CONTAINS
For music (standard singles) and playlists on YouTube click on the available > buttons <
> Back 1954 Sun Schedule <

1954 SESSIONS 5
May 1, 1954 to May 31, 1954

Studio Session for Billy Love, May 3, 1954 / Sun Records
Studio Session for The Prisonaires, May 8, 1954 / Sun Records
Studio Session for James Cotton, May 14, 1954 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Pat Hare, May 14, 1954 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Buddy Blake Cunningham, May 1954 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Onie Wheeler, May 17, 1954 / Okeh/Columbia Records

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
> YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1954

In the spring of 1954, future Sun artist Ernie Chaffin with his buddy Pee Wee Maddux signed a two record deal with Hickory Records, the label division of Acuff-Rose publishing released all four titles to scant acclaim during 1954. Fred Rose wrote a note to Pee Wee Maddux expressing disappointment in the sales but thought that Ernie had, in Rose's words, ''gained an entre'' Within a few weeks however Rose was dead and Ernie was never called back for another session. What should have become the start of a long career in mainstream country music evaporated when neither record released by Hickory garnered much attention. Two releases later, the deal was over.

If Rose had not accepted their material, Maddux was determined to start up an independent label to issue his work with Ernie. It was this option the their now began to explore. Fine Records was started in Biloxi as a joint venture between Maddux and Prof. Marion Carpenter who was a local band director and Ernie's manager. At some point promoter Yankie Bahanovich seems to have become involved. Their first venture, Ernie's original recording of ''The Heart Of Me'', was released in early 1956.

MAY 1, 1954 SATURDAY

Hardrock Gunter's "Gonna Dance All Night" b/w ''Fallen Angel'' (Sun 201) is released at about this time. It is a country boogie for the Bill Haley market and, unusually for Sun, has been recorded elsewhere, also released this day t he singles ''The Woodchuck''/''I'm Not Going Home'' Sun 203 by Billy "The Kid" Emerson and ''The Snuggle''/''Bourbon Street Jump'' Sun 204 by Raymond Hill, and Sun released Doug Poindexter and The Starlite Wrangler's ''My Kind Of Carryin' On'' backed with ''Now She Cares No More For Me'' (Sun 202), the only Sun single for the band, featuring guitarist Scotty Moore and bass player Bill Black. Within weeks, Moore and Black begin work with Sun's Elvis Presley. The element of this records make different was its sound, it introduced for the first time Sam Phillips' own version of the ''artificial'' echo that had become a common recording technique following the experiments of studio engineer Bill Putnam six or seven years earlier. Sam put his special stamp on it, applying the name ''slapback''. Nothing happened. None of the records sold.

Singer/songwriter Don King is born in Omaha, Nebraska. His writing credits include Janie Fricke's ''You Don't Know Love'' and Reba McEntire's ''Why Do We Want (What We Know We Can't Have)''.

Comedian Andy Griffith makes his Grand Ole Opry debut, at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee.

MAY 3, 1954 MONDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford makes the first of three guest appearance on ''I Love Lucky'' as hick relative Uncle Ernie. The plot includes a rendition of ''Wabash Cannonball''.

Columbia released Little Jimmy Dickens' ''Out Behind The Barn'' and Marty Robbins' ''Pretty Words''.

MAY, 1954

On May 14, Milton Billy Red Love played a session with blues guitarist Pat Hare and drummer Israel Franklin that produced the enthusiastic ''Bonus Pay'' and the foreboding ''I'm Gonna Murder My Baby'', neither of which were issued at the time. It is likely that this was the month when Love also recorded a promotional record for the Hart's bakery in Memphis, perhaps on May 3, when Love was paid $15.

The two songs he made that day have a much sparser and more bluesy sound and the musicians backing him on ''Blues Leave Me Alone'' and ''Hart's Bread Boogie'' are probably Pat Hare and Israel Franklin. ''Blues Leave Me Alone'' features a deliberate, slow and building riff and shows Love's vocal range and ability to lose himself in the blues.

He suddenly sounds much closer to the country blues singers of an earlier generation with his vocal, both smooth and hollering at the same time. It may have been recorded as a B-side but it was not issued and possibly Love or Phillips did not know that the Hart's company liked to issue promotional 45s with the same song on both sides. Love recorded three versions of ''Hart's Bread Boogie'' but only one was used.

The Hart's bakery briefly had a policy of using well-known local musicians to make promotional records in support of their products. They issued these on 78 and 45 rpm discs that were sold or were given away at various promotional events and which doubled as good advertising vehicles for use by disc jockeys. Billy Love's is the only known blues version of ''Hart's Bread Boogie'' but the same song was recorded by a number of hillbilly bands as were other variants like Slim Rhodes's ''Don't Say Bread Say Hart's'' also issued on the Hart's label. Curley Hickson recorded ''Hart's Boogie'' on the SEMO label, and versions appeared on a number of advertising agency labels.

Someone called Dreamy Joe recorded the same song as ''Hardin's Bread Boogie'' on Action Productions and he also recorded the song as both ''Holsum Bread'' and ''Sweetheart Bread''. The advertising agency Action Productions label also had a unidentified singer titled Bunny Bread.

It is difficult to say whether this song was written by Billy Love, by one of the hillbilly bands, or by an advertising man in Memphis somewhere. Billy Love sings the same lyrics as Curley Hickson and the other hillbillies but musically his version is a world apart. Love has a far more attacking vocal style and Pat Hare plays a wonderfully harsh guitar solo. There is something of the greasy style of Ray Charles's ''It Should Have Been Me'' about the recording and the bottom line was, "You can't do the boogie if Hart's not in it."

Hart's bread was founded by L. S. Hartzog, known as ''Mr Hart'' who founded a bakery in Selma, Alabama, before moving to Memphis and starting up the Hart's Bread Bakery on Summer Avenue at the junction with Mendenhall Street, just a short car ride away from 706 Union Avenue. At its height of success Hart's was a big operation and the company had a large factory over which towered a neon lit Hart's sign, a bright red heart on an aluminum pedestal with flashing yellow hearts all of which lit up in a pulsing sequence.

Although Hart's was a wholesale factory many Memphians recall the pre-health department days when they could walk up to a tiny window, hand an employee a quarter and take away a steaming hot loaf right off the assembly line. 'Mr Hart' also owned a lot of restaurants including many links in the chains of Wendy's, KFC, and others. It is not known who the 'Mr Brown' was, mentioned in all versions of the Hart's boogie song, but presumably he was the manager of the Memphis wholesale bakery. This closed down at some point in the 1970s although the Hart's brand is still current today.

One of the few differences in the versions Billy Love recorded is that the "man by the name of Brown" one version becomes "Mr Brown" in others. It's not known what politics Billy Love supported, but in taking the commission to make music for Hart's bread he unwittingly took part in what a famous politician later denounced as a history of exploitation by the Hart's company.

A chronicler of old Memphis, Vance Lauderdale, wrote this about the hart's Bread bakery at 4871 Summer Avenue and Mendenhall. ''The sign stood like a bacon. It was a combination neon and mechanical. You had a huge bright-red heart mounted on a fluted aluminium pedestal. On each side were neon-shaped hearts, arranged one inside the other, which got smaller and smaller as they reached the center.

These were in yellow, and as the neon tubes flashed on and off, in and out, in sequence, the heart seem pulse or beat. At the exact moment when every tube of neon was illuminated, the giant cursive letters spelling out 'Hart's' flashed across the sign. Then they turned off, and the whole 'heartbeat' started again. Mounted on top of this, was a full-color Volkswagen-sized loaf of Hart's bread''. So even the sign did the ''Hart's Bread Boogie''.

Here is a photograph of Billy Red Love (above) sitting at a piano on the corner of the stage of what may well be the Palace Theater on Beale Street in Memphis and behind him is an advertising poster for the Johnny Otis Show due to appear in Memphis for four nights from 9 -12 of a month and year that are not visible. It is known that the Otis show featuring the same singers and guests as listed in the poster was in Memphis at the Palace on November 9-12, 1950, and it just may be that Billy Love played that show too as part of the local support.

