CONTAINS
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1957 SESSIONS 7
July 1, 1957 to July 31, 1957

Studio Session for Jimmy Williams, May 12 or June (July) 8, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Cast King, June 1956 (Probably June 1957) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Cast King, July 1956 (Probably July 1957) / Sun Records
Studio Session for Eddie Bond, July 1957 / Mercury Records
Studio Session for Rosco Gordon, July 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, July 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Jerry Lee Lewis, 2nd Half July 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Johnny Cash, July 1, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Ed Kirby & Big Lucky Carter, July 2, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Unknown Vocal Group (Ed Kirby), 1957/58 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Malcolm Yelvington, July 22, 1957 / Sun Records
Studio Session for Magel Priesman, July 1957 / Sun Records

For Biographies of Artists See: > The Sun Biographies <
Most Sun tracks can be heard on the playlists from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on  > YouTube <

1957-1958

If Sam Phillips could have hung onto Dickey Lee or Edwin Bruce, he would have had a couple of acts that could have sustained him into the 1960s and beyond, and if he'd hung onto Mack Vickery, he would have had songs in his publishing catalog recorded by Faron Young, George Strait, Tanya Tucker, Jerry Lee Lewis and countless others. Dickey Lee appeared on Sun at the behest of disc jockey Dewey Phillips, and acknowledges that he was out-of-place on the label. His records could easily have come from Philadelphia or New York. Soon after leaving Sun and reuniting with Jack Clement, he became a teen star and the cowriter of one of country music's all time greatest songs, ''She Thinks I Still care''. Ed aka Edwin Bruce knew how to survive as well. Even as a teenager at Sun, he was surefooted as both a singer and songwriter. ''Rock Boppin' Baby'' should have been a hit. ''King Of Fools'' was almost certainly meant to be recorded by Johnny Cash, and Cash could have done much worse. In 1992, a California thrash band, Social Distortion, made good on Cash's oversight. Mack Vickery was no great shakes as a singer, but, like Ed Bruce, became a great songwriter. Auditioning at Sun, he recorded one song that was not his own, Billy Hill's 1933 hit ''Have You Ever Been Lonely''. Buddy Holly had just recorded it in his garage, but we'd have to wait awhile to hear that. Holly and Vickery probably both remembered Ernest Tubb's late 1940s recording.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Although only one record came out on Sun, Jimmy Williams recorded several tapes-full of material during a year-long contract from June 1956 to June 1957. He possessed a naturally controlled and clear vocal style best applied to ballads and mid-paced material and he produced some rich tones on the two rock-ballads Sam Phillips chose to issue on Sun, ''That Depends On You'' and ''Please Don't Cry Over Me''. Before the record came out, though, in the first half of 1957 Williams had experimented with two other styles with mixed success.

He tried some medium-paced rockers like ''My One Desire'' backed by ably by session players Roland Janes and Jimmy M. Van Eaton. Before that, in mid-1956, Williams had arrived at Sun with his own band and recorded seven songs in a totally different and much faster, rocking style.

Although some of the early songs are acceptably good, it is clear throughout that Williams was affecting a breathless, mannered higher-pitched vocal in the way of a dance-band vocalist trying his hand at being Elvis.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JIMMY WILLIAMS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE / MAY 12 OR JUNE (JULY) 8, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR STAN KESLER

Quite apart from the vocal, the instrumental work on this quiet; understated side is to kill for. Roland Janes' guitar and J.M. Van Eaton's drumming are thoroughly engaging, even in their minimal roles. In fact, the Little Green Men turned a throwaway B-side into an undiscovered Sun treasure.

01 - "MY ONE DESIRE" B.M.I. - 2:50
Composer: - Jimmy Williams
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 12 or June (July) 8, 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1030-5 mono
ROCKIN' ROLLIN' COUNTRY STYLE
Reissued: - August 1997 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16210-1 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 14

02 - "ALL I WANT" - B.M.I. - 2:06
Composer: - Jimmy Williams
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - May 12 or June (July) 8, 1957
Released: - 1985
First appearance: - Sun England (LP) 33rpm LP 1030-4 mono
ROCKIN' ROLLIN' COUNTRY STYLE
Reissued: - August 2000 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16405-2 mono
THAT'LL FLAT GIT IT! - VOLUME 17

Williams represents the softer side of rockabilly: mellow vocal and melodic constructions, although there is no shortage of tasty guitar work on "All I Want". This track is a winner, from the opening guitar riff borrowed from Bill Doggett's "Honky Tonk" to Williams' wordless chants over what would otherwise by the guitar solos. Williams turns in a fine vocal performance that becomes truly memorable with the addition of those little "huh" asides at the end of each line. The ending is pre class.

03 - ''WHY DON'T SHE NOTICE ME?''
Composer: - Jimmy Williams
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - May 12 or June (July) 8, 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jimmy Williams - Vocal and Guitar
Roland Janes - Guitar
Bill Riley - Guitar
Stan Kesler - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano

For Biography of Jimmy William see: > The Sun Biographies <
Jimmy Williams' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Cast King was one of the major discoveries on the Bear Family Sun Country Box. There is no artist in the history of Sun Records who left a stranger, more consistent series of recordings in the archieves, yet never enjoyed a single release on the original Sun label.

At that time the boxed was compiled in 1986 and include an excellent body of work by a singer who was only tentatively identified in the Sun vault as Cast King.

We could hear the Miller Sisters on one song, but they could only remember the song not the singer. Elsie Jo Miller thought he might have been from Luka, Mississippi. In fact, he was Joseph D. King from Pisgah, Alabama and he remembered the Millers too.

In June 1956 (though it is possible he meant 1957) when he came to Sun with his group led by the Sartin brothers, also from Pisgah, to play some songs that their radio director had already sent in as demos. King said that Sam Phillips asked his assistant, Jack Clement, to work with him and that on the first occasion Clement recorded one song with the Miller Sisters backing him and told him to come back with some more up to date material. King's home in northeast Alabama was within earshot of bluegrass on the Knoxville stations and that made his music very different from those who'd come to Memphis from the Delta or west Tennessee. King's music resonated with Clement, whose background was also in bluegrass.

STUDIO SESSION FOR CAST KING
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1956/1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JUNE 1956 (POSSIBLY JUNE 1957)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "I CAN'T FIND TIME TO PRAY" - B.M.I. - 3:04
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1956 (Possibly June 1957)
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-14 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

Thirty years after this session, Jo Miller commented, ''I'll still find myself singing that song. It was beautiful''. Indeed it was. She remembered Sam Phillips phoning to ask the Millers to come into the studio specifically to work on the song, even though they didn't know Cast King and Phillips himself was not producing the session. Everyone connected with the session must have believed that they had a winner here because a considerable amount of time was invested in its production. The result is a convincing religious narration that should have been given a chance in the marketplace but never was. Cast King's understated narrative is very powerful and the whole track jells magically, especially during the deceptively simple punchline delivered in the last four bars.

01(2) - "I CAN'T FIND TIME TO PRAY" - B.M.I. - 2:52
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - Alternate Take – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - June 1956 (Possibly June 1957)
Released: - 2000
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16387-22 mono
SUN GOSPEL

On this track, Kings works with the simply duet harmonies of Millie and Jo, who left their own recorded legacy in the Sun vaults. Surprisingly, there were over twenty takes made of this song.

Obviously, producer Jack Clement took the proceedings quite seriously, although ultimately all the work came to nothing as Cast King's recordings waited 30 years to appear. The track "I Can't Find Time To Pray'' is performed at a leisurely tempo before repetition began to take its toll.

The basic construction of King's narrative is masterful. In less than three minutes he literally convinces himself to go to church. The sound of King's voice blended with the Millers Sisters is a reminder of how wonderful pure country harmony can sound.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Cast King - Vocal
The Miller Sisters consisting of
Elsie Jo Miller - Vocal Harmony
Mildred Wages - Vocal Harmony

Possibly Oliver Brown - Second Tenor
John Walker - Guitar
James W. Sartin - Steel Guitar
John Sartin - Guitar
Gay Roberts - Bass
Robert Jones - Drums

For Biography of Cast King see: > The Sun Biographies <
Cast Kings' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR CAST KING
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JULY 1956 (POSSIBLY JULY 1957)
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

A month after his first session, in July 1956 (or possibly 1957) Cast King and the Country Drifters were back with Jack Clement, as requested, and King brought some rockabilly material as instructed. But first, he made this wonderful country record. History has shown that Sam Phillips made surprisingly few mistakes in deciding which track to release and which to leave for future generations of music archaeologists. ''When You Stop Loving Me'' may represent one of the biggest mistakes. It is a splendid song and must have stood a fair chance of success. Although neither the composition nor the performance are really polished, the end product is quite spectacular. The song is melodic, in fact, adjectives like memorable and beautiful don't seem out of place. Moreover, it has a hook strong enough to get the Titanic off the ocean floor. Instrumentally, the performance is a gem, featuring standout steel and lead guitar work from the Sartin brothers. As a matter of interest, and alternative take (with a somewhat flawed vocal) shows this beautiful country waltz to gain in strength with the temp slowed a little. This stands alongside Sun's finest country records and its non-appearance is a mystery, unless Jack Clement forgot to play it for Sam. Or unless you agree with Cast King when he mused, ''maybe my songs were so different than anything Sun had done. After all, why dig more holes when you've already got a gold mine''?

01 - "WHEN YOU STOP LOVING ME" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1956 (Possibly July 1957)
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-15 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-10 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Like A Weed In The Garden'' is another spectacular cut from Cast King from the opening steel notes to the Thoughtful lyrical reading, the harmony vocals, the slowly shuffling rhythm and the understated steel solo. It is an awesomely beautiful performance. The lyrics have elevated self-pity to a dizzying height but in King's hands the group and material achieve a magic blend. King's band was unusual because he carried a second tenor vocalist, Oliver Brown, and most of the musicians also sang along. On this one song, Bonny Sartin, who had come along with her brothers for the ride, also contributed to the hamonies.

