CONTAINS
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1956 SESSIONS 10
October 1, 1956 to October 31, 1956

Studio Session for Hayden Thompson, October 1, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Carl Perkins, Probably Mid-1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, October 1, 1956 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Onie Wheeler, October 9, 1956 / Columbia Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, October 25, 1956 / Sun Records 

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1956

Sun 244, Jean Chapel's ''Welcome To The Club'' b/w ''I Won't Be Rockin' Tonight'', is re-released on RCA 20/47-6681, only 8 to 10 weeks after its Sun launching.

Charlie Feathers has moved to King Records of Cincinnati, and his first single is released this month.

OCTOBER 1956

Johnny Carroll and The Moonlighters never made a dime more than subsistence living even though, in Carroll's words, ''we played anyplace we possibly could and just tried to get on stage anywhere we could''. It was at the Northside Coliseum in Fort Worth that Carroll met Ferlin Husky. ''Ferlin heard us and he said, 'I'll tell you what I'm gonna do. There's a lot of important people out there. You go out and do the first fifteen minutes of my show'. And we did, and that's when this J.G. Tiger came up...". J.G. stood for Jack Goldman, who added a flamboyant but fictional surname to increase his prestige. Johnny thought he was pushy but positive. Tiger took the band, now renamed the Hot Rocks, into Dallas where he had an interest in the Top Ten Recording Studio. Tiger used the tapes they made to pitch to Paul Chen, Decca's artist and repertoire chief in Nashville. ''Tiger called me saying, 'I've got you a deal but the regular boys in the band can't come to the session'. We went down and did three tunes and the next day we did three more. They were cut in the basement of a house that belonged to Owen Bradley. The session guys listened to our demos and copied ém almost exactly''. The Decca singles were played in the South and the North East. Most of Carroll's fan mail, enough to fill two suitcases, came from New York or New Jersey, but on a national scale kids paid more attention to ads for pimple cream. The entrepreneurial Goldman decided that a movie would best promote his nineteen year old protege. His family financed ''Rock Baby, Rock It'', filmed mainly in Dallas, a movie about a group of youngsters who thwart gangsters threatening to evict them from the building in which they run their Hot Rock Club. Filmed in October 1956 and released in the summer of 1957, the musical interest centered on the rhythm and blues of the Five Stars and Rosco Gordon. Johnny Carroll and the Hot Rocks injected their own kind of blues, a wild, passionate, thoroughly abrasive music, recorded for the film at Pappy Sellers' studio in Dallas. The film played in a few venues and was then withdrawn. Carroll continued on stage but he and Goldman parted in acrimonious circumstances when Carroll discovered a Dallas venue had been paying a thousand dollars a night to Goldman, but Johnny had been getting a hundred. (See Johnny Carroll Sessions: June 23, 1957)

OCTOBER 1956

While still hanging around Sun, Conway Twitty management was taken over by Don Seat. In the big band are, Seat had been a pianist (turored he said by Count Basie). Later, he became an agent (Seat says a partner) with General Artists Corporation (GAC), one of the largest artist management companies in the United States. He worked with Johnnie Ray, Nat King Cole, Desi Arnaz, and many others. Twitty said that he got a letter from Seat, who'd been told him by someone who'd served with him in Japan. ''Seat wanted to know if I was doing this new rock and roll music that was happened down around Memphis'', Twitty said later. ''I wrote back and told him I was. He wrote back and asked for a demo tape, so I sent him a copy of two or three things I had done at Sun. A couple of weeks later I got a letter back saying that he could get me a contract with any label I wanted. I said, I want to go with Sun'. He said, 'No, not Sun. They're just a small label'''. Completely untrue, insisted Seat. He'd known Sam Phillips from the time when there had been plans to move Elvis from Sun to Columbia Records. He said he went to Memphis with Columbia's cheque for $25,000 in his pocket, and ''as soon as I saw Sam Phillips' face, I knew we didn't have a deal''. Seat said he was on his way back from another visit to Memphis when he met someone in Cincinnati who had a letter from Twitty in which Twitty said that he had written some songs for Elvis. Seat flew to Memphis, driving on to Helena to meet Twitty. This, he said, was around the time that Twitty was getting married for the second time, in other words October 1956. Seat sent him a tape recorder. A tape arrived from Twitty, and, in Seat;s account, he took it to Bob Shad, Mercury Records' New York head of A&R, and landed a contract. Around the same time, Harold Jenkins became Conway Twitty (needless to add, Seat and Twitty couldn't agree on how that came about, either).