The Otis revue made regular visits to Memphis over the next two or three years and so Love's promotional photograph could date from as early as 1950 or as late as 1953.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BILLY LOVE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE PROBABLY MONDAY MAY 3, 1954
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

01(1) - "HART'S BREAD BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Milton Billy Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Possibly May 3, 1954
Released: - 1996
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-7-1 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958
Reissued: - March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-7-5 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Love pays a talking blues tribute to the title's product. In fact, the "Hart's Bread Show" ran regularly on KWEM in West Memphis, Arkansas, and an alternate version of this song appeared on the Hart's Bread label.

The lyric recounts the curative and restorative powers of the product in a manner which would no longer pass codes of Advertising Practice (imagine Love and Sam Phillips trying to argue the truth of lines like "You can't do the boogie if your heart's not in it" in court) Love's vocal is performed in the same greasy style as Ray Charles "It Should Have Been Me", which was highly popular in 1953 when this song was conceived.

01(2) - "HART'S BREAD BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 3:26
Composer: - Milton Billy Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Alternate - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Possibly May 3, 1954
Released: - 1992
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-9 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-18 mono
GEE... I WISH

01(3) - "HART'S BREAD BOOGIE" - B.M.I. - 2:39
Composer: - Milton Billy Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - HB 66 - Take 3
Recorded: - Possibly May 3, 1954
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Harts (S) 78rpm standard  single Harts H B-66 mono
HART'S BREAD BOOGIE
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-25 mono
GEE... I WISH

02(1) - "BLUES LEAVE ME ALONE" - B.M.I. – 3:29
Composer: - Milton Billy Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Possibly May 3, 1954
Released: - November 1977
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm CR 30135-12 mono
THE LEGENDARY SUN PERFORMERS - JUNIOR PARKER & BILLY LOVE
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-24 mono
GEE... I WISH

02(2) - "BLUES LEAVE ME ALONE" - B.M.I. – 3:28
Composer: - Milton Billy Love
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Possibly May 3, 1954
Released: - Re-Issued of Deleted Track
First appearance: - 1992 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD SUN 36-8 mono
THE SUN BLUES ARCHIVES - WAY AFTER MIDNIGHT - VOLUME 4
Reissued: - 2011 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17149-17 mono
GEE... I WISH

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Billy Love - Vocal and Piano
Pat Hare – Guitar
Unknown - Bass and Drums

For Biography of Billy ''Red'' Love see: > The Sun Biographies <
Billy ''Red'' Love's Chess/Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

BLUES LEAVE ME ALONE

Where out west? Well, according to the City Directory of Colorado Springs for 1959 Milton Love was living at 330 ½ Conejos Street with his wife, Lillie M Love, and he was working as an attendant at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs. He was obviously still playing music because the next year, 1960, he had moved with Lillie to 608 North Franklin and was listed as a musician at Duncan's Cotton Club.

The Cotton Club at 25/27 West Colorado Avenue was a renowned venue for black musicians and became an institution in Colorado Springs until it closed in the mid-'70s. The club was owned by Fannie Mae Duncan from Luther, Oklahoma, who ran a cafe and bar with her husband before establishing a night club in 1948. They booked top quality jazz and blues performers in the 1950s and 1960s including Fats Domino, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Lionel Hampton, Little Richard and B. B. King.

The club was the place to go for servicemen from Fort Carson as well as students from Colorado College and although the clientele was 80% black Mrs Duncan was renowned for discouraging segregation. She posted a huge sign with a spotlight over it in the window that read, 'Everybody Welcome!"'. Mrs Duncan became a local legend for her pioneering business sense and tough and savvy facade along with her all- embracing attitude. One employee said: "When you entered, you would always see her sitting at the end of the bar on a bar stool in the corner. She had this presence about her. She dressed like no other. She wore furs and diamonds, but everybody respected her. People felt very comfortable coming in there, of all races, and no one was ever turned away."

Fannie Mae Duncan employed a house band through the 1960s and Milton Love was a pianist and arranger there for several years. By 1961 he had moved to 608 Gillette Street with Lillie and on May 31, that year the ''Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph'' contained among its notices section the news: "Mr and Mrs Milton Love, 608 Gillette St, a boy, 7 pounds four and three-quarter ounces, born Monday May 29 at Penrose Hospital." This may have been one of the first of the 'six kids' Rosco Gordon spoke about.

Nothing is known of Milton Love's life outside of the Cotton Club during the 1960s but apparently things went wrong by 1968 when he was living at the rear of 117 Corona Street and listed as a labourer.

By 1973 he was living at the rear of 223 South Institute Street, apparently renting accommodation from a man named Raymond Anderson who lived in the main part of the house.

Sometime that year Milton's address was changed to 225 South Institute Street, indicating either that he had moved in next door to Anderson or that the rear part of the house now had a separate number. It was at this new address on January 6, 1974 that Milton was arrested by the police.

The Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph reported on 7 January: "Man killed in drug raid - A Colorado Springs man was shot to death Sunday after he opened fire on police officers conducting simultaneous drug raids on two houses in the 200 block of South Institute Street. Police identified the dead man as Raymond Anderson, 62 of 223 Institute Street. The Anderson house was raided by police at 9:15 p.m. fit with search warrants. The occupant of the second house, Milton Love, 225 South Institute Street, was arrested on complaints of possession for sale of narcotic drugs and possession of illegal weapons. Suspected heroin was found in both houses, according to Carl Petry, Assistant Chief of Police. Petry said police gained entrance to the Love home without incident but when Anderson answered the knock on his door and two officers identified themselves, he fired three shots through the glass portion of the door. After they were shot at, police said, Detective Sgt Adas Talley and Sgt James Lilley returned the fire through the door. Petry said the officers fired a total of six shots into the house. Anderson's son, Richard, 23, was in the house at the time of the shooting."

Three days later, the ''Gazette'' reported on January 10, that "Seven heroin counts were filed in district court Wednesday against two men, Garland Edward Banks, 23, of Hancock Avenue and Milton B Love, 44, of 425 South Institute Street. Banks had five counts of selling heroin and one of having heroin for sale filed against him … Love was charged with having heroin for sale and having an illegal weapon in hos possession, a sawed off shotgun, Sunday.... The defendant (Love) was arrested at his his home during a raid by police and narcotics officers who also raided the 223 South Institute which resulted in the death of an occupant of the house, Raymond Anderson. The matter was presented to the grand jury Tuesday night and it was established that Anderson had fired first. The officers returned six shots Anderson fired a second shot and when the officers entered the house it was found that Anderson had been hit five times. After six hours of testimony Tuesday night, the grand jury ruled it ''was a clear cut case of self defense'' and refused to return any indictment against the officers". The same day the ''Greeley (Col) Tribune'' reported that the Police said they confiscated $1500 worth of heroin from the Love household.

Nevertheless, it seems that Milton Love survived the events of 1974 relatively unscathed and the City Directory returns for the following year found him, described as Milton B Love, still living at 225 South Institute. However Milton's luck ran out five months into that year. The notices section of the ''Gazette Telegraph'' of Monday May 5, 1975 reported: "Milton Love. Passed away Friday at a local hospital. Arrangements later." It was not reported whether the cause was the heroin or the drink but Rosco Gordon told Hank Davis in 1980 that "(Billy's) dead. Died a long time ago... He drank himself to death."

The funeral arrangements involved moving Milton Love's body from Colorado Springs to Memphis where he was taken to the Victory Funeral Home. On May 16, 1975 Milton Morse ''Billy Red'' Love was buried at the Memphis National Cemetery on Townes Avenue.

Quite apart from the problems associated with his lifestyle leading to his early death, two and a half records on Chess, an aborted record on Sun, and a promotional disc for bread were not a lot to show for a life in music. But Milton Billy Love left behind a number of unissued recordings that started to be issued on blues and rhythm and blues collections in the 1970s and 1980s, fuelling a degree of interest in him and his music. Also, the little girl who had taken Billy Love's appetite back in the early 1950s never forgot him or his music. Raymond Sanders's sister Lillie was Lillie Jubirt by the 1980s when her three daughters, Ann, Carol and Lynn started performing in Memphis as the Jubirt Sisters. They made an LP, ''Ladies Sing The Blues'', High Water, LP 1008, for producer David Evans and included two of Billy Love's songs, ''Early In The Morning'' and ''If You Want To Make Me Happy''.

