CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1957 Sun Schedule <

1957 SESSIONS (3)
March 1, 1957 to  March 31, 1957

Studio Session for Rudi Richardson, Probably March 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Buddy Blake Cunningham, Probably March 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Onie Wheeler, March 14, 1957 / Columbia Records
Studio Session for Billy Emerson, March 27, 1957 / Vee Jay Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, March 28, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, Probably Spring 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Mack Self, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Four Dukes, March 29, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Sonny Burgess, Unknown Date 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Mann, Probably Early 1957 / Jaxon Records

For Biographies of Artists see > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

MARCH 1957

Carl Perkins "Your True Love" is number 1 on the Memphis charts. Johnny Cash is announced as the top seller in country and western for the first quarter of 1957.

Roy Orbison's single ''Sweet And Easy''/''Devil Doll'' released by Sun Records.

MARCH 1957

Back in Texas former Sun artist Dean Beard hung out some more with producer Slim Willet, and pitched him another song he'd written with Ray Doggett, ''On My Mind Again''. ''Slim really loved that song'', Beard told Wayne Russell. ''We needed something for the back side, and I got hold of Jimmy Seals and James Steward. I had met Dash Crofts over in Cisco. I liked the way he played drums. We recorded in Slim's garage''. The record came out on Willet's Edmoral Records in March 1957, and the response was good. ''Everyone was calling about ''On My Mind Again'', trying to buy the master'', Dean told Russell. ''Lew Chudd called Slim from Imperial. I think Columbia called and Gale Storm on Dot covered ''On My Mind Again'', but it was the flip-side, ''Rakin' And Scrapin''', that would have collectors emptying their pockets in years to come.

That first Atlantic singles created sufficient buzz for the label to pick up two more Dean Beard singles via Willet. One of them, ''Party, Party'' had the grungy, garage feel of the best rockabilly. ''It almost took off real big, Dean told Russell. ''I still have telegrams from places like Cleveland, Atlanta, Mobile. It looked like it was gonna break''. Beard thought the big time had arrived, and bought an old transit bus, refurbished it, and painted ''Dean Beard and the Crew Cats'' on the side.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sun's 200 series is sacred, and justly so. It contains early and wondrous recordings by Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny cash, Carl Perkins, Billy Riley, Sonny Burgess, Warren Smith, as well as several blues classics and one-off rockabilly jewels. Two records, one by Jean Chapel and another by Rudi Richardson, never seemed to belong in that fabled sequence, and with good reason: neither was a Sun recording.

A couple of other leased-in productions from Hardrock Gunter didn't sound nearly as incongruous as Richardson's and Chapel's records. It seems as if Sam Phillips was hung up a song called ''Fools Hall Of Fame''. Written by Texas rockabilly singer Danny Wolfe, it was published by Gene Autry's Golden West Melodies.

Both Johnny Cash and Roy Orbison recorded it at Sun, but the first version was Rudi Richardson's. A year or two earlier, business-savvy Gene Autry had done well with ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'', a song originally recorded by the Prisonaires on Sun.

He'd acquired the music publishing, and his partner, Joe Johnson, placed the song on a Dick Richards hillbilly session. Johnson had once worked as an intern to Richards' producer, Don Law, and it was Law who handed the song to his A&R counterpart, Mitch Miller, who in turn produced Johnnie Ray's record. Ray's single netted Autry around $58,000, prompting him to fund Johnson’s dream of a record label. They wanted to name it Champion Records after Autry's wonder horse, but Decca owned that name so they chose Challenge Records. Be fore Challenge was launched, it's likely that Johnson produced a session by Rudi Richardson comprised of four songs that he and Autry owned. Two of them, ''Fool's Hall Of Fame'' and ''Teenage Hangout'', were Wolfe's (''Teenage Hangout'' was recorded by Mac Wiseman in April 1957 during his mercifully brief career as a rock and roll singer). The B-side of ''Fool's Hall Of Fame'', ''Why Should I Cry'', was written by Autry's Nashville song-plugger Troy Martin (aka Jerry Organ), Joe Johnson, and Wayne Walker. The fourth song, ''Not Until I Pray For You'', was written by Leon Cole and Jeanne Stevens, and was first recorded by Richardson but first released by Dick Richards, the singer who'd recorded ''Just Walkin' In The Rain'' before Johnnie Ray.

It was probably either Joe Johnson or Troy Martin who pitched Richardson's session to Sam Phillips in late 1956 or early 1957.An acetate shows that the original master numbers were U-238 and U-239, numbers eventually reassigned to Sonny Burgess's ''Restless''/''Ain't Got A Thing'', released in January 1957. Challenge was launched in March 1957, and Richardson's record was finally released in July or August. The recordings were probably made in Nashville. It's possible that Troy Martin, who spent many nights drinking in nightclubs, might have seen Richardson, who performed often Nashville, and brought him to Johnson's attention.

STUDIO SESSION FOR RUDI RICHARDSON 1957

RECORDED PROBABLY IN NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY MARCH 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER JOE JOHNSON OR TROY MARTIN

The first person to wonder what Memphis-born Rudolph Richardson Riles moved to Chicago and debuted on the Miracle label in 1946. He was back in Memphis a decade or so later, is doing in the middle of the Sun release schedule for Spring, 1957. This record is a total anomaly. Taken on its own merits, it is not a bad record. Smooth, modern black vocal harmony: a latter day Ink Spots or Four Knights with a slight doowopping nod toward 1950s rhythm and blues. This is the kind of backup singing that Roy Orbison might have achieved on "Devil Doll" had his singers not been so, well, white.

Whatever the charms of this recording, it is hard to understand what its doing rubbing shoulders with "Miss Froggie" on one side and "Red Hot" on the other. The redoubtable Sun session file offers only 'unknown' next to the date, backing group or location of these recording. It seems clear that Rudi Richardson was black, and that he, his quartet, and instrumental combo (piano, guitar, bass and drums) were tight. It also seems a safe bet that these sides were not recorded at 706 Union. Six months after Rudi's single was released, Rudi died of drug and alcohol abuse in a Memphis hotel room.

01 - "FOOL'S HALL OF FAME" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - J. Freeman-Danny Wolf
Publisher: - Golden West Music
Matrix number: - U 252 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably March 1957
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 271-A < mono
FOOL'S HALL OF FAME / WHY SHOULD I CRY
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-4-11 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

To further complicate the puzzle, we also know that Johnny Cash, of all people, attempted a version of "Fool's Hall Of Fame" while at Sun, and so did Roy Orbison. After the Cash session, Sam Phillips wrote across the tape box "Never To Be Released", although his words later went unheeded. Even Elvis Presley wanted to record it.

02 - "WHY SHOULD I CRY" - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Jerry Organ-Joe Johnson-Wayne Walker
Publisher: - Golden West Music
Matrix number: - U 253 - Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably March 1957
Released: - April 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 271-B < mono
WHY SHOULD I CRY / FOOL'S HALL OF FAME
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-4-12 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

03 - "TEENAGE HANGOUT"
Composer: - Danny Wolfe
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 239 - Demo
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably March 1957
Released: - Sun Unissued

04 - "UNTIL I PRAY FOR YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Leon Cole-Jeanne Stevens
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably March 1957
Released: - 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387-9 mono
SUN GOSPEL

05 - "FOOLS HALL OF FAME" - B.M.I.
Composer: - J. Freeman-Danny Wolf
Publisher: - Golden West Music
Matrix number: - U 238 - Demo
Recorded: - Unknown Date / Probably March 1957
Released: - Sun Unissued

Rudi Richardson remains an enigma to Sun Records fans. His 1957 release ("Fools Hall Of Fame") seemed stylistically out of place at the time, although 50plus years have allowed a more charitable view of Richardson's music. With some hindsight, it is easy to see how Sam Phillips was drawn to the slick rofessionalism and retro (1940s) sound he heard here.