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR HAYDEN THOMPSON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 1, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - ROLAND JANES

Perhaps Jack Clement and Sam Phillips decided that the recordings were not the finished article, but for whatever reason they were put to one side and Hayden was invited back to a second session two months or so later, on October 1, 1956. This time, he was backed by Sun's session musicians in the form of a band that played with Arkansan rocker Billy Lee Riley. They were Roland Janes on guitar, Marvin Pepper on bass, and drummer Jimmy Van Eaton. Two songs had been chosen as the focus for this session and for subsequent sessions in December.

The first was "One Broken Heart", a shuffling ballad written by Hayden, and the other was a blues song that had been a minor hit on Sun Records for Junior Parker a few years earlier. Hayden doesn't remember exactly how he came to record Parker's "Love My Baby", saying:, "I had never heard of Junior Parker back at that time. I always thought that I heard the song from Billy Riley but he doesn't recall it that way, so I think it was someone else at Sun was playing the song. Maybe it was Roland Janes. I never knew where it came from, but I did know that I liked it immediately. I thought it was a tremendous song for me"

01(1) - "ONE BROKEN HEART" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Gee Dee Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1, 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15263-2 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - FAILANE ROCK
Reissued: - 1997 Gee Dee Music (CD) 500/200rpm 270131-2-30 mono
LOVE MY BABY

0(2) - "ONE BROKEN HEART" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:18
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment
Matrix number: - None -Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1, 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15263-5 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - FAILANE ROCK
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-4 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

02(1) - "LOVE MY BABY" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:30
Composer: - Herman Parker-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Memphis Music - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1, 1956
Released: - 1988
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15263-1 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - FAIRLANE ROCK
Reissued: - 2008 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-1 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

The version of "Love My Baby" were fired-up rockabilly from the off, even the initial run-through versions, and the slapped upright bass became more prominent as the song evolved, keeping time with ever more cutting guitar solos. Hayde delivered a raw and rocking vocal and Roland Janes came in with Scotty Moore-styled guitar solos. Jack Clement recognised the possibilities in this song and called a further session for December 11.

02(2) - "LOVE MY BABY" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Herman Parker-Sam Phillips
Publisher: - Memphis Music - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1, 1956
Released: - 2008
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16131-34 mono
HAYDEN THOMPSON - THE SUN YEARS PLUS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Hayden Thompson - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Marvin Pepper - Bass
James M. Van Eaton - Drums

For Biography of Hayden Thompson see: > The Sun Biographies <
Hayden Thompson's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CARL PERKINS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
UNKNOWN SUN SESSION: PROBABLY MID-1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

''THAT DON'T MOVE ME''

A real oddity, this song. Carl Perkins is known as a fine lyricist and songwriter but you'd never convince anybody by playing them ''That Don't Move Me''. The melody contains three chords and four notes - G A C C (in the key of C). Likewise, the lyrics aren't going to send Irving Berlin or Leiber and Stoller running for cover. There's basically nothing to this song. And that is exactly its strength.

It is pure energy. This is a tense, incessant, driving song that might as well have been an instrumental. The words mean next to nothing. All you need is that sample little guitar figure. If you insist on lyrics, the chorus and title phrase are all you get. Those extra lyrics in the verses are clunky and Carl has obvious difficulty phrasing them.

We've got six takes here, including a false start. The truth is, none of them works from start to finish. At its best, this sounds like a live recording - wild, energetic, sloppy and full of spontaneous feeling. Clayton slaps the hell out of his bass and drives the performance. W.S. provides a rock solid underpinning and keeps the verses separate with his tasty drum rolls after each 12 bars. Sometimes he accents on the tom-tom during the guitar solo. As live recordings go, this is a fine one. But it wasn't meant to be a live recording; it was cut in the studio and, as such, It falls far short.

The vocal is often off-mike. The echo cycles distractingly in and out. The lyrics are constantly being reshuffled, even in the chorus which only contains eight words!

The fifth take is the wildest, most spirited performance. But it's also quite sloppy. We may love this glimpse of Golden Age Carl Perkins a half a century later, but whether this was ever releasable material is another question. It sure is a perfect addition to an Outtake Box though.