Reflecting on discussions about the songwriter overheard during these recording sessions, Evens told me: "I always got the impression he was an elusive character, operating in the shadows. Well respected for his musical abilities though." The Jubirt Sisters recordings reappeared in CD form in 2000 on ''Sing! Sister! Sing!'', High Water, Hightone HMG 6515. Singer Ann Jubirt told me, "The Jubirt Sisters are inspired by this fascinating and talented artist."

by Martin Hawkins, Maidstone, England, October 2010

MAY 7, 1954 FRIDAY

The Nelson family, including Ricky nelson, appears on the cover of TV Guide.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Sam Phillips went to the Tennessee State Penitentiary with his portable recording equipment and cut what would be their last Sun single, "What'll You Do Next" and "There Is Love In You". It was released on July 1, 1954, a few days before Sam Phillips found the path towards commercial salvation with Elvis Presley. If Phillips had his ear a little closer to the ground, he would have known that the sound of doo-wop was changing.

Governor Frank Clement was running for re-election, and his political opponents, not to mention the newspapers, had been jumping all over him for his irresponsible ideas on prison reform ever since the Prisonaires had starting making outside appearances the previous July. Sam Phillips entered the prison gates not without a certain amount of trepidation, it was a maximum-security prison designed to hold twelve hundred with a population of a thousand more. But Sam knew that if he were to show fear, he would only be drawing further attention to himself. So, with the warden accompanying him, he ate in the prison chow line. ''Man, I can tell you, I didn't eat a whole lot.

Because I tried to speak with as many of the men as I could'', said Phillips. And Sam put forty or fifty prisoners to work hanging canvas with him to deaden the sound in the prison's concrete-block movie theater. Sam didn't want any extra guards. He just wanted as many prisoners as possible to participate in the process. And he left the prison at 2:30 the following morning with two songs for the Prisonaires' next and, as it would turn out, last single release.

Sam Phillips also left the prison with an acetate that had been set aside for him by Red Wortham, the song publisher who had steered the Prisonaires to Sun Records (See: Elvis Sun Sessions / Elvis 1954 / June 26, 1954).

STUDIO SESSION FOR THE PRISONAIRES
AT THE TENNESSEE STATE PENITENTIARY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 1954

PRESTO PT 900 PORTABLE RECORDING EQUIPMENT
SUN SESSION: SATURDAY MAY 8, 1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

A devotional, if you will. Love, faith, hope, trust, peace... all those qualities most of us wish we had a little more of in our lives. Whether we get them from lovers of friends or deities differs from person to person. Bragg's lyric is unusual only because he seems to shuttle back and forth within the same song until we don't know just whom he's adoring. And so the lyric stands in all its unorthodox ambiguity and honesty. Just the way Sam Phillips would have liked it.

01(1) - "WHAT'LL YOU DO NEXT" - B.M.I. - 1:37
Composer: - Johnny Bragg-William Stewart
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 8, 1954
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15523 AH-17 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - JUST WALKIN' IN THE RAIN

The Prisonaires saw three singles issued from sessions in Memphis, but the two songs that appeared as their fourth and final Sun single were made on portable recording equipment in the auditorium of the penitentiary. The alternative take of ''What'll You Do Next'' has never been issued before and is marginally slower than the issued version while retaining the bongo beat probably provided by prison band drummer Hubbard Brown and the clever interplay between the bass voice and the tenors.

01(2) - "WHAT'LL YOU DO NEXT"* - B.M.I. - 1:28
Composer: - Johnny Bragg-William Stewart
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 123 - Take 2 Master
Recorded: - May 8, 1954
Released: - July 1, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm single > Sun 207-B < mono
WHAT'LL YOU DO NEXT / THERE IS LOVE IN YOU
Reissued - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-3-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

01(3) – WHAT'LL YOU DO NEXT - B.M.I. - 1:35
Composer: - Johnny Bragg-William Stewart
Publisher: - Hi Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 8, 1954
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-24 mono
THE PRISONAIRES – BABY PLEASE

Is worth a long second listen. The big question is simply, is this a secular or a religious recording? To whom is Bragg singing? His girlfriend or God? While artists like Ray Charles, Sam Cooke or Aretha Franklin have made careers of blending gospel and secular music, it has been done like this. Initially, it seems a safe bet that Johnny Bragg is singing about God. There is joy, there is peace, there is hope, and there is rest in the object of his affection. These are not usually qualities associated with one's girlfriend, at least in popular music. The idea that he follows in the footsteps of his adored being, further suggests a religious theme.

By then, suddenly, the other shoe falls, "There is rest in you/When you're in my arms". Hardly the place one expects to find the Big Gut: in Johnny Bragg's arms. The version of the slow ballad ''There Is Love In You'' is similar to the issued version but with the group's voices more prominent behind Bragg's heartfelt lead vocal. Music writer Hank Davis has pointed out the confusion in the lyrics, which never make clear whether this is a secular or religious love Bragg's heart feels. The song was written by Bragg with co-composer, guitarist William Stewart.

02(1) - "THERE IS LOVE IN YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:51
Composer: - Johnny Bragg-William Stewart
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 122 - Take 1 Master
Recorded: - May 8, 1954
Released: - July 1, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm single > Sun 207-A < mono
THERE IS LOVE IN YOU / WHAT'LL YOU DO NEXT
Reissued - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-3-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

02(2) - ''THERE IS LOVE IN YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:53
Composer: - Johnny Bragg-William Stewart
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 8, 1954
Released: - 2011
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16893-25 mono
THE PRISONAIRES - BABY PLEASE

Has appeared both with and without percussion on different anthologies. Sam Phillips expended considerable time recording it and rightly so. It is a fine song, worthy of his effort. The final released version is superb, if a bit thin on the bottom end. With the addition of a string bass to drive it, this record would have been a classic. As it is, the recording features fine interplay between the bass singer and harmony vocals. The arrangement build considerable tension going into the final release, "Don't tell me you're not giving...". Sam Phillips picked the correct take for release; virtually every element meshes in this effective and minimalist recording.

What has happened here? Perhaps the most reasonable account is that somewhere in his lonely cell, Johnny Bragg thought about those things most missing in his life and wrote a simply love song to them. A devotional, if you will. Peace and Love are simple things, rendered that much more desirable by their absence. Both God and woman are ways to achieve them, and the distinction between these sources was of secondary importance in Bragg's lonely soul.

And so the Lyric stands, in all its unorthodox ambiguity and honestly. Just the way Sam Phillips would have liked it.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Bragg - Lead Tenor Vocal
John Drue - 2nd Tenor Vocal
William Stewart - Baritone, Vocal and Guitar
Marcell Sanders - Bass Vocal
Ed Thurman - Tenor Vocal
Probably Hubbard Brown – Bongoes (*)

For Biography of The Prisonaires see: > The Sun Biographies <
 The Prisonaires' Sun recordings can be heard on their playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 1954

The rawness that Sam Phillips found in Little Milton's guitar was amplified, bot literally and metaphorically, in the work of Auburn ''Pat'' Hare, the most aggressive picker to work at Phillips' studio in Memphis. Together, Pat Hare and James cotton produced one of the truly great blues recordings, ''Cotton Crop Blues''.

MAY 10, 1954 MONDAY

Tennessee Ernie Ford makes his second guest appearance as rural Uncle Ernie on CBD' ''I Love Lucy''. Viewers get renditions of ''Wabash Cannonball'' and ''Y'all Come''.

Decca released Webb Pierce's ''Even 'Tho'', featuring his duet with The Wilburn Brothers, ''Sparkling Brown Eyes'' on the B-side.

Columbia released Ray Price's ''Much To Young To Die''.

MAY 12, 1954 WEDNESDAY

Little Jimmy Dickens recorded ''Take Me As I Am (Or Let Me Go)'' in Nashville. The song becomes a hit for Ray Price a lucky 13 years later.

MAY 13, 1954 THURSDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''Go, Boy, Go'', ''More Than Anything Else In The World'' and ''No, I Don't Believe I Will'' during the afternoon at the castle Studio in Nashville.

Ray Kennedy is born in Buffalo, New York. He earns a hit in 1990 with ''What A Way To Go'', then goes on to produce alternate country albums with Steve Early.

The Broadway production ''The Pajama Game'' opens at the St. James Theatre in New York. The musical introduces the Richard Adler-Jerry Ross song ''Hernando's Hideaway'', which is parodied in a country rendition by Homer and Jethro.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

If ever there was a seminal example of country and city blues merging in Memphis, then this must surely be it. The lyrical content is so deeply rooted in the Delta, its surprising that it even got as far as Memphis - whilst on the other hand, Pat Hare's devastating guitar playing and sound epitomises the harsh angularity of the city blues. The whole record becomes a metaphor for rural oppression and hopelessness, in much the same was as Mercy Dee Walton's best records (but unfortunately, without any of the humour). Who can forget Cotton's brooding interjections like "So dark and muddy on this farm?".