02 - "LIKE A WEED IN THE GARDEN"* - B.M.I. - 3:29
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None
Recorded: - July 1956 (Possibly July 1957)
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-16 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-11 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

A mountain of tape was expended on ''Satisfied With Me'', probably because producer Jack Clement had his name on the song. Cast King recalled that he wrote the song with Clement and a man named Bill Pritcket in Taylor's Restaurant next to the Sun studio and they had never played the song before the session started. Take after take was recorded and then the little 7'' boxes were stowed away. There are some appealing bluegrass-styled harmonies and some fairly nifty picking from the guitarist, although King remained convinced in later years that the tapes had been speeded up somewhat. Perhaps Clement attempted to enhance the light, rhythmic feel of the music. However, it is the song itself that is so instantly attractive. The contrast between the high harmonies and the bullfrog baritone call to mind the Kershaw brothers with Wiley Barkdull.

03 - "SATISFIED WITH ME"** - B.M.I. 2:04
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King-Jack Clement-Bill Pricket
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1956 (Possibly July 1957)
Released: -1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-17 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-12 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Round 'N' Around'' is perhaps the closest approximation of rockabilly that the group recorded. The references to ''rock and roll to the day'' certainly date the song to the early days of the rock and roll era but, in a charming throwback, the steel guitarist resurfaces for some very tasty interplay with the lead guitarist. This is very accomplished music and the local bar crawlers in Pisgah would have had a real reason to stay until closing time.

04 - "ROUND "N" ROUND" - B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1956 (Possibly July 1957)
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-14 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

There is a distinct pop flavour to the cuts of ''Baby Doll'' Cast King left behind at Sun. However, the light folky leanings still render the song an outside contender by the standards that Phillips was setting. The lyric refers to a ''party doll'' and indeed the sound is distinctly redolent of Jimmy Bowen and Buddy Knox's hit ''Party Doll'', and but that may not to be so surprising since it was Jack Clement behind the glass rather than Sam Phillips. The steel guitarist sits out this cut but it is still a fair distance from the Sun releases of that period. The unaccompanied intro was difficult to handle and there are several false starts where the group lacked a beat to focus their efforts. This is wonderful music and it is surprising that King did not make more efforts to get his group on record once it became clear that Sun was not going to come through with a record release. Perhaps he felt that he just could not accommodate the changes that had occurred in country music.

05 - "BABY DOLL" - B.M.I. - 2:04
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1956 (Possibly July 1957)
Released: - November 1986
First appearance - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-21 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-16 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Destiny'' is another exceptionally strong piece of writing and singing from the King band. Some of the lines such as ''a parasite living on love...'' are quite arrested but the real clincher comes with the approach of the chorus. The group joins King on the last syllable of the verse and they extend their support through the chorus. The steel guitar solo is followed by a little Luther Perkins-styled picking. This is wholly out of context with the pattern of Sun releases in 1956 and 1957, the rawness is not in the performance but in the striking hillbilly images and stone back-country vocal of King himself. It is rawness that must be searched out rather than rawness that leaps out of the grooves. Perhaps Phillips was looking for the latter and Cast King's tapes were tied together with an elastic band and stored away.

06 – "DESTINY" - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally
Recorded: - July 1956 (Possibly July 1957)
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-20 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-15 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Please Believe Me'' is yet another strong entry from the highly accomplished Cast King band. It was one of his original demo songs and the one Jack Clement had told him to use as a model for some material that could be sold as rockabilly. This song had the hurrying rhythm of so many Sun records but the wonderful vocal harmonies, steel guitar solos, and light beat created by bass and drums probably stayed too close to country music to stand a chance in the musical ferment of the mid-1950s.

07 - "PLEASE BELIEVE ME" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Joseph Dudley King
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1956 (Possibly July 1957)
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-6-18 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-4-13 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''When You Stop Loving Me'' issued under the name Doug Poindexter on RLP 126.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Cast King - Vocal
Oliver Brown - Second Tenor Vocal
Bonny Sartin - Vocal*
John Walker - Guitar
James W. Sartin - Steel Guitar
John Sartin - Guitar
Gay Roberts - Bass
Robert Jones - Drums

And so, now only one question remains about Cast King and the eight previously unknown songs that sat in a Sun tape box for over thirty years, why did music so good not appear on at least one Sun record? Possibly it was simply that Jack Clement did not rate the results highly and didn't play the tapes for Sam Phillips, filling them away instead. Perhaps he had a plan to do something himself with the recordings. Maybe it was something to do with publishing rights. Jack Clement doesn't remember the sessions even though they could have been among his earliest at Sun. Most likely, it was just that the Country Drifters were too country, too classy even, to become part of the new wave of rockabillies. King himself back in 1987, he just said... ''As to the reason the records were never released, I really couldn't say for sure. Sam Phillips had nothing to do with the actual recording sessions. Perhaps it was as you say that Sam Phillips didn't have the finance to back too many singers at one time. Maybe my songs were so different than anything Sun had done before. Afterall, why dig more holes when you've already got a gold mine''?

For Biography of Cast King see: > The Sun Biographies <
Cast Kings' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube < 

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Session Published for Historical Reasons

STUDIO SESSION FOR EDDIE BOND
FOR MERCURY RECORDS 1957

GOLDSTAR RECORDING STUDIO
3104 TELEPHONE ROAD, HOUSTON, TEXAS
MERCURY SESSION: CIRCA JULY 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - PAPPY DALLY

After this and his last Mercury session, Eddie Bond began label-hoping through the South, particularly around Memphis.

01 – ''LOVE, LOVE, LOVE'' – B.M.I. - 2:16
Composer: - Roger Miller
Publisher: - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - YW 14782
Recorded: - Circa July 1957
Released: - November 14, 1957
First appearance: - Mercury Records (S) 45rpm Mercury 71237-A mono
LOVE, LOVE, LOVE / BACKSLIDIN'
Reissued: 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1-15 mono
EDDIE BOND – ROCKIN' DADDY

02 – ''LOVIN' YOU, LOVIN' YOU'' – B.M.I. - 2:26
Composer: - Darrell Edwards
Publisher: - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - YW 14783
Recorded: - Circa July 1957
Released: - July 7, 1957
First appearance: - Mercury Records (S) 45rpm Mercury 71237-A mono
LOVIN' YOU, LOVIN' YOU / HERSHEY BAR
Reissued: 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1-16 mono
EDDIE BOND – ROCKIN' DADDY

03 – ''HERSHEY BAR'' – B.M.I. - 2:15
Composer: - Eddie Bond
Publisher: - Starrite Music
Matrix number: - YW 14784
Recorded: - Circa July 1957
Released: - July 7, 1957
First appearance: - Mercury Records (S) 45rpm Mercury 71237-B mono
HERSHEY BAR / LOVIN' YOU, LOVIN' YOU
Reissued: 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1-17 mono
EDDIE BOND – ROCKIN' DADDY

04 – ''ONE STEP CLOSER TO YOU'' – B.M.I. - 2:05
Composer: - Eddie Bond
Publisher: - Starday Music
Matrix number: - YW 14785
Recorded: - Circa July 1957
Released: - 1958
First appearance: - Mercury Starday Records (LP) 33rpm ME 20360 mono
A NIGHT AT THE LOUISIANA HAYRIDE – VARIOUS ARTISTS
Reissued: - 1993 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15708-1-18 mono
EDDIE BOND – ROCKIN' DADDY

Mercury's country roster was taken over by Starday Records to create the Mercury/Starday imprint. The last of Eddie Bond's six Mercury-Starday singles was released on November 14, 1957; one side was written by Bill Cantrell and Quinton Claunch, the other by Roger Miller. Eddie Bond returned to Sun. There were three sessions between November 28, 1957 and May 5, 1958, but no singles. The band is reckoned to be Bond's Stompers with the addition of Ace Cannon on saxophone.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Eddie Bond - Vocal & Guitar
Phil Baugh - Lead Guitar
Hal Harris - Rhythm Guitar
Herb Remington - Steel Guitar, Bass,
Unknown - Drums,
Link Davis - Fiddle
Jimmy Smith – Piano
Unknown – Saxophone
Pee Wee Wamble - Trumpet

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ROSCO GORDON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERIVE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JULY 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS

The end of Gordon's affiliation with Sun is harder to piece together. He returned in 1957 to record the ersatz rockabilly tune "Sally Jo", which stands with some recordings by Ray Sharp, Tarheel Slim, and Roy Brown among the few examples of black rockabilly. Its appearance must have upturned a few eyebrows among Rosco's diehard constituency; but if Gordon can be said to have "sold out", he did it with style and boundless enthusiasm: "Sally Joy" was delightfully at variance with everything else he recorded.

01 - "SALLY JO" – B.M.I. - 2:02
Composer: - Sam Phillips-Rosco Gordon
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated - Knox Music Limited
Matrix number: - U 322 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1957
Released: - September 20, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 305-A < mono
SALLY JO / TORRO
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-3 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

For this swansong, Rosco applied the tried and tested adage of "why use any more musicians when two will do perfectly well". Fortunately, Sun was well-ersed in making sparse combos sound a whole lot bigger than they otherwise might. The credited guitarist here is Freddy Tavares, an Hawaiian born musician who helped design the Fender Jazzmaster.

The arrangement on "Torro" is quite strange and might not have been talked through too carefully. In fact, if Rosco Gordon had anything to do with this recording, it is unclear what he might have contributed. Sam Phillips has already begun his fadeout during the last four bars when Freddy Tavares ends cold. Billboard described the sides as "background music for a bullfight", which isn't a bad call. Tavares' brief vocal describes just that ("El amigo de la tarde... / The friend of the afternoon").