Whether recorded at Sun or bought from outside production, Richardson's tape box contains four titles. This marks the first time an additional title has been released. It is a sweet and loving ballad - a secular song with a religious twist, crooned in the smooth style associated with pop black quartets of the 1940s.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rudi Richardson - Vocal and Guitar
Unknown Musicians
Vocal Chorus - Jimmy Hart, Steve Spear, Mike Gardner,
James Tarbutton, David Beaver

Note: What little know of Rudi Richardson's life is recounted in the biography bloc. It seems likely that ''Fools Hall Of Fame'' was recorded in Nashville (perhaps that's Hank Garland on guitar) and leased to Sun. Clearly, Sam Phillips loved the song because he encouraged Roy Orbison and Johnny cash to record it without owning the publishing. Richardson, whose career dated back to the 1940s, turned in a blithely swinging performance that didn't belong on Sun but certainly belonged somewhere.

For Biography of Rudi Richardson > The Sun Biographies <
Rudi Richardson's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BUDDY BLAKE CUNNINGHAM
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY MARCH 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

The first Phillips International release extended the Sun career of Buddy Blake Cunningham. Blake had been last heard from three years earlier on SUN 208, a record most collectors remember with a shudder. The deservedly rare "Right Or Wrong"/"Why Do I Cry" makes most short lists for the least favorite and most anomalous early Sun release. For whatever reason, Blake's style held considerable appeal for Sam Phillips, who worked overtime with the local singer, scheduling sessions at 706 Union in March, April, May and June 1957. Blake left more that a dozen unissued sides from these dates which a quarter of a century of Sun archaeologists have never deemed worthy of resurrection. "Right Or Wrongly", Buddy Blake has never been the poster boy for Sun record collectors.

After his final session at 706 Union, the by now well-versed Blake departed to set up his own Cover Records operation.

01 - "PLEASE CONVINCE ME" – B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Bettye Maddox
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 302 Master - > PI 3516-3520 Series <
Recorded: - March 1957
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI 3516-B < mono
PLEASE CONVINCE ME / YOU PASS ME BY
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

If Blake's vocal style is hard to measure on this side, you need only turn the record over to understand what he, Sam Phillips and Jack Clement had in mind. "Please Convince Me" is a pop record by any standard relevant to 1957. From the piano triples and "doo doo wah" chorus, this is white pop music, and a pretty trite example at that. The last eight bars tell you everything you need to know about Blake and his roots. When evaluating the gentle acoustic feel of these sides, it's important to remember that Jerry Lee Lewis' "Whole Lotta Shakin'" and Warren Smith's "Miss Froggie" were recorded during exactly the same time period.

02 - "YOU PASS ME BY" – B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Hank Snow-E. Nesbit
Publisher: - Hill and Range Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 301 Master
Recorded: - March 1957
Released: - September 23, 1957
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 78/45rpm standard single > PI-3516-A < mono
YOU PASS ME BY / PLEASE CONVINCE ME
Reissued: - 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15805-3-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 5

This time, Blake left his big band, night club crooner roots behind in favor of a gentle pop/country approach. "You Pass Me By", recorded and co-written by Hank Snow in 1950, is a curious piece of material structurally. It retains an odd tension and manages to violate most rules of traditional country songwriting. Cunningham's arrangement features strong yet subtle interplay between Roland Janes' electric guitar and Jack Clement's acoustic picking. There is a clippity-clop western rhythm that almost suggests a horse loping across the prairie.

03 - "HITCH MY WAGON TO A STAR"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

04 - "HOW DO YOU THINK I FEEL"
Composer: - Wayne P. Walker-Webb Pierce
Publisher: - Gedar Music Publishing
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

05 - "I'M GONNA FIND HER"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

06 - "LORENA"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

07 - "MAYBE TOMORROW"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

08 - "YOU DON'T WANT TO BE TRUE"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

09 - "HOW DO YOU THANK AN ANGEL"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

10 - "DREAM OF YOU"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

11 - "ROCK ON"
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Buddy Blake Cunningham - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Lead Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Buddy Blake Cunningham see > The Sun Biographies <
Buddy Blake Cunningham's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

WEEK OF MARCH 10TH-16TH, 1957

Tulsa'a Top 50 Tunes, according to Record and Sheet Music
Sales, coin machine operators and radio requests
as determined by on accurate KTUL survey

01. Flying Saucer Rock & Roll - Billy Riley - Sun
02. Party Doll - Buddy Knox - Roulette
03. I'm Walkin' - Fats Domino - Imperial
04. Teen Age Crush - Tommy Sands - Capitol
05. Butterfly - Charlie Gracie - Cameo
06. Marianne - Hilltoppers - Dot
07. Too Much - Elvis Presley - RCA
08. Banana Boat - Harry Belafonte - RCA
09. Lucille - Little Richard - Specialty
10. Walkin' After Midnight - Patsy Cline - Decca
11. Young Love - Tab Hunter - Dot
12. Only One Love - George Hamilton IV - ABC-Paramount
13. Fools Fall In Love - The Drifters - Atlantic
14. Lucky Lips - Ruth Brown - Atlantic
15. Blue Monday - Fats Domino - Imperial
16. I'm Sticking With You - Jim Bowen - Roulette
17. Love Is Strange - Mickey & Silvia - Goove
18. Jim Dandy - La Verne Baker - Atlantic
19. I'm Wating Just For You - Pat Boone - Dot
20. Almost Paradise - Norman Petty Trio - ABC-Paramount
21. I'm Sorry - The Platters - Mercury
22. Sittin' In The Balcony - Johnny Dee - Colonial
23. Just Because - Lloyd Price - ABC-Paramount
24. Tricky - Gus Jinkins - Flash
25. Little Darlin' - The Diamonds - Mercury
26. Bad Boy - Clarence Palmer & Jivebombere - Savoy
27. Don't Forbit Me - Pat Boone - Dot
28. A Poor Man's Roses - Patti Page - Mercury
29. Who Needs You - The Four Lads - Columbia
30. The Man In The Phoone Booth - Big Bob Kornegay - Herald
31. Round And Round - Perry Como - RCA
32. Knee Deep In The Blues - Guy Mitchell - Columbia
33. Dreamy Eyes - The Four Preps - Capitol
34. Ram-Punk-Shush - Bill Doggett - King
35. Without Love - Clyde McPhatter - Atlantic
36. He's Got Time - McGuire Sisters - Coral
37. Ballerina - Nat King Cole - Capitol
38. I Need You So - Jessie Belvin - Modern
39. Gone - Ferlin Husky - Capitol
40. A Thousand Miles Away - The Heartbeats - Rama
41. Wringle Wrangle - Bill Hayes - ABC-Paramount
42. Come Go With Me - The Federals - DeLuxe
43. You Don't Owe Me A Thing - Johnny Ray - Columbia
44. One Love - The Cardinals - Atlantic
45. Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody -Jerry Lewis - Decca
46. I'm A Country Boy - Clarence Henry - Argo
47. Calypso Melody - David Rose - MGM
48. Teenage Crush - Frankie Lymon & Teenagers - Gee
49. Una Momento - Cathy Carr - Fraternity
50. First Impression - Eddie Gorme - ABC-Paramount

MARCH 1, 1957 FRIDAY

Etta James begins a lengthy tour in Columbia, Georgia.

