CONTAINS
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1951 SESSIONS 2
February 1, 1951 to February 28, 1951

Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, February 1951 / RPM Records
Studio Session for Walter ''Mumbles'' Horton, January/February 1951 / RPM/Modern

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/RPM recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

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FEBRUARY 1951

Sam Phillips cuts auditions of Rosco Gordon for Modern Records.

Modern accept Walter Horton's demo's and Sam Phillips duly cuts a session for Modern Records.

FEBRUARY 1951

Studio session for Rosco Gordon at the Memphis Recording Service in Memphis, Tennessee.

FEBRUARY 2, 1951 FRIDAY

MGM released Hank Williams' ''Cold Cold Heart'' and ''Dear John''.

The oil business provides the backdrop for a Roy Rogers film as ''Spoilers Of The West'' debuts in theaters. Foy Willing and The Riders Of The Purple Sage join Rogers on the silver screen.

FEBRUARY 3, 1951 SATURDAY

Songwriter Linda Hargrove is born in Tallahassee, Florida. She writes ''Let It Shine'', for Olivia Newton-John; ''Tennessee Whiskey'', for George Jones; and ''Just Get Up And Close The Door'', for Johnny Rodriguez.

FEBRUARY 8, 1951 THURSDAY

Pop vocalist Mary McCreary is born in San Francisco, California. In 1965, she marries future country hitmaker Leon Russell.

FEBRUARY 11, 1951 SUNDAY

Billy Walker holds his first recording session in a new agreement with Columbia Records, at the Jim Beck Recording Studio in Dallas, Texas.

FEBRUARY 14, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Michael Doucet is born in Scott, Louisiana. In 1975, he forms BeauSoleil, a Cajun group that joins Mary Chapin Carpenter for her 1991 hit ''Down At The Twist And Shout''.

FEBRUARY 17, 1951 SATERDAY

Zeb Turner recorded ''Chew Tobacco Rag'' at the King Recording Studio in Cincinnati.

FEBRUARY 18, 1951 SUNDAY

Isabel Preysler is born in The Philippines. In 1971, she marries ''To All The Girls I've Loved Before'' singer Julio Iglesias.

FEBRUARY 20, 1951 TUESDAY

Kathie Baillie, of Baillie & The Boys, is born in Morristown, New Jersey. She sings on seven Top 10 singles for the trio which becomes a duo after its first album from 1987-1990, including ''Oh Heart'', ''Long Shot'' and ''(I Wish I Had A) Heart Of Stone''.

FEBRUARY 21, 1951 WEDNESDAY

Keyboard player Vince Welnick is born in Phoenix. He joins the jam band The Grateful Dead in 1973, more than 20 years before the group is mentioned in the lyrics of Lonestar's ''No News''.

FEBRUARY 1951

In February, Sam Phillips sent the Bihari brothers sample dubs on another artist in whom he had a strong belief, a piano player with a quirky, almost childlike sense of his own inimitability. Rosco Gordon was twenty-two-yeas old and had grown up on Florida Street in South Memphis, not too fat from Beale Street, where, he liked to say, he had gotten his education. As a teenager he won the Amateur Night contest at the Palace Theater, and he picked up coaching on his piano playing from Billy ''Red'' Love, another young Beale Streeter, whom Rosco, a heavy drinker himself from his teen years, described affectionately as a ''winehead'' but who could play virtually every style of piano, past, present, and future, with effortless ease.

From the moment Rosco entered the studio, Sam Phillips liked him. He was a funny little guy with nothing polished about him. He had a long expressive face and an infectious enthusiasm, and he played piano with an amateur ishness that belied Billy ''Red'' Love teaching. His music in fact conveyed an almost fey whimsically, driven by a distinctive rhythmic approach, a kind of lilting loping beat built on a rudimentary boogie-woogie base.

According to Sam Phillips, ''Rosco was one of my favorite people. He would always come in by himself and sit down and play the piano, in this, very different way, and I thought, Well, you know, maybe we can just make a band out of this thing, we might not need any rhythm other than the way he plays this piano''. Even so, there was little question he needed a lot of work, and Sam had no idea how the Bihari brothers would react to him, he didn't really give a damn how they reacted to him, so long as they didn't steal Rosco from him, the main thing was, he didn't want Rosco to change, he didn't want him to go off and try to imitate someone else, he believed in him just as he was, and he did everything in his power to convince Rosco of that, too.

According to Rosco Gordon, ''Sam said, 'What you're playing, nobody in the world id going to play that but you'. Said, 'I don't know what it is. It's not blues, it's not pop, it's not rock. So we gonna call it ''Rosco's Rhythm''. That's what we called it. That's where that came from''.

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''I had a Memphis band and a road band'', recalled Rosco Gordon. ''The Memphis band was used mostly on recordings. Willie Wilkes, he played tenor saxophone. He was an old guy at the time, good player. I mean he was tight, he was like my father and me being so young. Richard Sanders was the great baritone, he had the guts and that, I tell you. There was Raymond Thomas, alto saxophone and Manson on drums. For sessions I also used Adolph Duncan on tenor saxophone, Billy ''Red'' Love on piano, Pat Hare on guitar, and Tuff Green on bass''.