If you listen closely to the sound of the guitar on "Torro", you'll hear the same musicians who drove the batterly bizarre and delightful "Sally Jo". Here, Rosco's contribution is obvious. No wonder Phillips was willing to issue yet another record by Rosco after all this time. Seven years on, and Sam Phillips was still recording him. What did Phillips visualize as the fate of this record? Was this his or anybody's idea of rhythm and blues, circa 1958?.

"Sally Jo" has been called an example, maybe even the first example of black rockabilly. Rosco, of course, never saw it that way. He was just making music, which is as it should be. The genres and categories were somebody else's problem. Billboard, for its part never even realized they had an oddity on their hands. Perhaps no one knew that they were describing a black singer, much less one with an impressive list of rhythm and blues credits, when they observed "The artist uses a listenable shoutin' approach on this vigorous rockabilly. Typical Sun string sound is prominent in support". Some typical rockabilly! A black vocalist and a Latino guitar player. One more example of hybrid vigor at 706 Union.

02 – "TORRO" – A.S.C.A.P. - 2:40
Composer: - Rosco Gordon-Freddie Tanares
Publisher: - Jerry Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 323 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1957
Released: - September 20, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 305-B < mono
TORRO / SALLY JO
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-3-4 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Torro" is a strong contender in the strangest Sun record ever released sweepstakes. Even without Rosco Gordon's name on the label, this tune just has no business on a Sun label. Years later, Gordon revealed that "Torro" was the creation of his guitar player, Freddy Tavares. Sam Phillips was intrigued by the whole idea, and figured he had little to lose by throwing the concoction out on the flipside of "Sally Jo".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Rosco Gordon - Vocal and Piano
Freddie Tavares - Guitar
Unknown Musicians

For Biography of Rosco Gordon see: > The Sun Biographies <
Rosco Gordon's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS ©

The re-evaluation of previously published information about the recording dates of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' (see below) brings to the fore other vexing questions concerning the origins of the solitary take of ''Mean Woman Blues'' and the running order of the fourteen examples of ''I'm Feelin' Sorry'' now to hand. Ten of the latter share one of the defining traits of ''Mean Woman Blues'', namely the effect, reminiscent of a clavichord, which resulted from Jack Clement having re-tuned the piano and applied thumb tacks to the hammers such that, upon impacting the strings, a distinctive metallic sound was produced. It's thought that this technique, a strong hint of which remains discernible in the ultimate delivery of ''Great Balls Of Fire'', was first applied during the course of at least one, possibly two, Lewis sessions in early September at which material was prepared for a projected EP release. This innovation, which has been attributed by some source to session pianist Jimmy Wilson, is also manifest on a number of recordings made at Sun by other artists during September and early October 1957. Though soon thereafter the ''clavichord effect'', which Clement himself casually, and misleadingly, related to the dissimilar sound of a harpsichord, appears to have been abandoned. (*)

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE / PROBABLY EARLY JULY 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

May have been recorded before September 5, 1957

But first let's look at the development of the song ''I'm Feelin' Sorry'' it self. Clement obviously had high hopes for his composition, later to be realised when Ricky Nelson covered it on his second album, released in July 1958. Ricky's version is probably representative of what Jack Clement had in mind when he wrote the song and it shares the same modest gait we hear on Jerry Lee Lewis' first attempt. But when Jack presented ''I'm Feelin' Sorry'' to Lewis, most likely early in July 1957, they tried it at various speeds; initially, a slow ballad, as originally conceived; next, up-tempo; then at a medium pace, as heard in the complete take presented here, and finally demonstrating the increased momentum of the issued master. It's noticeable that on each successive take, the drumming becomes bolder and incrementally more improvised.(*)

1(1) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (1) - B.M.I. - 3:05
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Slow
Recorded: - Early July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-9-B1 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-28 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 1963

This stellar alternate version of ''I'm Feelin' Sorry'', together with the second version that follows, lay in a tape box assigned to Billy Riley for almost thirty years. For some reason, Jerry has chosen to deliver his vocal in a strangulated near-falsetto. The backing track is a little ragged in places but, once again, Jerry Lee and Jimmy van Eaton constitute a working definition of 'empathy'. This was an interesting approach to the song but understandably soon abandoned.

The standout feature of this version is Jerry's phrasing. He is taking amazing liberties, and pulling it off. The tempo is borderline frantic but no-one losses it. Roland Janes turns in a lovely little solo with some help from his tremolo bar and, as always, Jimmy Van Eaton is outstanding. Once again, it sounds as though this was an experiment that someone (probably Jack Clement) decided had little commercial merit.

1(2) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:22
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Fast
Recorded: - Early July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-9-B2 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-29 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

1(3) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:26
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Fragment
Recorded: - Early July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-26 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

01(4) - "I'M FEELIN' SORRY" (1) - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Jack Clement
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - EP 25 - Take 4 - EP Master
Recorded: - Early July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA-107-A2 mono
THE GREAT BALL OF FIRE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-31 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

02 - "TURN AROUND" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Carl Perkins
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - EP 27 - EP Master
Recorded: - Early July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - September 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (EP) 45rpm EPA-107-B2 mono
THE GREAT BALL OF FIRE
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-33 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

When Sam Phillips mixed ''Honky Tonk Babe, Gal'' for release, he told Carl Perkins that he wanted a good country ballad to go on the flip side of ''Movie Magg''. The result was ''Turn Around''. Sam gave it that title; Carl had been calling it ''I'll Be Following You''. Sam brought in Quentin Claunch (guitar), Bill Cantrell (fiddle) and Stan Kesler (steel) to join the Perkins band on the session. He wanted a real country record.
The song is absolutely gorgeous - simple, heartfelt, and honest with a sing-along melody. Jerry Lee Lewis noticed that and included the song on his 1957 Sun EPA 107. If it had been a bigger hit, it would have been a natural for Ray Charles to resurrect in the early 1960s when he was recording country songs like ''I Can't Stop Loving You'' with a full orchestra and chorus. And Carl wrote it because Sam asked for a good country ballad. Sam should have sent in a request every week.

On the one complete outtake, Carl's vocal is every bit as pure and earnest as it is on the released version. The instruments - mainly the fiddle - are not all tuned up together, providing some truly uncomfortable moments which we guess were recognizable only when the tape was played back. This one belonged in the outtake box. There is also a few fragments and some studio chatter among musicians. At one point in the chatter there's a discussion of Elvis and someone, probably Cantrell, says he doesn't like that sort of music. The old guard passeth.

The coupling of "Turn Around" with "Movie Magg" was issued in February 1955 on Phillips new Flip subsidiary. The sincerity that Sam Phillips responded to was plainly on view in "Turn Around". It owed a measure of debt to Hank Williams in terms of both composition and execution but Phillips' hopes for Carl Perkins in the country market were not without foundation. "Turn Around", is a solid country outing that Jerry Lee Lewis recorded four years later here, and Carl himself continues to feature on his personal appearances some forty years later.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Unknown - Bass
James M. Van Eaton Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS ©

THE ''GREAT BALLS OF FIRE'' THEORY - Let's now turn to the next major landmark, ''Great Galls Of Fire''. The related development work has been one of the more sensitive subjects to deal with, not least because it involves disputing a series of dates that have hitherto been regarded by many as reputable entries in the often far from dependable recording diary. It seems, however, that this is a case where Sam Phillips did deliberately draw a veil over proceedings when he reported studio activity to the musicians' union, while others involved in the recording of Jerry Lee's second million-seller have contributed to the confusion by claiming that the finished product was arrived at in a single take. This fancy was perpetuated by Jerry Lee's bass player, cousin and sometime father-in-law Jay W. Brown as recently as in 2010, but it's a weak proposition in the face of so many indications to the contrary. One might speculate that such a declaration was originally part and parcel of Sam's efforts to outwit the union; looked at in that light, abiding loyalty to such a deception would be laudable!

However, it's clear that such stories about only ''one take'' being required to arrive at an impeccable cut, be it of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' itself or others of Jerry Lee's hits, haven't always been inspired by any intention to mislead. Rather, they may be down to a basic misunderstanding between the musicians involved and some of those who have delved into these events in much later years. It's only fair to say that the likes of Jay W. Brown, Jimmy M. Van Eaton and Jerry Lee himself wouldn't necessarily have regarded as ''takes'' any performances which were, in effect, only ''rehearsals'', while their own perceptions of the process may have failed to acknowledge the fact that quite so many run-throughs were being captured on tape, far less being kept for posterity. How valid this argument is in respect of the work undertaken on ''Great Balls Of Fire'' remains open to question, though it's easier to sustain in respect of ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On''; as we have seen, the master of the latter was, as both Jerry Lee Lewis and Jack Clement were always keen to emphasise, nailed in ''one take''. What is undeniable is that those who contributed to the making of this history would never have imagined that their work in the Sun studio, however formal or otherwise, would decades later be the subject of such intense interest and analysis.

Leaving the ''single-take'' fable aside, the accepted wisdom is that each and every cut of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' dated from a three day span, Sunday 6 to Tuesday 8, October 1957. There is, however, no firm testimony in support of this suggestion, which was published in the 1983 LP set and has been repeated unchallenged in most subsequent accounts. And while the discography in the 1989 bear Family set ''Classic'' did at least cast doubt on the belief that all fifteen takes originated in October, and pointed to a less intensive schedule, it fell short of providing any detail.

The premise that everything was recorded over the course of three days in October fails to pay regard to Sam Phillips' own declaration in later years that, having been pressed by Warner Brothers to supply a tape of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' for use in the film ''Jamboree'', he had submitted to the producers the best of what he already had to hand, while remaining determined to achieve still better results for the eventually single release. The idea that Sam would have sent to Warner Brothers an inferior cut for want of a day or two in early October doesn't stand up to close scrutiny. And the fact that the film was premiered on November 12, while not making an October date for the recording of the audio of Jerry Lee Lewis' contribution impossible, adds weight to the argument against the traditional explanation.