01(1) – "THAT DON'T MOVE ME" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-8 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(2) – "THAT DON'T MOVE ME" - B.M.I. - 1:58
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-9 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(3) – "THAT DON'T MOVE ME" - B.M.I. - 1:57
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-10 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(4) – "THAT DON'T MOVE ME" - B.M.I. - 0:14
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - False Start 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-4-11 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(5) – "THAT DON'T MOVE ME" - B.M.I. - 1:56
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240R-4-12 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

01(6) – "CHATTER/THAT DON'T MOVE ME" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 5 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - March 1982
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 101 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-2-10 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

''LONELY STREET''

The first thing we can tell you about this song is that you can disregard all previous liner notes that talk about Carl Belew and Andy Williams. This song by Perkins shares a title with that 1959 hit by Williams and nothing more.

If you actually listen to the songs before writing about them, it's clear that the compositions have nothing in common musically. We truth is, the Belew/Williams song with this title is the hands down winner.

It's not clear what this recording is all about. Carl's vocal isn't that bad, although it is a bit emotionally overwrought. It's the band work that dooms these takes to their status among the worst things Carl recorded at Sun (or at ' least during the Sun years). The overall effect is about as draggy as Carl ever sounded on tape. Worse yet all versions feature the electric bass from hell.

It's hard to believe that a track sounding this bad ever emerged from 706 Union Avenue. You could have gotten a letter mix by throwing darts at the mixing board. In the unlikely event this is Clayton playing bass, we can charitably say this isn't among his finest work. It isn't just the overbearing sound of the bass in the mix, it's the bass playing as well. Listen for some memorable clams at the end of the third take. The addition of a piano on the fourth take does little to relieve the tedium.

At least we can confident of thee time period during which this song was written and recorded. The lyric is directly insured by ''Heartbreak Hotel'', which pretty locates this sometime in 1956. In fact, ''Heartbreak Hotel'' spawned more the this unknown composition by Carl Perking. It seems to have given rise to a subgenre
of ''that's where you go when you're lonely'' compositions including Johnny Cash's ''Home Of The Blues'' (Sun 279, September 1957); The Gosdin Brothers' ''Lonely Lonesome Street'' (Cullman 6415, May, 1959); and Ricky Nelson's ''Lonesome Town'' (Imperial 5545, October, 1958).

To our misfortune, we don't get just one version of this song. Four times the boys went went back to the well, and four times they came back with something that sounded this bad. Unusually, amateurish home recordings are singular events. Do it, and move on to the next. The presence of four takes here does raise the legitimate question about the source of these recordings.

02(1) - "LONELY STREET" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Carl Belew-Kenny Sowder-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-21 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(2) - "LONELY STREET" - B.M.I. - 2:41
Composer: - Carl Belew-Kenny Sowder-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-22 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(3) - "LONELY STREET" - B.M.I. - 2:43
Composer: - Carl Belew-Kenny Sowder-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-23 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(4) - "STUDIO TALK/LONELY STREET" - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Carl Belew-Kenny Sowder-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - April 27, 2012
First appearance: Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17240-5-24 mono
CARL PERKINS - THE SUN ERA OUTTAKES

02(5) - "LONELY TREET" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Carl Belew-Kenny Sowder-W.S. Stevenson
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 4 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Probably 1956
Released: - 1975
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 300 003 mono
CARL PERKINS - ROCKIN' GUITAR MAN
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15494-2-11 mono
THE CLASSIC CARL PERKINS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Carl Perkins - Vocal and Guitar
Thomas E. Cisco (Eddie Star) - Rhythm Guitar
Lloyd Clayton Perkins - Bass
W.S. "Fluke" Holland - Drums
Jimmy Smith – Piano

For Biography of Carl Perkins see: > The Sun Biographies <
Carl Perkins' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY OCTOBER 1, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

"One More Ride", like "Brakeman's Blues", is another incomplete take that falls apart. It is a mystery as to why they gave up on what would have been another song suited to Cash's style. It was the only song recorded at this session in October 1956. Fortunately Cash did return to the song during is early sessions for Columbia Records.

01 - "ONE MORE RIDE" - B.M.I. - 1:23
Composer: - Bob Nolan
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Incomplete Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 1, 1956
Released: - 1984
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 103 5-1-27 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 1557-1-28 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and Guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant – Bass

For Biography of Johnny Cash see: > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 1, 1956 MONDAY

Capitol released Tennessee Ernie Ford's ''Hymns'' album.

Columbia released Ray Price's double-sided single, ''I've Got A New Heatache'' and ''Wasted Words''.

OCTOBER 4, 1956 THURSDAY

NBC-TV broadcast the debut of ''The Ford Show'', a variety program featuring Tennessee Ernie Ford as host and regular cast member Molly Bee. The show runs nearly five years.