''On the road, I had E. Jefferson and Harvey Simmons on tenor saxophones, Billy ''Red'' Love on piano, Murry Daley on drums with pick-up bass players. I toured with Tuff Green's band as well'', said Gordon.

''My main gig was in Mason, Tennessee, Doyle's Nitespot. I played Arkansas, Brinkley, The Club Eldorado in Little Rock, Hot Springs, Pine Bluff, all over Mississippi... West Memphis and Club Handy on Beale Street, Memphis. The audiences were very enthusiastic 'cause I had a new sound''.

''Look, we were young, he confides. ''We were enjoying what we were doing. Man, I was so hot! Every time I looked around I had a new record out. At 18 or 19 I had the best of everything, big Cadillac, the sharpest clothes, $200 shoes, girls... had so much fun, I tell you, But I didn't know anything about the business side. I get as big a thrill out of playing now as I did then. The same thrill, the same enthusiasm, the same energy, everything. It's still there. It doesn't just disappear''.

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR RPM RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: FEBRUARY 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR MARION KEISKER

Rosco Gordon Jr. was born in Memphis in 1934, the youngest of eight children, growing up on Florida Street. He taught himself piano by sitting next to his sister while she practiced her lessons and before the age of eighteen had won the Talent Show at Beale Street's famed Palace Theater (the M.C. was Rufus Thomas) and was appearing on WDIA, America's first all black radio station (where B.B. King got his start around the same time). Through WDIA's owner James Mattis he was sent to see Sam C. Phillips who recorded him, leasing his sides to the Bihari Brother' RPM label out of Los Angeles, charting for the first time with ''Saddled The Cow (Milked The Horse)'' b/w ''Ouch! Pretty Baby'' which went to number 9 at the Rhythm And Blues Charts in September of 1951.

01 – ''CITY WOMAN'' – B.M.I. - 3:18
Composer: - Rosco Gordon-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - 1503 Master
Recorded: - February 1951
Released: - April 1951
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 322-A < mono
CITY WOMAN / ROSCOE'S BOOGIE
Reissued: - November 14, 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm Ace CDCHD 64 mono
ROSCO GORDON - BOOTED - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS

02 – ''ROSCOE'S BOOGIE'' – B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - 1502 Master
Recorded: - February 1951
Released: - April 1951
First appearance: - RPM Records (S) 78rpm standard single > RPM 322-B < mono
ROSCOE'S BOOGIE / CITY WOMAN
Reissued: - November 24, 1998 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm Ace CDCHD 694 mono
ROSCO GORDON - BOOTED - THE BEST OF THE RPM YEARS
 
''The Phillips studio in its early days was like a hole'', said Rosco Gordon. ''It was just something Sam had slammed together. It wasn't a recording studio, just a hole in the wall with the backs out of the recording equipment - and Sam using his soldering iron, his pliers and whatever. But he put it together. You didn't get out of the studio until you got it right. He's the best, I tell you he's the best. He generated enthusiasm and energy. He gives it you. It was Sam who arranged the first recording deals with RPM and Chess''. 
 
03 – ''SO TIRED'' - B.M.I. - 3:20
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 1951
Released: - 1982
First appearance: - Ace Records (LP) 33rpm Ace CH 51-1-4 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE MEMPHIS SESSIONS - VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 2006 Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ROSCO GORDON - LET'S GET HIGH
 
04 – ''SHE ROCKS ME'' - B.M.I.'' - 3:06
Composer: - Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - February 1951
Released: - 1982
First appearance: - Ace Records (LP) 33rpm Ace CH51-1-1 mono
ROSCO GORDON - THE MEMPHIS SESSIONS - VOLUME 2
Reissued: - 2006 Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ROSCO GORDON - LET'S GET HIGH
 
 Rosco's name is misspelled on all RPM labels.
 
Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon – Vocal & Piano
Probably the next musicians:
Billy ''Red'' Love - Piano
Pat Hare - Guitar
Willie Wilkes - Tenor Saxophone
Richard Sanders - Baritone Saxophone
Adolph Duncan - Tenor Saxophone
Tuff Green - Bass
 
For Biography of Rosco Gordon see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rosco Gordon's RPM/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <
 
© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

The world of post-war blues harmonica was wide and varied and many names go to make up the story: the two Sonny Boys, Junior wells, Snooky Pryor, George Smith, Papa Lightfoot and Slim Harpo. However, two artists that stood way out in front and could not be challenged were Little Walter (Jacobs) and Big Walter Horton. These gifted musicians transformed the whole concept of harmonica playing and they pioneered the electronically amplified harmonica during the forties.

Their amazing virtuosity changed the role of the instrument from a solo one to a band instrument and they did for the harmonica what Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young had done for the tenor sax in jazz, shaping their harmonica blues tones into breath-taking instrumental solos.

The harmonica or French harp as it was known in the south, had been a staple instrument in the rural southern states and was widely used by black and white musicians alike, from cornball hillbillies of Appalachia, to wandering minstrels, and jug bands of the delta. Even a negro, Deford Bailey, featured the harmonica on the snowy-white Grand Ole Opry in Nashville for many years.