Contemporaneous published accounts also discredit the notion of an all-embracing October session and signify a different chain of events; these sources indicate that the recording of the so-called ''movie cut'' and its numerous sound-alike takes predated that of the finished master, as heard on Sun 281, not by just one or two days but quite possibly by an interval of at least two months. In all likelihood, the version heard on the soundtrack was actually taped before Jerry Lee's first live television appearance on ''The Steve Allen Show'', broadcast from New York City on Sunday July 28, 1957. This deduction is supported by a report in Billboard magazine of August 5, 1957 signposting that the lip-synched contribution to ''Jamboree'' was filmed during the same excursion to the north-east, which in turn points to the ''movie-take'' having been recorded before Jerry Lee Lewis left Memphis on July 25, 1957.

What seems most likely is that Jud Phillips, Sam's brother, having been made responsible for promoting Jerry Lee nationally and securing the TV dates, made his way to the New York office of music publishers Hill & Range well in advance of the July 28, commitment. Jud's assertion that he introduced the staff writers to ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On'' and invited them to devise a potential follow up is entirely persuasive. In response, a demo and/or the score for ''Great Balls Of Fire'' would have been dispatched to Memphis in time to allow tentative recordings to be made in advance of Jerry Lee's visit to New York both for the TV debut at the end of the month and, during the same venture, to film the movie cameo.

Let's also consider the aural evidence. The fifteen takes of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' readily fall into one or other of two detached groups; those which exhibit a relatively laboured guitar and bass rhythm, as heard in the frenetic ''movie'' take, and those that evince a more accomplished pattern, revealing enhanced tape echo, with the piano and the drums supposedly combining to form a wall of sound in the absence, according to some, of other instrumentation. Might this sea-change have been accomplished overnight? While it can't be ruled out absolutely, it is considered highly implausible; as a result, these recordings have now been split into the two groups and placed apart. The first session, at which the musicians were required to learn the song from scratch, culminated in the taping of the movie version. It's remembered by Jimmy Van Eaton as a chaotic exercise with a studio full of people, though clearly not everyone was impressed when it came to the dominant characters exchanging views on the subject of divine retribution.

On the second date, Jerry Lee Lewis is in an entirely secular frame of mind; exegesis has given way to excess. But, in his singing and playing, we can witness the steady progression from a relatively carefree, illdisciplined couple of run-throughs to the climactic ''master''; the sublime single release. At each stage a refinement of one sort or another is embodied, whether a change in emphasis or tone in part of the lyric, the stretching of a particular word or the intro-mission of an uncommon exclamation, or a new twist to the piano solo. Close analysis of this group also indicates that a bass guitarist is present throughout the session, up to and including the final take. This becomes readily identifiable during the second phase of the instrumental break, in which Jerry Lee's left hand drives the rhythm at eight to the bar and in so doing diverges from the walking bass line.

And there is even more substance to the issued master itself than has been generally acknowledge in the past. In combinning this song and Jerry Lee's talent, Sam Phillips knew that he was dealing with something extraordinary and he was painstaking in his search for the perfect rendition of ''Great Balls Of Fire''. This was to be Sun Records' magnum opus, its greatest hit to-date; the sound had to be both innovative and flawless. Jerry Lee had already had upwards of a dozen cracks at it but still something was missing, an extra component to complete the masterwork. Here's what appears to have happened next, based on the composition of separate tapes found in outtake boxes.

Having secured the sixth take at this second session, yet still unsatisfied, Sam decided to experiment and asked a percussionist to add a metronomic ''rim-shot'', hitting the edge of the snare drum, to accentuate the beat. Listen to the most conspicuous discrepancy between the master and all the preceding takes from this session; on the master alone one can hear a sharp, consistent strike on the edge of the drum. It might, of course, be thought that this was accomplished in real time, but a recent discovery in the Sun archives renders this proposition highly questionable; the reality seems to be that it wasn't recorded concurrently.

What we can now listen to, on a previously unreleased tape here presented on BCD 17254-18-1, is the cut that forms the basis of the ''master'' take lacking this ''rim-shot'' sound. This tape does, however, also feature an enhanced drum pattern compared to earlier takes, involving a supplementary layer of conventional ''skin shots'' on the snare drum. But the pronounced metronomic beat that helps define ''Great Balls Of Fire'', as known to the world, is absent. The distinction may appear subtle, but it is contended that this amounts to proof that the recording originally issued in November 1957 embodies an overdub of the defining ''rim-shot'' sound.

There is little reason to doubt that these less emphatic ''skin shots'' heard on this alternate are dubbed, rather then being representative of what was taped live and subsequently masked, either by the ''rim shot'' and/or other mastering techniques applied when the engineer prepared the track for release in 1957. Hence it is believed that what we have are two different overdubs adding extra percussion to the real time performance, one of which, featuring the ''rim shot'', was selected for release as Sun 281. It can be argued that the alternate presented on BCD 17254-18-1 sustains a closer relationship with the other recordings of the song, whereas the more obviously augmented ''rim shot'' version stands apart. Moreover, given the order in which the tapes were found in the outtake boxes, the balance of probability is weighted in favour of the rejected ''skin shot'' experiment being the first of two distinct overdubs, both having been made the fulfill Sam's ambition of lending additional muscle to the record. But being unable to present an underlying, undubbed, tape we have opted to include the master originally released on Sun 281 as part of the main sequence, rather than consign it to the collection of overdubs on BCD 17254-18-1.

Debates about the origin and the precise composition of this recording may well persist for as long as people continue to listen to popular music. One conclusion is undeniable. Promethean it assuredly is, yet evidently there were several pairs of hands at work in the genesis of the master take of ''Great Balls Of Fire'', the supposition that it represents nothing more than the inspired efforts of Jerry Lee Lewis and a drummer, supplemented by ''slapback echo'', is the myth.

by Andrew McRae, October 2015

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR JERRY LEE LEWIS
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE / PROBABLY 2ND HALF JULY 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - SAM C. PHILLIPS
AND/OR JACK CLEMENT

May have been recorded before September 5, 1957

1(1) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:54
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-12-7 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-19 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(2) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-9-5 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-20 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(3) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 3
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - March 1987
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/200rpm CD Charly 70-14 mono
RARE AND ROCKIN'
Reissued: - September 1989 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15420-2-34 mono
CLASSIC JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE DEFINITIVE SUN RECORDINGS 1956 - 1963

1(4) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 4
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - April 1993
First appearance: - Charly Records (CD) 500/22rpm Sunbox 4-11-3 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE ULTIMATE - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-32 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(5) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 5
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-A8 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued"- October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-23 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(6) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:50
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 6
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-24 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(7) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 0:21
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - 3 False Starts
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - January 1983
First appearance: - Charly Records (LP) 33rpm Sunbox 102-4-B1 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS - THE SUN YEARS
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-25 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1(8) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:51
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 7
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - October 2015
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-26 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

1 - ''RELIGIOUS DISCUSSION'' (1) - 3:59
Probably on October 1957

1(9) - "GREAT BALLS OF FIRE" (1) - B.M.I. - 1:49
Composer: - Jack Hammer-Otis Blackwell
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Movie Soundtrack Version
Recorded: - 2nd Half July 1957 - Not Originally Issued
Released: - November 15, 1957
First appearance: - Warner Brothers (LP) 33rpm WB JAM 1/2 mono
JAMBOREE
Reissued: - October 2015 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17254-3-28 mono
JERRY LEE LEWIS AT SUN RECORDS THE COLLECTED WORKS

It was essentially a duet between Jerry Lee and J.M. Van Eaton. The barely controlled slapback echo almost ranks as a third instrument, it gives such depth and presence to the recording. Sam Phillips had obviously counseled against finesse during the solo, for Jerry starts with four glissandi before hammering away at the same note for six consecutive bars. When the finished product was released, there was nothing more that Phillips and Lewis could have done during the production to ensure its success. The movie "Jamboree", released in November 1957, and the pay-off was swift and overwhelming.

Note: The date and place where Jerry filmed his part in ''Jamboree'' for Warner Brothers has never been determined. Jay W. Brown can only remember that it was on a set used previously by The Thee Stooges. It is known that the film was pre-viewed on November 12, 1957. Biographers have often said that both the recording on the movie version of ''Great Balls Of Fire'' and the filming occurred in September 1957. However, ...a press article (Billboard magazine) dated August 5, 1957. The article says: ''While in town last week, Lewis also completed his stint for the forthcoming Vanguard Productions films, ''Jamboree''. So Jerry took the opportunity of his stay in NYC between the Steve Allen show (July 28) and Alan Freed's Big Beat TV show (August 2) to finalize his appearance in Jamboree. The song, written by Otis Blackwell, was purchased from Hill & Range, which had offices in the same building as a restaurant owned by Jack Dempsey, the former world heavyweight boxing champion.

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Jerry Lee Lewis - Vocal and Piano
Roland Janes - Guitar
Unknown (Possibly Al Stanger) - Bass
James M. Van Eaton – Drums

For Biography of Jerry Lee Lewis see > The Sun Biographies <
Jerry Lee Lewis' Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 1957

Jerry Lee Lewis appears on the Steve Allen national TV show.

Probably studio session with Rosco Gordon at Sun Records, Memphis, Tennessee.

Probably studio session with Levester ''Big Lucky'' Cater and Ed Kirby.

During July of 1957, test pilot and future astronaut, John Glenn Jr. set a new transcontinental speed record while piloting a F8U Crusader from Los Angeles to New York. He became the first pilot to average supersonic speed during a transcontinental flight and it took three hours and twenty-three minutes to complete. Glenn later became one of the first U.S. astronauts when he was chosen for the Mercury program by NASA in 1959. In addition to being an accomplished test pilot, he became the first American to orbit the Earth and the fifth person to go into space in 1962 aboard the Friendship 7 spacecraft.