But make no mistake, its Hare's work which elevates this disc to classic stature: his blistering fills and solo, complemented by the barely contained distortion, are truly lightning in a bottle, whilst the pounding piano from Mose Vinson, and the drums of John Bowers, provide the ideal accompaniment. This is surely Hare's finest recorded performance - and whilst the solo was patently preconceived (sections of it are reproduced note-for-note in other Hare recordings), the fact that it was conceived at all, much less recorded, is truly impressive.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JAMES COTTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY MAY 14, 1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The aggressive guitar playing on ''Cotton Crop Blues'' raises eyebrows even today, more than sixty years after it was recorded. By any criterion, ''Cotton Crop Blues'' is one of the finest blues records ever made, easily transcending its origin as a barely disquised rewrite of Roosevelt Sykes' ''Cotton Seed Blues''. Here, country and city merge. The words are so deeply rooted in the Delta and the sharecropper's grimly predictable life, it's surprising that ''Cotton Crop Blues'' even got as far as Memphis, but Pat Hare's vituperative guitar seems born and bred of the city.

01 - "COTTON CROP BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:59
Composer: - James Cotton
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 120 - Master
Recorded: - May 14, 1954
Released: - July 1, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 206-A < mono
COTTON CROP BLUES / HOLD ME IN YOUR HANDS
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-3-5 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

If listening to "Hold Me In Your Arms" (Sun 206), the original master is lost, produces a sense of deja-vu, don't be surprised. Virtually every note here, from Hare's guitar intro to the simulated fadeout (Sam Phillips seemed unwilling or unable to fade out performances from the control room), is borrowed directly from Junior Parker's "Love My Baby". In a recent interview, Cotton claimed that he and guitarist Floyd Murphy had first conceived the tune and performed it over radio station KWEM. If Sam Phillips was aware of the duplication, he was unconcerned; he held the publishing, Hi-Lo Music Incorporated, to both titles.

02 - "HOLD ME IN YOUR ARMS" - B.M.I. - 2:45
Composer: - James Cotton
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 121 - Master
Recorded: - May 14, 1954
Released: - July 1, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 206-B < mono
HOLD ME IN YOUR ARMS / COTTON CROP BLUES
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-3-6 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Mind you, if one had to plagiarise, then this is as good a place to start as any. In a mid-1980s interview Cotton vividly recalled this session, right down to the fact that he had contributed to the rhythm section by playing 'drums' on a cardboard box.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
James Cotton - Vocal possibly Percussion
Pat Hare - Guitar
Mose Vinson - Piano
John Bowers - Drums

There was a marked contrast between the lyrics - rooted in rural despair - and Pat Hare's accompaniment which epitomized the harshness and angularity of city blues. Hare played intense and climactic fills around Cotton's vocal and then took a solo of extraordinary violence and passion. "Mr. Sandman" was sitting on top of the Hit Parade on the day "Cotton Crop Blues" was released. The two songs could have come from different planets.

For Biography of James Cotton see: > The Sun Biographies <
James Cotton's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR PAT HARE
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: FRIDAY MAY 14, 1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

''Bonus Pay'' although not titled as such on its initial release (it originally appeared as "Ain't Gonna Be That Way" on Charly Records Sun LP 1061, this is Hare's version of Eddie ''Cleanhead'' Vinson's 1946 Mercury single. In comparison with much of his earlier work the guitar solo is quite restrained, although it certainly features Hare's fondness for over-amplification to the point of distortion. Perhaps the major problem here is that Hare was constrained by having to sing and play guitar fills at the same time - i.e. without the benefit of latter-day overdubbing techniques.

01 - "BONUS PAY (AIN'T GONNA BE THAT WAY)" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Eddie Vinson
Publisher: - Cherio Music
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 14, 1954
Released: - 1990
First appearance: Rounder Records (CD) 500/200rpm Rounder CD SS 38-13 mono
MYSTERY TRAIN
Reissued: - 1996 Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CDSUNBOX 7-8-2 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1958

Back in 1941 when Doctor Clayton recorded ''Cheating And Lying Blues'', his murder threat was lighthearted and the lyrics were intentionally funny. Even without knowing the tragic coda in which life imitated art, nothing about this record was funny. Hare was not a great vocalist, but this is distinguished by his guitar solo and his psychopathic rewrite of Clayton's song. As recorded, it could almost be court evidence. In the light of what transpired interjections like ''Gonna kill her tomorrow'' are chilling.

Violence probably lay close to the surface in hare's life. His guitar-shredder style seems to imply as much. Jim Dickinson once said that Pat Hare played guitar like he was in Hell. Some of his cohorts from the good days in Memphis remembered him quite differently, but others remembered a mean drunk who was capable of committing the act prefigured in this recording.

02(1) - "I'M GONNA MURDER MY BABY
(CHEATIN' AND LYIN' BLUES)" - B.M.I. - 2:54
Composer: - Clayton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 14, 1954
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - 1986 Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 105 mono
SUN RECORDS - THE BLUES YEARS 1950 - 1956
Reissued: March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-5-26 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

02(2) - "I'M GONNA MURDER MY BABY
(CHEATIN' AND LYIN' BLUES)" - B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Clayton
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 14, 1954
Released: - 1973
First appearance: - Redita Records (LP) 33rpm Holland 111 mono
706 BLUES
Reissued: March 8, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310 JK-9-28 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

If only for the spoken asides, this is more menacing than the commonly available take heard (above). taken from an acetate disc and first issued on a Redita LP, this has been unavailable since the 1970s. What were Phillips' feelings as he sat in the control room listening to perhaps the most malevolent recording in the history of the blues.

And now to the notorious case of life imitation art: much has been written about the grim irony attached to this song and the tragic circumstances of Pat Hare's subsequent life - for he did in fact murder his baby, albeit not until nearly yen years later. Hare is not a great vocalist, but this recording is distinguished by its guitar solo and the psychopathic nature of the song (which is itself born in part from Dr Clayton's "Cheatin' & Lyin' Blues". Hare's menacing response to his baby's infidelity is captured forever on tape, and could almost have been used in court as evidence.

In the light of what later transpired, interjections such as "Gonna kill her tomorrow!" are chilling, indeed. Arguably, the violence in Pat Hare's life lay very close to the surface, although - as is often the way - many of his cohorts from the good ol' days in Memphis remembered him quite differently. In a Living Blues interview, Rosco Gordon described him as "a beautiful personality, such a gentle person", whilst conversely, Muddy Waters fired him for persistent drunkenness and violence. Who knows... but whatever, this remains a chilling, disturbing record.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Auburn Pat Hare - Vocal and Guitar
Billy Love - Piano
Unknown - Bass
Israel Franklin – Drums

For Biography of Pat Hare see: > The Sun Biographies <
Pat Hare's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

PAT HARE A BLUES GUITARIST

TAKE THE BITTER WITH THE SWEET
by Kevin Hahn, Juke Blues number 23, pp-8-15, Summer 1991

During the decade of the 1950s the name of Pat Hare stood among the front ranks of the many fine guitarists playing in Memphis, Houston, and Chicago. As Sam Phillips' favorite guitarist he appeared on many of Sun's blues sessions and his ferocious lead work made classics of records by the young James Cotton, Walter Bradford and Little Junior Parker; later recordings and performances with Parker, Bobby Bland and Muddy Waters served as tutelage for a new generation of blues players. Bob Koester, of Delmark Records, whose interest in blues is primarily as a vocal music, considered Pat as one of the finest non-singing guitarists and one of the few of interest. By the early 1960s, however, his career was over; his last recorded work dates from 1960 and in early 1964 he was sentenced to life in prison for a double murder in Minnesota. Although he lived until 1980 and continued to perform while incarcerated, he was a forgotten figure in the blues community. This article is intended to bring some attention to his brief but important part in the story of the blues, and especially to shed some light on the events that ended his musical life, a story that has been clouded with myth and misinformation.

Auburn Hare was born on December 20, 1930 in Cherry Valley, Arkansas at the home of his grandfather on Mrs Fay Van's plantation. The family, which included Auburn's only sibling, a brother who died at the age of six, remained on the plantation until 1940 when they moved to a farm near Parkin. By this time Auburn had been nicknamed ''Pat'' by his grandmother and had already begun to play on an old guitar he had discovered under a bed at his grandfather's house.