OCTOBER 5, 1956 FRIDAY

''Daniel Boone, Trail Blazer'' debuts in theaters, with Lon Chaney Jr. and Faron Young.

The wildly popular epic film “The Ten Commandments” premieres in the United States. The film, directed by legendary icon Cecil B. DeMille, starred Charlton Heston as Moses, Yul Brynner as Rameses and Anne Baxter as Nefretiri. The film told the Biblical tale of Moses in a grand and cinematic way and was filmed on location in Egypt. At the time it was created, “The Ten Commandments” was the most expensive film ever made and featured some of the largest sets ever created. It was a huge financial success and had critical acclaim, being nominated for 7 Academy Awards.

OCTOBER 9, 1956 TUESDAY

Instrumental partners Jimmy Bryant and Speedy West hold what proves to be their final recording session as a duo in Los Angeles

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR ONIE WHEELER
FOR COLUMBIA RECORDS 1956

MUSIC CITY RECORDERS
804 16TH AVENUE SOUTH, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
COLUMBIA SESSION: TUESDAY OCTOBER 9, 1956
SESSION HOURS: 14:00-17:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – DON LAW

01 – ''A BOOGER GONNA GETCHA'' – B.M.I. - 2:29
Composer: - Onie Wheeler
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : OB 1210 / CO 56953
Recorded: - October 9, 1956
Released: - 1956
First appearance: - Columbia Records (S) 78rpm standard single Columbia 40787-4 mono
A BOOGER GONNA GETCHA / A BEGGAR FOR YOUR LOVE
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-5 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

02 – ''A BEGGAR FOR YOUR LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 2:34
Composer: - Crowe
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : OB 1211 / CO 56954
Recorded: - October 9, 1956
Released: - 1956
First appearance: - Columbia Records (S) 78rpm standard single Columbia 40787-4 mono
A BEGGAR FOR YOUR LOVE / A BOOGER GONNA GETCHA
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-10 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Onie Wheeler – Vocal, Harmonica, Guitar
Joseph Edwards - Guitar
Ray Edenton – Guitar
Buddy Emmons – Steel Guitar
Roy M. ''Junior'' Huskey – Bass
Dale Potter - Drums

For Biography of Onie Wheeler see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 10, 1956 WEDNESDAY

The movie ''Giant'' premieres, starring Rock Hudson, Elizabeth Taylor and the late James Dean. Years later, Taylor's role in the picture inspires The Statler Brothers' Jimmy Fortune to write ''Elizabeth''. Also in the movie, Shen Wooley and Ray Whitley.

A New Jersey woman testifies in court that her husband hit her because she's a fan of Elvis Presley. The husband, a Bing Crosby fan, claims she hit him, too. The judge finds both innocent of assault charges.

OCTOBER 13, 1956 SATURDAY

Ricky Nelson and the Nelson family appear on the cover of TV Guide.

OCTOBER 16, 1956 TUESDAY

George Morgan recorded ''There Goes My Love''.

Little Richard recorded the rhythm and blues hit ''Send Me Some Lovin'''at J&M Studio in New Orleans. Hank Williams Jr. and Lois Johnson will earn a country hit by remaking the song 15 years later.

OCTOBER 18, 1956 THURSDAY

When Elvis Presley stops at a Memphis gas station, fans cause a scene, and station owner Ed Hoper pops Elvis in the head. Presley gives Hopper a black eye. They are booked, with one other participant for assault. Charges against Presley are dropped.

Just five months after playing on the classic ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'', Cliff Gallup takes part in his final recording session as a member of Gene Vincent's Blue Caps.

OCTOBER 19, 1956 FRIDAY

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's second album, ''Elvis'' (RCA Victor LPM-1302).

Sax player and band leader Isham Jones dies in Hollywood. He wrote ''It Had To Be You'', ''You're In The Army Now'' and ''My Best To You'', an Eddy Howard pop hit that was re-constructed for the country charts by the Sons Of The Pioneers.

OCTOBER 20, 1956 SATURDAY

Fiddler Benny Martin makes his first solo appearance on the Grand Ole Opry, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

OCTOBER 21, 1956 SUNDAY

Carrie Fisher is born in Berverly Hills. The daughter of Eddie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds, the ''Star Wars'' actress marries Paul Simon in 1983, three years after his song ''The Boxer'' became a hit for Emmylou Harris.