JULY 1, 1957 MONDAY

Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers open at the Paramount theater in New York.

Johnny cash recorded ''Home Of The Blues'' and ''Give My Love To Rose'' at Memphis' Sun Recording studio.

RCA Victor released Elvis Presley's ''Loving You'' (LPM-1515) album, consisting partially of music from the movie of the same name.

A Philadelphia radio station begins repeated airings on The Tune Weavers' ''Happy, Happy Birthday Baby''. The song becomes an instant pop hit, covered nearly 30 years later in country music by Ronnie Milsap.

CBS-TV reintroduces the sitcom ''Those Whiting Girls'' as a summer replacement series for ''I Love Lucy''. The show stars sometimes-country singer Margaret Whiting and her sister, Barbara.

THE TRUTH ABOUT JOHNNY CASH

Although there are conflicting dates Jack Clement took over as Cash's producer sometime in early 1957. "Sam was getting tired of running the board all the time. I was his first full-time assistant. He'd been strapped to that board for years and I came along and he seemed to like what! was doing''.

''We agreed on most things although we didn't have to agree, he was the boss. I cut tapes and if he liked them he would put them out. Johnny Cash and I were getting along and so one day he let me start working with John. I guess he was busy one day and let me work with him. One of the first things we cut was ''Home Of The Blues''.

He has fond memories of working with Cash. ''Johnny Cash was wonderful to work with. I guess he is my all-time favourite. He loved music and he had a lot of energy for it, took it very seriously but he had this great sense of humour. An ideal combination. We were about the same age and we just liked the same stuff. I'd feel free to play him oddball stuff that nobody else would go for, things like ''Ballad Of A Teenage Queen''.

Cash was riding high at this stage of his career but a situation was about to arise that would cause bitterness and resentment between Cash and Sam Phillips. In August 1957 Cash played the Town Hall Party show out on the West Coast and after the show he was approached by Don Law, who was working for Columbia Records. He asked Cash if he wanted to join the label after his contract with Sun had expired. Cash still had a full year to run on his contract but indicated to Law that he was interested in joining the label. Negotiations continued over the following few months and the news leaked out to Phillips through his distributors. Angered by this he approached Bob Neal, whose company Stars, Inc, were booking Cash's concerts, at first denied that there was any commitment between Cash and Columbia. However, in early 1958 Sam had a showdown with both Cash and Neal where he just looked Cash in the eye and asked, ''I understand that you have signed an option to go to another label at the expiration of your contract with Sun. I want you to look me straight in the eyes an I toll run, have you or have you not?" Phillips knew as soon as he opened his mouth that that he was lying. Understandably Phillips was hurt and felt betrayed and ,despite offering to match Columbia's offer Cash's mind was made up.

Jack Clement recalled this period during an interview with in 2004. "It did surprise me but he didn't just leave, we knew about it eight months or so before he left. It surprised me, because of all the people at Sun Records Sam seemed to admire Johnny Cash the most. He would always tell me how great Johnny was and the authority he had in his voice, when he sang he got people's attention. Just a powerful thing. He talked about how easy he was to work with. How he would go out on the road and write some songs, work them up with the Tennessee Two and come in and record them. He really admired Johnny Cash, he was his fair-haired boy actually. I think what happened Jerry Lee Lewis came along and John's sales were dropping, still very good, but he wasn't selling millions at that time, until ''Teenage Queen''. Jerry Lee Lewis was taking off and Sam was putting all his energies into him. That was one of Sam's weaknesses, that he couldn't really concentrate on more than one artist at a time. There is something to be said for that. Johnny Cash came by one day and wanted to go next door to Taylor's Restaurant and talk to Sam. He was busy talking to distributors and didn't put him off but he was busy. Sam probably thought Johnny Cash would understand that and didn't think much about it. But I think that little incident, maybe, is what sparked him leaving. And of course by this time he was selling lots of records and getting offers from people in Nashville, people who wanted to manage him and sign him to labels. He went over and signed with Columbia before his contract was up with Sun. It wouldn't go into effect until his contract was over with Sun but in other words he didn't give Sam a chance to bid on it''.

There were many reasons that Cash wanted to leave Sun Records. Obviously the the lure of a major label was something he couldn't ignore and would be seen as finally making in the music business. Columbia had also promised Cash that he could record a gospel album, something that Phillips had consistently refused to do. From a financial point of view Columbia would also be offering a better royalty deal.

''I remember another thing, Sam was paying people three per-cent which was honorable but not all that great. It was a starting royalty and Cash was wanting four per-cent, to re-sign and Sam argued about it. Well I know Sam would have given him the four per-cent, certainly he would. But Cash felt he didn't need to argue about it, he had these people in Nashville wanting to sign him, so he signed. Finally they agreed that John would come in and sing a certain number of songs before he left. I had to talk John into coming in and cutting them songs, unwillingly. John's heart wasn't really into recording that bunch of songs. I got everything out of him I could. Some of them were pretty good and some of them were not so hot, but that was my job. We got that done and he left''.

With a new label on the horizon it was obvious that Cash would keep his best songs for later and Phillips was determined that he would get enough new material to last for the next few years and wrote to Cash. He recalled this in an interview with Bill Flanagan in 1988. "It was a letter (saying) that I would go into the studio on such and such a day and record a certain number of songs. That really rankled me and I refused to do it. Then Jack Clement called me and said, 'My job is on the line. I'm supposed to produce you. I think you have to do it. You owe Sam some sessions.'I said, 'I'm not going to sing anything I don't like'. He said, 'Come in. We'll go over songs and find ones you like.' So, I like the songs but what I hated was that they overdubbed the vocal group on some of them. I hated that sound!".

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

Johnny Cash had released five singles within two years, and the striking originality of his formula was beginning to wear thin. When Cash went into the studio on July 1 and back in again for an overdub session at the end of the month, his sound was gradually eased uptown by Jack Clement, to whom Sam Phillips had entrusted the supervision of Cash's sessions.

"Home Of The Blues" was inspired by Cash's favourite Memphis record store located at Beale Street, and it was the first time he wasn't the sole writer of his material. Luther opens the song with a guitar intro that goes from one end of the scale to the other. There is a short false start where Perkins misses a note and is following by the undubbed master.

STUDIO SESSION FOR JOHNNY CASH
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JULY 1, 1957
SESSION HOURS: 15:00-18:00
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

OVERDUB SESSION: WEDNESDAY JULY 31, & THURSDAY AUGUST 1, 1957
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT

01(1) - "HOME OF THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:58
Composer: - Johnny Cash-Glenn Douglas-Lily McAlpin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - FS, Undubbed Master - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1, 1957
Released: - 1990
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-2-5 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958
Reissued: - 2007 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-1-5 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

"Home Of The Blues" (inspired by the record store on Beale Street that Cash had visited in leaner times) is as dolorous as any of Cash's previous efforts, but it sports a piano and a subdued vocal chorus.

01(2) - "HOME OF THE BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:38
Composer: - Johnny Cash-Glenn Douglas-Lily McAlpin
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 268 Overdubbed Master
Overdubbed Session July 31, and August 1, 1957
Recorded: - July 1, 1957
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 279-A < mono
HOME OF THE BLUES / GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE
Reissued - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-1 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

The two or three layers of overdubs account for the very muddy sound on this master.

If nothing else, "Home Of The Blues" established the fact that Luther Perkins' electric guitar contained high strings as well as his over-used low ones. His opening descending scale remains one of the more adventurous outings in the Johnny Cash Sun songbook. In fact, "Home Of The Blues" broke new ground in several ways. It turns out that the echoes, swampy mix (which resulted from a rare overdub session) contained several features not previously heard on a Johnny Cash record: piano and voices. Not coincidentally, it was the first Johnny Cash session that Jack Clement produced.

This ''Home Of The Blues'' marked Jack Clement behind the glass and Clement has said that he found the original Cash sound a little ''tubby'' and there is already one subtle addition here, a second electric guitarist. Sid Manker plays the treble strings while Luther sticks to safer ground after his 'guitar manual' intro. By the time the song was released in 1957, Clement had taken a different version and overdubbed a piano and subdued chorus which themselves produced a curiously muddy sound. This overdubbed version finds Cash singing marginally higher than he often did and there may be a slight loss of intensity, but it is a pleasure to hear the song without the piano and vocal additions after all this time. The song itself may have been inspired by the record shop of owner Ruben Cherry of the same name which was a feature on Beale Street of downtown Memphis until urban renewal took its toll.

"Give My Love To Rose" was a departure from almost anything recorded previously and is well-crafted performance. It covered a theme that Cash would return to time and time again throughout his career, prisons and prisoners. There are differences between the three takes featured here and the released version. Luther attempts a syncopated rhythm with a continuous guitar figure that he seems to struggle to keep up throughout the song and he slowed down ending is missing from these takes and had yet to be perfected. "Home Of The Blues" and "Give My Love To Rose" were issued as a single and reached a respectable number 5 on the country charts.

02(1) - "GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1, 1957
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-2 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(2) - "GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE" - B.M.I. - 2:46
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 1, 1957
Released: - 2007
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16325-2-3 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE SUN OUTTAKES

02(3) - "GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE" - B.M.I. - 3:07
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - False Start & Take 3 Undubbed Master
Recorded: - July 1, 1957 -
Released: - 1963
First appearance: - Sun Records (LP) 33rpm SUN 1270-8 mono
ALL ABOARD THE BLUE TRAIN WITH JOHNNY CASH
Reissued: - 1990 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15517-2-6 mono
JOHNNY CASH - THE MAN IN BLACK 1954 - 1958

02(4) - "GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE" - B.M.I. - 2:42
Composer: - Johnny Cash
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 269 - Take 3 Overdubbed Master August 1, 1957
Recorded: - July 1, 1957
Released: - September 14, 1957
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 279-B < mono
GIVE MY LOVE TO ROSE / HOME OF THE BLUES
Reissued - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-1-2 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Give My Love To Rose" is more minimalist than ever. A western ballad, it represents the first time that Cash's infatuation with the Old West (which would later consume entire albums) intruded itself onto disc. "Rose" is a mournful tale of a dying man's wishes told to the minimalist accompaniment. The slight change in direction brought forth some reward when the single rose quickly to number 5 in the country charts and number 88 in the pop listing before dying away. That showing encouraged Jack Clement to persevere in his attempt at sweetening Cash's sound. Billboard was correct when they described this as a "very strong reading of an unusual piece of country material".