In his young teens Pat came under the musical wings of Joe Willie Wilkins and Howlin' Wolf, who lived nearby and knew Pat's parents. From Joe Willie, Pat received lessons and was allowed to join in playing between innings at the minor league baseball games in West Memphis. By the late 1940s Pat was spending his weekends playing in Wolfs band when it performed in the Parkin/Forrest City/West Memphis area (Wolf would come out to the Hare farm and pick him up for the gig and return him at the end of the night); during the week he drove ''a big John Deere tractor'' helping his father on the farm. The band experience was a heady one for a teenager spending his life on the farm and this early exposure to nightlife and moonshine encouraged his rebellious streak. Feeling his oats, he had several runins with Wolf (who tried to keep him in check), one time getting up on a chair to punch the much-larger Wolf in the mouth (Wolf didn't retaliate, but did tell Pat's parents when he brought him home that night, recommending that they give him a good whipping!), and another time claimed to have actually taken a few pot-shots at Wolf with a small-caliber automatic, laughing with glee while Wolf scrambled up and over a wood-pile behind the juke they were playing at. One night a fight with some patrons ended with Pat cracking an antagonist over the head with a handy rake-handle, breaking the rake, his pursuer's jaw, and his own little finger, which healed crookedly and remained bent for the rest of his life.

Howlin' Wolf kept Pat in the band despite all this and by 1951 he was playing full-time with the group, broadcasting from West Memphis station KWEM on Wolfs radio spot; he also broadcast with James Cotton, Willie Nix and Joe Hill Louis, and from station WDIA in Memphis with his cousin, disc jockey Walter Bradford, with whom he made his recording debut, cutting six titles in February/June 1952 for Sun Records. The first session's results, ''Dreary Nights'' b/w ''Nuthin' But The Blues'', were supposedly issued on Sun 176 but copies have never been found and they remain unheard. The second session produced four titles, including the very fine ''Reward For My Baby'' with superb guitar work from Pat. Pat also remembered playing behind Wolf on some RPM titles cut at KWEM (twenty-five years later he could still play ''The Sun Is Rising'' note for note), but Willie Johnson claims that no titles were actually cut at the station, and that Pat never recorded with the band.

In 1952 Pat left Wolf and began playing with Little Junior Parker's band and was with Parker in Houston from June 1952 to April 1953. When he returned to Arkansas he joined up with Cotton until Floyd Murphy left Parker in 1954; Pat then rejoined the Blue Flames. As Pat recalled those days: ''I stayed on the farm all the time I was playing with Wolf and Junior Parker and Bland. . . I knew Wolf before I started playing with a band. Wolf was the first band. And in between them times I was playing with Johnny Ace, Ike Turner or just a bunch of us guys would meet up and go play a gig someplace. For a short while I played alone (his ex-wife Dorothy Mae Hare Adams, whom he had married on Christmas Day 1949, remembered Pat working as a one-man band in the late 1940s. ''I didn’t leave the farm at all because whenever I came off the road I would always make it out to the farm. I hung around Memphis a lot tho''.

Pat did indeed hang around Memphis a lot, soon becoming known, along with Willie Johnson, Floyd and Matt Murphy and, a bit later, Hubert Sumlin, as one of the city's premier young guitarists. Pat became a favorite of Sam Phillips and between 1952-1955 backed up a number of Phillips' artists in the studio, among them Bradford, Parker, Walter Horton, Big Memphis Ma Rainey, James Gayles, Kenneth Banks, Hot Shot Love, Rosco Gordon and others.

The musical event Pat spoke of with the most pride from his days in Memphis, however, was playing with Memphis Minnie on one occasion around 1960 after Minnie had returned to town on her retirement: Minnie was one of Pat's guitar heroes (along with Joe Willie Wilkins and Lonnie Johnson) and he tried to see Minnie and Son Joe frequently when in Memphis.

On May 14, 1954 Pat and James Cotton each recorded two vocal sides at the Sun studio. Cotton’s ''Cotton Crop Blues'' b/w ''Hold Me In Your Arms'' were released on Sun 206 and featured Pat as guitarist; ''Cotton Crop'' was a showcase for Pat's blistering, over-amplified soloing, derived from his earlier solo on Bradford's ''Reward For My Baby''. His playing here pushed Memphis-style guitar to new standards and, although he soon became much more technically proficient, this must remain the milestone of his recorded work, a landmark of 1950s Memphis blues-playing. Pat's own two cuts, the only vocals he would record during his career, showed an engaging, countrified style but were not released on Sun and did not appear until 1976 when they were issued on a Dutch bootleg LP. Although much has been made of the theme of his ''I'm Gonna Murder My Baby'' as revealing a side of his nature (and foreshadowing events in his life), the song is in fact a reworking of Doctor Clayton's 1941 ''Cheating And Lying Blues'' (also captured on tape in 1964 by Robert Nighthawk as ''Goin' Down To Eli's''); both of his titles, according to Pat, had been given to him to record by someone in the studio. The second tune, '' Ain't Gonna Be That Way'' (Eddie Vinson's ''Bonus Pay'') employed a much simpler guitar part than his other work of the day, suggesting some lack of familiarity with the song. Cotton was to have blown harp on Pat's sides, but he and Pat had a fist fight between sessions and was unable to play.

Shortly after this session Pat headed back to Houston with Little Junior Parker (who would become his son Larkin's godfather), who had left Sun and signed with Duke Records. Parker and Bobby Bland were touring together and sharing the same backup band; Pat required a better amplifier for this level of playing and so rather than the raw and distorted tone of the Sun recordings his playing with the Parker/Bland group in Houston was smoother, cleaner and jazzy. Because Duke/Peacock did not keep records of the session men it is sometimes difficult to absolutely identify Pat's work at Duke, but between 1954 and 1956 he seems to have played on almost all of Parker's records and shared the duty behind Bland with Roy Gaines and Clarence Hollimon; he may also, as he claimed, have been the guitarist on recordings by Harold Conner, Connie McBooker, Big Mama Thornton and Johnny Ace (i.e. possibly on the latter's ''How Can You Be So Mean'').

Pat never spoke of Gaines or Hollimon, but fondly remembered Big Mama, McBooker, Floyd Dixon and Curtis Tillman; he also told a favorite story involving saxophonist Evelyn Young. The band would often cross into Mexico to visit a favored bordello when they had some time off in Houston, and on one occasion Evelyn, who liked to dress in men's clothing, insisted on joining the pilgrimage. The bordello was a rather informal affair; lacking actual rooms it had curtained-off areas each equiped with a bed for the patron. Evelyn, undetected as a woman by the girls, had made her selection along with the others and things were proceeding swimmingly for everyone until a scream and a lot of Spanish expletives came from Evelyn's ''room'' and her girl went tearing through the cubicles, breaking down the ropes and curtains and jumping over beds and bodies. Everyone in the band fell out laughing themselves sick, although Evelyn was not amused with her evening!

Some time in 1956 Pat left the band, having been fired by Bobby Bland; he may have served a jail sentence in Houston at this time, precipitating his dismissal. James Cotton summoned him to Chicago to replace Jimmy Rogers in Muddy Waters' band, an offer he accepted after first situating his wife and three children in Cleveland. Pat felt that Muddy's music was a step backwards from what he had been playing in Houston: a simpler, rougher brand of blues with which some felt his Memphis-style guitar didn't fit. Nonetheless, with
Pat in the band Muddy played less and less guitar himself, letting Pat carry the load except on some of his older numbers featuring slide. Unfortunately, Pat didn’t get along with Leonard Chess and most of Muddy’s recordings from this time have Pat's guitar way down in the mix, oftentimes barely audible, although there are a few fine examples of his playing such as on ''She's Into Something'' and ''Take The Bitter With The Sweet''. When playing in clubs like the Tay May, Pat, Cotton and Otis Spann usually did most of the singing with Muddy coming on stage only in the shank of the evening. Some of the fine lead instrument interplay that Pat and Cotton developed is represented on the ''Muddy Waters Sings Big Bill'' LP.