The Everly Brothers recorded ''Bye Bye Love'' and ''I Wonder If I Care As Much'' at the Methodist Television, Radio and Film Commission in Nashville.

MARCH 2, 1957 SATURDAY

Jimmy Wakely and Patsy Cline appear on ABC-TV's ''Ozark Jubilee''.

MARCH 3, 1957 SUNDAY

Chicago's Catholic Diocese bans rock and roll from all school functions. Within days sales of r ock and roll records in Chicago go through the roof.

MARCH 4, 1957 MONDAY

Patsy Cline's husband-to-be, Charlie Dick, reports for service with the U.S. Army in South Carolina.

Columbia released Marty Robbins' ''A White Sport Coat (And A Pink Carnation)''.

Decca released the Kitty Wells and Webb Pierce duet ''O' So Many Years''.

MARCH 5, 1957 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley is parodied as ''Elvin Pelvin'' on CBS-TV's ''The Phil Silvers Show''.

MARCH 7, 1957 THURSDAY

Ray Price recorded ''I'll Be There (When You Get Lonely)'' and takes his first swipe at ''My Shoes Keep Walking Back To You'' during a five-hour session at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

MARCH 9, 1957 SATURDAY

''The Badge Of Marshall Brennan'' premieres in American movie theaters. The picture features Carl Smith and Marty Robbins.

Faron Young recorded ''The Shrine Of St. Cecillia'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville's Music Row.

Jerry Lee Lewis appears on the Big D Jamboree in Dallas, Texas.

MARCH 10, 1957 SUNDAY

Osama bin Laden is born in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A leader of the terrorist Al Qaeda organization, he oversees the attacks on American on September 11, 2001, and ends up referenced in Darryl Worley's song about the incident, ''Have You Forgotten?''.

MARCH 11, 1957 MONDAY

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''Honky Tonk Song''.

MARCH 14, 1957 THURSDAY

Johnny Horton makes contact with Shreveport psychic J. Bernard Ricks, beginning a friendship that lasts the rest of his life. The relationship hones Horton's own psychic abilities, and he eventually predicts, with accuracy, his own death will be violent.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The last Columbia single appeared in May 1957. It couplet the rockabilly flavoured ''Going Back To The City'' with ''Steppin' Out''. One of only two non-originals that future Sun artist, Onie Wheeler recorded while he was with Columbia. The rockabilly recordings were fine in their way, but Onie functioned best at a slower or mellow mid-tempo. It allowed all the subtle shadings in his voice to come to the fore. Somehow, there was a more compelling drive to the mid-tempo ''Run 'En Off'' than to the faster numbers.

Billboard's obituary called Onie, ''one of the pioneers of rockabilly'', but even though he was quick to spot the potential in Elvis Presley, his heart lay where it always had, in stone country music.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR ONIE WHEELER
FOR COLUMBIA RECORDS 1957

BRADLEY FILM & RECORDING STUDIO
804 16TH AVENUE SOUTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
COLUMBIA SESSION: THURSDAY MARCH 14, 1957
SESSION HOURS: 19:30-22:30
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – DON LAW

01 – ''GOING BACK TO THE CITY'' – B.M.I. - 2:17
Composer: - Jean Wheeler
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : OB 1316 / CO 57635
Recorded: - March 14, 1957
Released: - May 1957
First appearance: - Columbia Records (S) 78rpm standard single Columbia 40911-4 mono
GOING BACK TO THE CITY / STEPPIN' OUT
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-6 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

02 – ''LONG GONE'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : OB 1317 / CO 57636
Recorded: - March 14, 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-11-13 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-7 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

03 – ''STEPPIN' OUT'' – B.M.I. - 2:36
Composer: - Starr
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : OB 1318 / CO 57637
Recorded: - March 14, 1957
Released: - May 1957
First appearance: - Columbia Records (S) 78rpm standard single Columbia 40911-4 mono
STEPPIN' OUT / GOING BACK TO THE CITY
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-8 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

04 – ''I'LL LOVE YOU FOR A LIFETIME'' – B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : OB 1319 / CO 57638
Recorded: - March 14, 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-11-15 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-9 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Onie Wheeler – Vocal, Harmonica, Guitar
Harold Ray Bradley - Guitar
Ray Edenton – Guitar
Floyd T. ''Lightnin'''Chance – Bass
Farris Coursey – Drums
Floyd Cramer – Piano

Onie Wheeler had quit playing with the Nelson brothers again at some point in 1956 because Charlie Terrell had landed him a gig with Flatt and Scruggs who were hosting a syndicated television show and travelling far and wide. Terrell lent Onie a truck for the move to Nashville, and found him a house near the Cumberland River. It could have heralded a very successful period for Onie, but he did his best to self-destruct. ''He was getting calls from all kinds could move back to Sikeston and handle his career out of there. When he appeared at my door with all his stuff in a U-Haul, I gave up. I was looking for bigger things''. Terrell soon took over the management of Ray Smith, another Missourian with bags of talent and self-destruct buttons implanted all over him.

By the time the Columbia deal ended in 1957, Onie Wheeler was steppin' out with some of the most unregenerate rockabillies to walk the planet. Starting in March that year, Bob Neal had booked Onie and the Nelson Brothers onto his Stars Inc. package shows with Jerry Lee Lewis, Billy Riley, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash. By the end of 1957, Onie Wheeler was pretty tight with the Memphis crowd and went to Sun Records to cut a record that November.

For Biography of Onie Wheeler see > The Sun Biographies <
Onie Wheeler's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 15, 1957 FRIDAY

"Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" b/w ''It'll Be Me'' (Sun 267) by Jerry Lee Lewis is released, entering the local charts in May and hitting nationally throughout the summer.

MARCH 16, 1957 SATURDAY

Concurrently a move to develop links with radio were set up when the Eddie Bond Show was transmitted on KWEM, beginning a relationship with the airwaves that continues today. So now touring was joined by broadcasting as well as recording in the continually broadening of Eddie Bond's career.

At the same time Eddie signed with Bob Neal's Stars Inc., then looking after the interests of Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash with Warren Smith and Roy Orbison soon to be added to the ranks.

Other developments during this time included appearances on the Louisiana Hayride alongside Johnny Horton, Elvis Presley and Sonny James, and further touring alongside Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Harold Jenkins (later to become Conway Twitty), and Charlie Feathers.

''The dyed-in-the-wool country musicians would look down at us and say, 'There's one of THEM'', Eddie Bond told Raiteri. ''I was ashamed to do rockabilly, but not so ashamed I didn't want to make a livin' at it. We'd play schoolhouses, little theaters, honky tonks, and bar-rooms. Played on top of every drive-in movie theater from Texas to Arizona. Bob Neal would keep you real busy like that. Little school houses would fill up with people come to see Eddie Bond, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, and Roy Orbison''. Bond doubled as a disc jockey on KWEM, West Memphis from 2:30 until 4:30 every afternoon and, from April 28, 1957, he was a featured performer on the Louisiana Hayride. If not in the charts, he was busy.

MARCH 19, 1957 TUESDAY

Elvis Presley purchases a 18 room, $100,000 in Memphis. The house will be known as Graceland Mansion.

By the beginning of 1957, bitter disillusion was setting in for Carl Perkins. He had started off on an equal footing with Elvis Presley: they had both played for pennies off the back of a truck on Bob Neal's forays into Mississippi, and they had both shot up the charts with their ''mongrel music''. By 1957, however, Perkins was competing with Bill Haley for the honor of becoming rock and roll's first casualty. He had sold 1 million copies of ''Blue Suede Shoes'', only to slip into almost total obscurity. Elvis Presley went on to sell 12.5 million singles and 2.75 million albums in 1956.