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Johnny Cash - Vocal and guitar
Luther Perkins - Guitar
Marshall Grant - Bass

Overdub Session July 31, and August 1, 1957
James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Sid Manker - Guitar
Jimmy Smith - Piano
Malcolm Yelvington - Vocal Harmony
Asa Wilkerson - Vocal Harmony
Bill Abbott - Vocal Harmony
Don Carter - Vocal Harmony
Lee Holt - Vocal Harmony

For Biography of Johnny Cash see > The Sun Biographies <
Johnny Cash's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on 
 > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR ED KIRBY & BIG LUCKY CARTER
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: JULY 2, 1957
STUDIO HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER – SAM C. PHILLIPS

No Details

01 – ''GONNA BREAK THAT LOCK''
Composer: - Ed Kirby-Levester Carter
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 2, 1957

02 – LITTLE ROCK''
Composer: - Ed Kirby-Levester Carter
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 2, 1957

03 – ''GOOD, BETTER, BEST''
Composer: - Ed Kirby-Levester Carter
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None – Sun Unissued
Recorded: - July 2, 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Ed Kirby Vocal & Saxophone
Big Lucky Carter - Vocal & Guitar
Clarence Beaton - Bass
Charles Ballard - Drums
Lindberg Nelson - Piano

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR UNKNOWN VOCAL GROUP
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957/58

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION (3): UNKNOWN DATE 1957/1958
SESSION HOURS: UNKNOWN
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - UNKNOWN

Although this is taken at a similar to Little Walter's record of the same name, Walter was working with a real song from the pen of Willie Dixon; this is more a riff masquerading as a song. When first issued on Charly Records, it was credited to ''Unknown Vocal Group'', but it's not a vocal group in the commonly accepted sense because the parts aren't harmonized. Additionally, the guitarist isn't strumming chords innocuously in the background as a vocal group accompanist would; he's a front-and-center blues man, and a pretty good one. ''Oh Baby'' is on a tape with Bill Pinkney's ''Sally's Got A Sister'', an unknown hillbilly-rockabilly singer, and Ed Kirby singing ''Mean Old Gin''. Kirby recorded for Sun at various points in 1957 and Pinkney's session was dated February 1958. With all that in mind, our current best guess is that this is Kirby's group, the Rhythmaires, possibly with Kirby playing saxophone and an unknown lead vocalist. Although Sun book-keeping was lax, Pinkney's ''After The Hop''/''Sally's Got A Sister'' single was almost certainly recorded as stated in February 1958 because ''At The Hop'' was a hit in the early months of that year, so ''Oh Baby'' could have been recorded in late 1957 or early 1958

01 - ''OH BABY'' - B.M.I. - 2:01
Composer: - Unknown
Publisher: - Copyright Control
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date 1957/1958
Released: - March 8, 2013
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17310-10-17 mono
THE SUN BLUES BOX 1950 - 1958

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Unknown Vocal Group
Probably The Rhythmaires including
Ed Kirby - Vocal & Saxophone
Big Lucky Carter - Vocal & Guitar
Unknown - Bass, Drums

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 2, 1957 TUESDAY

Spade Cooley and Sonny James are special guests on a country edition of CBS-TV's ''The Spike Jones Show''.

JULY 3, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Songwriter Frank J. Myers is born in Dayron, Ohio. He builds such credits as John Michael Montgomery's ''I Swear'', Chris Young's ''Tomorrow'', Lonestar's ''I'm Already There'' and Reba McEntire's ''One Honest Heart''.

Actress Judy Tyler and her husband dies in an automobile accident. She had worked with Elvis Presley just months earlier, as his romantic interest, in the filming of ''Jailhouse Rock''. In the early evening of July 3, their 1957 Chevrolet approached “Wild Bill’s Curio Store'' and Petting Zoo” on US Highway 30, three miles north of Rock River, Wyoming. When a car pulled out of the tourist site onto the highway, Tyler's husband LaFayette swerved, sending the couple’s car skidding into the oncoming lane. Their car was hit broadside by an northbound vehicle. Judy was killed instantly; her husband died the next day in a Laramie hospital from chest and back injuries. Also dead at the scene was a passenger in the other car. The only survivor of the collision was the other driver.

JULY 4, 1957 THURSDAY

The Country Gentlemen form in the Washington, D.C., area. The bluegrass band later counts among its members Ricky Skaggs and dobro player Jerry Douglas.

Songwriter Woody Mullis is born. He authors George Strait's ''Adalida'', T. Graham Brown's ''Darlene'', Montgomery Gentry's ''Hillbilly Shoes'' and Skip Ewing's ''Burnin' A Hole In My Heart'', among others.

JULY 6, 1957 SATURDAY

Guitarist David Doucet is born in Louisiana. In 1975, he becomes a founding member of the cajun group BeauSoleil. The band contributes to Mary Chapin Carpenter's 1991 country hit ''Down At The Twist And Shout''.

John Lennon and Paul McCartney meet at a church picnic in Liverpool, England, where McCartney writes out the words of ''Be-Bop-A-Lula'' for Lennon. The two go on to form The Beatles, whose repertoire yields several country hits.

JULY 7, 1957 SUNDAY

Elvis Presley meets beauty contest winner Anita Wood, whom he dates for four years, in Memphis.

JULY 8, 1957 MONDAY

Imperial released The Scholars' ''Beloved''. The group includes 18-year-old singer Kenny Rogers.

JULY 9, 1957 TUESDAY

''Loving You'', Elvis Presley's second movie, premieres at the Strand Theatre in
Memphis. The movie opens National July 30.

Bobby Helms recorded ''My Special Angel'' at Nashville's Bradley Recording studio.

JULY 11, 1957 THURSDAY

Webb Pierce recorded ''Holiday For Love'' during an afternoon session at Nashville's Bradley Recording studio.

Kitty Wells recorded ''(I'll Always Be Your) Fraulein'' in Nashville at the Bradley Film and Recording Studio.

JULY 12, 1957 FRIDAY

Carl Smith recorded ''Why, Why'' at the Bradley Studios on Nashville's Music Row.

Alan Freed begins a 13 week National Television show devoted to rock and roll. The show is broadcast from 10:00-10:30 every Friday on ABC-TV network.

ABC-TV introduces the short-lived Alan Freed music series ''The Big Beat''. The Everly Brothers, Ferlin Husky and Connie Francis all appear on the inaugural episode.

JULY 14, 1957 SUNDAY

Marvin Rainwater sings ''Gonna Find Me A Bluebird'' on the CBS prime-time program ''The Ed Sullivan''.

Chet Atkins recorded ''Walk Don't Run'' at the Methodist Television, Radio and Film Commission in Nashville. The song becomes a pop hit when The Ventures released their version in 1959.

JULY 15, 1957 MONDAY

Mac McAnally is born in Red Bay, Alabama. He scores a minor hit as an artist with 1990s ''Back Where I Come From'', teams with Kenny Chesney on ''Down The Road'' and writes such hits as ''Two Dozen Roses'', ''All These Years'' and ''Old Flame''. He also wins the Country Music Association's Musician of the Year six times.

Columbia released Marty Robbins' two-sided single, ''Please Don't Blame Me'' and ''Teen-Age Dream''.

The Everly Brothers net their first number 1 country single with ''Bye Bye Love''.

When Jerry Lee Lewis' ''Whole Lot A Shakin' Going On'' at number 30 on the pop charts, Sam Phillips placed a half-page ad in the July 15 issue of Billboard, announcing that there was ''gonna be a whole lot of shaking going on on the Steve Allen TV program on July 28, and three days before that date, Jud Phillips and Jerry Lee Lewis took the train to New York.

JULY 1957

In July 1957, Kenny Parchman received an invitation from Jimmie Martin to record for his new Jaxon label in Jackson, Tennessee. Martin was a local musician with a good ear for what was current. He started Jaxon as a launch pad for his Jimmy Martin Combo, and he issued Ramsey Kearney's first record, albeit under his own name. Ramsey Kearney was another artist who, after recording two songs for Sun, saw no resulting record release. The Jaxon label was also the first step to an illustrious career for another young guy from Jackson, Carl Mann, who scored big with his rocked up ''Mona Lisa'' on Phillips International. Jimmie Martin used Sun's Hi-Lo publishing firm for his own releases. Possibly he hoped that Sam Phillips would re-record some of the songs with his artists. It is also possible that some or many of the Jaxon recordings were actually made at the Sun studio whose facilities were available for hire. That would certainly explain why Kenny was a frequent visitor there during 1957. However, we digress. Kenny was more than happy to record for Jimmie Martin and so ''Treat Me Right''/''Don't You Know'' became Jaxon 504.

JULY 18, 1957 THURSDAY

Off RCA, Tommy Blake signed with Sun Records in Memphis, and around the same time he was signed as a regular to the Louisiana Hayride. Sam Phillips loaned Blake ninety dollars.

Nine days later, Blake's name first appear on the Hayride schedule, but he disappeared from the roster soon after Tillman Franks took over the show's management in September that year. According to Tillman Franks, ''A bunch of us were downtown at a drug store drinking coffee one morning.