Pat had a reputation for toughness or ''meanness'' that had followed him up to Chicago and, although Paul Oliver found him quite amiable when he met him in 1960, Oliver commented on this in ''Nothing But The Blues''. Pat responded to the charge in a letter: ''I've never been a mean guy, I just never did backup off nothing or anybody. Oh I would fight in about two seconds if somebody gave me a reason to, but nobody can say that I went around looking for someone to jump on. It was somebody always around or someplace I went that thought they could kick my ass. Then I would have to come unglued you dig? See I just never afraid. And lots of people mistook that for meanness. Another thing I stayed pretty well down under (i. e. drunk) all the time. That's why Paul said I looked about 20 years older than I really was''.

One night, however, (some time between 1960-1963, the date is unclear) Pat did go looking for someone to jump on. With his wife in Cleveland, Pat had been seeing a woman in Chicago named Louise Kennedy, but things weren't going smoothly between the two and he accused Louise of cheating on him. One night he called her and, getting no answer, got his Winchester and went to her apartment. Pat said he knew she was there and just refused to answer the door, so he emptied the rifle through the front window in a drunken rage. The police knew who had done the shooting and were on the lookout for him. Muddy was able to hide him for a short time but then sent him to Memphis to stay with Joe Willie Wilkins. He was visiting his parents in Parkin in May 1963 when Mojo Buford and Jojo Williams, both late of Muddy's band, tracked him down. They were starting up a band of their own in Minneapolis and wanted Pat to join them.

The band, with Pat and Sonny Rodgers on guitars, Jojo (not Jody) Williams on bass, Francey Clay on drums and Mojo on harp and vocals, found work almost immediately playing weekends at Mattie's B-B-Q on 29th and 1st Avenue in South Minneapolis. Mojo had brought the band to the area because of the encouragement he had received there while playing with Muddy so his reception was not unexpected; what did cause him consternation were the antagonisms with Pat, who was proving to be at the end of his downward spiral. Pat was drinking heavily, and by this time apparently it wasn't taking much alcohol to put him out of control. There were reports of him drinking wine and falling asleep on the bandstand, and one night Mojo sent him home when he was unfit to play. Pat took two nights off and then reappeared, demanding to be paid for the time he had missed; when Mojo refused Pat threatened to get his gun and shoot him, but nothing further transpired.

Shortly after beginning their engagement at Mattie's Pat met Agnes Winje, a white woman whose husband was the maintenance man at the club. Soon afterwards ''Aggie'' left her husband and moved into an apartment with Pat at 3025 Portland Avenue, just a few blocks from Mattie's. In order to augment his income Pat took a job as a window washer during the weekdays but his drinking was using up most of the money, and even though Aggie was working at a nearby grocery store they had a hard time making ends meet. Soon there were arguments about money, his drinking problem, and her jealousy. Aggie was 49 to Pat's 32 and insecure about the age difference. They lived together for four to five months and the arguments got worse with time. In October 1963 Pat confronted Aggie while she was at work and threatened her with a gun he had bought at Hy's Pawn Shop in August; a police officer, Kymphus Workcuff, who knew Pat and was in the store at the time, took the gun from him and later gave it to Nila Pool, who was Mojo's girlfriend and manager of the band. She later returned the gun to Pat.

On Sunday, December 15, Pat apparently spent the afternoon drinking wine with S. P. Leary (known as Kelly) who was living on the 1800 block of 15th Avenue South and was working with Willie Johnson and J. T. Brown. After Leary left, Pat called a young woman friend of Aggie's named Pat Morrow and hitched a ride to a friend's house where he obtained a half-pint of gin. From there they proceeded to the home of James McHie, who employed Hare as a window washer; McHie wasn't home at the time and Pat invited McHie's wife to bring James to his apartment when he returned. There were difficulties because Aggie had told him that she was thinking of returning to her husband, and Pat was working himself into a state.

Morrow pulled up outside the Portland address and dropped Pat off; she did not think he was drunk as his speech was clear and he was walking alright. For some reason she waited a few minutes and Aggie came out to the car and got in: she was afraid. Pat had just taken a few shots at her with his pistol. Aggie wanted Morrow to wait and drive Pat away as she wanted to throw him out. Aggie went back to the apartment and Morrow drove off.

Aggie went into the apartment and the argument continued. There was a knock at the door and Pat was called to the telephone of neighbor Charles Cooke (Pat and Aggie did not have a phone). Pat crossed to his neighbor’s apartment, saying, ''That woman is going to make me kill her''. He had a brief conversation on the phone, hung up, and told Cooke, ''You got the wrong Pat''. The caller had been Pat Morrow's husband looking for her.

Hare returned to his apartment; there were more shouts and more shots, and Cooke's girlfriend Florence Whipps called the police. Officers James E. Hendricks and Chester Langaard were only blocks away when the call went through. In two minutes they were at the apartment and Hendricks, several steps ahead of Langaard and armed with a shotgun, was directed to Pat's rooms by Whipps, who then retreated. Langaard saw his partner enter the room and heard him say, ''Give me the gun’, then heard three gunshots. He got to the door and saw Hendricks lying on the floor and Pat pointing his pistol at the body. Langaard shot Pat twice and dropped him. Aggie was sitting on a couch, shot twice.

Help was called for and Hendricks was rushed away in the first ambulance but died on the way; Aggie and then Pat were loaded into the second ambulance and taken to General Hospital where they both underwent surgery. Pat was out of the operating room at 11: 15 and was interviewed for the second time of the night (he had been questioned briefly at the scene of the shooting). He was questioned at least once again that night and was understandably confused; he claimed he was drunk and that when he had been drinking he didn’t know what he was doing. He said that he knew he had been shot by a policeman, but didn’t think he had shot anyone; when told that Aggie had been shot he thought that she might have done it herself; when told that a policeman was dead he said Aggie must have shot him, and when asked if she would do such a thing replied, ''She wouldn’t hurt a fly''. The next morning he made a statement admitting to both shootings. On January 22, 1964 Aggie died of her wounds.

Pat got no breaks at his trial: his case was assigned to Judge Tom Bergin and he was persuaded to waive his rights to a jury trial. Bergin had been a Minneapolis cop for eight years before being appointed to traffic court in 1949 where he earned the nickname ''Tender Tom'' for his habit of handing down maximum sentences. He had just been elected to the criminal court earlier that year and Pat's was one of his first cases.

Court convened on February 19, 1964 and the trial lasted one day: Pat was found guilty of 1st degree murder in the case of Hendricks and ''was allowed'' to plead guilty to 3rd degree murder in Aggie's case. He was sentenced to life in prison and was immediately bound over to Stillwater State Prison where he was assigned number 21961-E.

I met Pat in the summer of 1973; I had been interviewing Jojo Williams and Lazy Bill Lucas and corresponding with Living Blues when Jim O'Neal told me that Pat was in prison here. When I first went to Stillwater that August I met a small, stooped, balding and intensely quiet man, hardly what I'd expected from the little bit that I then knew of him. He was glad of the company and eager to help with whatever information he could give me; other than letters from Bob Eagle and occasional visits from Willa Buford (Mojo's wife) he had been pretty much out of touch; indeed he seemed to have been forgotten, as in all my visits with Jojo, Lazy Bill, Sonny Rodgers, Baby Doo Caston and Mojo in the previous two years his name had never been mentioned. I had asked Muddy about Pat in 1972 and he affirmed that Pat was in prison here but then quickly changed the subject, as if he were an embarrassment.

Soon after he was incarcerated, Pat was befriended by Sgt Bill Kiley who induced him to join the prison Alcoholics Anonymous group. He was soon considered a model prisoner; he minded his own business and stayed away from confrontation. Eventually he was allowed to start a musical program for the inmates, collectively called ''Sounds Incarcerated'': this consisted of various inmate bands playing country and western, jazz, rock and blues, who put on shows for the prison population. Because of Pat’s musical reputation and his quiet leadership which earned him the esteem of both inmates and prison officials, the groups were allowed to put on programs outside the prison until 1972 when the prison tightened security because of unrest in the penitentiary.

Pat began drawing attention from the outside now nearly ten years after his imprisonment. He met another inmate's attorney, Dan Shulman (son of author Max Shulman), and his wife Margret, and Dan began representing him. On the basis of his fine prison record Pat was urged to try for an early parole in 1974; unfortunately this bid for freedom failed in spite of a large number of letters of support from blues fans around the world who had been made aware of Pat's situation. Although the pardon was not granted (in part because o f a letter Judge Bergin sent the parole board) Pat became cognizant of the large interest in him on the outside, support which he needed to boost his morale at times. Although he rarely complained, his health and prison life were wearing him down. As he wrote to me:

''Yes I'm back and feeling pretty goddam good, you dig? Man I was a sick man for a few days. They had to cut the ole belly open and go in there and straighten things out. So in no time at all I should be good as new you dig''?