MARCH 20, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Roni Stoneman, of The Stoneman Family, has her first child, Eugene Cox Jr.

MARCH 22, 1957 FRIDAY

A teenage marine accuses Elvis Presley of pulling a gun on him in Memphis. Three days later, Presley sends an apologetic six-page telegram, and the incident is brushed aside.

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''All Shook Up'' backed with ''That's When Your Heartaches Begin'' (RCA Victor 47-6870).

MARCH 23, 1957 SATURDAY

Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper finish a 10-year run on ''The Wheeling Jamboree'' in West Virginia, in preparation to move to Nashville, where they've already joined the Grand Ole Opry.

MARCH 24, 1957 SUNDAY

Singer/songwriter Carson Robison dies in Pleasant Valley, New York. A recording artist for four decades, he wrote many of his songs from the national events of the day. His hits included ''Hitler's Last Letter To Hirohito'' and ''Life Gits Tee-Jus Don't It''.

MARCH 25, 1957 MONDAY

Ricky Nelson holds his first recording session, singing ''I'm Walkin''', which he later lip-syns in an episode of ''The Adventures Of Ozzie and Harriet''.

Don Everly elopes with Mary Sue Ingraham, marrying in Ringgold, Georgia.

Broadway performer and rhythm and blues artist Shorty Long portrays a theater-goer in an episode of CBS-TV's ''I Love Lucy'' Long played piano during the Elvis Presley session that yielded ''Don't Be Cruel'' and ''Hound Dog''.

The Treaty of Rome was signed by West Germany, France, Belgium, Italy, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands establishing the European Economic Community, the precursor to the European Union. The Treaty of Rome created a common market to be shared between the six countries and was one of the main documents used to create the European Union in the 1990s. The European Atomic Energy Community Treaty was also signed at the same time with the goal of establishing peaceful atomic energy programs.

MARCH 26, 1957 TUESDAY

With a tour of U.S. military bases in Germany set to begin April 1, Jim Reeves, The Browns, Hank Locklin, Del Wood and Janis Martin appear on NBC-TV's ''The Tonight Show'' in a special installment from Nashville.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY EMERSON
FOR VEE JAY RECORDS 1957

UNIVERSAL RECORDING STUDIO
46 EAST WALTON STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
VEE JAY SESSION: WEDNESDAY MARCH 27, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – CALVIN CARTER

01 – ''SOMEBODY SHOW ME'' – B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Conrad Music
Matrix number: - 55-656
Recorded: - March 27, 1957
Released: - 1957
First appearance: - Vee-Jay Records (S) 45rpm standard single VJ 247 mono
SOMEBODY SHOW ME / THE PLEASURE IS ALL MINE
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-20 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

By March 27, former Sun recording artist Billy Emerson was back in Chicago recording a second session for Vee-Jay. He made four titles including one that still stands out in his mind. ''My best record'', he told, ''was ''The Pleasure Is All Mine'', a city blues that thought came out real well''. Although ''Pleasure'' is a crisp, uptempo song with rock and roll riffs and chorus, it is nevertheless based on the familiar melody of ''When It Rains''. There is a good interplay between sax and horn solos and this recording was indeed a contender. In ''Somebody Show Me'', Emerson is looking to find the way to go home to make everything alright with his baby. It features a rock and roll piano figure and sax solo and with the female vocal chorus it also had all the hallmarks of a potential cross-over hit.

''The Pleasure Is All Mine'' and ''Somebody Show Me'' were issued in the summer of 1957 on Vee-Jay 247 and by May Emerson was appearing with The Spaniels at the Liberty Theater in Philadelphia showcasing his new songs. In August Billboard caught him on stage in Gary, Indiana at a celebration for disc jockey Vivian Carter, the wife of Vee-Jay Records president Jimmy Bracken.

02 – ''THE PLEASURE IS ALL MINE'' – B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Conrad Music
Matrix number: - 55-657
Recorded: - March 27, 1957
Released: - 1957
First appearance: - Vee-Jay Records (S) 45rpm standard single VJ 247 mono
SOMEBODY SHOW ME / THE PLEASURE IS ALL MINE
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-21 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

03 – ''DO THE CHICKEN'' – B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Conrad Music
Matrix number: - 55-658
Recorded: - March 27, 1957
Released: - 1982
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CFM 602 mono
BILLY THE KID EMERSON – CRAZY 'BOUT AUTOMOBILES
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-22 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

This other two sides from this session remained unissued at the time. One was ''Do The Chicken'', a dance craze song cloned from the Sun recording of ''Shim Sham Shimmy''. This is a tighter production, but no less raucous and it could have done juke box business if it had been released. The other unissued song was ''Don't Be Careless'', a gospel-based song with a repeating lyric and Emerson preaching his secular love while a vocal group takes the part of the congregation.

04 – ''DON'T BE CARELESS'' – B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - William Robert Emerson
Publisher: - Conrad Music
Matrix number: - 55-658
Recorded: - March 27, 1957
Released: - 1982
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CFM 602 mono
BILLY THE KID EMERSON – CRAZY 'BOUT AUTOMOBILES
Reissued: - 2009 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16937-23 mono
BILLY EMERSON – THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
William Robert Emerson – Vocal & Piano
William ''Lefty'' Bates – Guitar
Quin Wilson – Bass
Al Duncan – Drums
McKinley Easton – Baritone Saxophone
James ''Red'' Holloway – Tenor Saxophone
Hobert Dotson - Trumpet

For Biography of Billy Emerson see > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MARCH 28, 1957 THURSDAY

Patsy Cline's divorce from Gerald Cline is finalized.

Elvis Presley wears a $2,500 gold lame suit, inspired by Liberace, for the first time during a concert at the International Amphitheater in Chicago. The suit is designed by hillbilly fashion specialist Nudie Cohn. There was a crowd of 12,000.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY MARCH 28, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

''FOREVER YOURS''

Back In March l957, George Hamilton IV's hit record ''A Rose And A Baby Ruth'' was stall on the charts when Carl recorded this. If this was the era for candy-bar inspired love songs, Carl wanted a piece of the action. ''Forever Your'' bars may be all but forgotten now, but these ''vanilla Milky Way'' bars were once quite popular. They disappeared from the candy counters of America abut 20 years later in 1979, but this was Carl Perkins attempt to continue the candy bar trend in American popular music. Commercial tie-in or not, this is a damn fine ballad and, needless to say, light years away from the ballad style we've heard previously on ''Turn Around'' or ''I'm Not Sorry''. One aside about the original single record: When original released on Sun 274, ''Forever Yours'' was coupled with that nasty little opus called ''That's Right''. It was an odd paring to say the least.

We're going to go out on a limb here and say that ''Forever Yours'' is the most beautiful song Carl Perkins recorded for Sun. It's true that most of what fans value about Perkins' work isn't tied up in ballads, but this one is a stunner. Arguably, the big selling point is that flatted VI chord (C in the key of E) in the release. It's beautiful and unexpected. According to his bio, Carl nearly had a mutiny on his hands when he taught the song to brother Jay. It's also not the first time Carl worked that territory. The same chord change appeared in ''Honey Don't'', when Carl was in his more accustomed rockabilly mode. But here, in a ballads he adds a 4-note to the chord making it a little softer and warmer than the straight version of the chord that appeared in the uptempo ''Honey Don't''.