OCTOBER 22, 1956 MONDAY

Decca released The Wilburn Brothers' ''Go Away With Me''.

Capitol released Wanda Jackson's ''Silver Threads And Golden Needles''. The song becomes a hit for Linda Ronstadt in 1974.

OCTOBER 23, 1956 TUESDAY

Dwight Yoakam is born in Pikeville, Kentucky. With an edgy vocal style and a proclivity for roots music, he becomes one of country's most creative forces, augmenting such iconic hits as ''Honky Tonk Man'', ''Ain't That Lonely Yet'' and ''Fast As You'' with a side career as an actor.

OCTOBER 1956

A very different African American artist, Rosco Gordon had an affiliation with Sam Phillips that predated Sun Records. In the early 1950s, Phillips recorded him for RPM, Chess and Duke. Returning to Phillips in 1955, Rosco cut four singles that remained true to his credo while staying up on what was happening. The third in 1956, ''Cheese And Crackers'', was co-credited to Hayden Thompson. Gordon said that he found the song fragment on the piano. Thompson said he met Gordon next door to Sun at Dell Taylor's Cafe and insisted that they wrote it together there. ''Hayden Thompson'' said Rosco. ''No, I never met him. Never heard of him''. Billboard gave it a nomination as ''Far Out Record of the Week'' on January 5, 1957, adding, in its review that, ''cat is on a real screaming kick... a far-out novelty that youngsters may dig''. Sadly, not so, Rosco's last Sun single was a sweetly anomalous slice of black rockabilly, ''Sally Jo''. It would take a move to Vee-Jay to get his career back on track.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Rockabilly artist Hayden Thompson storms out of the Sun Recording Studio at 706 Union Avenue, after wasting the whole day with Sam Phillips. The boys had been trying to work up some material good enough for an upcoming single, most of the songs that day were covers of old blues songs, but one "Cheese And Crackers" was penned by Hayden himself. Unfortunately the song's awkward structure left Hayden creatively lost. Disgusted at the lack of inspiration with the song, Hayden left the lyrics on top of the studio's beat up Wurlitzer piano and headed for home.

''sittin' at the bar, high as a bat
when up walked to me, this old alley cat
he looked at me and said now son "Cheese and Crackers anyone?"
I said "No! I don't like 'em!"

''my friend got sick, laid up in the bed
Ole' doctor came over, you know what he said?
"Cheese and crackers anyone?"
I don't like 'em that's why I said No!

''when I was just boy, still at home
that's before I decided to roam
when the dinner bell rang, you could hear my daddy yell...
"Cheese and Crackers anyone?!"
I said No!

Sam Phillips calls Rosco Gordon and tells him to come to the studio for a night of recording, and Rosco finds Hayden's unused lyrics on the piano and in about 10 minutes he has worked up the song as a shuffle. The novelty song is so strange that Sam reserves it for the B side and has Roscoe cut a Fats Domino inspired song called "Shoobie Oobie". Neither side cracked the charts but "Cheese And Crackers" was quoted by Billboard as the "weirdest record of the week."

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: THURSDAY OCTOBER 25, 1956
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

His head to one side, and with the kind of inert enunciation that someone like Mose Alison would adopt in the seasons ahead, the irrepressible Rosco Gordon puts in yet another appearance on the Sun release schedule. A quick look at Sun's output reveals that Rosco was the only black artist who still caught Sam Phillips' fancy from January, 1956 until April of the following year. During his formative sessions at Sun, Hayden Thompson was trying to work up a lyric called "Cheese And Crackers", which he apparently left laying around the Sun studio in September or earlier October.

It was picked up by rhythm and blues singer Rosco Gordon, who finished the song and changed the melody a little in time to record the song at the end of October that year. Gordon's disc was issued within a month, at the end of November, while Hayden was still awaiting his break on the label. Nevertheless, id did give him his first credit as a songwriter apart from his Von disc.

Rosco Gordon used his larynx more as an instrument than as a vocal attribute: Witness his gargling fluid delivery on "Cheese And Crackers". Even more oblique is the rolling piano intro, which conjures up the accompaniment to a silent movie - the part where the villain makes his entrance. There must have been a permanent high at Sun cutting records like this.

"Cheese And Crackers", gives full vent to Rosco's zaniless. As Billboard noted, "Cat is on a real screaming kick here". The story goes that Hayden Thompson left the lyrics (or most of them, anyway) on the piano at Sun, and Rosco found them and worked them up into the song we know. Its an engaging tale if true, and almost too bizarre not to be true.