Tommy Blake was there, and he told me that he was the one who got (Louisiana Hayride owner) Henry Clay to hite me. 'I am the one who swung that deal for you', he said. I told him, 'Well, you had better go up there and un-swung it because I am letting you go first. He asked why, and I said, 'You are not good enough to be on the Hayride'. He would sell pictures and write a few songs and sell them. He said, 'I want to sell my pictures. I can't believe you are telling me this'. I replied, 'You are not the caliber that I want''. Then, according to Tillman, Tommy Blake issued yet another death threat.

Most weekends, Tommy Blake and his band The Rhythm Rebels played guest spots on the local Saturday night jamborees; the Big D in Dallas, the Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport; the Grand Prize Jamboree in Houston, and smaller shows, but Ruston was their home base. The Hayride gave Tommy Blake a front row seat at the birth of rock and roll. Elvis was on the show nearly every week from late 1954 until early 1956. The audience was at first incredulous, then ecstatic. Watching intently, Blake declared himself for rock and roll.

JULY 22, 1957 MONDAY

Marty Robbins recorded ''The Story Of My Life'' and ''She Was Only Seventeen (He Was One Year More)'' in an overnight session with producer Mitch Miller at New York's Columbia Recording Studio.

Sonny James recorded ''Near You''. Twenty years later, it becomes a hit for George Jones and Tammy Wynette.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MALCOLM YELVINGTON
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: MONDAY JULY 22, 1957
PRODUCER AND RECORDING ENGINEER - BILL JUSTIS

Gradually, the original Yelvington band was breaking up as its members found other pressures more important than pursuing the recording dream. Frank Tolley replaced the Flemings on piano, and Reece Fleming dropped out of the band completely. He died during the 1960s. However, in 1957, Malcolm Yelvington was back at Sun hustling for another release. He made at least two sessions in 1957, now working not with Sam Phillips but with Bill Justis, a new producer Phillips had taken on. Justis was a trained musician who saw the future for a smoother kind or rock and roll than Phillips had. He encouraged Malcolm to use a different band and a different musical formula.

On this session, which produced three songs, Yelvington brought in Frank Tolley on piano and Bubba Winn on guitar, brother of the departed steel player, Miles. Justis augmented this group with members of Phillips' studio band. This first session in 1957 for Yelvington, worked up three rockballads, "Mr. Blues", "Did I Ask You To Stay", and "First And Last Love". A brooding, reflective mood was created on this session but none of the songs was quite developed to final release standard.

01 - "FIRST AND LAST LOVE" - B.M.I. - 2:32
Composer: - Louie Moore
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 22, 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-4-17 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-3-8 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''First And Last Love'', quite an interesting track. The instrumental backing has a surprising amount of drive and energy to it but Yelvington's vocal is decidedly laid back. In fact, it is quite a mismatch with the instrumental support. Perhaps a different lyric or a more animated vocal might have made this track a total winner. Lord knows, it comes close in many ways. The opening echoey 5-chord, repeated between verses, is riveting and the guitar track is redolent of the understated chord work on Billy Riley's ''Trouble Bound''. All in all, this track is quite a little gem.

02(1) - "MR. BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:07
Composer: - Louie Moore
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 22, 1957
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-13 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS

Malcolm Yelvington became particularly enthusiastic about "Mr. Blues", but its progress was blocked by Bill Justis, who persuaded Phillips that this was not the song to go with. Maybe Justis preferred songs he had some commercial interest in, or maybe it was the lack of an authoritative guitar solo that made the difference. In any case, Yelvington's contract expired before the matter could be resolved and Phillips decided to drop Malcolm in favour of his younger artists.

Yelvington essay Moore's countryish ballad in his gentlest bass voice. The track's pop intension are signalled by the trip;et-wielding piano (similar to Carl Perkins's ''I'm Sorry I'm Not Sorry''). This piece of material was not the strongest in Yelvington's repertoire although the title is certainly repeated enough to 'hook' half a continent. Yelvington thought it was commercial at the time of recording.

02(2) - "MR. BLUES" - B.M.I. - 2:13
Composer: - Louie Moore
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 22, 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-4-16 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-3-7 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

03(1) - "DID I ASK YOU TO STAY" - B.M.I. - 2:19
Composer: - Louie Moore
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 1 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 22, 1957
Released: - November 1986
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (LP) 33rpm BFX 15211-4-18 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY YEARS 1950 - 1959
Reissued: - February 15, 2013 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 17311-3-9 mono
THE SUN COUNTRY BOX 1950 - 1959

''Did I Ask You To Stay'', together with other material from the same period, confirms that Sun was considering Yelvington for a wider audience. The overall sound here is certainly not out of line with mid-1950s country crossover material and the surprisingly heavy backbeat might have garnered some rock and roll interest. Yelvington's vocal is a little shaky in places, as the guitar support. Had this track been worked through and perfected, then released to moderate success, Yelvington and his group might have appeared on Bandstand or played the record hops in New York. A new set of false teeth, a new rug and ol' Malcolm would have been all set for a career as the unlikeliest-ever teen idol.

03(2) - "DID I ASK YOU TO STAY" - B.M.I. - 2:20
Composer: - Louie Moore
Publisher: - Sun Entertainment Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Take 2 - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - July 22, 1957
Released: - 2006
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16757-14 mono
MALCOLM YELVINGTON - THE SUN YEARS

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Malcolm Yelvington - Vocal and Guitar
Bubba Winn - Guitar
Possibly Stan Kesler - Bass
Possibly James M. Van Eaton - Drums
Frank Tolley - Piano

For Biography of Malcolm Yelvington see > The Sun Biographies <
Malcolm Yelvington's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on >YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

JULY 1957

Magel Priesman recorded in July 1957 with a group that included a couple of veterans of Sun's rhythm and blues days, vibraphonist Onzie Horne and bassist/vocalist Wilbur Steinberg. By mid-1958, Priesman double-tracked vocal sounded unerringly like Connie Francis, who'd just leaped to the charts with ''Who's Sorry Now'', and her record suddenly found itself on the streets. A disc jockey in Charlotte, Michigan, she'd met Jerry Lee Lewis and Roland Janes when they'd toured there earlier in 1957, and she'd come to Sun of their behest.

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

STUDIO SESSION FOR MAGEL PRIESMAN
AT THE MEMPHIS RECORDING SERVICE FOR SUN RECORDS 1957

SUN RECORDING STUDIO
706 UNION AVENUE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
SUN SESSION: UNKNOWN DATE JULY 1957
SESSION HOURS: 4:00 PM
PRODUCER - SAM C. PHILLIPS AND/OR STAN KESLER
RECORDING ENGINEER - JACK CLEMENT / ARRANGER - BILL JUSTIS

For many years, Magel Priesman was an enigma to Sun collectors. Her lone single - SUN 294 - was released in April 1958, nearly a year after it was recorded. Nobody, it seemed, had a line on the oddly named Ms. Priesman. Because her style was far removed from the qualities that attracted most Sun fans, there seemed little impetus to track her down. Fortunately, researcher Colin Escott made contact with her in time to include her story on Volume 3 of the Complete Sun Singles (Bear Family 15803). The double-tracked vocal seemed to hark back to the early 1950s sound of Patty Page.

01 - "I FEEL SO BLUE" - B.M.I. - 2:33
Composer: - Magel Priesman
Publisher: - Knox Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 302 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1957
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 294-A < mono
I FEEL SO BLUE / MEMORIES OF YOU
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-7 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

"Memories Of You" was a lovely evocation of a lost love affair, but Sam Phillips delayed its release for almost a year, and by the time it hit the streets Connie Francis was high in the charts with "Who's Sorry Now". The passing similarity between Connie Francis' double-tracked vocal and Magel Priesman's doubletracket vocal might have convinced Sam that Magel's moment had come. Not so.

02(1) - "MEMORIES OF YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:25
Composer: - Magel Priesman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None – Demo - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1957
Released: - August 2002
First appearance: - Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 16609-6-22 mono
MEMPHIS BELLES - THE WOMEN OF SUN RECORDS

02(2) - "MEMORIES OF YOU" - B.M.I. - 2:35
Composer: - Magel Priesman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - U 303 Master
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1957
Released: - April 9, 1958
First appearance: - Sun Records (S) 78/45rpm standard single > SUN 294-B < mono
MEMORIES OF YOU / I FEEL SO BLUE
Reissued: - 1996 Bear Family Records (CD) 500/200rpm BCD 15803-2-8 mono
THE SUN SINGLES COLLECTION - VOLUME 3

03 - ''FOR I NEED YOU'' - B.M.I. - 2:03
Composer: - Magel Priesman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Not Originally Issued
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1957
Released: - June 25, 2006
First appearance: - Charly Records (MP3) Internet Sample mono
ROCK CLASSICS - LIVING EYE

04 - ''TEENAGE QUEEN''
Composer: - Magel Priesman
Publisher: - Hi-Lo Music Incorporated
Matrix number: - None - Sun Unissued
Recorded: - Unknown Date July 1957

Name (Or. No. Of Instruments)
Magel Priesman - Vocal
Roland Janes - Guitar
Unknown Bass, Drums
Jimmy Wilson - Piano
Nelson Grilli - Saxophone
Onzie Horne - Vibes

Vocal Chorus consisting of
Asa Wilkerson
Don Carter
Lee Holt
Wilbur Steinberg

For Biography of Magel Priesman see > The Sun Biographies <
Magel Priesman's Sun recordings can be heard on his playlist from 706 Union Avenue Sessions on > YouTube <

© - 706 UNION AVENUE SESSIONS - ©

RECORDED AT SUN, JULY 1957. MAGEL PRIESMAN'S JOURNAL - In my biobook of Elvis was a picture of Dewey, WHBQ, Memphis. My being a DJ. might strike interest, if I could meet him. I hired a taxi at 9pm to take me where he was doing his "Red Hot And Blue" show, portfolio of demo tapes under my arm. Inside, I discovered that I was at the television studio where he did his day show. A secretary working late felt sorry I had come to the wrong place. She phoned Dewey and told him I had come all the way from Michigan. He told her to tell another taxi man to bring me to a certain door at WHBQ.