''I told you that they changed our meeting to Monday nights didn't I? Well anyway they did. You did get my other letter didn't you? And did I tell you I got ulcers again? Man I don't know what’s happening I get one thing taken care of and something else comes up''.

''As you could guess I'm in the hospital again. Man I think I'm just falling apart. Seems that way anyway. This time I got hepatitis don't no how the hell I got that I don’t shoot no dope but that's what they say I got. I don't know how long I'll be here it could be two weeks three or four I don't no. . . Man looks like everything is happening to me. My mother passed away the 16th of last month and I just found it out and 22nd and you know I've been pretty upset ever since''.

''I came out of the hospital yesterday. I'm still very weak tho, but feels much better now in a few weeks I should be as good as new you dig''?

''I made it a point to get visiting musicians who had been friends with Pat to go see him, and those who paid him visits eagerly when they were in town included Mighty Joe Young, Sunnyland Slim, Louis Myers, Willie Smith, Albert King, Freddie King, Willie Dixon, Gatemouth Brown, Walter Horton and James Cotton.

In 1975 Pat was diagnosed with lung cancer; surgery was performed and part of a lung removed. His recovery was slow and he didn't have a lot of strength to draw from, but eventually he seemed to be coming around. Then in 1977 cancer appeared in his throat and he again underwent surgery and chemotherapy. This time the muscles from the left side of his neck and under his tongue were removed, as well as the left half of his jawbone. His speech was garbled, although it improved somewhat in time, and he had a hard time chewing food. Always smallframed, he seemed to become almost frail and he never fully recovered his strength. Realizing that his condition was grave, the prison administration softened its policy and transferred Pat to the minimum security ward where he was given a lighter job and his diet was catered to more carefully. He was also now allowed to go outside of the prison grounds (accompanied by a guard) to perform on occasion.

Pat had formed a group of ''outside'' musicians including Roger Herd on second guitar and Gene Adams on trumpet, and in the summer of 1978 they performed free concerts at Harriet Lake Park and at Lake Nokomis in Minneapolis; in 1979 there was a show at the Walker Church which was broadcast over station KFAI, and Jim O'Neal and Steve Wisner came up to record the show and interview Pat. That same year Muddy Waters came to town as the warm-up act for Eric Clapton and Pat was allowed backstage to surprise Muddy, whom he hadn't seen in years. Pat and his guard sat behind the bank of speakers during Muddy's set, and then for his encore of ''Got My Mojo Working'' Muddy called Pat on stage, introduced him to the huge crowd with, ''This young man is my old guitar player, Pat Hare''!, and handed him Bob Margolin's guitar. It had been nearly twenty years since they had last played together, and it would be their last time.

The next year the prison band was asked to play at the Hennepin County Government Center, but then received news that they would be picketed by the Minneapolis police (whose headquarters was across the street), and they were forced to cancel. In February 1980, however, they did play in Powderhorn Park's recreation building where they were filmed for the local PBS program ''Wyld Rice'', and there was later a segment on Pat on the local ''PM Magazine'' program, broadcast just the week before he died. In April Pat appeared in the basement of Mama D's restaurant near the University of Minnesota; by this time he was very weak and just beginning to cough up blood.

In August Muddy and his new band were going to play at the Union Bar and arrangements had been made for Pat to sit in. I had heard nothing from Pat for two weeks before the show, and then received a call from a guard at the prison telling me that Pat had been admitted to Ramsey Hospital in St. Paul with a recurrence of lung cancer. The cancer had also affected some nerves in his vocal cords and he was barely able to speak. He missed the gig with Muddy but rallied enough to play at an engagement he had made at the Whole Coffeehouse on the University of Minnesota campus, but was extremely weak, sitting through the entire set and unable to speak to the appreciative listeners who approached him afterwards.

Pat's estranged family, whom he hadn't seen since his incarceration (Dorothy Mae divorced him while he was in prison), was contacted and made the trip up from Cleveland; when they arrived they found that Pat had been taken to Rochester's Mayo Clinic for an effort to temporarily clear his congested lungs which were literally growing shut; this was done by holding him down and forcing a tube down his throat and tearing an opening into his air passages. On his return to Ramsey, Pat told me he'd never go through that again, fully aware of the consequences. A side benefit of this treatment was some restoration of his vocal powers, and he was able to reunite with his now grown family.

A week after his family returned to Cleveland and a day after he had been informed that he would be granted a medical pardon, Pat Hare died at Ramsey Hospital at 2:25 p.m. September 26, 1980. Margret Shulman was at his bedside.

Bobby Bland performed at the Riverview Supper Club in Minneapolis on Saturday the 27th and left the next day for another gig in another town, so he had neither the chance to see his old guitarist one last time nor to pay his last respects. Instead he sent a floral tribute in the shape of a guitar. On the Lady Day of September, after his friends had gathered to remember the gentle and creative man they had known, after his last band had played a slow blues for him, Pat Hare was put to rest in Stillwater's Fairview Cemetery at the opposite end of the Mississippi river from which he had begun, the flowered guitar standing at his gravesite silhouetted against the late summer sunset.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR BUDDY BLAKE CUNNINGHAM
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1954

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: PROBABLY END MAY 1954
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

Many, probably most, Sun collectors have never heard this single, which gives new meaning to the notion that ignorance is bliss. The earliest Sun, catalogs, those simple one page sheets that were replete with typing errors, ominously listed Buddy Blake Cunningham's record under the category "Popular". Now you know why. Hearing either side of this single for the first time may be the cruellest part of being a completest.

Sam Phillips must have liked his style though, for there are no less than 16 unissued tracks by Buddy Blake Cunningham Sr. in the Sun vaults, which no Sun archeaologist has ever deemed worthy of resurrection.

01 - "RIGHT OR WRONG" - A.S.C.A.P. - 2:46
Composer: - Lew Douglas-L. Laney-Clif Parman
Publisher: - Midway Music - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - U 127 - Master
Recorded: - Probably End May 1954
Released: - July 15, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 208-A < mono
RIGHT OR WRONG / WHY DO I CRY
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-3-9 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Originally born en bred in Jackson, Mississippi, Buddy Blake Cunningham had a career as a minor league pitcher to concentrate on singing. Instead he pitched himself as a vocalist, albeit in the style of forties' crooner, Rus Morgan. Using a song from Lew Douglas, an arranger who had once worked with Tommy Dorsey in his hometown of Chicago, Cunningham cut his own master and sold tapes to Sun. In July 1954 he was living in Memphis very close to Sam Phillips, and he was the closest thing to a star on the Sun roster that month too. His Valley recording of "Angels In The Sky", which, like this record, was also directed by Cliff Parman had been a good regional seller earlier in 1954.

02 - "WHY DO I CRY" - B.M.I. - 2:28
Composer: - Eddy-Hubbs
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 126 - Master 
Released: - July 15, 1954
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > Sun 208-B < mono
WHY DO I CRY / RIGHT OR WRONG
Reissued: - 1994 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15801-3-10 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 1

Did Sam hear something special here he thought he could sell? God knows what might have happened to the fledgling Sun label if this record had sold. Still, Sam Phillips gave Buddy a second kick at the can on Phillips International in 1957, and Buddy's son, B.B., went on to become a luminary in the local scene as a member of the Hombress. Buddy himself went on to start a collection agency which may have repo'd the automobiles of several members of the Sun rooster.

03 - "MY BABY DONE ME WRONG''
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Probably End May 1954

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Buddy Blake Cunningham - Vocal
Cliff Parman Orchestra

For Biography of Buddy Blake Cunningham see: > The Sun Biographies <
Buddy Blake Cunningham's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

(Above) The Hi-Hat Club, Memphis, Tennessee. The building with the Sisco TV sign was the site of nightclubs including one with the name Hi-Hat. The Hi-Hat was located at Third Street (Highway 61) on the edge of town and featured country and western music and a business card for the Hi-Hat club (below).