01 - "CHEESE AND CRACKERS" - B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Hayden Thompson
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 225 Master
Recorded: - October 25, 1956
Released: - November 21, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 257-A < mono
CHEESE AND CRACKERS / SHOOBIE OOBIE
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

When Rosco Gordon made his triumphant return to performing in Memphis in 1981, ''Shoobie Oobie'' was one of his featured numbers. He turned in a dazzling performance and, as he must have done in Phillips' studio, he left his trademark ''blood on the keys'' from playing so hard. The first twelve bars of this track are incessant and memorable. It's a bit surprising that all of this musical tension and power abates so soon and the song resolves itself into a playful and scat-nonsense lyric with the band joining in the backing vocals. This track, and its utterly bizarre flipside, ''Cheese And Crackers'', attracted a fair bit of southern attention during its original release in November 1956. Billboard noted that it ''had some flash'' and was ''good for a few spins''. There had been seismic changes in blues, rhythm and blues and popular music in general in the six years since Gordon first recorded at Sam Phillips' studio. His shambolic, loping rhythms were framed differently... but not much differently. The core of his music was still essentially and delightfully the same.

02 - "SHOOBIE OOBIE" - B.M.I. - 2:57
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 224 Master
Recorded: - October 25, 1956
Released: - November 21, 1956
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 257-B < mono
SHOOBIE OOBIE / CHEESE AND CRACKERS
Reissued: - 1995 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15802-3-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 2

03 - "NEW ORLEANS" - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 25, 1956
Released: 1986
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-8-22 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUEAS YEARS 1950 - 1958

Another example of Rosco's Vee-Jay output having its origins in his Sun recordings, this early version of "New Orleans" boasts a full production and could quite easily have been released as a single. The opening couplet is derived from Stick McGhee's earlier opus about the Crescent City's lifestyle - viz: "Drinkin' Spo - Dee-O-Dee" - whilst the general background anarchy puts one in mind of Gary U.S. Bond's early 1960s hits. Whatever, Sam Phillips never saw fit to release this infectious track, which remained in the can until its inclusion in the original Sun Box.

04 - "HARD HEADED WOMAN" - B.M.I. - 2:24
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 25, 1956
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records Internet iTunes mono
ROSCO GORDON - SELECTED HITS

05 - "STAY WITH ME BABY'' - B.M.I.
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - October 25, 1956

06 - "JUST MY MEMORIES OF YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:48
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 25, 1956
Released: - April 21, 2009
First appearance: - JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm B001TKKAFK mono
LET'S GET HIGH - THE MAN ABOUT MUSIC FROM MEMPHIS
Reissued: - 2014 Cherished Records Internet iTunes-6 mono
ROSCO GORDON - JUST A LITTLE BIT

07 - "REAL PRETTY MAMA'' - B.M.I. - 2:08
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - October 25, 1956
Released: - April 21, 2009
First appearance: - JSP Records (CD) 500/200rpm B001TKKAFK mono
LET'S GET HIGH - THE MAN ABOUT MUSIC FROM MEMPHIS
Reissued: - 2014 Cherished Records Internet iTunes-21 mono
ROSCO GORDON - JUST A LITTLE BIT

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Phillip Walker - Guitar
L.W. Canty - Bass
Joe W. Payne - Drums
James Jones - Tenor Saxophone
Lionel Prevost - Tenor Saxophone

For Biography of Rosco Gordon see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rosco Gordon's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

OCTOBER 27, 1956 SATURDAY

Brenda Lee makes a guest appearance on NBC-TVs ''The Perry Como Show''.

OCTOBER 28, 1956 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley makes his second appearance on "The Ed Sullivan show, performing ''Don't Be Cruel'', ''Hound Dog'', ''Love Me'' and ''Love Me Tender''.

OCTOBER 29, 1956 MONDAY

Charley Pride pitches four innings of shutout ball, as the Negro League All-Stars beat the Major League All-Stars, including Hank Aaron and Willie Mays, 4-2.

Priscilla Beaulieu, the future wife of Elvis Presley, is crowned queen of the Popham Halloween Carnival in Austin, Texas.

OCTOBER 30, 1956 TUESDAY

Sonny James recorded ''Young Love'' and its B-side ''You're The Reason I'm In Love'' at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio in Nashville.

END OCTOBER 1956

Jerry Lee Lewis begins to appear at the Sun studios to make demo tapes.

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©