Another feature that takes ''Forever Yours'' into a very special realm is the recording mix. For this, we have Sam to thank. The slap bass is miked so prominently, it's almost shocking. Forget the drums; this one is driven by Clayton's bass. When is the last time you heard a ballad recorded like this? It was one thing on ''Blue Suede Shoes''. But a percussive bass on a ballad? You betcha, and it works like a charm.

Sadly, we were only able to find one outtake of ''Forever Yours'', and it's not all that different from the issued version. The bass is every bit as percussive as on the single, sometimes startlingly so. The reverb on the vocal gives it an unearthly quality. If you want to understand the difference between Sun reverb and regular studio echo, just listen to this record.

W.S.'s drums are more clearly recorded here than on the issued version. Listen to them especially during the first release Carl's guitar solo is just lovely In fact, this is a fine take of the song, arguably superior in some ways to the single. What sabotages this outtake is the ending, which is weak enough for Sam to call of for a second recording. That one turned into the master.

In order to give a little more dimension to Carl's issued performance, we have included a live version from a TV show taped just months after ''Forever Yours'' was released. Obviously the sound quality is a step down from the master tape, but it's still quite revealing. Carl's vocal is really beautiful – both soulful and expressive. Just listen to him wail during the second released tempo! The tempo is a bit brisker than the single and Carl concentrates on playing triplets on his guitar. What the live version brings home is that Carl was the real deal. There he stands in front of the mike, facing the studio audience, performing the song. No lip-synching for our man Carl. Every guitar note and word are simultaneously performed right on the spot. In fact you can barely hear anything but Carl singing and playing and the drums. Ultimately, Carl depended on little more than himself to write and perform these songs.

01(1) - "FOREVER YOURS" - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-3-15 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-2-19 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

01(2) - "FOREVER YOURS" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 258 Master - "Sun 271-280 Series <
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - August 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 274-A < mono
FOREVER YOURS / THAT'S RIGHT
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-4-17 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

"Forever Yours", named after a popular American candy bar, is quite a beautiful country ballad, delivered by Perkins in an affecting emotional style. This is gorgeous acoustic country music, made all the more appealing by its prominently miked slap bass. Make no mistake: despite the absence of a chorus or other pop trimmings, this is very sexy music that had every right to compete for the backseat sweepstakes in 1957. And if all else failed, it had that marvelously unexpected sharped-5 chord to take it a cut above the

Carl Perkins made two more singles before his divorce from Sun Records. The first coupled another gritty honky tonk number, "That's Right", with a country ballad, "Forever Yours". The coupling even failed to make the country charts. "That's Right" was a grim song, laced with threats and delivered in the vernacular of the bar-room: "If what they say is true and there is another joker. We'll use a number five in this game of poker, When I find the cat that's been gettin' my sugar. Its gonna be rough when I catch that booger. And That’s RIGHT!...". That entire verse was excised before the song was issued in England. With even less regard for the creative process, Quality Records in Canada only took out the line containing "booger".

''THAT'S RIGHT''

If there was a lesson to be learned from ''Dixie Fried'', you'd think it would have been that little slices of Southern low-life wouldn't burn up the national charts. But Sam didn't get it and Carl is back with another bit of borderline violence that was selected for mass market release. Some 30 years later, this storyline would have been at home on the Jerry Springer TV show.

Maybe Sam was more interested in the catchy rhythm than the lyrics. That bass drum-driven backing track is certainly arresting, but once Carl started telling his mean-spirited tale of revenge, it's hard to keep dancing. This story of infidelity would go down easier with a dollop of humor, but there's none to be found. He's a hard working man who gets off from his shift around 4pm and is home by 4:05 sharp. He's warning his wife Lucy that her daytime lover better be out the back door and gone by the time he gets home. He's ready for the night shift with her and she better be ready to party with him.

''It's gonna be rough when I catch that booger''. Aside from its threat of violence, that line had bigger problems, all of which seem pretty funny today. The word ''booger'' (as in ''sugar booger'' - see ''Lend Me Four Comb''). is too close to ''bugger'' and is thus an evil term in commonwealth countries and beyond. The line or the record itself was banned outright in the United Kingdom and Canada! Can you imagine that? That ban turned up in Spain as well. Each of these markets took pains to keep that hideous, horrible offending word away from its citizens, thus avoiding fornication in the streets. Sometimes they censored Carl's voice with a bleep, other tames with a razor blade, ridding the tape of the offending word or the entire line of lyrics. Prudery and art have never been close friends.

Carl plays a different guitar intro to the first of four outtakes and the drums are a bit out of meter but everyone gets together by the 6th bar Actually. it's surprising that Sam let this take continue past the instrumental intro. The case against it gets even stronger when Carl botches up the opening lyrics. His vocal on the second verse is way out of sync with the instrumental backing. In short, this initial version of the song is a mess. It's not lacking in feeling, however: WS.. is perky with his single stroke rolls and Carl shouts to himself (''Now let's play one!''). but doesn't seem to respond to his own encouragement. The take is mercifully brought to an end around 2:34. For you numerologists in the crowd, that also happens to be the release number of ''Blue Suede Shoes''.

The second outtake starts out more cleanly. This time around Carl gets home by 4:35 sharp. Apparently the commute takes him a half hour longer in this early version. W.S. is kicking that bass drum here. Jimmy M. Van Eaton may have had this approach in the back of his mind when he tackled ''Lonely Weekends'' two and a half year later. Carl's vocal phrasing is pretty rough and his vocal barely keeps pace with the music in the second verse. There's a clever line here that alludes to the title (''There's one way to live and That's Right!) It would have been even more clever if the notion of ''living right'' were not so at odds with the life style portrayed in the lyrics. In any case, that bit of lyric disappeared before the final take was hatched.

It sounds like Sam who tries to spur the boys on to a usable master at the start of the third outtake when he says ''We got it going our way now'' but the first four bars suggest otherwise. First the first four lanes go awry. Things briefly settle down but get all out of sync during the 12-bar instrumental break. With just 12 bars and three chords, it's surprising things can go so far astray.

The frustration is running high at the start of the final outtake. The first thing we hear is ''Damn! And then ''Let's get this son of a bitch''. Within 35 seconds, Carl has blown the lyrics beyond repair. At the used 44-sec mark Carl hits an uncharacteristic guitar clam. You can smell the aroma of Early Times whiskey rising off the tape on this one. It's strange to think that the boys went from this outtake to the masters, although no intermediate versions of the song have surfaced.

02(1) - "THAT'S RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-6 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-21mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(2) - "THAT'S RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-6 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS
Reissued: - April 27, 2012 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-22 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(3) - "THAT'S RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:40
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-23 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(4) - "THAT'S RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:44
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-24 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(5) - "THAT'S RIGHT" - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 259 Master Take 5
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - August 15, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 274-B < mono
THAT'S RIGHT / FOREVER YOURS
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-4-18 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

Anybody who thought "That's Right" was going to be a teen hit was in serious need of a reality check. Not since "Dixie Fried" had Carl Perkins come through with such a slice of southern lowlife. Precious few urban white teens were going to connect with the sentiments and moods of this ol' disc. In truth, its a menacing, rather mean spirited lament delivered in a slurred, palpably drunken style. How many 16 year olds could identify with the singer's life?. A mean, short tempered guy, suspicious of cheating, both at cards and love. And then there was that word "booger" which was just a little too close to "bugger" for comfort in Canada (where the line was excised) and in England (where the entire verse ended up on the cutting room floor). This has made British and Canadian pressings of this record perversely collectable.