I went up the elevater and met Dewey. He did much showing off, and I much giggling. He called Sam and told him about me. Sam said, "Bring her round after your show", which was midnight. Dewey then called Dickey Lee, who he managed, he said "to kill two birds with one stone". Dickey had met Sam before and questioned his honestly, so he wasn't number 1 on Sam's list. Dewey grabbed this chance to reacquaint Sam and Dickey, Barbara Pittman, and one of Elvis' buddies and four others, came to the station, said there was a party going on at Elvis' place and they invited me along. I thanked them and told them I was going to meet Sam that night.

Sam told me that he took a personal interest in all his artists. Carl Perkins was the most difficult, he said. He had to stand in front of Carl and motion like a bandleader with extreme motion to keep Carl at the high peak his music called for.

It was 2:00am when Sam told me, "Come to Sun at 4:00pm to meet Jack Clement the engineer and Bill Justis the arranger". Jack was casual, with dark blonde deep wavy hair. Tallish and quiet. His writing talent was wrapped around the on and off relationship with his ex-wife Doris. I noticed an affliction. He would blink his eyes, wrinkle his nose and distort his mouth with a twist, and jerk his head side to side. I mentioned to secretary Sally Wilbourn about how it was too bad a good looking man like Jack had this affliction. She said, "You noticed that too? He didn't do that when he first started working here".

Bill Justis was prematurely balding, round-faced and rosy color. His jive talk didn't fit his looks. Every sentence started with, "Like, man...". His efficiency making arrangements was so speedy, my head was in a spin watching him. Jack said that they went out in a boat and Bill jumped into the water, down deep. Bill surfaced saying, "Like, glub", then he went down again. Coming up he said, "Like, blub". Third time down, then up, he yelled, "Like man, HELLLP".

My first recording session I met Roland Janes. Searching eyes, mild manner, patient. Later in Grand Rapids, Michigan he was guitarist for Jerry Lee Lewis and we renewed acquaintance. He said my record went terrific in the South. Later I wrote to Jerry Lee Lewis looking for a record for my son. I mentioned Roland Janes, and I received a letter from Roland on his studio letterhead in Memphis. He was so pleased someone remembered him. Told me of his brother who was going blind and his sympathy and compassion for his brother leaped from the paper. Roland is a most humble man.

I was staying at the Hotel Tennessee, across from the Peabody. I went into my room and a maid was changing the linen. I said, "Go ahead, I have cards to buy, and write home". I went outside, and people were coming from all directions. I saw a man laying face up on the sidewalk, his head and neck sloping into the curb. I walked right up to him, my feet nearly touching his left shoulder. His dark brown glazed eyes were open, and he was wearing pajama bottoms only and a gold wristwatch. He had leaped from the sixth floor.

I heard someone calling, "Magel, Magel Priesman", over and over, but I was completely transfixed by this dead man's eyes. Someone, who turned out to be Billy Riley, pulled on my right arm toward a car. Bill Justis, his left arm covering the steering wheel, body turned toward me, said, "What in hell happened?" I said, "I don't know". Bill said, "What the hell its probably just another hillbilly waiting for a release".

JULY 23, 1957 TUESDAY

CBS-TV's ''The Spike Jones Show'' welcomes country singer Molly Bee.

JULY 24, 1957 WEDNESDAY

Pam Tillis is born in Plant Coty, Florida. The daughter of country singer Mel Tillis, she fashions a career of her own with a series of hits in the 1990s, winning the Country Music Association's Female Vocalist in 1994 and joining the Grand Ole Opry in 20.

JULY 26, 1957 FRIDAY

Fats Domino guests on Alan Freed's weekly ABC-TV show.

Imperial Records signs Ricky Nelson to an exclusive long term contract.

Sam and Jud Phillips and Jerry Lee Lewis flew to New York, where Jud had booked a luxure suite at the Hotel Delmonico on Park Avenue. After a few calls, Jud Phillips got a fifteen-minute appointment with Steve Allan's manager, Jules Green, and Henry Frankel, NBC's talent coordinator. Jud and Jerry Lee walked in, and Frankel\s first question was, ''Well, Jud, what can you let me have? have you got any pictures or records?''. Jud told him no, and Frankel turned to Green and said, ''How do you like that? That's the first time we've had a salesman come in here without anything to sell''. ''The man'', recalled Jerry Lee, ''looked at Jud like he was crazy. I just sat there blowing bubblegum. This guy looked at me, and I looked at him. Finally he said, 'Okay, kid, let's see you play piano and sing'. I walked over to the piano, and this guy sat down and put his feet up on his desk like he was going to get a big laugh. The minute I started in on ''Whole Lot Of Shakin''', this guy came up out of his chair and got down behind me and just crouched down looking over my shoulder the whole time I was playing. When I finished, he said to Jud, 'I'll give you $500 if you don't show him to anyone else. And bring him back first thing morning. I want Steve to hear him.

JULY 27, 1957 SATURDAY

Bill Engvall is born in Galveston, Texas. He emerges in 1997 with the album ''Here's Your Sign'' to become a major country comic.

JULY 28, 1957 SUNDAY

Jerry Lee Lewis appeared for the first time on the NBC-TV's Steve Allen Show, one slot behind Ed Sullivan in the ratings. Like Elvis' television appearances, Jerry's spots on the Allen show are landmarks in the history of rock and roll. He pounded the piano, eyes fixed above with messianic intensity.

When it came time to sing, he glared at the camera with a wild-eyed fury. "Whose barn/ What barn/ Mah barn!" At the top of the last chorus, he kicked the piano stool back across the stage, only to see Steve Allen send it flying back past him.

Set in the context of the jugglers, ventriloquists, and singing sister acts that were the staples of television variety in those days, Jerry's performance was nothing short of demonic.

Lewis appearance on the Steve Allen show gave "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On" the shot in the arm it needed. Before the show, it had started to lose momentum, pegging out in the lower reaches of the Top 30. It eventually rose to the number 1 slot on the Country and Rhythm and Blues charts, though it was excluded from the top position on the pop charts by Debbie Reynold's "Tammy".

"I took him to New York", recalled Judd Phillips, "and presented him to Jules Green, who was managing Steve Allen, and Henry Frankel, who was talent coordinator for NBC. I took a real gamble to see whether a mass audience would accept this man. Our distributors made sure that every retail outlet in the United States had copies of "Shakin'"; that represented a lot of merchandise that could have been returned".

Nashville promoter Oscar Davis was brought in to do for Jerry Lee Lewis what Colonel Tom Parker had done for Elvis Presley. In fact, Davis had even worked as a front man for Tom Parker. Jud Phillips was also a key figure in getting Jerry Lee Lewis off the ground.

He had rejoined Sun at some point in late 1956 or early 1957; after falling out with Sam Phillips again in 1958, he remained in Lewis' camp until the late 1970s in an ill-defined role based primarily on the fact that he was one of the few able to match Lewis drink for drink.

His flamboyance, cheery hustle, and willingness to pick up the bar tab and take care of the right people made him a born promoter, something his brother never was.

According to Kay Martin, later successor as President of the Jerry Lee Lewis Fan Club, ''I first heard of Jerry Lee Lewis in April 1957 while reading a magazine named ''16'', which was totally dedicated to Elvis Presley. It featured pictures and an article which previously appeared in the Memphis Press Scimitar about the so-called Million Dollar Quartet. In the interim, I happened to hear ''Whole Lot Of Shakin' Going On'' played on the radio one day by Alan Freed. I never heard it for a long time thereafter because it was banned. I tried to buy it, but it was unavailable. In mid-July, my friend Elaine Berman, who worked at the advertising agency for one of Steve Allen's TV sponsors, told me that she learned that Jerry would be on ''The Steve Allen Show'' on the 28th so we decided to go see the show. I made some phone calls and secured an appointment to meet Steve Allen's secretary, Doris Braverman, at the Hudson Theater where the show was performed. She was to introduce me to Jerry so I could interview him for my college newspaper''.

NEWSPAPER LINES - United Press Staff writer Doc Quigg reports, that headlined: Jerry Lewis' 'Shaking' Show World Phillips Brothers Find Another Singing Star

New York. - The brothers Phillips, two gents from way down yonder in Memphis, Tennessee, who contributed Elvis Presley to world culture, are all shook up about a new boy in their pasture. This blond, curley-haired, blue-eyed, 21-year-old rock and roller from Ferriday, Louisiana, who id going great guns with a two-month-old record named "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" and has another ready to bust out called "Great Balls Of Fire".

His name is Jerry Lee Lewis. He plays the piano while he sings. He has sideburns but not as long as Elvis Presley. Does he shake like Elvis? "Doesn't have to", says Jud Phillips. "When he feels like it, he just jumps up and kicks the piano stool across the stage and plays standing up. And his legs get real stiff. What's different about him is that he's got a beat, a rhythm, like you've never felt".

Jud Phillips brought his boy into New York for his second national TV show in two weeks while brother Sam Phillips stayed at home and tended store at the Sun Record Company, which has sold 400,000 "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" records in two months.

Sam Phillips, the man who is given credit for discovering Presley, teaching him how to shake, and telling him to let his hair grow, is president of the Sun Record Company, and runs an allgirl radio station in Memphis named (WHER). Jud is national sales manager of the record company.

They sold Elvis Presley to RCA Victor a couple of years ago, but Jud says they don't aim to sell anymore artists to anybody - particularly not Lewis.

Lewis returned to Memphis Sunday after making several guest appearances in Kentucky and New York. Jud Phillips came back home last week.

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