MAY 15, 1954 SATURDAY

Elvis Presley and Dixie Locke go to the Hi-Hat Club on South Third. Elvis is wearing his bolero jacket with a pink shirt and accompanies himself on the guitar, singing two songs. The tryout does not get him a job, and in later years Elvis will dramatize the rejection by saying that Eddie Bond told him to go back to driving a truck.

The owners of the Hi-Hat Club, Tom and Mary, were former Arthur dance instructors who had invested their profits in the creation of a beautiful music club. They wanted a pop music band, but most of the Memphis groups performed country or hillbilly music.

Eddie Bond and his group, a country artist and band that were decidedly un-pop, were reorganized by Ronald Smith, who also urged the hiring of Elvis Presley as a guest vocalist.

Ronald and Eddie Bond, who were also performers on KWEK in West Memphis, gave away tickets to the Hi-Hat's Saturday Night Show. "I asked Elvis Presley to bring Dixie Locke out to the Hi-Hat", Smith recalled. "Elvis was nervous but I told him the band could play anything".

It was at this May 1954, club engagement that Elvis Presley was first introduced to Eddie Bond. "I was outside and talked in my car", Bond remarked. "I had known Elvis before, when he sang over at the Home For Incurables", said Bond. "My father sold paint to the Home. I had met Elvis over there and knew he could sing anything. So, I asked Elvis if he wanted to sing pop with Eddie Bond and The Stompers down at the Hi-Hat, and he jumped at the chance. He came down and began singing with us. He sang three or four weeks with us". "I was amazed by Elvis' knowledge of pop music, he knew all the songs on that day".

When Ronald Smith took over Bond's Stompers for nightclub dates, he often brought in Ace Cannon, so it happened that when Elvis Presley performed with the band, he was backed by some of Memphis' best musicians. "Elvis loved the Hi-Hat Club and couldn't stop talking about singing there", Ronald Smith remembered.

The music was pop and there was no brawling. At the Hi-Hat, Mark Waters played drums, Dino Dainesworth played saxophone and clarinet, Elvis Presley vocal, Ronald Smith played guitar, and Aubrey Meadows played piano.

"Sitting right in front of the bandstand were a man and two woman. We called them the Board of Directors. One of them owned the club. After they heard Elvis and saw Elvis, they came to me and said, 'If you don't get rid of that greasy-haired redneck, we will get rid of you!", said Eddie Bond.

"I was making fifteen hundred dollars a week at the time. Not long out of high school. That was big money in those days. I wasn't about to give that up. What else could I do? So I fired Elvis!'.

"I'm probably the only person in the world who can legitimately lay claim to having fired Elvis". "Not long after that, Elvis recorded "That's All Right" at Sun, Elvis took off, headed toward becoming a legend. The owner came to me then and said, 'We might let him back if he wants to come back'".

"I went to Elvis and gave him the offer. He kind of laughed. said, sure, he would come back to the Hi-Hat, but it would cost them twenty-five hundreds dollars a week''!

MAY 17, 1954 MONDAY

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that separate educational facilities for blacks and whites "are inherently unequal". With that decision the Court overturned the precedent of "separate but equal" set by the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson case and set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR ONIE WHEELER
FOR OKEH/COLUMBIA RECORDS 1954

CASTLE RECORDING STUDIO, TULANE HOTEL
EIGHT AVENUE / CHURCH STREET, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
OKEH/COLUMBIA SESSION: MONDAY MAY 17, 1954
SESSION HOURS: 15:00-19:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – DON LAW

It was not until May 1954 that future Sun country star Onie Wheeler tried to vary the formula. ''Hazel'' was in the Latin groove that Johnnie and Jack were using. ''His mind worked overtime'', remembered Alden J. Nelson. ''Different songs, arrangements, and he loved those screwy rhythms''. ''Hazel'' didn't impress producer Don Law though, and sat in the can while Columbia stayed on safer ground. Later, in a half-hearted gesture towards tropical rhythms, they released ''I'm Satisfied With My Dreams'' (later recorded in October 18, 1954), which switched between rhumba and 4/4.

Onie's releases were moved from Okeh to the parent Columbia label in April 1955 (a year when he didn't record at all). At the beginning of that year, one of Onie's songs, ''No, I Don't Guess I Will'', became a minor hit for Carl Smith as ''No, I Don't Believe I Will'' on the flipside of ''Kisses Don't Lie''. Onie's version was held back until January 1956. In exchange for placing it with Smith, Jim Denny took half the composer credit.

01 – ''HAZEL'' – B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Onie Wheeler-Tracy Lee
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1860 / CO 51579
Recorded: - May 17, 1954
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-11-13 mono
SUN RECORDS – THE COUNTRY YEARS 1950-1959
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-22 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

02 – ''LITTLE MAMA'' – B.M.I. - 2:10
Composer: - Crowe-Strange
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1861 / CO 51580
Recorded: - May 17, 1954
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Okeh 18049-4 mono
LITTLE MAMA / LOVE ME LIKE YOU USED TO DO
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-21 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

03 – ''NO, I DON'T GUESS I WILL'' – B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Crowe-Jim Denny
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1862 / CO 51581
Recorded: - May 17, 1954
Released: - January 1956
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Columbia 21500-4 mono
NO, I DON'T GUESS I WILL / I TRIED AND I TRIED
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-17 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

04 – ''MY HOME IS NOT A HOME AT ALL'' – B.M.I. - 3:01
Composer: - Onie Wheeler-Tracy Lee
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1863 / CO 51582
Recorded: - May 17, 1955
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Columbia 21418-4 mono
MY HOME IS NOT A HOME AT ALL / THAT'S WHAT I LIKE
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-20 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

05 – ''WOULD YOU LIKE TO WEAR A CROWN'' – B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Onie Wheeler-Tracy Lee
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1864 / CO 51583
Recorded: - May 17, 1955
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Okeh 18058-4 mono
WOULD YOU LIKE TO WEAR A CROWN / I SAW MOTHER WITH GOD LAST NIGHT
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-18 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

06 – ''I SAW MOTHER WITH GOD LAST NIGHT'' – B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Crowe-Sherry
Publisher: - Peer Music
Matrix number : NASH 1864 / CO 51583
Recorded: - May 17, 1955
Released: - 1954
First appearance: - Okeh Records (S) 78rpm standard single Columbia 18058-4 mono
WOULD YOU LIKE TO WEAR A CROWN / I SAW MOTHER WITH GOD LAST NIGHT
Reissued: - 1992 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15542-19 mono
ONIE WHEELER – ONIE'S BOP

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Onie Wheeler – Vocal, Harmonica, Guitar
Alden J. Nelson – Lead Guitar, Vocals
Doyal Nelson – Rhythm Guitar, Vocals
Benny Martin – Fiddle
Ernest G. Thompson - Drums

For Biography of Buddy Blake Cunningham see: > The Sun Biographies <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

MAY 20, 1954 THURSDAY

Linda Porter, the wife of ''Don't Fence Me In'' songwriter Cole Porter, dies in their apartment at the Waldorf Towers in New York.

MAY 21, 1954 FRIDAY

Johnnie and Jack recorded ''Goodnight, Sweetheart, Goodnight''.

MAY 22, 1954 SATURDAY

Bob Dylan celebrates his bar mitzvah. The folk/rock legend will write Johnny Cash's ''It Ain't Me Babe'', Chris Hillman and Roger McGuinn's ''You Ain't Going Nowhere'' and Garth Brooks' ''To Make You Fell My Love''.

MAY 28, 1954 FRIDAY

A western documentary, ''The Cowboy'', opens, with Tex Ritter serving as one of the picture's four narrators.

MAY 29, 1954 SATURDAY

Marty Robbins recorded ''Call Me Up (And I'll Come Calling On You)'' and ''Time Goes By'' during an afternoon session at Dallas' Jim Beck Studio.

MAY 31, 1954 MONDAY

Capitol released Tennessee Ernie Ford's ''River Of No Return'', the theme song from a movie starring Robert Mitchum and Marilyn Monroe. Monroe sings in the movie.

Steel player Paul Franklin is born in Detroit. Beginning his studio career on Gallery's 1972 pop hit ''It's So Nice To Be With You'', Franklin plays on country hits by George Strait, Alan Jackson, Rascal Flatts and Shania Twain, among others.

Capitol released Hank Thompson's two-sided single, ''Honky Tonk Girl'' and ''We've Gone To Far''.

> Page Up <

For Biographies of Artists see: > The Sun Biographies <
Sun recordings can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©