''I CARE''

Why or how Carl got his teeth into this one is anybody's guess. Carl's falsetto-laced vocal bears a strong resemblance to the style of Bill Kenny of the Ink Spots. The similarity doesn't stop there. That memorable four bar instrumental figure that opens things here is lifted straight from the Charlie Fuqua's guitar intro to numerous Ink Spot hits including ''My Prayer'' (revived by the Platters in 1956).

Although the Ink Spots never recorded Carl s song, it's probably no coincidence that the title of their fist and most famous big hit was ''If I Didn't Care''. Subconsciously or otherwise, Perkins homage to the Ink Spots is almost complete here.

Just to show that inspiration comes from many quarters, there also that little snatch of lyric (''Now you got me started/ Don't you leave me brokenhearted.. '') which is taken directly from Elvis' record ''Too Much'', that just happened to be a smash hit in early 1957 (spending 17 weeds on the charts).

We've got two takes of ''I Care'' (along with a little pre-take chatter). Because neither one was released, it's not clear which is the ''outtake'', although the second is clearly more polished. It's also not clear how seriously this song was ever a contender for release. One thing for sure: If Sam thought Carl was in a rut, this song on a Sun 45 would have broken him free of it. The section of the song beginning with the 1-7 chord (''It's the way I feel'') just cries out for a vocal chorus to bring it to life. Perhaps that would have been the next step had the song in taken more seriously, but Carl was providing Sam with more than enough releaseable material as it was. ''I Care'' never made it out of its tape box until decades later.

03(1) - "I CARE" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28. 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-25 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

03(2) - "I CARE" - B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28. 1957
Released: - 1979
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300 003 mono
ROCKING GUITAR MAN 1955 - 1958
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-10 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

''Y.O.U.''

This song is a considerable departure from most of what Carl Perkins did at Sun. There's only one guitar and it's acoustic. The production ls a generally laid back arrangement with occasional intense vocal moments from Carl. It's got a chorus going ''wah wah wah wah'' and (in two the three takes) a recitation by Carl in the middle. In all, it's a late-1950s period piece, what sometimes got called a ''rock-a-ballad'' in those days. Although no versions of it were released, there is a notation on a tape box that the song was slated to be the side of ''That's Right''. It seems that Carl may have sung this song, among others, in a Philippines movie called ''Hawaiian Boy'' (which also featured Roy Hamilton). Although posters publicizing the film appear on the web, there's no indication the film was ever released in the United States, Canada or Europe. It featured Eddy Mesa (''the Elvis of the Philippines'') and involves a plot that might have been drawn from a dozen Elvis movies of the era; a pineapple worker gets fired and rises to fame as a singing boxer. Carl Perkins' son, Stan Perkins reports that no member of the Perkins family over owned or saw a copy of the film.

''Y.O.U'' was written by George Bain, the husband of Carl's cousin Martha. The song and its performance are a wonderful amalgam of musical ingredients of the era. When Carl took this song into the studio, there had been two number 1 hits within the last six months that had a vocal surrounded by harmonizing voices with acoustic guitar; Elvis' ''Love Me Tender'' and Sonny James' ''Young Love''. The backing ''wah-wah-wah-wah'' much like what the Jordanaires sang behind Elvis on ''Playing For Keeps'' which arrived on the charts only a month or so before this recording date. Ending a record on a high note was a common maneuver for Tony Williams of the Platters in those days, and Carl had already followed Williams up into falsetto at the finale of his LP version of ''Only You''. Carl's recitation between verses came only a week or two after Elvis' release of That 'When Your Heartaches Begin'' which included a recitation between verses, as had the Ink Spots' original recording of the song. (It's interesting, by the way, that ''Y.O.U'' was recorded at the same session as ''I Care'', another song with strong connection to the Ink Spots. The Ink Spots were more of an inspiration to the Memphis rockabillies than we customarily acknowledge).

Let us make clear that were not saying that ''Y'.O.U'' is stolen from other successful sources. Rather we're saying that it is firmly rooted in the popular music styles of its time and has lots of ingredients that were commonplace and familiar to both buyers and producers back then.

We have three outtakes of ''Y.O.U''. The first and the third are what happened in the Sun studio. But the second, the one without a recitation, is not. It is a product playing with the first outtake. It's easiest to hear that the two have identical performances in the last few seconds - listen to the bass notes after Carl goes up to the high note on the final ''you''. One obvious change is that the recitation in the first outtake has been removed. There are other smaller changes, harder to hear in real time. One involves the simple seven-note guitar run that plays behind ''it's you (guitar run), 'Y.O.U'' that occurs about 52 seconds into the first outtake and 46 seconds into the second one. Someone spliced an additional copy of that run into the second 9and you can hear a click just before it, where the splicing was done). Perhaps Sam thought that recitations weren't marketable since ''All Shook Up'' was by far the hotter side of Elvis' new record.

Both of the actual versions (and all three outtakes) are admirably and appropriately simple performances of a simple and heartfelt song. The melody and Carl s vocal intensity are what make it such a beautiful and emotionally honest piece of music. Carl hits the final top note in a way that is at once strong and plaintive. The whole thing is a nice reminder of how little machinery is needed to make a good record - less can be more. And it's also a reminder that records don't have to be innovative to be good; they just have to be good.

04(1) – "Y.O.U." - B.M.I. - 3:31
Composer: - G. Bain
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-27 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

04(2) – "Y.O.U." - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - G. Bain
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - 1978
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30152 mono
SUN SOUND SPECIAL
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-3-9 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

04(3) – "Y.O.U." - B.M.I. - 3:19
Composer: - G. Bain
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - With Narration - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - November 1987
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) BFX 15211-11-3 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-6-24 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Notes in tape box indicate that "Y.O.U." originally scheduled as flip side of "That's Right".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
LOS ANGELES 1957

SUN SESSION: PROBABLY SPRING 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN

01 - "FOREVER YOURS" - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably Spring 1957
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-20 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
James Buck Perkins - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland – Drums

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MACK SELF
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY MARCH 28, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

"Everyday", for too long has this track been overshadowed by its gorgeous flipside, "Easy To Love". "Everyday" is a fine country song in its own right. It reveals Mack as a songwriter with a penchant for country waltzes as well as a deft melodic touch and a gift for imagery. In addition to the release version, we have two previously unissued alternate takes that are quite different from each other. Serious listening is rewarded here. Jimmy Evans (or perhaps Stan Kesler on steel) provides a highly unusual bass figure, sliding up to the target note. Either Van Eaton or Holland provides some interesting drum work, accenting on the cymbal during the guitar break. This is a simple country song with relatively few musicians in the studio. But Lord, Lord, there sure is a lot going on here.

01(1) – "EVERYDAY"** - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 257 Master
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - June 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 273-A < mono
EVERYDAY / EASY TO LOVE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-4-16 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

The song ''Everyday'' of Mack Self (Sun 273-A) can you hear on the soundtrack of the American neo-crime drama TV series ''Breaking Bad'' (January 20, 2008, to September 29, 2013), season 5, episode 11 with the title ''Confession''.

01(2) – "EVERYDAY" - 1 - B.M.I. - 2:09
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-12 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

01(3) – "EVERYDAY" - 2 - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Alternate Take - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 28, 1957
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16519-20 mono
MACK SELF - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

This record falls in the cracks in so many ways. It is too country for pure rockabilly collectors, and it was too country for the crossover country market in 1957. To its credit, it was even rather raw for the country charts back in 1957. Nearly 40 years later, it sounds just right.

