlie Feathers-Bill Cantrell-Quinton Claunch
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Possible 1958
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm LP 126-14 mono
COTTON CHOPPER COUNTRY
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311 3-20 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Charlie Feathers - Vocal and Guitar
Quinton Claunch – Guitar

For Biography of Charlie Feathers see: > The Sun Biographies <
Charlie Feathers' Sun/Flip recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE SUNRAYS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - STAN KESLER

How many Sun fans bought this record back in 1958 and wondered what had hit them? No review in Billboard. No advance publicity. Virtually no air play north of the Tennessee state line. Who were the Sunrays? That mystery stayed pretty well intact until recently (even the redoubtable Sun Records Discography by Escott and Hawkins came up empty. "Unknown vocal group. Unknown date. Possibly 706 Union".

In a 1989 interview with Barbara Pittman, all was revealed. "Stan Kesler had in mind that he wanted to put together a vocal group, an Anita Kerr type of thing. He got us all into the studio. It was horrible. The voices just clashed. It was real difficult. The arrangement was all Stan's. Elsie Sappington sang that little solo on there. I was just a kid and my voice hadn't developed enough for me to hit those high notes. I sang lead all the way through until that part of the song". The Sunrays consisted of Barbara, along with Elsie Sappington, Hank Byers and Jimmy Knight.

01(1) - "LOVE IS A STRANGER*" - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 300 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 293-A < mono
LOVE IS A STRANGER / THE LONELY HOURS
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

In truth, "Love Is A Stranger" isn't that bad a record. The instrumental backing track is particularly solid and driving. The lyric is servicable, and the key modulations provide a fair amount of tension. Probably the worst thing about SUN 293 is that it appeared on a Sun label. The expectations were just too high.

01(2) - "LOVE IS A STRANGER*" - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-2-12 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

02 - "THE LONELY HOURS" - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Stan Kesler
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 301   - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 293-B < mono
THE LONELY HOURS / LOVE IS A STRANGER
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Sunrays consisting of
Barbara Pittman - Vocal
Elsie Sappington - Vocal*
Jimmy Knight - Vocal
Hank Byers - Vocal
 
Stan Kesler - Bass, Steel Guitar
Jimmy Knight - Guitar
Clyde Leoppard - Drums
Hank Byers - Trumpet
Smokey Joe Baugh – Piano
 
For Biography of The Sunrays see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Sunrays' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SONNY BURGESS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY JACK CLEMENT

Session dated to 1958 because "Skinny Ginny" cloned from Larry Williams' "Bonie Maronie", a hit in the early months of 1958. Possible recorded with "Mama Loochie" next session below.

01(1) - "TOMORROW NEVER COMES" - B.M.I. - 0:14
Composer: - Ernest Tubb-Johnny Bond
Publisher: - Hill and Range Songs Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-17 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

01(2) - "TOMORROW NEVER COMES" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Ernest Tubb-Johnny Bond
Publisher: - Hill and Range Songs Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1039-11 mono
V' 3 - SONNY BURGESS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-18 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

02 - "SKINNY GINNY" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - Unknown - Mistitled "Sweet Jenny" - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-17 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959
Reissued: - 2005 Emusic Records (CD) 500/200rpm Sun 10932959 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE COMPLETE SUN RECORDINGS - VOLUME 2

03 - "SO SOON" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1958
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30115-A-7 mono
SUN THE ROOTS OF ROCK VOLUME 8 - SUN ROCKS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-18 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal, Guitar
Chatter references to J.C. Caughron
J.C. Caughron - Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass
Kern Kennedy - Piano
Bobby Crafford – Drums

For Biography of Sonny Burgess see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sonny Burgess' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SONNY BURGESS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1958

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE - PROBABLY 1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PROBABLY JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "MAMA LOOCHIE" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Lee Diamond
Publisher: - Regent Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Mistitled "Oochie Coochie" - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date - Probably 1958
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1037 mono
AFTER THE HOP
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-21mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

01(2) - "MAMA LOOCHIE" - B.M.I. - 0:43
Composer: - Lee Diamond
Publisher: - Regent Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Breakdown - False Starts - Mistitled "Ootchie Kootchie"*
Recorded: - Unknown Date - Probably 1958
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1039 mono
V'3 SONNY BURGESS
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-22 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

01(3) - "MAMA LOOCHIE" - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Lee Diamond
Publisher: - Regent Music Corporation
Matrix number: - None - Complete Take 3 - Mistitled "Ootchie Kootchie"*
Recorded: - Unknown Date - Probably 1958
Released: - 1987
First appearance: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-2-23 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
Billy Riley - Bass or Guitar
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Unknown - Piano
Martin Willis - Saxophone

Billy Riley and James M. Van Eaton identified in session chatter.

For Biography of Sonny Burgess see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sonny Burgess' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

(Above) Claudette Frady (September 5, 1941-June 6, 1966), son Roy Dewayne Orbison (April 18, 1958 - September 15, 1968), and Roy Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), photos circa 1959.

JANUARY 1958

Shortly after Roy Orbison's "Chicken Heart" was flopped, Orbison returned to Texas with his new bride, Claudette Frady, from Odessa. She had joined him in Memphis; for a while before their marriage in 1957, they chastely slept in separate rooms at Sam Phillips' house at 233 North Waldran in Memphis.

Johnny Cash's Sun single "Ballad Of A Teenage Queen" was picked by Billboard as a "dual market contender" in January 1958.

Carl Perkins, having left Sun, cuts his first session for Columbia. Johnny Cash tours the midwest with Roy Acuff and the Wilburn Brothers. Jerry Lee Lewis tours Australia with the Crickets and Paul Anka.

> Page Up <

> Continued: 1958 Sessions 1 (2) <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©