Little Walter met Walter Horton in Memphis during the 1940s where they exchanged ideas. Little Walter later left for Chicago where he joined Muddy Waters band and later went on to stardom as a solo performer on Checker Records. Horton subsequently made his move to Chicago some years later, but not before he made some classic sides at Sam Phillips' Memphis Recording Service.

In early 1951 Sam Phillips recorded Walter Horton. It has been reported that he went down to Handy Park and brought both Walter Horton and Jim Lockhart back to his studio, where he recorded sample auditions for the Biharis.

STUDIO SESSION FOR WALTER ''MUMBLES'' HORTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICES FOR RPM/MODERN RECORDS 1951

MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
STUDIO SESSION: JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1951
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

All the recordings on this session were made direct to acetate lacquers, and a great deal of restoration work has been done, including cleaning and remastering.

01 - ''COTTON PATCH HOT FOOT'' - B.M.I - 2:33
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1504 - Instrumental - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-6 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-6 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

02(1) - ''WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH YOU'' - B.M.I. 2:27
Composer; - Walter Horton-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - 1505 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-5 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHDH 252-12 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

02(2) - ''WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:14
Composer; - Walter Horton-Jules Taub
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - 1505 - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-12 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHDH 252-5 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

03(1) - ''BLUES IN THE MORNING'' - B.M.I. - 2:49
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - 1507 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-9 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-9 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

While transferring ''Blues In The Morning'' we noticed the acetate had another take of this number, not listed on the label. This take of the song is probably not Walter Horton on vocal and harmonica, and this gave rise to the theory that musicians would gather around the studio when Sam Phillips was holding sessions and would be given the chance to audition, even on the numbers that were currently being recorded.

03(2) - ''BLUES IN THE MORNING''
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - 1507 - Take 2
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - Unissued

04(1) - ''LITTLE BOY BLUE'' - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - Robert Lockwood Jr
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1508 - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-3 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-13 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

Also here for the first time is an alternate of the magnificent ''Little Boy Blue'', and two takes of ''What's The Matter With You'' from this session and best of all you can now hear clearly, for the first time, the wonderful instrumental ''Cotton' Patch Hot Foot'' (above).

04(2) – ''LITTLE BOY BLUE'' - B.M.I. - 2:56
Composer:- Robert Lockwood Jr
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1508 Master Take 2
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - Early 1951
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Modern 809-A < mono
LITTLE BOY BLUE / NOW TELL ME BABY
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-7 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

During subsequent weeks Sam cut further sessions with Walter Horton, who was accompanied by Joe Hill Louis on guitar and drums, and possibly a dancer with bottle tops on his boots, producing a novel clickerty-clack effect.

An unknown pianist is just audible on ''Little Boy Blue'' and ''I'm In Love With You Baby''. From these first sessions the Biharis selected ''Little Boy Blue'' and ''Now Tell Me Baby'' for Horton's first release on Modern 809. On the labels he was credited as ''Mumbles''.

05(1) - ''NOW TELL ME BABY'' - B.M.I. - 3:04
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-10 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

The real sensation was finding an alternate take of ''Now Tell Me Baby'', which is quite different from the released version on Modern 809. This features the legendary guitarist Willie Johnson, whose choked guitar figure is musically better than the released version. Maybe Sam Phillips was looking for diversity, trying out new arrangements and riffs. Sadly we could not use both versions because the released master take is irreparably damaged. However it is available on a Memphis Blues collection on Nighthawk LP 105.

05(2) - ''NOW TELL ME BABY'' - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1506 Master Take 2 Damaged 
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - Early 1951 - Master Damaged
First appearance: - Modern Records (S) 78rpm standard single > Modern 809-B < mono
NOW TELL ME BABY / LITTLE BOY BLUE
Reissued: - January 5, 2009 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm Ace CDCHD 1003 mono
THE MODERN DOWNHOME BLUES SESSIONS VOLUME 3 - MEMPHIS ON DOWN

06(1) - ''WALTER'S BLUES (I'M IN LOVE WITH YOU) - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1509 – Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-8 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-8 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

06(2) - ''WALTER'S BLUES (I'M IN LOVE WITH YOU) - B.M.I. - 2:37
Composer: - Walter Horton
Publisher: - Modern Music
Matrix number: - MM 1509 – Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - January/February 1951
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Polydor Records (LP) 33rpm 2383 200-11 mono
COTTON PATCH HOTFOOT
Reissued: - 1988 Ace Records (CD) 500/200rpm CHD 252-11 mono
MOUTH HARP MAESTRO

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Walter Horton - Vocal & Harmonica
Joe Hill Louis - Guitar, Percussion
Willie Johnson - Guitar
Unknown tap dancing effect
Other Musicians Unknown

When Modern Records received outside masters, they would assign their own MM matrix numbers en-bloc, so these do not always accurately refer to the original sessions when they were recorded.

For Biography of Walter Horton see: > The Sun Biographies <
Walter Horton's Modern/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

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For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
MRS/RPM recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©