"Mad At You", this delightful slice of rural life dates from Mack's earliest session at Sun and continued appearing on the session logs almost until the end. Dueting with bass player Jimmy Evans, Mack gives us a comic version of his troubles. He's mad at everything in sight - including both his girl and the world. His cow's gone dry, the hens won't lay, his tires are flat and he's got a hole in his Sunday hat. Those last two lines, by the way, came to Mack courtesy of Jack Clement. Clement had a listen to what Mack was working on, jotted the "ties are flat/Sunday hat" couplet down on a piece of paper and handed it to Mack in the studio. Two great minds worked together. All the complaining is quite good- natured and the song is wonderfully picked and sung.

02 - "MAD AT YOU"* - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer: - Mack Self
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - P 359 Master
Recorded: - Probably March 28, 1957
Duet vocals by Jimmy Evans
Released: - October 1959
First appearance: - Phillips International (S) 45rpm standard single > PI 3548-B < mono
MAD AT YOU / WILLIE BROWN
Reissued: - 1998 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15806-1-20 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 6

"Mad At You" offers a vivid glimpse at the identity of the elusive Mack Self. The verdict comes in Country. Country to the core. And back country at that. This record is a delight.

Listen to those verses during the "mad at the world" segment. Cows, chickens, and a Sanday hat. How much further back into the country can you get? Self seems lost in another time zone.

In fact, he kept making music that truly belonged in another decade (both this track and "Easy To Love", issued on SUN 273, are fine examples) and Sam Phillips, bless his heart, kept putting it out. Note that this track sat in the can for over two years before being released in October, 1959. The master was recorded in March 1957 and there are demos of "Mad At You" dating from February 1956, if not earlier.

"On my first sessions at Sun, I had Therlow Brown playing hot guitar", recalled Mack Self, "and Jimmy Evans on upright bass. That was our band. Sam Phillips added Stan Kesler on steel and Carl Perkins' drummer W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland. Around that time, we cut "Goin' Crazy" and "Mad At You" but they were not released then. Around 1956 we cut some other songs, "Vibrate" was one. It was several years before Sam Phillips put out another record, which was "Willie Brown" and "Mad At You" on Phillips International".

"Mad At You" was recorded back in 1956 or 1957 with some other tunes. We tried it on several occasions right from my first session. The record had myself and Jimmy Evans singing. Jimmy played upright bass too. Roland Janes and Therlow Brown played guitar and Billy Riley too I think. But that was the flipside, an old recording pulled out to back up "Willie Brown" was made in 1959. That had Roland Janes on hot guitar, me on rhythm, Martin Willis on sax, Jim Wilson on piano and either Carl Perkins' or Warren Smith's drummer. We just cut the song that time. Sam Phillips and Ernie Barton Artist and Repertoire’s that one".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Mack Self - Vocal and Guitar
Therlow Brown - Lead Guitar
Jimmy Ray Paulman - Rhythm Guitar
Jimmy Evens - Bass and 2nd Vocal*
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

For Biography of Mack Self see: > The Sun Biographies <
Mack Self's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

One of Sam Phillips' most commendable qualities was his willingness to appraise little league acts, especially at a time when Sun was enjoying regular hits on an international basis. With the advent of bequiffed rockabillies gibel a profound new identity, black performers had become sparsely represented in the company catalogue. "Baby Doll", from a scratch tape by The Four Dukes, offers a rare excursion into the vocal group stylings that were then flooding out of the east coast.

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE FOUR DUKES
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MARCH (15) 29, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "BABY DOLL" - B.M.I. - 1:55
Composer: - The Four Dukes
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 29, 1957
Released: - January 1, 1997
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CPCD 8277 mono
SUN ROCK 'N' ROLL - VOLUME 1
Reissued: 2002 Sanctuary Records (CD) 500/200rpm FBUBX002-4-25 mono
50 GOLDEN YEARS 1952 - 2002

02 - ''ANNIE'' - B.M.I. - 2:55
Composer: - The Four Dukes
Publishers: Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - March 29, 1957
Released: 1996
First appearance: - Collectables (CD) 500/200rpm COL 5810 mono
SPOTLIGHT ON SUN RECORDS - VOLUME 2

03 - ''WALKING ALONE'' - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - The Four Dukes
Publishers: Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 29, 1957
Released: 1976 Sun
First appearance: - Sun (S) 45rpm bootleg 518 mono
DOOWOP - VOCAL GROUP HARMONY - RHYTHM AND BLUES

04 - ''ANGEL DEAR'' - B.M.I - 3:10
Composer: - The Four Dukes
Publishers: Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - March 29, 1957
Released: - 1976
First appearance: - Sun (S) 45rpm bootleg 515 mono
DOOWOP - VOCAL GROUP HARMONY - RHYTHM AND BLUES

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
The Four Dukes
Members Probably
Billy Dawn Smith - Lead Vocal
Donnie Sehested - Tenor Vocal
Tommy Smith - Baritone Vocal
Edward "Sonny" Benton - Bass Vocal

Roland Janes - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
Smokey Joe Baugh - Drums (March 15)
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of The Four Dukes see: > The Sun Biographies <
The Four Dukes' Sun recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Probably bio of The Four Dukes. Billy Dawn Smith was an aspiring singer and composer who grew up on the streets of Brooklyn in a section known as Fort Green. In the early nineteen fifties Smith put together a vocal group that consisted of himself, his brother Tom, and two friends Donny Myles and Sonny Benton . Billy dropped his last name in naming the foursome and was now known as The Billy Dawn Quartette.

One of the sometime members of the group was pianist and vocalist Al Browne who in later years become famous for his work for many record labels in New York, especially Hull Records. While the vocal group worked on their harmony and presence, they also worked hard on coming up with original material. In the spring of 1952, they made their way to Harlem to see Lexy "Flap" Hanford, a well known entertainment entrepreneur in the neighborhood. 

He thought enough of their talent to send them to an acquaintance of his named David Levitt who owned a small independent record label called Decatur Records. After meeting with Levitt and some more work on their songs, they went into a small recording studio and the result was two songs "This Is The Real Thing Now" and "Crying For My Baby" which was released by the label on #3001. The first copies were listed as by The Dawn Quartette, but that was soon changed to The Billy Dawn Quartette. They release three discs all under three names: Billy Dawn Quartet, Four Dukes and Heralds.

MARCH 31, 1957 SUNDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis begin a tour in Little Rock, Arkansas that would last until May 5, 1957, supporting Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Onie Wheeler, and others who came and went as the troupe slowly made its way up into the frozen North. From the subarctic springtime in Sault St. Marie, Ontario, they trekked across the prairies, ending up in Billings, Montana.

According to Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins, it was during the long haul that Lewis developed his stage act. Not content to remain chained to the piano stool, Lewis started clowning and expending some of the frightening energy he possessed.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR SONNY BURGESS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT
AND/OR SAM C. PHILLIPS

01 - "ONE BROKEN HEART" - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-1-17 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

02 - "AIN'T GONNA DO IT" - B.M.I. - 2:31
Composer: - Dave Bartholomew-Pearl King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Mistitled "Goin' Home"* – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - 1985 Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1022 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-1-18 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

Sam Phillips or Jack Clement got as far doing vocal overdubs before the idea was scotched.

03 - "HAND ME DOWN MY WALKING CANE" - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - James A. Bland
Publisher: - Public Domain
Matrix number: - None - Mistitled "All My Sins Are Taken Away"*
Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - October 1976
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30116-2 mono
SUN - THE ROOTS OF ROCK - VOLUME 9 - MORE REBEL ROCKABILLY
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-1-19 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

"Ain't Gonna Do It" 2 and "Hand Me Down My Walking Cane" are on the same session reel. Rockabilly icon Sonny Burgess invested one take on "Hand Me Down My Walking Gane" or "All My Sins Been Taken Away" on this traditional gospel song in 1957. This is obviously a very rough recording and for from Sonny's best work for Sun, but it marks the only time he ever veered in the general direction of gospel music. The song, which renounces worldly goods and rejoices in imminent death and rebirth, was also recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis. Like Sonny, Jerry Lee also gave the song one take before moving on to other material.

04 - "GONE" – B.M.I. - 2:11
Composer: - Sonny Burgess
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - 1990 Rounder Records (LP) 33rpm SS 36 mono
WE WANNA BOOGIE
Reissued: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-1-21 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

05 - "PLEASE LISTEN TO ME" - B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Dave Bartholomew-Pearl King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Undubbed Recording - Mistitled "Don't Be That Way"*.
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957
Released: - 1991
First appearance: - 1991 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15525-1-20 mono
SONNY BURGESS - THE CLASSIC SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1959

"Gone" and "Please Listen To Me" are on the same session reel.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Sonny Burgess - Vocal and Guitar
Joe Lewis - Guitar
Johnny Ray Hubbard - Bass
Kern Kennedy - Piano
Jack Nance - Trumpet
Russell Smith – Drums

For Biography of Sonny Burgess see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sonny Burgess' Sun recordings can be heard on the playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Brought up in Huntingdon, it's small wonder that Carl Mann was rooted in country music, but his vision of music didn't begin and there. ''I listened to all types of music'', he says, ''but country is what I was raised up with. I remember hearing Piano Red doing ''Rockin' With Red'' around 1952. I would call that the first rock and roll record''.

''I never used to sing the song, but my brother would take me around and he would sing it sometimes. And I'll certainly never forget hearing Elvis doing ''Blue Moon Of Kentucky''. I jumped right on that stuff. sang every song he did as soon as it was released''.

By the time Carl was thirteen, he had three ''live'' radio shows on local radio stations. ''I formed my own group, and we played on a station in Milan, another in Lexington and another in McKenzie.

All the shows were on Saturday morning and we couldn't play all three at once so we'd tape a couple of them on Thursday night. After about three years, this disc jockey in Milan named Bill Haney set up an audition with Jimmy Martin in Jackson''.

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL MANN
FOR JAXON RECORDS 1957

UNKNOWN STUDIO LOCATION
JAXON SESSION: POSSIBLY EARLY 1957

Carl Mann's first Sun sessions gave us everything we could expect from him during the course of his Sun recording career. There was a mixture of pre-rock standards and originals, mostly delivered at a rolling midtempo.

That's not where it begin, though, Carl Mann's first records was for the Jaxon label. It pre-dated his first Sun session by a year-and-a-half, and it was an inauspicious debut betraying Carl's tender years (he was probably all of fourteen or fifteen). There is none of the striking originality we would expect from Carl Mann and his guitarist Eddie Bush, if indeed it is Bush we hear on the Jaxon single.

Jimmy Martin was a local musician and man about the music scene in Jackson, Tennessee. There was no great distinction to what he played, but, like many people with little or no talent, he had a good ear for it. He also had an entrepreneurial streak, and seeing the success of Sun Records in Memphis, Martin started the Jaxon label. The label was mostly a vehicle for artists who were part of the Jimmy Martin Combo. Reinforcing the connection to Sun, Martin also arranged for the earlier Jaxon sides to be publishing through Sun's publishing affiliates. This might have been because Martin wanted to get his show on the road and didn't want to wait for BMI to screen and register his own publishing company, or it might have been because he hoped that Sun might lease his records or re-record the songs, and he knew there would be a bigger incentive for Sam Phillips at Sun to do so if he owned the publishing.

Coincidence or not, some of the artists that Jimmy Martin featured on Jaxon had already been turned down by Sun Records. Ramsey Kearney, the first vocalist with the Martin Combo, had already been nixed by Sun with good cause. Still, two very mediocre Kearney songs, "Rock The Bop" and "Red Bobby Sox" were copyrighted by Sun's Hi-Lo Music in December 1956 and subsequently issued under Martin's name on Jaxon.

Martin also recorded Kenny Parchman who tried desperately hard to get a record released on Sun, and came very close; his songs "Feel Like Rockin'" and "Love Grazy Baby" were actually assigned an issue number but the record was canned at the last minute. Like Kearney, Parchman ended up on Jaxon Records.

Jaxon 502 featured Carl Mann, and it was issued in April 1957. "Jimmie Martin contacted me about forming a band that would be a mixture of my band and his band", recalled Carl. "Each of us would let a one or two men go. So that's what we did". Jimmie Martin played drums or bass, and Eddie Bush played guitar. Bush was just in from Texas after a stint on the Louisiana Hayride; in fact, a 1959 Hayride Yearbook showed him still in the staff band, although he had probably been gone for a year or so. He had been in the service in Hawaii with Ramsey Kearney, and had come to Jackson, Tennessee to visit Kearney after his discharge. Jimmie Martin liked his playing and invited him to stay, and Eddie Bush - the inveterate drifter - had no problem in accepting.

01 - "GONNA ROCK AND ROLL TONIGHT" – B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated – Distributed by Sun Records
Matrix number: - J 12 - Master
Recorded: - Early 1957
Released: - April 1957
First appearance: - Jaxon Records (S) 45rpm standard single Jaxon 502-A mono
GONNA ROCK AND ROLL TONIGHT / ROCKIN' LOVE
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-1 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

It didn't take Carl Mann long to realism that he was heading nowhere on Jaxon Records, but before the disillusionment set in there was the thrill of seeing your name on your first record. "I can't even explain how good it felt. I paid for that record and we got 350 copies. We thought we was in the big time - for a couple of weeks".

The arrangement with Jimmie Martin quickly fell apart, and Carl Mann formed his own combo with Eddie Bush, Robert Oatsvall on bass and Tony Moore on drums. He had switched from guitar to piano soon after he joined Martin. "We needed a little more rhythm, so I learned the piano. I put some tape on the keys and marked the notes on there. I learned enough to play a little rhythm. We had an old piano at home that was half out-of-tune, but I'd thump around on it".

The logical next step for Carl Mann and his new combo was to approach Sun Records, then very much the label to be with in that area. It might not have panned out for Ramsey Kearney or Kenny Parchman, but it had worked for another local boy, Carl Perkins. When Perkins came back to Jackson it was in a late model powder Cadillac Fleetwood, and just a few months earlier he had been dodging bottles at the beer joints and cracker barrels around Jackson.

02 - "ROCKIN' LOVE" – B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Carl Mann
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated - Distributed by Sun Records
Matrix number: - J 11 - Master
Recorded: - Early 1957
Released: - April 1957
First appearance: - Jaxon Records (S) 45rpm standard single Jaxon 502-B mono
ROCKIN' LOVE / GONNA ROCK AND ROLL TONIGHT
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15713-1-2 mono
CARL MANN - MONA LISA

"I found out later that Sam Phillips wanted to lease my Jaxon record", said Carl, "but Jimmie Martin never did tell me anything about that. Eddie Bush and I just kept going to Sun Records. We took 'em demo tapes and worried 'em down. Never got anywhere, though, 'til we hooked up with W.S. ''Fluke'' Holland. He started coming around the local clubs and he took an interest. Then it was another six or eight months before a regular session was fixed up. I seem to recall that Jack Clement cut the audition tape and produced "Mona Lisa".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Mann - Vocal
Eddie Bush - Guitar
Jimmie Martin - Bass
Tony Moore – Drums

For Biography of Carl Mann see > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

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For Biographies of Artists see > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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